Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 011338/001.

Names and composition

"FLUOTHANE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of HALOTHANE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011338/001 FLUOTHANE HALOTHANE LIQUID/INHALATION 99.99%

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011338/001 FLUOTHANE HALOTHANE LIQUID/INHALATION 99.99%
080810/001 HALOTHANE HALOTHANE LIQUID/INHALATION 99.99%
083254/001 HALOTHANE HALOTHANE LIQUID/INHALATION 99.99%
084977/001 HALOTHANE HALOTHANE LIQUID/INHALATION 99.99%

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Answered questions

I have an old quantiflex anesthesia machine used by an animal doctor. It used fluothane. Is it worth salvaging?
Asked by Chin Akima 1 year ago.

Fluothane is halothane, and we don't use that for humans anymore. Better gases are available that cause fewer problems. I do NOT miss the arrhythmias that halothane used to generate! I have no idea what they use for animals, though. The thing about anesthesia machines is that they have to be properly serviced or they can be very dangerous, both to the animal being anesthetized, and the people in the room. The cost of rehabbing the machine might be more than it's worth. Answered by Latanya Gercak 1 year ago.


Why is the bromine atom in Fluothane the most likely to be substituted in a hydrolysis reaction?
Asked by Juli Boshes 1 year ago.

Check the link I have provided. It simply is that in dehalogenation reactions, it is I>Br>Cl>F Answered by Wanita Hiciano 1 year ago.


Calculate the molecular and molecular formula for halothane.?
Halothane (fluothane) is a non flammable, nonirritating general anesthetic, and in many instances it is superior to ethyl ether. At 57 Celsius and 640 torr, 0.529g of the gaas occupies a volume of 86.4 mL. Its composition is 12.2% carbon, 0.5% hydrogen, 40.5% bromine, 18.0% chlorine, and 28.9% fluorine. Calclate... Asked by Brooke Coudriet 1 year ago.

Halothane (fluothane) is a non flammable, nonirritating general anesthetic, and in many instances it is superior to ethyl ether. At 57 Celsius and 640 torr, 0.529g of the gaas occupies a volume of 86.4 mL. Its composition is 12.2% carbon, 0.5% hydrogen, 40.5% bromine, 18.0% chlorine, and 28.9% fluorine. Calclate the molecular mass and molecular formula for halothane. * show your work please and thank you ! ^_^ .. cuz I seriously have no idea how to answer this =( Answered by Lashawn Replenski 1 year ago.

first we use the gas equation to find the molecular weigh number of moles = PV /RT R = 62.363 L Torr K−1 mol−1 we substitute the values given - in the form of the units in the value of R = 640 X .0864 / 62.363 X ( 273+ 57 ) = 0.00269nmoles which weigh .529 g so 1 mole weighs .529 / 0.00269 = 196.8g so molecular weight = 196.8 g / moles mass of carbon in the compound = 12.2 % of 196.8= 24 g or 2 moles mass of H = .5 % of 196.8 = 1 g or 1 mole Br = 40.5 % of 196.8 = 79 g or 1 mole Cl = 18 % of 196.8 = 35.4 g or 1 mole F = 28.9% of 196.8 = 56.8 g or 58.8 / 19 moles = 3 moles molecular formula is C2HBrClF3 Answered by Randal Preer 1 year ago.


What is An example of a general anesthetic?
A. halothane. B. oxycodone HCl. C. sulfisoxazole. D. cephalexin Asked by Danilo Bommer 1 year ago.

A. halothane a simple Google search would have revealed Halothane (trademarked as Fluothane) is an inhalational general anesthetic. Its IUPAC name is 2-bromo-2-chloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane. It is the only inhalational anesthetic agent containing a bromine atom; there are several other halogenated anesthesia agents which lack the bromine atom and do contain the fluorine and chlorine atoms present in halothane. It is colorless and pleasant-smelling, but unstable in light. Answered by Jonathan Albanez 1 year ago.


What kind of chemical...?
what kind of chemical does when a person smells it, he/she falls unconscious? can it be sprayed? can you make it at home? (home made) need chemists/ chemical engineers.. thank you! Asked by Sara Trend 1 year ago.

They are called anaesthetics. There many options, chloroform diethyl ether cycloproane, fluothane, and many more. As for home manufacture you could make ether from a strong alcohol solution and sulphuric acid. Careful it is highly flammable. Hydrogen cyanide would work, but remove it before the person dies !! Answered by Carolynn Luiso 1 year ago.

that kind of chemical is called CHLOROFORM............ IT IS ONE OF THE MAJOR PAIN KILLER USED IN SURGERY Answered by Bud Hintze 1 year ago.

chloroform... Answered by Darryl Steelmon 1 year ago.


Halothane anesthesia?
do you know how halothane sensitizes the heart to epinephrine? Asked by Kelly Zador 1 year ago.

Epinephrine (adrenaline) regulates the heart's speed, some people are sensitive to the effects of halothane and the stimulation of epinephrine can throw the heart rate out of balance. After its use epinephrine slows down the heart as it clears the body, with a sensitivity to halothane the person won't recover and the heart will continue to slow possibly to the point of death. The halothane is also slowing down the rate of circulation and it can stimulate a sudden demand in the skeletal muscles. If you get the slow down rate after the epinephrine wears off occurring while the halothane is forcing the body to demand more oxygen then the lack of oxygen can starve organs. If the brain is one of those organs then death is likely. The heart is suddenly forced to overwork itself, then after the effects wear off it slows then the body's demand for oxygen can suddenly increase before the heart can speed up enough to keep pace with the demand. This sudden flux in the heart rate can cause it to stutter. According to Wikipedia: "Halothane vapour (or Fluothane) is an inhalational general anaesthetic. Its IUPAC name is 2-bromo-2-chloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane. It is the only inhalational anaesthetic agent containing a bromine atom; there are several other halogenated anesthesia agents which lack the bromine atom & do contain the fluorine & chlorine atoms present in halothane. It is colourless and pleasant-smelling, but unstable in light.... Adverse effects Halothane hepatitis, while rare, led to gradual abandonment of halothane anesthesia in adults in the 1980's, as safer halogenated volatile anesthetics, such as isoflurane, were developed. Cardiac side-effects can occur. All volatile anaesthetics such as halothane can trigger malignant hyperthermia in genetically susceptible individuals. The caffeine-halothane contracture test was developed to directly test muscle biopsy specimens for this susceptibility. This test may be replaced by genetic testing in the future." According to Wikipedia: "Malignant hyperthermia (MH or MHS for "malignant hyperthermia syndrome", or "malignant hyperpyrexia due to anaesthesia") is a rare life-threatening condition that is triggered by exposure to certain drugs used for general anaesthesia (specifically all volatile anaesthetics), nearly all gas anaesthetics, and the neuromuscular blocking agent succinylcholine. In susceptible individuals, these drugs can induce a drastic and uncontrolled increase in skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism which overwhelms the body's capacity to supply oxygen, remove carbon dioxide, and regulate body temperature, eventually leading to circulatory collapse and death if not treated quickly." According to Wikipedia: "Epinephrine (usually referred to as adrenaline; see Terminology) is a hormone and neurotransmitter. It is a catecholamine, a sympathomimetic monoamine derived from the amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine. The Latin roots ad-+renes and the Greek roots epi-+nephros both literally mean "on/to the kidney" (referring to the adrenal gland, which sits atop the kidneys and secretes epinephrine). Epinephrine is often shortened to epi or to EP in American medical jargon... Epinephrine is used as a drug to treat cardiac arrest and other cardiac dysrhythmias resulting in diminished or absent cardiac output; its action is to increase peripheral resistance via α1-adrenoceptor vasoconstriction, so that blood is shunted to the body's core, and the β1-adrenoceptor response which is increased cardiac rate and output (the speed and pronouncement of heart beats). This beneficial action comes with a significant negative consequence—increased cardiac irritability—which may lead to additional complications immediately following an otherwise successful resuscitation... Epinephrine synthesis is solely under the control of the central nervous system (CNS). Several levels of regulation dominate epinephrine synthesis." Answered by Keila Peevy 1 year ago.

It's not completely clear, but the most convincing theory I've read about is this: "Volatile anesthetics alter tissue excitability by decreasing the extent of gap junction–mediated cell-cell coupling and by altering the activity of the channels that underlie the action potential." It affects certain gap junctions more than others, creating an effect where some conduction pathways conduct faster than others, causing dissynchrony. The basic effect is an increased sensitivity of the ventricle to sympathetic stimulation, which can be blocked by sympathetic blockade (by epidural anesthesia, beta-blockers, and calcium channel blockers). Answered by Kay Desir 1 year ago.


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