FUROXONE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 011270/002.

Names and composition

"FUROXONE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of FURAZOLIDONE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011270/002 FUROXONE FURAZOLIDONE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
011323/002 FUROXONE FURAZOLIDONE SUSPENSION/ORAL 50MG per 15ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011270/002 FUROXONE FURAZOLIDONE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
011323/002 FUROXONE FURAZOLIDONE SUSPENSION/ORAL 50MG per 15ML

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Answered questions

Can I mix these prescription medications?
I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know... Asked by Quincy Mortell 2 months ago.

I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know for sure if you don't move on to the next question don't make a stupid comment about nothing you know. Answered by Neely Pethtel 2 months ago.

Mucinex is a multi-ingredient drug consisting of pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. If you'd like to know more about how either one interacts with other medication, Google "pseudoephedrine drug interactions" and "guaifenesin drug interactions," although I don't believe you should be having any problems while on seroquel and lamictal. Here's a list of medication that WILL, however, interact with Mucinex, which I have looked into to double-check myself. I didn't see either of the two medications that you are on on any of the three lists, but here they are anyway, in case you'd like to see so for yourself: Major Interactions Atapryl, Azilect, Carbex, Eldepryl, Emsam, furazolidone, Furoxone, isocarboxazid, Jumex, linezolid, Marplan, Matulane, Nardil, Parnate, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, Selgene, tranylcypromine, Zelapar, Zyvox Moderate Interactions acarbose, acetoHEXAMIDE, Aldomet, Amaryl, Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, bromocriptine, chlorproPAMIDE, Citra pH, Citrate-Phos-Dex, D.H.E. 45, deserpidine, DiaBeta, Diabinese, dihydroergotamine, Dymelor, epoprostenol, ergoloid mesylates, Ergomar, ergonovine, ergotamine, Ergotrate Maleate, EXUBERA, EXUBERA Combination Pack 12, EXUBERA Combination Pack 15, EXUBERA Kit, Flolan, Fortamet, glimepiride, glipiZIDE, glipiZIDE extended release, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, Glumetza, glyBURIDE, glyBURIDE micronized, Glynase PresTab, Glyset, guanadrel, guanethidine, Harmonyl, Humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Humulin L, Humulin N, Humulin N Pen, Humulin R, Humulin R (Concentrated), Humulin U, Hydergine, Hydergine LC, Hylorel, Iletin II Lente Pork, Iletin II NPH Pork, Iletin II Regular Pork, Iletin Lente, Iletin NPH, Iletin Regular, iloprost, insulin, insulin analog, insulin aspart, insulin aspart protamine, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, insulin inhalation, rapid acting, insulin isophane, Insulin Lente Pork, insulin lispro, insulin lispro protamine, Insulin Purified NPH Pork, Insulin Purified Regular Pork, insulin regular, insulin zinc, insulin zinc extended, insulin, lente, insulin, NPH, insulin, ultralente, Inversine, Ismelin, Januvia, Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen, Lente insulin, Levemir, Levemir FlexPen, Levemir InnoLet, Levemir PenFill, mecamylamine, Meridia, metformin, metformin extended release, Methergine, methyldopa, methylergonovine, methysergide maleate, Micronase, midodrine, miglitol, Migranal, nateglinide, Neut, Novolin L, Novolin N, Novolin N Innolet, Novolin N PenFill, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill, NPH insulin, Orinase, Orvaten, oxytocin, Parlodel, Pitocin, potassium citrate, Prandin, Precose, ProAmatine, prostacyclin, protamine zinc insulin, Rauwolfemms, Rauwolfia 1X, rauwolfia serpentina, regular insulin, Relion Novolin N, ReliOn/Novolin R, Remodulin, repaglinide, reserpine, Riomet, Sansert, sibutramine, sitagliptin, sodium acetate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, sodium lactate, Starlix, Syntocinon, Tham, Tol-Tab, TOLAZamide, TOLBUTamide, Tolinase, treprostinil, Tricitrasol, tromethamine, Twin-K, Ultralente insulin, Urocit-K, Velosulin BR, Ventavis Minor Interactions Acerola, ammonium chloride, Ascor L 500, ascorbic acid, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, Ascot, atomoxetine, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cardoxin, Cecon, Cee-500, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Cenolate, Centrum Singles-Vitamin C, Cevi-Bid, Cotameth, Digitek, digitoxin, digoxin, digoxin capsule, Ester-C, K-Phos Original, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, M-Caps, Mega-C/A Plus, methionine, N Ice with Vitamin C, Pedameth, potassium acid phosphate, sodium acid phosphate, sodium ascorbate, Strattera, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips Answered by Yang Altrogge 2 months ago.

No interactions were reported. I also checked Mucinex D and Mucinex DM too, just in case. (I am a pharmacist, BTW) Answered by Tera Heidelburg 2 months ago.


What does the term MAIO inhibiting drugs mean?
I was asked about drug interactions and this term came up. My question is what drugs are considered maio inhibitors. Asked by Cole Presas 2 months ago.

I think you mean MAOI?? Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOI) drugs and trade names: • Furazolidone: Furoxone • Isocarboxazid: Marplan® • Isoniazid: Laniazid®, Nydrazid® • Isoniazid rifampin: Rifamate®, Rimactane®/INH • Moclobemide • Pargyline: Eutonyl® • Phenelzine: Nardil® • Procarbazine: Matulane® • Selegiline: Atapryl®, Deprenyl®, Eldepryl® • Tranylcypromine: Parnate® type of drug: Two groups: • Hydrazine derivatives: phenelzine, isocarboxazid • Non-hydrazine derivatives: tranylcypromine, pargyline mechanism: Agents that inhibit monoamine oxidase and alter catecholamine metabolism (down-regulating noradrenergic synpases and upregulating serotogenic synapses); includes other agents with secondary MAOI action, e.g., phenelzine. used to treat: Depression (refractory to tricyclic antidepressants); antineoplastic (procarbazine), antibiotic (furoxone); adjunctive treatment in Parkinson's (selegine) and hypertension (pargyline). Answered by Tashia Cuva 2 months ago.

Mono Amine Oxidase Inhibitors - MAOI See the wiki page about it They are old fashioned antidepressants and associated with the necessity to stick to a particular diet and avoid certain foods. There is a new class of MAOI's now, the RIMA's Reversible Inhibitors of Monoamine oxidase A: moclobemide This is a better drug as it is safer and does not require the diet. It is considered a mild antidepressant as it's efficacy is not quite up to par with the hard core tricyclics and SSRI's The wiki page has a list of the names of these: # Isocarboxazid (Marplan) # Moclobemide (Aurorix, Manerix, Moclodura®) # Phenelzine (Nardil) # Tranylcypromine (Parnate) # Selegiline (Selegiline, Eldepryl), and Emsam # Nialamide # Iproniazid (Marsilid, Iprozid, Ipronid, Rivivol, Propilniazida) # Iproclozide # Toloxatone Answered by Darryl Boese 2 months ago.

I asked my doctor recently. It is a group of drugs that used to be used for treating depression. They are still used but not very often. I don't have the names of the drugs but if you aren't being treated for depression, you should be ok. If in doubt, call a 24 hr. pharmacy and ask to speak to the pharmacist. Answered by Aurore Foppe 2 months ago.

Certain types of antideppressants. (BTW, it's MAOI) Look this up on the internet and it will give you the names of them. Most health care professionals are steering away from these now because of the many interactions with other meds and even foods, such as cheese and wine. Answered by Omer Grills 2 months ago.

Maoi Drug Names Answered by Babette Correira 2 months ago.


How long do i have to wait to drink after antibiotics?
But if I haven't had them for approximately 3 days is it still not okay to drink? Asked by Kylee Blanscet 2 months ago.

Among the antibiotics during which the intake of alcohol should be completely avoided are Atabrine or Antimalarial Quinacrine, Furazolidone or Furoxone, Griseofulvin or Grisactin, Tinidazole and Metronidazole. The use of alcohol with these drugs could possibly cause various side effects, such as headache, nausea and vomiting, racy heartbeat, shortness of breath, palpitations and low blood pressure. I prefer chemical names than brand.. at any rate -- Bactrim: Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole -- Is contraindicated with alcohol while taking. It is a "Sulfa" drug that inhibits and enzymatic process as the body processes alcohol which results in many of the above effects. All of that said -- the half life, renally, of Bactrim is 9-14 hours, give or take. After two passes of this half life you no longer have sufficient levels to cause such contraindications with alcohol. Which would put you at about 28-36 hours without to be perfectly in the clear. Three days is more than enough.. No problems with this. Answered by Crystle Infante 2 months ago.

Most are OK, but not the one you're on. A few antibiotics — such as Flagyl, Tindamax and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim) — should never be mixed with alcohol because this may result in a severe reaction. Drinking any amount of alcohol with these medications can result in side effects such as flushing, headache, nausea and vomiting, rapid heart rate, and shortness of breath. Not fun. Answered by Rana Horsely 2 months ago.

Sulfa Antibiotics And Alcohol Answered by Faviola Gathje 2 months ago.


Need a clinic to get adapecks?
Asked by Arla Evetts 2 months ago.

Adam, As you surely know, Adipex-P (phentermine) is a stimulant that is similar to an amphetamine. In the USA it requires a doctor's prescription. Many labs in other countries offer it for sale without a prescription, BUT you never know if it's a scam, and, if you get caugfht with in in your possession in the USA, it will be a federaql pffense. If you get a legitimate supply in the USA, the following info should help. Adipex-P is an appetite suppressant that affects the central nervous system. Adipex-P is used together with diet and exercise to treat obesity (overweight) in people with risk factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or diabetes. It may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide. Do not use Adipex-P if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur, leading to serious side effects. Taking Adipex-P together with other diet medications such as fenfluramine (Phen-Fen) or dexfenfluramine (Redux) can cause a rare fatal lung disorder called pulmonary hypertension. Do not take Adipex-P with any other diet medications without your doctor's advice. Adipex-P may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of this medicine. Adipex-P may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Never share Adipex-P with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep track of the amount of medicine used from each new bottle. Adipex-P is a drug of abuse and you should be aware if anyone is using your medicine improperly or without a prescription. Do not stop using Adipex-P suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Ask your doctor how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when you stop using this medicine. Taking Adipex-P together with other diet medications such as fenfluramine (Phen-Fen) or dexfenfluramine (Redux) can cause a rare fatal lung disorder called pulmonary hypertension. Do not take Adipex-P with any other diet medications without your doctor's advice. You should not take Adipex-P if you are allergic to it, or if you have: coronary artery disease (hardening of the arteries); heart disease; severe or uncontrolled high blood pressure; overactive thyroid; glaucoma; if you have a history of drug or alcohol abuse; or if you are allergic to other diet pills, amphetamines, stimulants, or cold medications. To make sure you can safely take Adipex, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions: high blood pressure; diabetes; or a thyroid disorder. NOW, PLEASE MAKE A WISE DECISION AND STAY ALIVE and in good health !!!. Answered by Hildegarde Yark 2 months ago.

Adipex..u can order them online. Answered by Magdalene Dalhart 2 months ago.


If your on celexa (the medication)......?
is there anything that your not supposed to combine with it? (like vitamins, certain foods, caffeine, anything?!) Asked by Tandra Kinley 2 months ago.

Medication (in alphabetical order); Major Interactions 5-HTP, 5-hydroxytryptophan, Actiq, Acutrim 16 Hour, Acutrim II, Maximum Strength, Acutrim Late Day, Adapin, Adipex-P, Adipost, Alfenta, alfentanil, almotriptan, Amerge, amitriptyline, amoxapine, amphetamine, Anafranil, Anorex-SR, Aplenzin, Appecon, Asendin, Atapryl, Aventyl HCl, Axert, Azilect, Babee Cof, Balminil DM, Balminil DM Pour Enfants, Balminil DM Sans Sucrose, Benadryl for the Family Dry Forte, Benylin, Benylin Adult Formula, Benylin DM, Benylin DM Pediatric, Benylin Dry Coughs, Benylin Pediatric, benzphetamine, Bisolvon Dry, Bisolvon Dry Junior, Bontril PDM, Bontril Slow Release, Buckley's Mixture Cough Suppressant, Buckleys Mixture, Budeprion SR, Budeprion XL, buPROPion, buPROPion 24 hour extended release, buPROPion extended release, BuSpar, BuSpar Dividose, busPIRone, Calmylin, Carbex, Chem Mart Tramadol, clomiPRAMINE, Contac Cough, Control, Cough Relief, Cough Syrup DM, Covonia Bronchial Balsam, Creo-Terpin, Creomulsion, Creomulsion Children, Cymbalta, D.H.E. 45, Darvon, Darvon-N, Delsym, Delsym 12 Hour Cough Relief, Delsym 12 Hour Cough Relief for Children & Adults, Demerol HCl, desipramine, Desoxyn, Desoxyn Gradumet, desvenlafaxine, Desyrel, Desyrel Dividose, DexAlone, Dexatrim, Dexatrim Caffeine Free, Dexedrine, Dexedrine Spansule, dexfenfluramine, Dexi-Tuss, dextroamphetamine, dextroamphetamine extended release, dextromethorphan, dextromethorphan extended release, Dextromethorphan HBr Adult Formula, Dextrostat, Didrex, diethylpropion, diethylpropion extended release, dihydroergotamine, dihydroergotamine nasal, Dimetapp Cold Cough & Flu Day & Night Liquid Caps, doxepin, doxepin topical, Dristan DM, Dromadol SR, Dromadol XL, Dry Cough, duloxetine, Duragesic, Duragesic-100, Duragesic-12, Duragesic-25, Duragesic-50, Duragesic-75, Effexor, Effexor XR, Elavil, Eldepryl, eletriptan, Elixsure Cough, Empro, Emsam, Endep, ephedra, Ergomar, ergotamine, Eskalith, Eskalith-CR, Fastin, fenfluramine, fentanyl, fentanyl topical, Fentora, Frova, frovatriptan, furazolidone, Furoxone, GenRx Tramadol, GHB, Hold DM, hypericum perforatum, imipramine, imipramine pamoate, Imitrex, Imitrex Nasal, Imitrex Statdose, Imitrex Statdose Refill, iohexol, Ionamin, Ionsys, iopamidol, Iopamidol-370, isocarboxazid, Isovue-128, Isovue-200, Isovue-250, Isovue-300, Isovue-370, Isovue-M-200, Isovue-M-300, Jack & Jill Thin Strips Cough, Jumex, l-tryptophan, Larapam SR, levomethadyl acetate, linezolid, lisdexamfetamine, lithium, lithium carbonate, lithium carbonate extended release, lithium citrate, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lloydspharmacy Dry Adult Cough, ma huang, Marplan, Matulane, Maxalt, Maxalt-MLT, Mazanor, mazindol, Mega-Trim, Melfiat, Mellaril, Mellaril-S, meperidine, Meridia, methamphetamine, methamphetamine extended release, metrizamide, Migranal, milnacipran, mirtazapine, Myelo-Kit, naratriptan, Nardil, nefazodone, Neocitran Thin Strips Cough, Norpramin, nortriptyline, Novahistine DM, Nucosef DM, Obephen, Obezine, Oby-Cap, Oby-Trim, Omnipaque 140, Omnipaque 180, Omnipaque 180 Redi-Unit, Omnipaque 210, Omnipaque 240, Omnipaque 240 Redi-Unit, Omnipaque 300, Omnipaque 350, Omnipaque Flexipak, Orap, Orlaam, Pamelor, Panshape M, Parnate, Pedia Relief, Pediacare, pentazocine, Pertussin CS Childrens, Pertussin DM, Pertussin ES, Phendiet, Phendiet-105, phendimetrazine, phendimetrazine extended release, phenelzine, Phentercot, phentermine, phentermine hydrochloride, phentermine hydrochloride extended release, phentermine resin extended release, Phentride, Phenyldrine, phenylpropanolamine, pimozide, Plegine, Pondimin, PP-Cap, Prelu-2, Pristiq, Pro-Fast HS, Pro-Fast SA, Pro-Fast SR, procarbazine, Propagest, Propan, propoxyphene, propoxyphene hydrochloride, propoxyphene napsylate, protriptyline, Prudoxin, rasagiline, Redux, Relpax, Remeron, Remeron SolTab, remifentanil, Rhindecon, rizatriptan, Robafen Cough Liquidgels, Robafen Pediatric Cough & Cold, Robitussin Cough Calmers, Robitussin CoughGels, Robitussin Dry Cough, Robitussin DX Cough Control, Robitussin DX Cough Control Forte, Robitussin DX Dry Cough Forte, Robitussin Honey Cough, Robitussin Junior Persistent Cough, Robitussin Maximum Strength, Robitussin Pediatric Cough Long-Acting, Robitussin Pediatric Cough Suppressant, Robitussin Soft Pastilles, Ryzolt, Sanorex, Savella, Scot-Tussin Diabetic, Scot-Tussin DM Cough Chasers, selegiline, Selgene, Serzone, sibutramine, Silphen DM, Sinequan, sodium biphosphate, sodium oxybate, St. John's wort, St. Joseph Cough Suppressant, Statobex, Strepsils Cough, Strepsils Cough Relief, Sublimaze, Sucrets DM Cough, Sufenta, sufentanil, sumatriptan, sumatriptan nasal, Surmontil, T-Diet, Talwin, Talwin Lactate, Tenuate, Tenuate Dospan, Teramine, Teramine ER, Terry White Chemists Tramadol, Theraflu Thin Strips Cough, thioridazine, Tofranil, Tofranil-PM, traMADOL, traMADOL extended release, Tramahexal, Tramahexal SR, Tramake, Tramake Insts, Tramal, Tramal SR, Tramedo, tranylcypromine Answered by Rodney Aikins 2 months ago.

There are no side effects at all. I have gone off of it several times and had no issues, although if you do decide to go back on, all that headache and stuff will come back. If the issue is not being able to pay for them I would like to suggest that i am taking a generic version of celexa called citralopram that only costs 20 dollars for 30 pills at 40mg. I hope i helped you, Answered by Jeraldine Blondin 2 months ago.

Tramahexal Sr 100 Answered by Vanetta Enstrom 2 months ago.


I have Giardia and have some T-Para for parasites but can't remember how much to take or for how long. HELP
Asked by Corrine Lysne 2 months ago.

the only drug used for treatment of giardiasis in the US is Furoxone and it is taken for 7 to 10 days, dosage determined by the physician. Answered by Larue Dimmer 2 months ago.


Is there any medication like Meridia?
Is there any medication like Meridia that got recalled or Obesity, Are there anything like it in the market? Asked by Sunday Keezer 2 months ago.

Yes Meridia (sibutramine) was withdrawn from the U.S. market in October 2010. Meridia affects chemicals in the brain that affect weight maintenance. Meridia is used together with diet and exercise to treat obesity that may be related to diabetes, high cholesterol, or high blood pressure. Important information about Meridia Meridia was withdrawn from the U.S. market in October 2010. Do not use Meridia if you have taken an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. Serious, life threatening side effects can occur if you use Meridia before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. You should not take Meridia if you are allergic to sibutramine, or if you have severe or uncontrolled high blood pressure, an eating disorder (anorexia or bulimia), if you are taking stimulant diet pills, or if you have a history of coronary artery disease, stroke, or heart disease. Before taking Meridia, tell your doctor if you have glaucoma, high blood pressure, liver or kidney disease, depression, underactive thyroid, seizures, a bleeding disorder, a history of gallstones, or if you are older than 65 or younger than 16. Tell your doctor about all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use, especially antidepressants, cold or allergy medication, narcotic pain medicine, or migraine headache medicines. Tell your doctor if you do not lose at least 4 pounds after taking the medication for 4 weeks along with a low calorie diet. Answered by Deloras Bertagnoli 2 months ago.


How does drinking alcohol while on antibiotics make you more drunk?
My friends say that if your are on antibiotics and you drink you get drunk a hell of a lot quicker. Is this true? And if it is, how does this happen? Asked by Elin Gains 2 months ago.

Antibiotics. Antibiotics are used to treat infectious diseases. In combination with acute alcohol consumption, some antibiotics may cause nausea, vomiting, headache, and possibly convulsions; among these antibiotics are furazolidone (Furoxone), griseofulvin (Grisactin and others), metronidazole (Flagyl), and the antimalarial quinacrine (Atabrine) (7). Isoniazid and rifampin are used together to treat tuberculosis, a disease especially problematic among the elderly (12) and among homeless alcoholics (13). Acute alcohol consumption decreases the availability of isoniazid in the bloodstream, whereas chronic alcohol use decreases the availability of rifampin. In each case, the effectiveness of the medication may be reduced (7) And yes you get drunk a lot quicker, depending on your medicine dose Answered by Otha Bergeman 2 months ago.

This ALL depends on the type of antibiotic tablet and what the antibiotic is being used to treat. In any case..WHY would U do this or WHY should anyone do such an idiotic thing. NOT that it might be dangerous..I wouldn't think that its a fatal thing to do..but I certainly would not recommend it.. But if the antibiotics were taken, say, some 6 hours BEFORE drinking, then I dont see ANY danger at all I wonder at the reason for your question ?? Answered by Migdalia Butel 2 months ago.

Lamisil is an anti fungal-yeast- not an antibiotic. You should cut out sugar including alcohol when taking antifungal medicine so it can do its job, sugar feeds yeast. Answered by Thora Uptain 2 months ago.

YORE INABILLITY TO PROCESS THE FOOD FROM DINERR. Answered by Kermit Gushard 2 months ago.


GIARDIA PARASITE.............?
I WAS DIOGNOSED A MONTH AGO WITH GIARDIA. I STARTED GETTING SICK DEC 18 2012 AND WAS PRESCRIBED ALBENZA WHEN DIOGNOSED. I AM STILL HAVING SYMPTOMS AND HAVE LOST 2O LBS. MY QUESTION IS HOW LONG DOES THIS PARASITE LIVE FOR, ACCORDING TO ALL THE RESEARCH I HAVE DONE IT DIES ON ITS OWN USUALLY ABOUT 6 WEEKS AFTER... Asked by Wilhemina Vidot 2 months ago.

I WAS DIOGNOSED A MONTH AGO WITH GIARDIA. I STARTED GETTING SICK DEC 18 2012 AND WAS PRESCRIBED ALBENZA WHEN DIOGNOSED. I AM STILL HAVING SYMPTOMS AND HAVE LOST 2O LBS. MY QUESTION IS HOW LONG DOES THIS PARASITE LIVE FOR, ACCORDING TO ALL THE RESEARCH I HAVE DONE IT DIES ON ITS OWN USUALLY ABOUT 6 WEEKS AFTER PICKING IT UP. SO ANY INFO WOULD BE GREAT, THANKS ALSO I WENT TO THE DOCTOR THURSDAY AND AM WAITING FOR THE HOSPITAL TO CALL ME WITH RESULTS AND HOPEFULLY A PRESCRIPTION Answered by Ping Deignan 2 months ago.

Alicia, How is giardiasis treated? The most common treatment for giardiasis is metronidazole (Flagyl) for 5-10 days. It eradicates the Giardia more than 85% of the time, but it often causes gastrointestinal side effects such as nausea and a metallic taste as well as dizziness and headache. Despite its effectiveness, metronidazole is not approved by the FDA in the U.S. for treatment of giardiasis. The only drug approved for treating giardiasis in the U.S. is furazolidone (Furoxone) for 7-10 days. It is approximately as effective as metronidazole. Tinidazole is available outside the U.S. and is highly effective at treating giardiasis(>90%). It also can be given as a single dose and is well tolerated. Quinacrine is very effective for treating giardiasis but is no longer available in the U.S. Paromomycin and albendazole are less effective than other treatments. Occasionally, treatment fails to eradicate Giardia. In such cases, the drug may be changed or a longer duration or higher dose may be used. Combination therapy also may be effective (e.g., quinacrine and metronidazole). I hope you will be better soon and then drink only safe water. Answered by Maynard Rimer 2 months ago.


I've been feeling mildly depressed for a while now?
I was thinking of starting some St.Johns Wort. I am on birth control pills and other than that tylenol or advil for aches and pains. would this interfere with any of these meds. Asked by Aliza Schmid 2 months ago.

YOu do dound a bit depressed. You should not be worrying about the family finances - that is your parents job. There will plenty of time for you to worry about money when you are grown up. In the meantime if things are a bit tight you can help by not asking for expensive clothes or presents and offering to cook for the family to save on ready meals and take outs. As for your dog, you are worrying about him and nothing has happened to him yet. All living things get old and die and although when the time comes for him to pass on will be sad, you must counter balance that sadness with the happiness you have had owning him. Ask yourself would it be better to never have any pet or to have the joy and the sadness. It is feeling both joy and sadness that means we are alive. If you felt nothing part of you would be dead. In order to help your depression talk to your parents about your anxieties. Also try to get out into the fresh air every day and get some exercise even if it is only a 15 minute walk. Get that doggy out in the fresh air. Practice smiling at people even if you dont really feel like it. it has been proven that smiling (even forced ones) lift mood. And although it all seems terrible at times think of those poor people who lost whole families in the tsunamis or in earthquakes. Whatever happens with money you are extremely unlikely to ever have to deal with anything like that. There ARE always people worse off than you. it seems hard because you have had a comfortable lifestyle and you are concerned you will lose it. Some people have NEVEr had a comfortable life. This recession may last a couple of years but things will improve and pick up agin. They always do eventually. And people pick themselves up and get on with improving their lives again. it really isn't all black. As for your self esteem write a list of all the good things about yourself. If you cant think of many ask your mum or friend what they like about you. Then when you feel low read the list through. Think about the positives about youraelf and your life. You have got in the habit of looking at the downside but there are two ways of looking at things. A pessimist will look at a half filled glass and say ;the glass is half empty' The optimist will look at it and say the glass is half full;. Answered by Mable Climes 2 months ago.

Ask a phamacist if there would be any side effects from taking St. Johns Wort while taking the birth control pills. They have a wealth of information that they would be willing to share. Answered by Fonda Bastress 2 months ago.


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