Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020195/001.

Names and composition

"FENTANYL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of FENTANYL CITRATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020195/001 FENTANYL FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/ORAL EQ 0.2MG BASE
020195/002 FENTANYL FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/ORAL EQ 0.3MG BASE
020195/003 FENTANYL FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/ORAL EQ 0.4MG BASE
020195/007 FENTANYL FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/ORAL EQ 0.1MG BASE
202577/001 FENTANYL FENTANYL TABLET/BUCCAL 100MCG
202577/002 FENTANYL FENTANYL TABLET/BUCCAL 200MCG
202577/003 FENTANYL FENTANYL TABLET/BUCCAL 300MCG
202577/004 FENTANYL FENTANYL TABLET/BUCCAL 400MCG
202577/005 FENTANYL FENTANYL TABLET/BUCCAL 600MCG
202577/006 FENTANYL FENTANYL TABLET/BUCCAL 800MCG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016619/001 SUBLIMAZE PRESERVATIVE FREE FENTANYL CITRATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 0.05MG BASE per ML
019101/001 FENTANYL CITRATE PRESERVATIVE FREE FENTANYL CITRATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 0.05MG BASE per ML
019115/001 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 0.05MG BASE per ML
020195/001 FENTANYL FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/ORAL EQ 0.2MG BASE
020195/002 FENTANYL FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/ORAL EQ 0.3MG BASE
020195/003 FENTANYL FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/ORAL EQ 0.4MG BASE
020195/007 FENTANYL FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/ORAL EQ 0.1MG BASE
020747/001 ACTIQ FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 0.2MG BASE
020747/002 ACTIQ FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 0.4MG BASE
020747/003 ACTIQ FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 0.6MG BASE
020747/004 ACTIQ FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 0.8MG BASE
020747/005 ACTIQ FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 1.2MG BASE
020747/006 ACTIQ FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 1.6MG BASE
021947/001 FENTORA FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.1MG BASE
021947/002 FENTORA FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.2MG BASE
021947/003 FENTORA FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.4MG BASE
021947/004 FENTORA FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.6MG BASE
021947/005 FENTORA FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.8MG BASE
021947/006 FENTORA FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.3MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
022266/001 ONSOLIS FENTANYL CITRATE FILM/BUCCAL EQ 0.2MG BASE
022266/002 ONSOLIS FENTANYL CITRATE FILM/BUCCAL EQ 0.4MG BASE
022266/003 ONSOLIS FENTANYL CITRATE FILM/BUCCAL EQ 0.6MG BASE
022266/004 ONSOLIS FENTANYL CITRATE FILM/BUCCAL EQ 0.8MG BASE
022266/005 ONSOLIS FENTANYL CITRATE FILM/BUCCAL EQ 1.2MG BASE
022510/001 ABSTRAL FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.1MG BASE
022510/002 ABSTRAL FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.2MG BASE
022510/003 ABSTRAL FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.3MG BASE
022510/004 ABSTRAL FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.4MG BASE
022510/005 ABSTRAL FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.6MG BASE
022510/006 ABSTRAL FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.8MG BASE
022569/001 LAZANDA FENTANYL CITRATE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL EQ 0.1MG BASE
022569/002 LAZANDA FENTANYL CITRATE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL EQ 0.4MG BASE
022569/003 LAZANDA FENTANYL CITRATE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL EQ 0.3MG BASE
070636/001 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 0.05MG BASE per ML
070637/001 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 0.05MG BASE per ML
072786/001 FENTANYL CITRATE PRESERVATIVE FREE FENTANYL CITRATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 0.05MG BASE per ML
073488/001 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 0.05MG BASE per ML
074917/001 FENTANYL CITRATE PRESERVATIVE FREE FENTANYL CITRATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 0.05MG BASE per ML
077312/001 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 0.2MG BASE
077312/002 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 0.4MG BASE
077312/003 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 0.6MG BASE
077312/004 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 0.8MG BASE
077312/005 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 1.2MG BASE
077312/006 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 1.6MG BASE
078907/001 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 0.2MG BASE
078907/002 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 0.4MG BASE
078907/003 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 0.6MG BASE
078907/004 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 0.8MG BASE
078907/005 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 1.2MG BASE
078907/006 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TROCHE/LOZENGE/TRANSMUCOSAL EQ 1.6MG BASE
079075/001 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.1MG BASE
079075/002 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.2MG BASE
079075/003 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.4MG BASE
079075/004 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.6MG BASE
079075/005 FENTANYL CITRATE FENTANYL CITRATE TABLET/BUCCAL, SUBLINGUAL EQ 0.8MG BASE

Ask a doctor

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Answered questions

Who invented (FENTANYL) what was his name??????
Is it one big cover-up Asked by Isidro Davaz 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is an opioid analgesic, first synthesized by Janssen Pharmaceutica (Belgium) in the late 1950s, with an analgesic potency of about 80 times that of morphine. Fentanyl was introduced into medical practice in the 1960s as an intravenous anesthetic under the trade name of Sublimaze. Fentanyl has an LD50 of 3.1 milligrams per kilogram in rats, and, 0.03 milligrams per kilogram in monkeys. The LD50 in humans is not known. In the United States, fentanyl is a Schedule II drug. Fentanyls are extensively used for anesthesia and analgesia, most often in the operating room and intensive care unit. Duragesic, by Janssen Pharmaceutica, is a fentanyl transdermal patch used in chronic pain management. Duragesic patches work by releasing fentanyl into body fats, which then slowly release the drug into the blood stream over 72 hours, allowing for long lasting relief from pain. In the past few years, the patches have gone generic and are available for lower costs. Duragesic is manufactured in five patch sizes: 12.5 micrograms/h, 25 µg/h, 50 µg/h, 75 µg/h, and 100 µg/h. Dosage is based on the size of the patch, since the transdermal absorption rate is generally constant at a constant skin temperature. Rate of absorption is dependent on a number of factors. Body temperature, skin type and placement of the patch can have major effects. The different delivery systems used by different makers will also affect individual rates of absorption. Answered by Rodger Rodin 2 years ago.

Cover up? What are you on? (Probably not fentanyl) Fentanyl has been around since Paull Janssen (founder of Janssen Pharmaceutical) sythesized it in 1960. We use it all the time in anesthesia. It works fast and is less likely to make you vomit than many other opiates. And it costs pennies. It's a great drug. It's a rare patient who meets me and doesn't get some fentanyl. Answered by Caroline Mathenia 2 years ago.

Fentanyl was first synthesized by Janssen Pharmaceutica (Belgium) established by Dr. Paul Janssen in the late 1950s. Answered by Melvina Duverney 2 years ago.

Patent in US (3,141,823) granted 1964 to Janssen. Gardocki also mentioned in the development. An amazing narcotic. 1000 times more potent than morphine? Answered by Tamra Biron 2 years ago.


Fentanyl patch question?
From just one patch? Asked by Kirby Randazzo 2 years ago.

A Fentanyl patch has no "location" indication. I administer these on a daily basis to patients and I will tell you what we are told. You are to put the patch over a "fatty" area of the body where it is not likely to be bothered or iritated. The Fentanly is released over a 24 hour - 32 hour period with dosages peaking at 12 hours. We usually use the chest below the collar bone (below the subclavean artery) and switch sides left to right with the application of the new patch. This is done to prevent skin irritation and cell breakdown. We also use the shoulder blades and the meatier part of the shoulder towards the spine also rotating. Old patches contain residual Fentanyl and should be removed before a new one is applied to prevent overdose. Also, when disposing of these patches, please remember to do so responsibly as I have heard of dogs getting them out of the trash, chewing them and dying from respiratory arrest. Imagine if this was a toddler. Teens love these things as they are the new craze in perscription drugs so cutting them and squeezing the excess into a paper towel or just into raw trash keeps a bad teen from collecting them and either selling them or pasting 2 or 3 at a time to themselves...yes, I've seen this in my ER as well. Your pain should be alleviated system wide. Something like a lidocaine patch is used more along the lines of topical pain relief. Lidocaine is a topical anesthetic and is used on bad shoulders, knees and joint areas. A Ben-Gay patch is also used this way. Answered by Carolina Starns 2 years ago.

The patch is not intended to deal only with pain in its vicinity; it is designed as a method of slowly releasing fentanyl over an extended period of time into the bloodstream. It will therefore deal with all the pains you have at the same time. Answered by Loise Lathen 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is fat soluble, where it slowly enters the bloodstream. Therefore, anywhere blood flows is in reach of the analgesic effects. Fentanyl is also one of the most powerful opioid analgesics, so it should reduce a fair amount of the pain you have. It does, however, take several hours for it to take effect, so you'll probably need that Vicodin for the first few hours. Answered by Sharell Symore 2 years ago.

hi and that i"m sorry your discomfort isn't controlled! those patches do no longer artwork as without postpone as pills because of the fact the medicine first might desire to be absorbed into the tissues, and then that's released on your physique. They as a bring about lots of circumstances take 12 hours or greater to realize finished consequence. you will possibly desire to notice them as directed to bathe, dry skin-no lotion and so on-and it will help in case you press down over the patch with your hand for 20-30 seconds to heat the adhesive and help it stick once you notice them. because of the sluggish onset of alleviation, you will possibly be able to desire a pill to conceal your leap forward discomfort. Please touch your medical expert as quickly as available. under no circumstances use greater patches than directed! you will possibly be able to certainly desire a greater dose than what he initially gave you, yet you will possibly desire to artwork as much as that dose as prescribed or it could have severe effects, as much as and which contains overdose/dying. Please do call your surgeon and clarify your discomfort stages and concerns. There are countless oral discomfort meds available which could settle for with the Fentanyl patch. If the surgeon does not hear from you they are going to assume you're doing super. advantages, cryllie Answered by Ebony Yankovitch 2 years ago.


How does fentanyl work?
Asked by Cristen Dicaprio 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is a potent synthetic opiate agonist. Similar to morphine, fentanyl is a strong agonist at µ- and kappa- opiate receptors. The actions of fentanyl are similar to those of morphine, although fentanyl is much more lipophilic (fat soluble) as compared to morphine and has a more rapid onset of action. Clinically, stimulation of µ-receptors produces analgesia, euphoria, respiratory depression, miosis, decreased gastrointestinal motility, and physical dependence. Kappa-receptor stimulation also produces analgesia, miosis, respiratory depression, as well as, dysphoria and some psychomimetic effects (i.e., disorientation and/or depersonalization). Following IV administration, peak analgesia occurs within minutes and lasts for 30—60 minutes after a single dose. Following the IM route, onset of analgesia is within 7—15 minutes and lasts for 1—2 hours. Answered by Elana Liedtke 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is a patch which is absorbed through the skin, and goes directly into the blood stream. It is a time released medication. It's a very potent narcotic. It effects certain parts of the brain which are responsible for pain response. It's an opiate based drug, similar to Loratab. It is extremely addictive. You should use caution when using it. Please contact your doctor or pharmacist with any questions. Answered by Keith Ohaver 2 years ago.

fentanyl is a narcotic patch. The medication is absorbed through the skin and it enters the bloodstream. It then acts on your opiod receptors in your body to produce an effect. This effect is used to numb the pain you are feeling. Answered by Kittie Geurin 2 years ago.


How much does Fentanyl cost?
Is there a generic? Asked by Rodrigo Dority 2 years ago.

Fentanyl Patch Cost Answered by Alise Murcia 2 years ago.

Fentanyl Patch Price Answered by Madonna Rossetti 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much does Fentanyl cost? Is there a generic? Answered by Angel Goyer 2 years ago.

How much dies fentanyl cost I have 100 mcg & 25 mcg every 72 hours . My insurance lapsed and now I m in trouble I need help , quickly, I have 15 days left and then it s cold turkey /withdrawl fir me. I ve been there and swore I d never go back...it pure hell the withdraws . Please answer me, momfreakingoout Answered by Alleen Crivello 2 years ago.

There is not a generic for Fentanyl yet. It depends on your insurance or lack there of and where you get your scrips filled on cost. Ball park 40-60$ Answered by Kasey Keleher 2 years ago.

Not to my knowledge there isn't. I know under my medical plan it was more expensive then what I normally pay. But it is dangerous stuff!!! I only used one patch and ended up taking it off after almost fainting and stop breathing! The stuff is major big time strong!!! Answered by Neal Wiedenheft 2 years ago.


Withdrawel from Fentanyl?
Hey there. I am a 27 year old male who has ben chewing on 100 MCG Fentaynl patches for 12 days. I have chewed small amounts mainly at night time for RECREATION. I have chewed 3 patches in 13 days. I am planning on stopping and wondering if I am going to have any withdrawls. I have chewed 3 in 13 days. Any help or... Asked by Jerold Koetting 2 years ago.

Hey there. I am a 27 year old male who has ben chewing on 100 MCG Fentaynl patches for 12 days. I have chewed small amounts mainly at night time for RECREATION. I have chewed 3 patches in 13 days. I am planning on stopping and wondering if I am going to have any withdrawls. I have chewed 3 in 13 days. Any help or sugestions would be great. I know I dont need to be chewing on these patches so please no smart comments. I am going to quit, would just like some advice. Answered by Margurite Reinsvold 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is stronger that morphine. Both are opiates, and yes, you will probably go through withdrawal and it won't be fun. Count yourself fortunate that you did not accidentally overdose yourself, because 100 mcg of fentanyl is a lot of narcotic! You say you know it's not good for you, but it can kill you taking so much. Go to web sites like Mayo Clinic, Web Md to see what withdrawal will entail. You may need to go to the ER if you get really sick. Answered by Angelita Eddins 2 years ago.

yes you will have withdrwals, fetanyl is a very strong drug. i wish you luck. btw how did you get your hands on it in the first place? Answered by Myrtle Kaui 2 years ago.


Why was the drug "fentanyl" recalled?
I cannot find it anywhere. Anyone know, perhaps? Asked by Lane Ganoe 2 years ago.

Fentanyl makers have recalled transdermal skin patches due to faulty manufacturing . Fentanyl is an opiate pain killer nearly 100 times stronger than morphine. Damaged patches can cause a deadly overdose of the medication. In the last few years, numerous recalls have plagued Johnson & Johnson and their subsidiaries who are makers and distributors of Fentanyl. The latest recall was declared by the PriCara division of Ortho-MacNeil-Janssen Pharmaceuticals, a Johnson & Johnson unit and Sandoz. Two separate lots of pain patches using Fentanyl in 50 mcg were affected – one lot was sold under the brand name Duragesic skin patches and the other was generic. In these lots, cuts in the patches could release the potent Fentanyl gel unexpectedly into the pouch, making them deadly for users, caregivers or medical workers – basically anyone coming into contact with the skin patches. Answered by Freddie Crowthers 2 years ago.


Who invented (FENTANYL) what was his name??????
Is it one big cover-up Asked by Mindy Gaekle 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is an opioid analgesic, first synthesized by Janssen Pharmaceutica (Belgium) in the late 1950s, with an analgesic potency of about 80 times that of morphine. Fentanyl was introduced into medical practice in the 1960s as an intravenous anesthetic under the trade name of Sublimaze. Fentanyl has an LD50 of 3.1 milligrams per kilogram in rats, and, 0.03 milligrams per kilogram in monkeys. The LD50 in humans is not known. In the United States, fentanyl is a Schedule II drug. Fentanyls are extensively used for anesthesia and analgesia, most often in the operating room and intensive care unit. Duragesic, by Janssen Pharmaceutica, is a fentanyl transdermal patch used in chronic pain management. Duragesic patches work by releasing fentanyl into body fats, which then slowly release the drug into the blood stream over 72 hours, allowing for long lasting relief from pain. In the past few years, the patches have gone generic and are available for lower costs. Duragesic is manufactured in five patch sizes: 12.5 micrograms/h, 25 µg/h, 50 µg/h, 75 µg/h, and 100 µg/h. Dosage is based on the size of the patch, since the transdermal absorption rate is generally constant at a constant skin temperature. Rate of absorption is dependent on a number of factors. Body temperature, skin type and placement of the patch can have major effects. The different delivery systems used by different makers will also affect individual rates of absorption. Answered by Clair Bigler 2 years ago.

Cover up? What are you on? (Probably not fentanyl) Fentanyl has been around since Paull Janssen (founder of Janssen Pharmaceutical) sythesized it in 1960. We use it all the time in anesthesia. It works fast and is less likely to make you vomit than many other opiates. And it costs pennies. It's a great drug. It's a rare patient who meets me and doesn't get some fentanyl. Answered by Aileen Frock 2 years ago.

Fentanyl was first synthesized by Janssen Pharmaceutica (Belgium) established by Dr. Paul Janssen in the late 1950s. Answered by Kelly Spurzem 2 years ago.

Patent in US (3,141,823) granted 1964 to Janssen. Gardocki also mentioned in the development. An amazing narcotic. 1000 times more potent than morphine? Answered by Chu Evartt 2 years ago.


Fentanyl patch question?
From just one patch? Asked by Jonna Dolbow 2 years ago.

A Fentanyl patch has no "location" indication. I administer these on a daily basis to patients and I will tell you what we are told. You are to put the patch over a "fatty" area of the body where it is not likely to be bothered or iritated. The Fentanly is released over a 24 hour - 32 hour period with dosages peaking at 12 hours. We usually use the chest below the collar bone (below the subclavean artery) and switch sides left to right with the application of the new patch. This is done to prevent skin irritation and cell breakdown. We also use the shoulder blades and the meatier part of the shoulder towards the spine also rotating. Old patches contain residual Fentanyl and should be removed before a new one is applied to prevent overdose. Also, when disposing of these patches, please remember to do so responsibly as I have heard of dogs getting them out of the trash, chewing them and dying from respiratory arrest. Imagine if this was a toddler. Teens love these things as they are the new craze in perscription drugs so cutting them and squeezing the excess into a paper towel or just into raw trash keeps a bad teen from collecting them and either selling them or pasting 2 or 3 at a time to themselves...yes, I've seen this in my ER as well. Your pain should be alleviated system wide. Something like a lidocaine patch is used more along the lines of topical pain relief. Lidocaine is a topical anesthetic and is used on bad shoulders, knees and joint areas. A Ben-Gay patch is also used this way. Answered by Chadwick Rust 2 years ago.

The patch is not intended to deal only with pain in its vicinity; it is designed as a method of slowly releasing fentanyl over an extended period of time into the bloodstream. It will therefore deal with all the pains you have at the same time. Answered by Karey Galt 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is fat soluble, where it slowly enters the bloodstream. Therefore, anywhere blood flows is in reach of the analgesic effects. Fentanyl is also one of the most powerful opioid analgesics, so it should reduce a fair amount of the pain you have. It does, however, take several hours for it to take effect, so you'll probably need that Vicodin for the first few hours. Answered by Chelsea Shadid 2 years ago.

hi and that i"m sorry your discomfort isn't controlled! those patches do no longer artwork as without postpone as pills because of the fact the medicine first might desire to be absorbed into the tissues, and then that's released on your physique. They as a bring about lots of circumstances take 12 hours or greater to realize finished consequence. you will possibly desire to notice them as directed to bathe, dry skin-no lotion and so on-and it will help in case you press down over the patch with your hand for 20-30 seconds to heat the adhesive and help it stick once you notice them. because of the sluggish onset of alleviation, you will possibly be able to desire a pill to conceal your leap forward discomfort. Please touch your medical expert as quickly as available. under no circumstances use greater patches than directed! you will possibly be able to certainly desire a greater dose than what he initially gave you, yet you will possibly desire to artwork as much as that dose as prescribed or it could have severe effects, as much as and which contains overdose/dying. Please do call your surgeon and clarify your discomfort stages and concerns. There are countless oral discomfort meds available which could settle for with the Fentanyl patch. If the surgeon does not hear from you they are going to assume you're doing super. advantages, cryllie Answered by Pablo Suess 2 years ago.


How does fentanyl work?
Asked by Amal Board 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is a potent synthetic opiate agonist. Similar to morphine, fentanyl is a strong agonist at µ- and kappa- opiate receptors. The actions of fentanyl are similar to those of morphine, although fentanyl is much more lipophilic (fat soluble) as compared to morphine and has a more rapid onset of action. Clinically, stimulation of µ-receptors produces analgesia, euphoria, respiratory depression, miosis, decreased gastrointestinal motility, and physical dependence. Kappa-receptor stimulation also produces analgesia, miosis, respiratory depression, as well as, dysphoria and some psychomimetic effects (i.e., disorientation and/or depersonalization). Following IV administration, peak analgesia occurs within minutes and lasts for 30—60 minutes after a single dose. Following the IM route, onset of analgesia is within 7—15 minutes and lasts for 1—2 hours. Answered by Theo Hollis 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is a patch which is absorbed through the skin, and goes directly into the blood stream. It is a time released medication. It's a very potent narcotic. It effects certain parts of the brain which are responsible for pain response. It's an opiate based drug, similar to Loratab. It is extremely addictive. You should use caution when using it. Please contact your doctor or pharmacist with any questions. Answered by Mana Huhta 2 years ago.

fentanyl is a narcotic patch. The medication is absorbed through the skin and it enters the bloodstream. It then acts on your opiod receptors in your body to produce an effect. This effect is used to numb the pain you are feeling. Answered by Petrina Tvedt 2 years ago.


How much does Fentanyl cost?
Is there a generic? Asked by Hyun Passley 2 years ago.

Fentanyl Patch Cost Answered by Keisha Safi 2 years ago.

Fentanyl Patch Price Answered by Lala Ueno 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much does Fentanyl cost? Is there a generic? Answered by Katherine Hoeschen 2 years ago.

How much dies fentanyl cost I have 100 mcg & 25 mcg every 72 hours . My insurance lapsed and now I m in trouble I need help , quickly, I have 15 days left and then it s cold turkey /withdrawl fir me. I ve been there and swore I d never go back...it pure hell the withdraws . Please answer me, momfreakingoout Answered by Bess Manko 2 years ago.

There is not a generic for Fentanyl yet. It depends on your insurance or lack there of and where you get your scrips filled on cost. Ball park 40-60$ Answered by Meri Franciosa 2 years ago.

Not to my knowledge there isn't. I know under my medical plan it was more expensive then what I normally pay. But it is dangerous stuff!!! I only used one patch and ended up taking it off after almost fainting and stop breathing! The stuff is major big time strong!!! Answered by Marna Rotz 2 years ago.


Withdrawel from Fentanyl?
Hey there. I am a 27 year old male who has ben chewing on 100 MCG Fentaynl patches for 12 days. I have chewed small amounts mainly at night time for RECREATION. I have chewed 3 patches in 13 days. I am planning on stopping and wondering if I am going to have any withdrawls. I have chewed 3 in 13 days. Any help or... Asked by Lawrence Mcmorran 2 years ago.

Hey there. I am a 27 year old male who has ben chewing on 100 MCG Fentaynl patches for 12 days. I have chewed small amounts mainly at night time for RECREATION. I have chewed 3 patches in 13 days. I am planning on stopping and wondering if I am going to have any withdrawls. I have chewed 3 in 13 days. Any help or sugestions would be great. I know I dont need to be chewing on these patches so please no smart comments. I am going to quit, would just like some advice. Answered by Darci Franca 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is stronger that morphine. Both are opiates, and yes, you will probably go through withdrawal and it won't be fun. Count yourself fortunate that you did not accidentally overdose yourself, because 100 mcg of fentanyl is a lot of narcotic! You say you know it's not good for you, but it can kill you taking so much. Go to web sites like Mayo Clinic, Web Md to see what withdrawal will entail. You may need to go to the ER if you get really sick. Answered by Gabriel Baulch 2 years ago.

yes you will have withdrwals, fetanyl is a very strong drug. i wish you luck. btw how did you get your hands on it in the first place? Answered by Eva Boespflug 2 years ago.


Why was the drug "fentanyl" recalled?
I cannot find it anywhere. Anyone know, perhaps? Asked by Elvin Lacourse 2 years ago.

Fentanyl makers have recalled transdermal skin patches due to faulty manufacturing . Fentanyl is an opiate pain killer nearly 100 times stronger than morphine. Damaged patches can cause a deadly overdose of the medication. In the last few years, numerous recalls have plagued Johnson & Johnson and their subsidiaries who are makers and distributors of Fentanyl. The latest recall was declared by the PriCara division of Ortho-MacNeil-Janssen Pharmaceuticals, a Johnson & Johnson unit and Sandoz. Two separate lots of pain patches using Fentanyl in 50 mcg were affected – one lot was sold under the brand name Duragesic skin patches and the other was generic. In these lots, cuts in the patches could release the potent Fentanyl gel unexpectedly into the pouch, making them deadly for users, caregivers or medical workers – basically anyone coming into contact with the skin patches. Answered by Kris Cecilio 2 years ago.


Who invented (FENTANYL) what was his name??????
Is it one big cover-up Asked by Prince Gostlin 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is an opioid analgesic, first synthesized by Janssen Pharmaceutica (Belgium) in the late 1950s, with an analgesic potency of about 80 times that of morphine. Fentanyl was introduced into medical practice in the 1960s as an intravenous anesthetic under the trade name of Sublimaze. Fentanyl has an LD50 of 3.1 milligrams per kilogram in rats, and, 0.03 milligrams per kilogram in monkeys. The LD50 in humans is not known. In the United States, fentanyl is a Schedule II drug. Fentanyls are extensively used for anesthesia and analgesia, most often in the operating room and intensive care unit. Duragesic, by Janssen Pharmaceutica, is a fentanyl transdermal patch used in chronic pain management. Duragesic patches work by releasing fentanyl into body fats, which then slowly release the drug into the blood stream over 72 hours, allowing for long lasting relief from pain. In the past few years, the patches have gone generic and are available for lower costs. Duragesic is manufactured in five patch sizes: 12.5 micrograms/h, 25 µg/h, 50 µg/h, 75 µg/h, and 100 µg/h. Dosage is based on the size of the patch, since the transdermal absorption rate is generally constant at a constant skin temperature. Rate of absorption is dependent on a number of factors. Body temperature, skin type and placement of the patch can have major effects. The different delivery systems used by different makers will also affect individual rates of absorption. Answered by Karina Carbone 2 years ago.

Cover up? What are you on? (Probably not fentanyl) Fentanyl has been around since Paull Janssen (founder of Janssen Pharmaceutical) sythesized it in 1960. We use it all the time in anesthesia. It works fast and is less likely to make you vomit than many other opiates. And it costs pennies. It's a great drug. It's a rare patient who meets me and doesn't get some fentanyl. Answered by Isabel Repsher 2 years ago.

Fentanyl was first synthesized by Janssen Pharmaceutica (Belgium) established by Dr. Paul Janssen in the late 1950s. Answered by Tommy Shastri 2 years ago.

Patent in US (3,141,823) granted 1964 to Janssen. Gardocki also mentioned in the development. An amazing narcotic. 1000 times more potent than morphine? Answered by Cherie Tsunoda 2 years ago.


Fentanyl patch question?
From just one patch? Asked by Leigh Oubre 2 years ago.

A Fentanyl patch has no "location" indication. I administer these on a daily basis to patients and I will tell you what we are told. You are to put the patch over a "fatty" area of the body where it is not likely to be bothered or iritated. The Fentanly is released over a 24 hour - 32 hour period with dosages peaking at 12 hours. We usually use the chest below the collar bone (below the subclavean artery) and switch sides left to right with the application of the new patch. This is done to prevent skin irritation and cell breakdown. We also use the shoulder blades and the meatier part of the shoulder towards the spine also rotating. Old patches contain residual Fentanyl and should be removed before a new one is applied to prevent overdose. Also, when disposing of these patches, please remember to do so responsibly as I have heard of dogs getting them out of the trash, chewing them and dying from respiratory arrest. Imagine if this was a toddler. Teens love these things as they are the new craze in perscription drugs so cutting them and squeezing the excess into a paper towel or just into raw trash keeps a bad teen from collecting them and either selling them or pasting 2 or 3 at a time to themselves...yes, I've seen this in my ER as well. Your pain should be alleviated system wide. Something like a lidocaine patch is used more along the lines of topical pain relief. Lidocaine is a topical anesthetic and is used on bad shoulders, knees and joint areas. A Ben-Gay patch is also used this way. Answered by Hollie Stolar 2 years ago.

The patch is not intended to deal only with pain in its vicinity; it is designed as a method of slowly releasing fentanyl over an extended period of time into the bloodstream. It will therefore deal with all the pains you have at the same time. Answered by Janay Cecena 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is fat soluble, where it slowly enters the bloodstream. Therefore, anywhere blood flows is in reach of the analgesic effects. Fentanyl is also one of the most powerful opioid analgesics, so it should reduce a fair amount of the pain you have. It does, however, take several hours for it to take effect, so you'll probably need that Vicodin for the first few hours. Answered by Austin Larrosa 2 years ago.

hi and that i"m sorry your discomfort isn't controlled! those patches do no longer artwork as without postpone as pills because of the fact the medicine first might desire to be absorbed into the tissues, and then that's released on your physique. They as a bring about lots of circumstances take 12 hours or greater to realize finished consequence. you will possibly desire to notice them as directed to bathe, dry skin-no lotion and so on-and it will help in case you press down over the patch with your hand for 20-30 seconds to heat the adhesive and help it stick once you notice them. because of the sluggish onset of alleviation, you will possibly be able to desire a pill to conceal your leap forward discomfort. Please touch your medical expert as quickly as available. under no circumstances use greater patches than directed! you will possibly be able to certainly desire a greater dose than what he initially gave you, yet you will possibly desire to artwork as much as that dose as prescribed or it could have severe effects, as much as and which contains overdose/dying. Please do call your surgeon and clarify your discomfort stages and concerns. There are countless oral discomfort meds available which could settle for with the Fentanyl patch. If the surgeon does not hear from you they are going to assume you're doing super. advantages, cryllie Answered by Milagros Woolwine 2 years ago.


How does fentanyl work?
Asked by Curtis Nedeau 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is a potent synthetic opiate agonist. Similar to morphine, fentanyl is a strong agonist at µ- and kappa- opiate receptors. The actions of fentanyl are similar to those of morphine, although fentanyl is much more lipophilic (fat soluble) as compared to morphine and has a more rapid onset of action. Clinically, stimulation of µ-receptors produces analgesia, euphoria, respiratory depression, miosis, decreased gastrointestinal motility, and physical dependence. Kappa-receptor stimulation also produces analgesia, miosis, respiratory depression, as well as, dysphoria and some psychomimetic effects (i.e., disorientation and/or depersonalization). Following IV administration, peak analgesia occurs within minutes and lasts for 30—60 minutes after a single dose. Following the IM route, onset of analgesia is within 7—15 minutes and lasts for 1—2 hours. Answered by Dominique Celedon 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is a patch which is absorbed through the skin, and goes directly into the blood stream. It is a time released medication. It's a very potent narcotic. It effects certain parts of the brain which are responsible for pain response. It's an opiate based drug, similar to Loratab. It is extremely addictive. You should use caution when using it. Please contact your doctor or pharmacist with any questions. Answered by Shenita Magera 2 years ago.

fentanyl is a narcotic patch. The medication is absorbed through the skin and it enters the bloodstream. It then acts on your opiod receptors in your body to produce an effect. This effect is used to numb the pain you are feeling. Answered by Sabra Kotterna 2 years ago.


How much does Fentanyl cost?
Is there a generic? Asked by Genoveva Rosenau 2 years ago.

Fentanyl Patch Cost Answered by Kenyetta Hilo 2 years ago.

Fentanyl Patch Price Answered by Livia Sappington 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much does Fentanyl cost? Is there a generic? Answered by Roscoe Dally 2 years ago.

How much dies fentanyl cost I have 100 mcg & 25 mcg every 72 hours . My insurance lapsed and now I m in trouble I need help , quickly, I have 15 days left and then it s cold turkey /withdrawl fir me. I ve been there and swore I d never go back...it pure hell the withdraws . Please answer me, momfreakingoout Answered by Kristen Extine 2 years ago.

There is not a generic for Fentanyl yet. It depends on your insurance or lack there of and where you get your scrips filled on cost. Ball park 40-60$ Answered by Jillian Wedding 2 years ago.

Not to my knowledge there isn't. I know under my medical plan it was more expensive then what I normally pay. But it is dangerous stuff!!! I only used one patch and ended up taking it off after almost fainting and stop breathing! The stuff is major big time strong!!! Answered by Louann Lehnhoff 2 years ago.


Withdrawel from Fentanyl?
Hey there. I am a 27 year old male who has ben chewing on 100 MCG Fentaynl patches for 12 days. I have chewed small amounts mainly at night time for RECREATION. I have chewed 3 patches in 13 days. I am planning on stopping and wondering if I am going to have any withdrawls. I have chewed 3 in 13 days. Any help or... Asked by Meda Capizzi 2 years ago.

Hey there. I am a 27 year old male who has ben chewing on 100 MCG Fentaynl patches for 12 days. I have chewed small amounts mainly at night time for RECREATION. I have chewed 3 patches in 13 days. I am planning on stopping and wondering if I am going to have any withdrawls. I have chewed 3 in 13 days. Any help or sugestions would be great. I know I dont need to be chewing on these patches so please no smart comments. I am going to quit, would just like some advice. Answered by Dennis Monington 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is stronger that morphine. Both are opiates, and yes, you will probably go through withdrawal and it won't be fun. Count yourself fortunate that you did not accidentally overdose yourself, because 100 mcg of fentanyl is a lot of narcotic! You say you know it's not good for you, but it can kill you taking so much. Go to web sites like Mayo Clinic, Web Md to see what withdrawal will entail. You may need to go to the ER if you get really sick. Answered by Shirl Jenning 2 years ago.

yes you will have withdrwals, fetanyl is a very strong drug. i wish you luck. btw how did you get your hands on it in the first place? Answered by Euna Muzacz 2 years ago.


Why was the drug "fentanyl" recalled?
I cannot find it anywhere. Anyone know, perhaps? Asked by Carolynn Coonce 2 years ago.

Fentanyl makers have recalled transdermal skin patches due to faulty manufacturing . Fentanyl is an opiate pain killer nearly 100 times stronger than morphine. Damaged patches can cause a deadly overdose of the medication. In the last few years, numerous recalls have plagued Johnson & Johnson and their subsidiaries who are makers and distributors of Fentanyl. The latest recall was declared by the PriCara division of Ortho-MacNeil-Janssen Pharmaceuticals, a Johnson & Johnson unit and Sandoz. Two separate lots of pain patches using Fentanyl in 50 mcg were affected – one lot was sold under the brand name Duragesic skin patches and the other was generic. In these lots, cuts in the patches could release the potent Fentanyl gel unexpectedly into the pouch, making them deadly for users, caregivers or medical workers – basically anyone coming into contact with the skin patches. Answered by Lisandra Eagleson 2 years ago.


Who invented (FENTANYL) what was his name??????
Is it one big cover-up Asked by Aimee Eikleberry 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is an opioid analgesic, first synthesized by Janssen Pharmaceutica (Belgium) in the late 1950s, with an analgesic potency of about 80 times that of morphine. Fentanyl was introduced into medical practice in the 1960s as an intravenous anesthetic under the trade name of Sublimaze. Fentanyl has an LD50 of 3.1 milligrams per kilogram in rats, and, 0.03 milligrams per kilogram in monkeys. The LD50 in humans is not known. In the United States, fentanyl is a Schedule II drug. Fentanyls are extensively used for anesthesia and analgesia, most often in the operating room and intensive care unit. Duragesic, by Janssen Pharmaceutica, is a fentanyl transdermal patch used in chronic pain management. Duragesic patches work by releasing fentanyl into body fats, which then slowly release the drug into the blood stream over 72 hours, allowing for long lasting relief from pain. In the past few years, the patches have gone generic and are available for lower costs. Duragesic is manufactured in five patch sizes: 12.5 micrograms/h, 25 µg/h, 50 µg/h, 75 µg/h, and 100 µg/h. Dosage is based on the size of the patch, since the transdermal absorption rate is generally constant at a constant skin temperature. Rate of absorption is dependent on a number of factors. Body temperature, skin type and placement of the patch can have major effects. The different delivery systems used by different makers will also affect individual rates of absorption. Answered by Kesha Oropesa 2 years ago.

Cover up? What are you on? (Probably not fentanyl) Fentanyl has been around since Paull Janssen (founder of Janssen Pharmaceutical) sythesized it in 1960. We use it all the time in anesthesia. It works fast and is less likely to make you vomit than many other opiates. And it costs pennies. It's a great drug. It's a rare patient who meets me and doesn't get some fentanyl. Answered by Luanne Schenewerk 2 years ago.

Fentanyl was first synthesized by Janssen Pharmaceutica (Belgium) established by Dr. Paul Janssen in the late 1950s. Answered by Darby Wignall 2 years ago.

Patent in US (3,141,823) granted 1964 to Janssen. Gardocki also mentioned in the development. An amazing narcotic. 1000 times more potent than morphine? Answered by Shon Kohrman 2 years ago.


Fentanyl patch question?
From just one patch? Asked by Nu Gass 2 years ago.

A Fentanyl patch has no "location" indication. I administer these on a daily basis to patients and I will tell you what we are told. You are to put the patch over a "fatty" area of the body where it is not likely to be bothered or iritated. The Fentanly is released over a 24 hour - 32 hour period with dosages peaking at 12 hours. We usually use the chest below the collar bone (below the subclavean artery) and switch sides left to right with the application of the new patch. This is done to prevent skin irritation and cell breakdown. We also use the shoulder blades and the meatier part of the shoulder towards the spine also rotating. Old patches contain residual Fentanyl and should be removed before a new one is applied to prevent overdose. Also, when disposing of these patches, please remember to do so responsibly as I have heard of dogs getting them out of the trash, chewing them and dying from respiratory arrest. Imagine if this was a toddler. Teens love these things as they are the new craze in perscription drugs so cutting them and squeezing the excess into a paper towel or just into raw trash keeps a bad teen from collecting them and either selling them or pasting 2 or 3 at a time to themselves...yes, I've seen this in my ER as well. Your pain should be alleviated system wide. Something like a lidocaine patch is used more along the lines of topical pain relief. Lidocaine is a topical anesthetic and is used on bad shoulders, knees and joint areas. A Ben-Gay patch is also used this way. Answered by Dierdre Sofer 2 years ago.

The patch is not intended to deal only with pain in its vicinity; it is designed as a method of slowly releasing fentanyl over an extended period of time into the bloodstream. It will therefore deal with all the pains you have at the same time. Answered by Tammi Willougby 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is fat soluble, where it slowly enters the bloodstream. Therefore, anywhere blood flows is in reach of the analgesic effects. Fentanyl is also one of the most powerful opioid analgesics, so it should reduce a fair amount of the pain you have. It does, however, take several hours for it to take effect, so you'll probably need that Vicodin for the first few hours. Answered by Dawne Faiola 2 years ago.

hi and that i"m sorry your discomfort isn't controlled! those patches do no longer artwork as without postpone as pills because of the fact the medicine first might desire to be absorbed into the tissues, and then that's released on your physique. They as a bring about lots of circumstances take 12 hours or greater to realize finished consequence. you will possibly desire to notice them as directed to bathe, dry skin-no lotion and so on-and it will help in case you press down over the patch with your hand for 20-30 seconds to heat the adhesive and help it stick once you notice them. because of the sluggish onset of alleviation, you will possibly be able to desire a pill to conceal your leap forward discomfort. Please touch your medical expert as quickly as available. under no circumstances use greater patches than directed! you will possibly be able to certainly desire a greater dose than what he initially gave you, yet you will possibly desire to artwork as much as that dose as prescribed or it could have severe effects, as much as and which contains overdose/dying. Please do call your surgeon and clarify your discomfort stages and concerns. There are countless oral discomfort meds available which could settle for with the Fentanyl patch. If the surgeon does not hear from you they are going to assume you're doing super. advantages, cryllie Answered by Aretha Corolis 2 years ago.


How does fentanyl work?
Asked by Wilbur Landwehr 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is a potent synthetic opiate agonist. Similar to morphine, fentanyl is a strong agonist at µ- and kappa- opiate receptors. The actions of fentanyl are similar to those of morphine, although fentanyl is much more lipophilic (fat soluble) as compared to morphine and has a more rapid onset of action. Clinically, stimulation of µ-receptors produces analgesia, euphoria, respiratory depression, miosis, decreased gastrointestinal motility, and physical dependence. Kappa-receptor stimulation also produces analgesia, miosis, respiratory depression, as well as, dysphoria and some psychomimetic effects (i.e., disorientation and/or depersonalization). Following IV administration, peak analgesia occurs within minutes and lasts for 30—60 minutes after a single dose. Following the IM route, onset of analgesia is within 7—15 minutes and lasts for 1—2 hours. Answered by Talia Siniscalchi 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is a patch which is absorbed through the skin, and goes directly into the blood stream. It is a time released medication. It's a very potent narcotic. It effects certain parts of the brain which are responsible for pain response. It's an opiate based drug, similar to Loratab. It is extremely addictive. You should use caution when using it. Please contact your doctor or pharmacist with any questions. Answered by Thu Isa 2 years ago.

fentanyl is a narcotic patch. The medication is absorbed through the skin and it enters the bloodstream. It then acts on your opiod receptors in your body to produce an effect. This effect is used to numb the pain you are feeling. Answered by Olevia Nater 2 years ago.


How much does Fentanyl cost?
Is there a generic? Asked by Jeanelle Macandog 2 years ago.

Fentanyl Patch Cost Answered by Kendall Leatham 2 years ago.

Fentanyl Patch Price Answered by Harrison Rivlin 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much does Fentanyl cost? Is there a generic? Answered by Kathaleen Nouth 2 years ago.

How much dies fentanyl cost I have 100 mcg & 25 mcg every 72 hours . My insurance lapsed and now I m in trouble I need help , quickly, I have 15 days left and then it s cold turkey /withdrawl fir me. I ve been there and swore I d never go back...it pure hell the withdraws . Please answer me, momfreakingoout Answered by Richie Strausner 2 years ago.

There is not a generic for Fentanyl yet. It depends on your insurance or lack there of and where you get your scrips filled on cost. Ball park 40-60$ Answered by Pat Uson 2 years ago.

Not to my knowledge there isn't. I know under my medical plan it was more expensive then what I normally pay. But it is dangerous stuff!!! I only used one patch and ended up taking it off after almost fainting and stop breathing! The stuff is major big time strong!!! Answered by Taisha Nylin 2 years ago.


Withdrawel from Fentanyl?
Hey there. I am a 27 year old male who has ben chewing on 100 MCG Fentaynl patches for 12 days. I have chewed small amounts mainly at night time for RECREATION. I have chewed 3 patches in 13 days. I am planning on stopping and wondering if I am going to have any withdrawls. I have chewed 3 in 13 days. Any help or... Asked by Adah Passero 2 years ago.

Hey there. I am a 27 year old male who has ben chewing on 100 MCG Fentaynl patches for 12 days. I have chewed small amounts mainly at night time for RECREATION. I have chewed 3 patches in 13 days. I am planning on stopping and wondering if I am going to have any withdrawls. I have chewed 3 in 13 days. Any help or sugestions would be great. I know I dont need to be chewing on these patches so please no smart comments. I am going to quit, would just like some advice. Answered by Marco Kizzia 2 years ago.

Fentanyl is stronger that morphine. Both are opiates, and yes, you will probably go through withdrawal and it won't be fun. Count yourself fortunate that you did not accidentally overdose yourself, because 100 mcg of fentanyl is a lot of narcotic! You say you know it's not good for you, but it can kill you taking so much. Go to web sites like Mayo Clinic, Web Md to see what withdrawal will entail. You may need to go to the ER if you get really sick. Answered by Magen Dagraca 2 years ago.

yes you will have withdrwals, fetanyl is a very strong drug. i wish you luck. btw how did you get your hands on it in the first place? Answered by Lieselotte Comber 2 years ago.


Why was the drug "fentanyl" recalled?
I cannot find it anywhere. Anyone know, perhaps? Asked by Bulah Duffie 2 years ago.

Fentanyl makers have recalled transdermal skin patches due to faulty manufacturing . Fentanyl is an opiate pain killer nearly 100 times stronger than morphine. Damaged patches can cause a deadly overdose of the medication. In the last few years, numerous recalls have plagued Johnson & Johnson and their subsidiaries who are makers and distributors of Fentanyl. The latest recall was declared by the PriCara division of Ortho-MacNeil-Janssen Pharmaceuticals, a Johnson & Johnson unit and Sandoz. Two separate lots of pain patches using Fentanyl in 50 mcg were affected – one lot was sold under the brand name Duragesic skin patches and the other was generic. In these lots, cuts in the patches could release the potent Fentanyl gel unexpectedly into the pouch, making them deadly for users, caregivers or medical workers – basically anyone coming into contact with the skin patches. Answered by Lera Kaster 2 years ago.


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