Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018152/001.

Names and composition

"ESKALITH CR" is the commercial name of a drug composed of LITHIUM CARBONATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018152/001 ESKALITH CR LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016782/001 LITHONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
016834/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
016860/001 ESKALITH LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
016980/001 LITHOTABS LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
017812/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
017812/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
017812/003 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
017971/001 ESKALITH LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018027/001 LITHOBID LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
018152/001 ESKALITH CR LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018558/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018833/001 LITHANE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070407/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
072542/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
076121/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
076170/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076243/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
076243/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
076366/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG
076382/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076490/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG
076691/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG
076795/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
076823/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
076823/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
076823/003 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
076832/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
078715/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
078763/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
079139/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
079139/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
079139/003 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
079159/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
079159/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
079159/003 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
090702/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
090702/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
090702/003 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
091027/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
091544/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
091616/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG
202219/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG
202288/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
204445/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
204779/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
205532/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
205663/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG

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Answered questions

Help please...meds question.......?
my dic switched my meds from lithoid 300 mg twice a day to eskalith cr 450 mg 2 and 1/2 daily...i am scared to start these meds whats the difference when they are both lithium and could i have an allergic reaction even though i didnt to the first med...help! Asked by Leena Klay 1 year ago.

Anything you worry about you should look up on WebMd, if you doc can't help you. You shouldn't need to stress about a med. I have taken meds that had the doses changed. Really Look into it. Answered by Johnny Trester 1 year ago.

Definitely contact your doctor's office, but your pharmacist can also help give you some information. From what you've stated here, it sounds like you're basically just taking a higher dose of the same medication (?). But if you really are not comfortable, the best thing to do (in my opinion) is ask your doctor as soon as you can, but don't stop your old meds in the meantime as this might cause you more problems. Answered by Keith Corriher 1 year ago.

It always bothers me that doctors prescribe drugs that have effects on the brain and don't realize that it might be a good idea to observe the patient to check for any adverse reactions before they get sent home with their new meds or med regime. If you are worried, don't take the medicine until you have talked it over with your doctor about any side effects you might experience. Also be sure to tell him about any other medications you are taking and any other medical conditions you may have. My mom had BPD, so I have an idea of what you are going through - best of luck to you. Answered by Angel Mcdaniel 1 year ago.

OK asking medical questions to a bunch of strangers on the Internet clearly shows that the original problem persists. Here's the 411: Do as the Doctor prescribes; chances are that he knows better than us. Answered by Allegra Bulisco 1 year ago.

If I remember correctly Eskalith is a generic name for Lithium. There shouldn't be any problem with you switching medications as prescribed. If you have questions about your medications, you should contact your doctor's office. Answered by Myung Kanish 1 year ago.

Lithobid is another name for Eskalith There should not be any allergic reaction to the LiCO3 salt. Answered by Theresia Tress 1 year ago.

Talk to your doc. If I were you I would put little stock in what I find on the internet. Answered by Mariella Schayer 1 year ago.

see another MD Answered by Katerine Thode 1 year ago.


If your on celexa (the medication)......?
is there anything that your not supposed to combine with it? (like vitamins, certain foods, caffeine, anything?!) Asked by Carey Vanhoutte 1 year ago.

Medication (in alphabetical order); Major Interactions 5-HTP, 5-hydroxytryptophan, Actiq, Acutrim 16 Hour, Acutrim II, Maximum Strength, Acutrim Late Day, Adapin, Adipex-P, Adipost, Alfenta, alfentanil, almotriptan, Amerge, amitriptyline, amoxapine, amphetamine, Anafranil, Anorex-SR, Aplenzin, Appecon, Asendin, Atapryl, Aventyl HCl, Axert, Azilect, Babee Cof, Balminil DM, Balminil DM Pour Enfants, Balminil DM Sans Sucrose, Benadryl for the Family Dry Forte, Benylin, Benylin Adult Formula, Benylin DM, Benylin DM Pediatric, Benylin Dry Coughs, Benylin Pediatric, benzphetamine, Bisolvon Dry, Bisolvon Dry Junior, Bontril PDM, Bontril Slow Release, Buckley's Mixture Cough Suppressant, Buckleys Mixture, Budeprion SR, Budeprion XL, buPROPion, buPROPion 24 hour extended release, buPROPion extended release, BuSpar, BuSpar Dividose, busPIRone, Calmylin, Carbex, Chem Mart Tramadol, clomiPRAMINE, Contac Cough, Control, Cough Relief, Cough Syrup DM, Covonia Bronchial Balsam, Creo-Terpin, Creomulsion, Creomulsion Children, Cymbalta, D.H.E. 45, Darvon, Darvon-N, Delsym, Delsym 12 Hour Cough Relief, Delsym 12 Hour Cough Relief for Children & Adults, Demerol HCl, desipramine, Desoxyn, Desoxyn Gradumet, desvenlafaxine, Desyrel, Desyrel Dividose, DexAlone, Dexatrim, Dexatrim Caffeine Free, Dexedrine, Dexedrine Spansule, dexfenfluramine, Dexi-Tuss, dextroamphetamine, dextroamphetamine extended release, dextromethorphan, dextromethorphan extended release, Dextromethorphan HBr Adult Formula, Dextrostat, Didrex, diethylpropion, diethylpropion extended release, dihydroergotamine, dihydroergotamine nasal, Dimetapp Cold Cough & Flu Day & Night Liquid Caps, doxepin, doxepin topical, Dristan DM, Dromadol SR, Dromadol XL, Dry Cough, duloxetine, Duragesic, Duragesic-100, Duragesic-12, Duragesic-25, Duragesic-50, Duragesic-75, Effexor, Effexor XR, Elavil, Eldepryl, eletriptan, Elixsure Cough, Empro, Emsam, Endep, ephedra, Ergomar, ergotamine, Eskalith, Eskalith-CR, Fastin, fenfluramine, fentanyl, fentanyl topical, Fentora, Frova, frovatriptan, furazolidone, Furoxone, GenRx Tramadol, GHB, Hold DM, hypericum perforatum, imipramine, imipramine pamoate, Imitrex, Imitrex Nasal, Imitrex Statdose, Imitrex Statdose Refill, iohexol, Ionamin, Ionsys, iopamidol, Iopamidol-370, isocarboxazid, Isovue-128, Isovue-200, Isovue-250, Isovue-300, Isovue-370, Isovue-M-200, Isovue-M-300, Jack & Jill Thin Strips Cough, Jumex, l-tryptophan, Larapam SR, levomethadyl acetate, linezolid, lisdexamfetamine, lithium, lithium carbonate, lithium carbonate extended release, lithium citrate, Lithobid, Lithonate, Lithotabs, Lloydspharmacy Dry Adult Cough, ma huang, Marplan, Matulane, Maxalt, Maxalt-MLT, Mazanor, mazindol, Mega-Trim, Melfiat, Mellaril, Mellaril-S, meperidine, Meridia, methamphetamine, methamphetamine extended release, metrizamide, Migranal, milnacipran, mirtazapine, Myelo-Kit, naratriptan, Nardil, nefazodone, Neocitran Thin Strips Cough, Norpramin, nortriptyline, Novahistine DM, Nucosef DM, Obephen, Obezine, Oby-Cap, Oby-Trim, Omnipaque 140, Omnipaque 180, Omnipaque 180 Redi-Unit, Omnipaque 210, Omnipaque 240, Omnipaque 240 Redi-Unit, Omnipaque 300, Omnipaque 350, Omnipaque Flexipak, Orap, Orlaam, Pamelor, Panshape M, Parnate, Pedia Relief, Pediacare, pentazocine, Pertussin CS Childrens, Pertussin DM, Pertussin ES, Phendiet, Phendiet-105, phendimetrazine, phendimetrazine extended release, phenelzine, Phentercot, phentermine, phentermine hydrochloride, phentermine hydrochloride extended release, phentermine resin extended release, Phentride, Phenyldrine, phenylpropanolamine, pimozide, Plegine, Pondimin, PP-Cap, Prelu-2, Pristiq, Pro-Fast HS, Pro-Fast SA, Pro-Fast SR, procarbazine, Propagest, Propan, propoxyphene, propoxyphene hydrochloride, propoxyphene napsylate, protriptyline, Prudoxin, rasagiline, Redux, Relpax, Remeron, Remeron SolTab, remifentanil, Rhindecon, rizatriptan, Robafen Cough Liquidgels, Robafen Pediatric Cough & Cold, Robitussin Cough Calmers, Robitussin CoughGels, Robitussin Dry Cough, Robitussin DX Cough Control, Robitussin DX Cough Control Forte, Robitussin DX Dry Cough Forte, Robitussin Honey Cough, Robitussin Junior Persistent Cough, Robitussin Maximum Strength, Robitussin Pediatric Cough Long-Acting, Robitussin Pediatric Cough Suppressant, Robitussin Soft Pastilles, Ryzolt, Sanorex, Savella, Scot-Tussin Diabetic, Scot-Tussin DM Cough Chasers, selegiline, Selgene, Serzone, sibutramine, Silphen DM, Sinequan, sodium biphosphate, sodium oxybate, St. John's wort, St. Joseph Cough Suppressant, Statobex, Strepsils Cough, Strepsils Cough Relief, Sublimaze, Sucrets DM Cough, Sufenta, sufentanil, sumatriptan, sumatriptan nasal, Surmontil, T-Diet, Talwin, Talwin Lactate, Tenuate, Tenuate Dospan, Teramine, Teramine ER, Terry White Chemists Tramadol, Theraflu Thin Strips Cough, thioridazine, Tofranil, Tofranil-PM, traMADOL, traMADOL extended release, Tramahexal, Tramahexal SR, Tramake, Tramake Insts, Tramal, Tramal SR, Tramedo, tranylcypromine Answered by Carole Vansteenberg 1 year ago.

There are no side effects at all. I have gone off of it several times and had no issues, although if you do decide to go back on, all that headache and stuff will come back. If the issue is not being able to pay for them I would like to suggest that i am taking a generic version of celexa called citralopram that only costs 20 dollars for 30 pills at 40mg. I hope i helped you, Answered by Roberto Hendrikson 1 year ago.

Tramahexal Sr 100 Answered by Rodger Tempelton 1 year ago.


Is all Lithium the same?
I have read that Lithium comes in different forms. And, I am taking Lithium Carbonate. Is that a generic form, or just plain Lithium? Sometimes I feel like what I take helps me more than other times, and I wondered if I was taking a low quality type. IF so, what is the best quality to ask for? Asked by Viki Oleveda 1 year ago.

lithium is short for lithium carbonate. there are 2 brands the main one is priadel. dont do any thing until youve had a word with the doc or it could all go pear shaped. are you having blood tests? if not why not? Answered by Serena Waverly 1 year ago.


What meds are prescribed for bi-polar disorder?Also, what are the side effects of the meds?
I'm currently taking nuerontin but it doesn't seem to be helping much. I've heard some bad things about lithium and would rather not take this med. Asked by Lemuel Raglow 1 year ago.

Neurontin is no longer an approved drug for mood stabilization per multiple studies showing that it worked no better than a placebo. I would suggest that you change docs if this is what you are being given for mood stabilizing. On the other hand, Neurontin is promising as an anti-anxiety medication. If this is the reason you are taking it, that would be a different story. Some of the different medications used in the treatment of Bipolar disorder include: * Lisinopril * Carbolity * Cibalith-S * Duralith * Eskalith * Eskalith CR * Liskonium * Lithane * Lithizine * Lithobid * Lithonate * Lithotabs * Olanzapine and Fluoxetine * Symbyax * Quetiapine * Seroquel * Tigabine * Gabitril * Ziprasidone * Geodon Unlabelled alternative drug treatments include: * Gabapentin - used as part of a combination ultreatment * Neurontin - used as part of a combination ultreatment * Selegiline * Apo-Selegiline * Carbex * Dom-Selegiline * Eldepryl * Med-Selegiline * Novo-Selegiline * PMS-Selegiline * Alti-Clonazepam * Clonapam * Gen-Clonazepam * Nu-Clonazepam * PMS-Clonazepam * Rho-Clonazepam * Kenoket * Fazaclo * Gen-Clozapine * Rhoxal-Clozapine * Clopsine * Leponex * Apo-Gabapentin * Novo-Gabapentin * Nu-Gabapentin * PMS-Gabapentin * Levetiracetam * Keppra * Topiramate * Topamax Answered by Alan Schmeling 1 year ago.

You need to check with your physician on this. Everyone is different. The important part is to cooperate with your doctor in finding something that works for you. It is also important for you to get a therapist. Cognitive Behavior therapy has been shown to really help people with Bipolar in their depressed phase especially. Lithium has been pretty safe for most people who use it for centuries and is a mood stabilizer it should be taken(or whatever you are prescribed) constantly and regularly. Get in a habit of taking your meds in the same place at the same time every day. Answered by Drucilla Rochin 1 year ago.

bipolar is a disorder that is composed of mania and depression. Different drugs are prescribed for each one. Lithium is the number one drug that is prescribed for the Manic(hyper) part. Lithium is pretty safe but it does have some serious side effects. You cant take lithium if you are pregnant. Also Lithium can lead to Tremor, Hypothyroidism, Nephrogenic Diabetes insipidus (kidneys dont respond to a hormone (ADH) and you drink a lot, pee a lot). For Depression Usually good old Prozac is given and it has side effects also. Some are : Stomach aches, Sexual dysfunction, hyperthermia (really high body temperature), muscle aches, heart problems Answered by Walker Newbrough 1 year ago.

maybe some luvox and/or valpro,I'm not a doctor, but they help with depression which is similar! Keep in touch with your doctor, let him know of side affects. Everyone is different and react different! Answered by Macie Wachsman 1 year ago.

a good slap usually cures it... Answered by Mario Mcennis 1 year ago.


I'm researching bipolar disorder especially on teens, can anyone please help me?
I'm researching bipolar disorder and I'm most interested on how it affects teens. How often do mood swings occur? I've researched on the internet and read a lot about it but any additional information would be apreciated. Anything that helps me to understand what goes on the head of people with bipolar... Asked by Celinda Belt 1 year ago.

I'm researching bipolar disorder and I'm most interested on how it affects teens. How often do mood swings occur? I've researched on the internet and read a lot about it but any additional information would be apreciated. Anything that helps me to understand what goes on the head of people with bipolar disorder. And what medicines are often used, I have a list of some of them but I'm not sure they're right. Answered by Burton Himanga 1 year ago.

I am 16, and was diagnosed with bipolar May-ish of 2007. I had symptoms of bipolar since my early teens, and suffered from severe depression for several years. My hypomanic episodes became apparent around 14, but I began to have frustrating, miserable mixed episodes more than the wonderful manias. I am primarily depressive, but it seems that every couple of months I will be hypomanic for one to several weeks. I have yet to have a florid mania, which is expected when you are primarily depressed and have mixed episodes, although it is not unlikely that I will experience a full mania later on in life. I will be on medication for the rest of my life. Common medications I know of: Lamictal (lamotrogine) which I am on Eskalith (lithium) which I am on Abilify My brain stopped working... I will remember more in about 2 minutes! :) Many people, particularly with bipolar II (me) are also prescribed antidepressants... and there is a ton of those. I have taken Remeron and Celexa, and some other one I can't remember. Sleep aids are not uncommon, either, because sleep has been proven to greatly affect those with bipolar. When we are hypomanic we get little sleep if any, and this can aggravate the episode. I do not sleep in severe depressions, either, due to the thinking of life and existence and suicide incessantly through the night. I have taken Lunesta (tastes HORRIBLE,) Ambien, Ambien CR, and something with melatonin. Ambien did cause hallucinations and sleepwalking. Being a teenager with bipolar does give you a different perspective on things... you know teens always have mood swings due to hormones and such, but you have to understand that yours are 100x more extreme, and for me they are often dangerous. You will have to suffer through yours the rest of your life. School can be difficult, particularly in the depressive states. Education, life, everything becomes pointless, and you watch numbly as your hard work vanishes and becomes a 2% overall grade. Then you are slapped in the face once the cloud is lifted and overwhelmed by the devastation your disease has caused. Life seems hopeless... this is a foreshadowing of the rest of your projectedly pitiful life. Then you get to a hypomania, and you begin to kickass in school and feel so amazingly wonderful and energized and full of life, as if nothing will stop you. You forget about being bipolar, you forget about misery and depression. You bask in the ecstasy. Nothing is impossible. And then you crash. The cycle continues. You learn to communicate with teachers and employers and friends (the few that you still have after various episodes) about what is going on. You confront the humiliation of telling an authority figure that you are bipolar, knowing they will have a warped idea of what the disorder is. You then will have to explain in great detail the truth of the disease and the severity it can hold. You grow up a lot quicker, it seems, as an adolescent with bipolar than your average teen. You learn a lot about life, its opposite, and the powers of the brain. You deal with depression, anxiety, anger, and elation, sometimes all at once. Sometimes it is unfathomable that you can possibly survive the next episode... you have no control over what your mind will do to you this time. All you can do is hope and hope and hope for a pure hypomania, with its wonders and greatness, and hope for an absense of a crash. It is hard not to wish for that AMAZING feeling everyday, and dreading the deadly onset of depression or a mixed episode. Statistic: At least 50% of all people with bipolar will commit suicide. Lovely, huh? Hope this helped in the slightest degree, Anna Answered by Nicolette Akapo 1 year ago.

Hi I'm 13, I discovered that I'm bipolar at the age of 8. Bipolar disorder is very hard. My mood swings happen every 5-10 minutes, I'm not exaggerating one minute I'm happy go lucky the other I want to kill myself and everyone around me. I also have depression Mia and Ana are kind of plotting against me. So anyway I am happy with my friends laughing my bum off but then I think of my dead grandfather whom I've never even met and I'm a crying mess. Just the mere thought of something happy/sad/depressing/cheering my mood immediately shifts. I take Omega 3+ and that's about it actually. It really helps and I stay away from lentils. Although my therapist said to stay away from apples, they're my favorite so I still eat them, hope I've helped! Answered by Kent Novack 1 year ago.

Hi there, I was diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder last April. One thing that happened with me is that I went through a sort of grieving process. I understand I'm still the same person, but I was fire mad that I had a disorder that requires medication for the rest of my life. I'm 32 years old, but my doctor stated that he feels that based on my information I had onset in my teen years. My life from my teens til the present has been filled with times where I have gotten a lot accomplished along with times where I have been dead to the world. It can wreak havoc on ones self-esteem and sense of purpose. I have had mood swings back and forth in one day...literally moment to moment, and I have also suffered from long bouts of depression with spikes of great energy, other days I can be just plain irritable. I must say that I think we have finally found the right type and dosage of medication. I am on Geodon and Lamictal. Both are great b/c they stabilize my mood, I'm able to get much accomplished, and especially since I started Lamictal I don't want to retreat to the couch in the middle of the day when I should be doing something productive ( like doing Yahoo Answers...hey at least I'm interacting with humans:) Anyway, just understand that it can truly take time to find the right mix of meds for a person. And Bipolar can look very different in one person to the next, it's a mixture of symptoms each with their own scale of severity. Don't be afraid to discuss all feelings with the psychiatrist so they can better gauge how the medicine is working. That is the key to a successful plan, trust me, we had to tweak a few things with mine before I got a nice therapeutic effect. Also, check out NAMI, a non profit that provides free local support groups so you can learn about resources in your own area from people who have experience with those resources. Best of luck and if you have any question feel free to contact me via email at ms.magicwand@yahoo.com Dara Answered by Elbert Defranceschi 1 year ago.

When working with teens that are diagnosed with Bi-Polar disorder (even though it is rare) they have a really hard time understanding it. The lack the insight into what this disorder does to their lives. They often times do not want to take medications because of how they make them feel. Answered by Cassaundra Montas 1 year ago.

Children and teenagers with Bipolar Disorder have manic and/or depressive symptoms. Some may have mostly depression and others a combination of manic and depressive symptoms. Highs may alternate with lows. Research has improved the ability to diagnose Bipolar Disorder in children and teens. Bipolar Disorder can begin in childhood and during the teenage years, although it is usually diagnosed in adult life. The illness can affect anyone. However, if one or both parents have Bipolar Disorder, the chances are greater that their children may develop the disorder. Family history of drug or alcohol abuse also may be associated with greater risk for Bipolar Disorder. Manic symptoms include: * severe changes in mood-either unusually happy or silly, or very irritable, angry, agitated or aggressive * unrealistic highs in self-esteem - for example, a teenager who feels all powerful or like a superhero with special powers * great increase in energy and the ability to go with little or no sleep for days without feeling tired * increase in talking - the adolescent talks too much, too fast, changes topics too quickly, and cannot be interrupted * distractibility - the teen's attention moves constantly from one thing to the next * repeated high risk-taking behavior; such as, abusing alcohol and drugs, reckless driving, or sexual promiscuity Depressive symptoms include: * irritability, depressed mood, persistent sadness, frequent crying * thoughts of death or suicide * loss of enjoyment in favorite activities * frequent complaints of physical illnesses such as headaches or stomach aches * low energy level, fatigue, poor concentration, complaints of boredom * major change in eating or sleeping patterns, such as oversleeping or overeating Some of these signs are similar to those that occur in teenagers with other problems such as drug abuse, delinquency, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, or even schizophrenia. Teenagers with Bipolar Disorder can be effectively treated. Treatment for Bipolar Disorder usually includes education of the patient and the family about the illness, mood stabilizing medications such as lithium and valproic acid, and psychotherapy. Mood stabilizing medications often reduce the number and severity of manic episodes, and also help to prevent depression. Psychotherapy helps the child understand himself or herself, adapt to stresses, rebuild self-esteem and improve relationships. The diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder in children and teens is complex and involves careful observation over an extended period of time. A thorough evaluation by a child and adolescent psychiatrist identify Bipolar Disorder and start treatment. Answered by Trista Simuel 1 year ago.

as a teen, my mood swings were usually: hypomanic=2-3weeks, depressed=8+months! Answered by Mariella Lamoree 1 year ago.

check out www.dbsalliance.org they have information regarding teen and BP along with chat rooms Answered by Kareen Dauila 1 year ago.

This is a good site.. www.panicsurvivor.com Answered by Jan Chieffo 1 year ago.


Kleptomaniac please help!?
I need to know if there is any place on line that i can get help with my kleptomaniac,or if anyone knows steps i can take for treatment,im 15 so i can take any counseling courses or get drugs so please help! Asked by Rusty Holthouse 1 year ago.

Kleptomania is the irresistible urge to steal items that you don't really need and that usually have little value. It's a serious mental health disorder that can tear your life apart if not treated. Kleptomania is a type of impulse control disorder — a disorder in which you can't resist the temptation or drive to perform an act that's harmful to you or someone else. Many people with kleptomania live lives of secret shame because they're afraid to seek mental health treatment. Although there's no cure for kleptomania, treatment with medication or psychotherapy may be able to help end the cycle of compulsive stealing. There's little solid scientific research about using psychiatric medications to treat kleptomania. However, some studies have suggested that certain medications may be helpful. Which medication is best for you depends on your overall situation and other conditions you may have, such as depression or obsessive-compulsive disorder. You may benefit from taking a combination of medications. Medications to consider include: Antidepressants. Those most commonly used to treat kleptomania are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). These include fluoxetine (Prozac, Prozac Weekly), paroxetine (Paxil, Paxil CR), fluvoxamine and others. However, there have been a few case reports of SSRIs actually triggering kleptomania symptoms. Talk to your doctor about your concerns and coping with side effects of antidepressants. Mood stabilizers. These medications are meant to even out your mood so that you don't have rapid or uneven changes that may trigger urges to steal. Some evidence suggests that lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid) may be helpful. Benzodiazepines. These medications are central nervous system depressants, also called tranquilizers. They include clonazepam (Klonopin) and alprazolam (Xanax, Niravam). The effectiveness of benzodiazepines often varies, and they may be habit-forming — causing mental or physical dependence, especially when taken for a long time or in high doses. Anti-seizure medications. Although originally intended for seizure disorders, these medications have shown benefits in certain mental health disorders, possibly including kleptomania. Some studies have shown benefits from topiramate (Topamax) and valproic acid (Depakene, Stavzor). Addiction medications. Naltrexone (Revia), known technically as an opioid antagonist, blocks the part of your brain that feels pleasure with certain addictive behaviors. It may reduce the urges and pleasure associated with stealing. You may have to try several different medications or combinations of medications to see what works best for you with the fewest side effects. Keep in mind that it may take several weeks to notice full benefits. Talk to your doctor or mental health provider if you're bothered by side effects. Under his or her guidance, you may be able to switch medications or change your dosage. Many side effects go away on their own with time. Psychotherapy Cognitive behavioral therapy has become the psychotherapy of choice for kleptomania. In general, cognitive behavioral therapy helps you identify unhealthy, negative beliefs and behaviors and replace them with healthy, positive ones. Cognitive behavioral therapy may include these techniques to help you overcome kleptomania urges: Covert sensitization, in which you picture yourself stealing and then facing negative consequences, such as being caught. Aversion therapy, in which you practice mildly painful techniques, such as holding your breath until you become uncomfortable, when you get an urge to steal. Systematic desensitization, in which you practice relaxation techniques and picture yourself controlling urges to steal. Other forms of therapy, such as psychodynamic therapy, family therapy or marriage counseling, also may be helpful. Answered by Marcella Corra 1 year ago.

Your age does not determine whether or not you can see a counselor/therapist/psychiatrist. I am sure there is one at your school that you can talk to. She isn't going to tell your parents, don't worry. As for being too young to take antidepressants or other psychiatric medications, that is simply not true-many 15 year-olds take medication for emotional issues. The combination of these two things is going to be the most effective way of overcoming your compulsive shoplifting problem. Answered by Patrina Tlatenchi 1 year ago.


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