FLUDROCORTISONE ACETATE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 040425/001.

Names and composition

"FLUDROCORTISONE ACETATE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of FLUDROCORTISONE ACETATE.

Answered questions

Functions of fludrocortisone acetate?
plz list the functions of the fludrocortisone as the replacement for aldosterone Asked by Marissa Sessler 3 months ago.

Fludrocortisone, a corticosteroid, is used to help control the amount of sodium and fluids in your body. It is used to treat Addison's disease and syndromes where excessive amounts of sodium are lost in the urine. It works by decreasing the amount of sodium that is lost (excreted) in your urine. Chemically, its structure is identical to cortisone except for the substitution of fluorine in place of one hydrogen. Fluorine is a good bioisostere for hydrogen because it is similar in size. The major difference is in its electronegativity. Answered by Isa Falge 3 months ago.

This sounds suspiciously like a homework question - why are you asking? Answered by Ula Kitcher 3 months ago.


Is Fludrocortisone Acetate the same as aldosterone?
For an aldosterone deficiency doctors will prescribe Fludrocortisone Acetate; is it molecularly the same as aldosterone? Asked by Rosanna Mendieta 3 months ago.

No but it has similar molecular structure. Tweaking has probably been done IOT improve efficacy or reduce toxicity. Answered by Veronique Hummons 3 months ago.


Can the steroid Florinef have bad long term side effects if taken for an extened period?
im a 21yr old female in the usa, ive been on 0.1 mgs of Florinef for over 2yrs for neuro cardiogenic snycope Asked by Taylor Carrizales 3 months ago.

Florinef (Fludrocortisone) is usually taken long term so in terms of having bad side effects if taken long term, you would probably be worse off if you didn't take it. Dose depends on the severity of the disease and the response of the patient. Patients should be continually monitored for signs that indicate dosage adjustment is necessary, such as remissions or exacerbations of the disease and stress (surgery, infection, trauma). Fludrocortisone tablets are indicated as partial replacement therapy for primary and secondary adrenocortical insufficiency in Addison's disease and for the treatment of salt-losing adrenogenital syndrome. In Addison's disease - the usual dose is 0.1 mg of Fludrocortisone daily, although dosage ranging from 0.1 mg three times a week to 0.2 mg daily has been employed. In the event transient hypertension develops as a consequence of therapy, the dose should be reduced to 0.05 mg daily. Fludrocortisone acetate is preferably administered in conjunction with cortisone (10 mg to 37.5 mg daily in divided doses) or hydrocortisone (10 mg to 30 mg daily in divided doses). Salt-Losing Adrenogenital Syndrome - the recommended dosage for treating the salt-losing adrenogenital syndrome is 0.1 mg to 0.2 mg of Fludrocortisone acetate daily. Sometimes it doesn't cause any side effects at all, and sometimes it may cause extreme side effects in some people. Also, adverse effects may occur as your body or circumstances changes. Please see the attached source link. To get a better idea of the side effects that MAY occur please read under "Adverse Reactions". Answered by Sadie Taylar 3 months ago.

Florinef Side Effects Answered by Gale Finger 3 months ago.


Looking for a drug called Fludocorisn?
know its a generic of another drug Asked by Lazaro Leh 3 months ago.

it's in the Corticosteroids(oral) group Answered by Darrel Marske 3 months ago.


How low is 1 ng/dL of Aldosterone?
I add these details of the case in response to Matador 89's response. Asked by Ericka Kimberly 3 months ago.

The normal range is given as < or = 28 ng/dL The physician said that the patient clearly has an aldosterone deficiency and prescribed 50 mcg of Fludrocortisone acetate daily. The blood serum test showed 1 ng/dL of aldosterone. The patient presented with the following symptoms: low blood pressure, nausea, fatigue, poor memory, and a craving for salt. The patient has been taking the 50 mcg of fludrocortisone acetate for two months now and although his blood pressure is somewhat higher, it is still low; and although his energy level has improved, it is still sub-par. His craving for salt has subsided, he no longer has nausea, and his memory has improved. However, since his blood pressure is still low, and his energy level is still low, he thinks he would feel much better if his dosage of fludrocortisone acetate would be increased. Is he justified in requesting that his physician increase his daily dosage of fludrocortisone acetate to 100 mcg per day? There are indications that this person's adrenal insufficiency has been a chronic condition throughout his life. The patient is now nearly 70 years of age; when he was going through puberty, he developed two areas of hyperpigmentation which have remained throughout his life. This hyperpigmentation was evidently caused by an aldosterone insufficiency: the anterior pituitary, in an attempt to stimulate the adrenal gland to produce more aldosterone, produced an excessive amount of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and this excessive amount of ACTH caused the secretion of an excessive amount of melanin which in turn caused the hyperpigmentation. The blood serum test result of 1 ng/dL seems quite low to me: is it considered to be very low or just moderately low? Additionally, what is considered to be the maximum amount of fludrocortisone acetate to be administered, and is the maximum amount determined by the patient's blood pressure levels? Answered by Lyla Truocchio 3 months ago.

Joe Conrad, It would appear that you are quoting a paper or a report. I trust that you will be able to access the answers to your questions at a later date. In the meantime, I will briefly discuss this subject. Blood aldosterone levels are often combined with other tests to diagnose over or under-production of the hormone. These tests may include - ACTH infusion test. Captopril test. Intravenous saline infusion test. Plasma renin activity. Laboratory values vary with the patient's age, however, patients of 11 years and older the ‘normal’ level would be between 1 to 21 ng/dl. (This also varies as to whether the patient was erect of supine at the time of collection). Low serum aldosterone levels may indicate primary or Hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism, salt-losing syndrome, eclampsia, or addison's disease (rare), congenital adrenal hyperplasia or a very high-sodium diet. Florinef Acetate is indicated as partial replacement therapy for primary and secondary adrenocortical insufficiency in Addison's disease and for the treatment of salt-losing adrenogenital syndrome. The usual dose is 0.1 mg of Florinef Acetate daily, although dosage ranging from 0.1 mg three times a week to 0.2 mg daily has been employed. In the event transient hypertension develops as a consequence of therapy, the dose should be reduced to 0.05 mg daily. Florinef Acetate is preferably administered in conjunction with cortisone (10 mg to 37.5 mg daily in divided doses) or hydrocortisone (10 mg to 30 mg daily in divided doses). ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Detra Stermer 3 months ago.

Aldosterone Levels Normal Range Answered by Maryalice Lanpher 3 months ago.


Does anyone have personal perspective with treating Addison's Disease in dogs?
Update: Please read the question carefully. I have researched this on the web thoroughly, so I don't need copypasta from websites. I need/want PERSONAL anecdotes and/or treatment options, particularly when it comes to alternatvie therapies. Asked by Amira Genovese 3 months ago.

I have a 17 year old Aussie mix, who has a tentative diagnosis of Addison's. (ACTH test tomorrow) I know all about the disease, having worked as a vet tech. I've also done some web-based research, so don't tell me what it is, etc... What I'm looking for are personal stories of the practical side of dealing with this: treatment options, tips and tricks, and ESPECIALLY any holistic alternatives/complementary treatments. Answered by Ruben Encallado 3 months ago.

Treatment for this disease is usually done by oral administration of fludrocortisone acetate (Flurinaf), salting the food, and administration of corticosteroids like prednisone. In a crisis situation this disorder must be treated more aggressively with intravenous fluids, IV glucocorticoids and correction of acid/base balances. You have to pay close attention to a dog with this problem. Don't ignore any changes in appetite, GI disturbances or anything else that makes you think your dog is ill. If you work with your vet and are careful about following his or her directions this disease has a good prognosis when it is discovered before a crisis occurs. Answered by Ester Blatchford 3 months ago.

I have a friend with a Dane who has Addison's. She gets a steroid shot monthly, and is like a new animal. She was skin and bones, lethargic prior to beginning treatment. About 3 months after beginning treatment, she completely returned to her normal self. Answered by Joette Huseby 3 months ago.


Is adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) available as a supplement?
When an individual has an adrenal gland insufficiency and is not producing adequate aldosterone, doctors will prescribe Fludrocortisone Acetate as a supplement. This introduction of an exogenous cortisone, however, will have the effect that the pituitary gland will diminish its production of adrenocorticotropic... Asked by Josephine Varisco 3 months ago.

When an individual has an adrenal gland insufficiency and is not producing adequate aldosterone, doctors will prescribe Fludrocortisone Acetate as a supplement. This introduction of an exogenous cortisone, however, will have the effect that the pituitary gland will diminish its production of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) via the feedback-loop of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal glands. This results in the atrophying of the adrenal glands so that they produce very little (if any) endogenous aldosterone. Do doctors then prescribe supplemental ACTH in order to prevent the adrenals from atrophying? Answered by Amina Loughnan 3 months ago.

ACTH is too expensive. It is also only IV. So it is only used for stimulation testing. For replacements, corticosteroids are given but nothing can prevent the adrenals from atrophy - once they are not working, they start to atrophy. Too much ACTH BTW, is Cushing's disease, and can lead to the adrenals becoming enlarged - and in turn, not functional, and even nodular. So giving ACTH is not ideal. I did read about it for MS patients though. One of my links shows normal adrenals, adrenals without ACTH, and with too much. I had Cushing's, mine were removed and were enlarged. Oddly, the CTs showed they were normal before and after removal. Answered by Shawn Boise 3 months ago.

ACTH is a hormone secreted by using the pituitary gland. Its objective organ is the adrenal glands to stimulate production of adrenal hormones (cortisol, etc). ACTH is on no account linked to the thyroid gland. The pituitary hormone that stimulates the thyroid gland is declared as TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone. It reasons production of T3 and T4 by using the thyroid. This in turn has damaging comments inhibition on TRH (thyrotropin liberating hormone) secreted by using the hypothalamus. Answered by Kristeen Piedigrossi 3 months ago.


Is my dog going to die?
and has been for the past 5 days! Asked by Faith Guecho 3 months ago.

she is three years old. Im not stupid i keep in tact with my vet i just want some more experience on what other peoples dogs have gone through and what it could be. I've been to two different vets already to get more than one opinion and im getting her an exray so ive pretty much spent the same amount i bought her as a puppy (1000$) So dont say i should talk to a vet because i am. I just want to get some extra info imbatween info from the vet. Answered by Sonja Mchendry 3 months ago.

Treatment can be divided into two phases. Firstly, in the case of the Addisonian Crisis, we can never be sure that the dog has Addison's Disease. It may well be strongly suspected, but treatment is directed towards correcting dehydration, and improving the circulation. This is done by the rapid intravenous injection of saline (salty water). When the dog is improved, he can be worked up to prove Addison's Disease, and move onto long term treatment. The long term treatment of Addison's Disease is by replacement of the missing hormone, aldosterone. However, aldosterone itself is not available, so we have to use a drug that has similar properties. This is called fludrocortisone acetate, and is marketed as Florinef®. The starting dose of Florinef® is one tablet per 10kg of dog. It is very important to monitor the dog to check the effect of the drug. This is done by regularly testing the levels of sodium and potassium within the blood. If the drug dose is too low, then sodium will be too low, and potassium too high. In this case, we increase the dose and may even give it twice daily. The first blood test is done about a week after starting treatment, and each week after that until satisfactory maintenance is achieved. Once stable, we usually recommend to test the dog every 6 months or so, or as required if symptoms recur. It is not unusual for the final dose of Florinef® to be as high as three times as much as was initially used. Addison's Disease is a very satisfying disease to treat for a veterinary surgeon. Most cases of Addison's Disease return completely to normal with treatment, and those that are not completely normal have a more than adequate quality of life. However, it is a potentially life threatening disease, and you have to be vigilant. Dogs die with the Addisonian Crisis. All dogs with Addison's Disease require lifelong treatment. It is vital that the medication is given regularly, even when the dog looks better. Also remember that at times of stress, or if the dog is not eating, vomiting or lethargic, it is likely that some cortisol is required. You should be prepared to give some prednisolone at these times, and even if you hardly ever use it, remember to keep some just in case. Answered by Betty Tagami 3 months ago.

I had a dog with Addison's disease he died last week at age 12 1/2- EIGHT YEARS (that's right, 8 yr!) after developing Addison's. BUT Addison's requires continuing commitment to medication needs for the dogs entire life as it is not curable but only treatable (much like insulin keeps diabetics going but they have to have it everyday ) Often the Predisone is started at high doses and will need to be tapered down over time or that will start trouble - tapering too fast or far will too. The aldosterone substitute (either monthly shot DOCP or daily florineif) will need customized too - Bloodwork can reveal if this component of treatment needs adjusting. Is she near the time for a new shot (that can vary slightly from dog to dog)? there are two support lists for Addison's dog owners www.k9addisons.com and www.addisondogs.com with nearly a thousand members someone has had nearly any possible problem and can tell you what worked for them. THey can be a GODSEND and owners credit them with saving dogs lives...... Answered by Norma Phillippy 3 months ago.

You may need to take your dog back to the vet, or to the humane society. I can't tell you what could be wrong, because I'm not a vet. My suggestion is to take your dog to a vet that you trust. If you need to take her to a specialist, then go for it. Check all of your options before you come with a straight conclusion. Answered by Vernon Ziemke 3 months ago.

Honestly, these are questions you need to be asking your vet directly. Your vet knows your dogs situation better than anyone here does and would be the only one able to help your dog. Sorry, but we cannot diagnose your dog over the Internet. Answered by Azucena Kea 3 months ago.

Go back to the Vet and get the info you need from them. I hope all works out Answered by Kareen Krzemien 3 months ago.

Hi Taylor If she is still on meds, the dosage may need to be adjusted, as it sounds like her metabolism & electrolytes are not where they should be. This would cause the symptoms you are seeing. If she is not on meds. at this time, the Vet will likely put her back on meds. In either case, she should be seen immediately. Best of luck, Rebel Answered by Alverta Lewczyk 3 months ago.

Everything alive dies. Sounds like sooner than most for the poor dog. Do NOT force it to linger & suffer. Your parents need to take responsibility-fast. Answered by Celestine Hanson 3 months ago.

how old is she? it could be liver failure possibly? my cat had liver failure and he lived with it for about 2 years, and near the end he was bumping into things all the time and staring at walls, seeming dizzy. i hope that is not the case though. good luck. Answered by Raymond Teverbaugh 3 months ago.


What are some treatments for vasovagal reflex?
My father has been told there is no cure for his disease and that he will be bed ridden for the rest of his life. Are there known treatments for vasovagal reflex? Asked by Louvenia Aipopo 3 months ago.

The vasovagal reflex, which causes the heart rate to slow and the blood vessels to widen, or dilate. As a result, blood pools in the lower body and less blood goes to the brain. This reflex can be triggered by many things, including stress, pain, fear, coughing, holding your breath, and urinating. Though vasovagal reactions themselves are not fatal, treatment involving medication and adequate hydration is imperative because resulting falls can be harmful. Beta-blockers are commonly used to treat vasovagal syncope. Though it seems paradoxical to select a negatively chronotropic medication to treat bradycardia, the negative inotropic effects may decrease the afferent signals from the mechanoreceptors to the brain stem, thereby suppressing the efferent arm of the reflex . Disopyramide has been used successfully in the treatment of neurally mediated syncope. This type 1 antiarrhythmic has profound negative inotropic effects and anticholinergic properties. The negative inotropic effects may decrease afferent mechanoreceptor activity, while the anticholinergic effects may decrease vagal (efferent) output. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have also been used with success in patients who have vasovagal syncope, though the mechanism of action is speculative. A study has shown that intracerebroventricular serotonin induces hypotension, inhibits renal sympathetics, and excites adrenal sympathetics. SSRIs may blunt the response to shifts in serotonin levels. Fludrocortisone acetate, which has volume-expanding properties, has been used with some success. Midodrine, which received US Food and Drug Administration approval in September 1996 for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension, has peripheral alpha-adrenergic effects and has shown promise in treating vasovagal reactions . Vasovagal reactions do not appear to be life-threatening but certainly are a cause of great concerns. In many cases, the condition can occur suddenly and without warning. The falls incurred from such vasovagal events can be very dangerous, making avoidance of causative exercise prudent, but not necessarily imperative. ________________________ I suggest your Dad get a 2nd opinion. Yes, it can't be cured at this time but, it can be treated with meds. I wonder why his doctor didn't discuss a treatment plan? With proper treatment he should be able to have a normal life. I didn't see any articles where the patient was forced to be bed ridden. Try a new cardiologist & discuss treatment. If he is nervous walking around....he can always wear an event recorder to fine tune his condition for his Cardiologist. Good luck! Answered by Nelle Dingwall 3 months ago.

Stay hydrated. Eat good. Do no longer rise up away from bed/or mendacity down, with out sitting at the area for a minute first. Jiggle legs round and stretch whilst sitting at a table or pc to inspire an develop in circulate. Vasovagal is truly Answered by Maddie Geiselman 3 months ago.

THIS SOUNDS LIKE MY HUSBANDS PROBLEM---AFTER HE EATS SOME TIME RIGHT AWAY OR MAYBE IN 1/2 HR LATER HE WILL GET VERY WEAK FEELING LIKE EVERY THING IS DRAINING OUT OF HIM AND NAUSEADED BUT VERY WEAK AND WANTS TO GO TO BED AFTER A FEW HOURS THERE HE SEEMS TO BE FINE BUT THEN ITS TIME TO EAT AGAIN. THEY SAY THE BLOOD IS GOING TO HIS GUT AND NOT THE BRAIN. THAT CAUSES THIS BUT HAVE GIVEN ME NO SOLUTION FOR IT. DO YOU HAVE A SOLUTION??? THANK YOU SO MUCH. Answered by Wayne Barresi 3 months ago.


Has anyone had a tilt table test ?
I've been passing out and feeling faint lately. I been in the hopitsk for days and they couldn't find anything wrong. I'm finally home with a heart monitor and my mom called me and asked me did they do a tilt table test.. A long time ago when I was younger I used to pass out and they did one and I ended... Asked by Tonie Leithiser 3 months ago.

I've been passing out and feeling faint lately. I been in the hopitsk for days and they couldn't find anything wrong. I'm finally home with a heart monitor and my mom called me and asked me did they do a tilt table test.. A long time ago when I was younger I used to pass out and they did one and I ended up having to get on meds but I guess I stopped taking them. I guess my question is... Has anyone out there been through this ? If so, how did the medicine work for you. The medicine is called Fludrocortisone acetate & what did they diagnose you with. Also, only when I stand up do I start getting lightheaded or dizzy. As long as I'm laying down, I'm fine.. ( Sometimes when Lay down I get woozy too) Answered by Esta Blohm 3 months ago.

Do you mean the test for Vertigo due to crystals in the ear? I am having it done in the UK next week. The medicine you have mentioned if for problems with the kidneys., not for Vertigo. Answered by Jarrett Martina 3 months ago.

Don't ask us, we are not doctors. Consult your own physician as it may be that there is an alternative medicine. Answered by Sommer Mensah 3 months ago.

Ask lestermount Answered by Sheree Revak 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
040425/001 FLUDROCORTISONE ACETATE FLUDROCORTISONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
040431/001 FLUDROCORTISONE ACETATE FLUDROCORTISONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
091302/001 FLUDROCORTISONE ACETATE FLUDROCORTISONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010060/001 FLORINEF FLUDROCORTISONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
040425/001 FLUDROCORTISONE ACETATE FLUDROCORTISONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
040431/001 FLUDROCORTISONE ACETATE FLUDROCORTISONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
091302/001 FLUDROCORTISONE ACETATE FLUDROCORTISONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG

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