ESKALITH Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016860/001.

Names and composition

"ESKALITH" is the commercial name of a drug composed of LITHIUM CARBONATE.

Answered questions

Quit Lithium (Eskalith) cold turkey?
I have quit my 900 mg a day Eskalith dose cold turkey after being on it for a year and a half. What should I expect? Should I get dizzy? Asked by Veronique Poetker 4 months ago.

i think you needed to ask your doctor before stopping any meds...cold turkey as you say is not ever a good thing with any medication. lithium included! it can cause many withdrawals and unwanted feelings...hope this helps. "" When a person remains well week after week, there is a tendency to forget to take lithium or to deliberately stop taking the medication, believing that the illness has been cured. Lithium's effects, however, last only when patients regularly take the medication. If patients stop taking Lithium-no matter if they've been taking it for 5 weeks or 5 years-the hances of having another manic or depressive attack increase. In fact, patients who stop taking the medication are just as likely as patients who have never been treated to fall back into a manic or depressive episode. This does not mean, though, that all patients must take lithium for a lifetime."" i have been on lithium for about 15years...it works for me. Answered by Suzi Simerly 4 months ago.

Good question. I believe that with enough work spiritually you can get off Lithium but it takes time. Do the work then slowly taper off. *Note: I've taken it for about 5 years and just quit cold turkey 2 weeks ago. I was taking 625mg a day. Not smart, but I did. The problem is that the kidneys are affected by Lithium, therefore your blood must be tested regularly. The first week I was angrier and more egotistical and the 2nd I believe I had physical withdrawal of feeling completely exhausted, a small fever, hard to hold food down, and weird colored stools. I am just beginning to feel better. I have been practicing different behaviors and healthier lifestyle while I was on it, so being off it, I feel pretty good. The physical part scared me bc/I'm 35 and in great shape. Do it slowly. -FrazierHughes.com Answered by Natalya Mcfatten 4 months ago.

I did the same thing, and it was hell. I got nauseas/dizzy, and my balance got thrown off. Then I started going off in rages and getting insanely angry and irritated, and then crashing to a dehabilitating depression. I was saving the lithium meanwhile, so that I could OD when I had enough. I ended up turning myself into my doctors before I did it, but now I have to be watched that I swallow all of my meds every time. It sucks.... it is absolute hell. All of the old symptoms return tenfold. It seems like a good idea now, but it f-cking sucks. Answered by Trena Ermitanio 4 months ago.


Question about a medication......?
What exactly is the medication Eskalith used to treat. I know that it has something to do with Bipolar Disorder, but what does it do? Thank you Asked by Jesse Tranter 4 months ago.

Eskalith is basically lithium which is a mood stabilizer used to treat person with bipolar disorder. The current mechanism of action is unknown. Answered by Dorthey Nakamatsu 4 months ago.

My son used to be identified with ADD. Fortunately, he used to be now not hyperactive. That being the change. Behavior amendment labored good for my son considering that he used to be now not Hyperactive. If he have been, we might have long past with the healing. There are such a lot of med choices to be had. It's now not like a few years in the past in which the one alternative used to be Ritalin. Not that Ritalin is a nasty path of meds to make use of, it simply wasn't the correct med for each youngster with ADHD. I might discover the cure with meds. You can consistently give up the meds if there are opposed reactions. You might have got to check out extraordinary meds to uncover the one who exceptional suits your youngster's demands. It's now not an designated technology. As you stated, the cure is as much as the moms and dads, so it kind of feels that the document and the expert are of little support. They are going through your choices. Give them the improvement of the doubt till you spot how the cure works. If you're nonetheless uncomfortable with the general practitioner's endorse or cure, uncover a brand new document and get a moment opinion. Answered by Avery Wilterdink 4 months ago.


What happens when a person is prescribed Eskalith and does not need it?
I was diagnosed with Bi-polar, But I don't have the gene for it. neither my mother or father or siblings have it. Asked by Marquetta Moneyhun 4 months ago.

you know, it is true that the illness usually is an inherant illness. Perhaps you should think about going to a different doctor. I can't help but wonder how if affects you, does it help? Many people simply don't want to be branded as having anything wrong, and actually like the manic stage of the conditon. I hope you can find a good balance. If you really feel you do not need it, please find another doctor and get another opinon. Answered by Cody Ostrosky 4 months ago.

I would strongly suggest a 2nd opinion. I was diagnosed with Bipolar for over a decade when I truly had a developmental disorder. I also had no family history of Bipolar. Taking Lithium when you don't really have Bipolar can be dangerous. I now exhibit more Bipolar symptoms than I ever did before taking Lithium and antidepressants. If you do truly have Bipolar, Lithium is always the best course of treatment to start with because it is not a chemical concoction. It should also be kept in mind that true mania is not something most people with Bipolar experience. It is much more common to rapid cycle between depression and feeling normal or hypomanic. One of the problems with Bipolar diagnosis today is that guidelines are far more relaxed. When I was first diagnosed, at least one inpatient hospitalization was a prerequisite set by the DSM. Since that was removed, far more individuals than ever are being diagnosed. This is either the result of more cases really existing, or the industry looking for more profit. It simply depends on how you feel about the mental health care structure. I subscribe to the latter. Answered by Amos Imes 4 months ago.

It doesn't mean you don't have it. It can be caused by other things besides genes. You might be the first in your family to have it. Try it. It might make you feel a whole lot better. And if it doesn't talk to your doctor about other options. But give it some time to work. P.S. Nothing bad will happen to you from taking it. Answered by Joya Ammirata 4 months ago.

my sister was diagnosed with it after spending 45 Min's with a psychiatrist I know she definitely does not have it as i have lIved with at least 4 people who do have it and ive never seen my sis on a high so maybe if you dont think you have it either you should ask for a different doc. its not always inherited tho Answered by Kayla Trapeni 4 months ago.


Is weight gain a very common effect of lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid)?
but i mean is it just an increase in appetite, because i can deal with that or is it some chemical thing that makes your body just gain 30 pounds in a few weeks, even if you eat as much as you used to? Asked by Cherie Ruggerio 4 months ago.

yes its chemical, iam on depokte and it hs made me gain alot these pills tend to work on something in the brain kinda of like whe you smoke pot and get the munchies Answered by Karisa Maheux 4 months ago.

When I was on lithium it didn't make me gain any weight it just made me really thirsty all the time. I do have other meds that cause weight gain which is not due becuase I eat more just kind of happens. Answered by Kelley Lecaros 4 months ago.


I found meds for mania. Is my dad bipolar?
While cleaning the kitchen, i opened a drawer and found several prescription meds belonging to my dad. i identified several as sleeping aids from various times, and i know my dad has problems sleeping. But i also found meds used to treat bipolarmania, such as eskalith and risperdal. My dad has a quick temper but... Asked by Nelson Kivela 4 months ago.

While cleaning the kitchen, i opened a drawer and found several prescription meds belonging to my dad. i identified several as sleeping aids from various times, and i know my dad has problems sleeping. But i also found meds used to treat bipolarmania, such as eskalith and risperdal. My dad has a quick temper but he's kind and not the sort i would've thought to have biplormania. Does he have it? What do these medications indicate? Answered by Jannette Songster 4 months ago.

Risperadal and eskalith are often used to treat bipolar, but they may have other applications as well. You might want to check out drugs.com, where they have lots of information about all the different meds. Also, one of my favorite sites has online experts therapists 24/7 to answer your questions; if you want to check it out, the link is below: Answered by Claris Fera 4 months ago.

They do probably indicate that he is bipolar - Lithium is not used to treat anything else...... We are very normal when we stay on our meds and being bipolar does not automatically mean that someone is mean or violent. Since your dad seems to have everything under control I would say to not worry about it. If he hasn't told you then he has his reasons....... Probably because people look at you differently after they know. Look at how your own feelings for him have become confused...... He hasn't changed, he hasn't done a thing.......... Your perception has changed because you saw a pill bottle. Answered by Dixie Kitch 4 months ago.

good im bipolar i additionally might run out of meds and no longer have time to replenish however due to the fact that it does keep in ur process for a couple of days principally if he used to be consistant he will have to be adequate for a at the same time it simply will depend on the severity. I paintings @ the drugstore and in a few circumstances the pharmacist sells sufferers a couple of"loaner" drugs whilst it is circumstances like those or remedy that they consistently will want refills on. god bless Answered by Honey Langley 4 months ago.

They may not indicate anything. Some drugs are used to treat a wide range of diseases. It would be best to talk to your dad and find out exactly what they were prescribed for. Answered by Hannah Wiebusch 4 months ago.


Lithium..................?
i took lithium carb for about 2 months and 2 weeks ago my coc switched me to lithium eskalith. i have been told that these drugs can take up to 3 months to theraputically work...so have i basically like started over? Asked by Odette Patriss 4 months ago.

Not really. (I'm not a doctor, but I've been through it) The issue is really, what is the half life of carb. Because just like the fact eskalith takes 3 months to fully take affect, I'm pretty sure carb takes 2 months to exit the system fully. I'm not promising you that it will be perfect, but hopefully the latter will kick in as the first one is wearing off. Pay attention to your moods, your thoughts, and your body. There is a withdraw from the drugs, and new side affects for the new one. Be patient, be safe, and even if it sucks now, remember that feeling better is worth it. Good luck. Answered by Steve Brogdon 4 months ago.

I have an immediate family member who has taken both of these meds. He took lithium carbinate for several years, then was switched to eskalith (sp?) directly. None of us noticed any change in his behavior, so I assume you're not "starting over." Check with your doctor right away if you feel strange, or you have any mood swings. I do remember he was more tired than usual, though. I hope this helps. Answered by Marhta Mendrin 4 months ago.

They are the same base drug there should be little or no lag time for theraputic effects. Unless the dosing is incorrect Answered by Maryanne Bouffard 4 months ago.

eskalith and lithium are the same thing. Answered by Hellen Edgington 4 months ago.


What are the long term affects of bipolar disorder?
What does lithium do to your body? And what other mental illness can also be confused with bipolar disorder? Asked by Bo Kanney 4 months ago.

Lithium Active Ingredients: Lithium Representative Names: Eskalith, Lithane, Lithonate, Lithotabs Available Product Images: What are lithium tablets or capsules? What should my health care professional know before I take lithium? How should I take this medicine? What if I miss a dose? What drug(s) may interact with lithium? What side effects may I notice from taking lithium? What should I watch for while taking lithium? Where can I keep my medicine? What are lithium tablets or capsules? (Back to top) LITHIUM (Eskalith®, Lithonate®, Lithane®, Lithotabs®) helps to control extreme mood swings in manic-depressive illness. Lithium helps you to maintain a more balanced state, without swinging from a highly elated, over-excited state to that of being very sad and depressed. Lithium can prevent or reduce these episodes. Generic lithium tablets or capsules are available. What should my health care professional know before I take lithium? (Back to top) They need to know if you have any of these conditions: •dehydration (diarrhea or sweating) •heart or blood vessel disease •kidney disease •leukemia •low level of salt in the blood, or low-salt diet •Parkinson's disease •psoriasis •seizures (convulsions) •under-active thyroid, or thyroid disease •an unusual or allergic reaction to lithium, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives •pregnant or trying to get pregnant •breast-feeding How should I take this medicine? (Back to top) Take lithium tablets or capsules by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Swallow the tablets or capsules with a drink of water. Take after a meal or snack to avoid stomach upset. Take your doses at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on your prescriber's advice. Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. Elderly patients over age 65 years may have a stronger reaction to this medicine and need smaller doses. What if I miss a dose? (Back to top) If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose (less than 2 hours), take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses. What drug(s) may interact with lithium? (Back to top) •antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen, or COX-2 inhibitors, such as celecoxib) •caffeine •calcium iodide •carbamazepine •filgrastim, G-CSF, or pegfilgrastim •guarana •medicines for diabetes •medicines for high blood pressure •medicines for mental problems and psychotic disturbances •metronidazole •potassium iodide, KI •sodium bicarbonate •sodium chloride •verapamil •water pills Tell your prescriber or health care professional about all other medicines you are taking, including non-prescription medicines, nutritional supplements, or herbal products. Also tell your prescriber or health care professional if you are a frequent user of drinks with caffeine or alcohol, if you smoke, or if you use illegal drugs. These may affect the way your medicine works. Check with your health care professional before stopping or starting any of your medicines. What side effects may I notice from taking lithium? (Back to top) Side effects that you should report to your prescriber or health care professional as soon as possible: More common: •diarrhea •drowsiness •loss of appetite •muscle weakness •nausea, vomiting •slurred speech These symptoms can progress to: •blurred vision •clumsiness or loss of balance •confusion •dizziness •seizures •trembling Rare or uncommon: •difficulty speaking or swallowing •fainting •hair loss •hoarseness •slow, fast, or irregular heartbeat (palpitations) •pain, coldness, or blue coloration of fingers or toes •rough, dry skin •sensitivity to cold •swelling in the neck •unusual tiredness or weakness •unusual weight gain Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your prescriber or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome): •increased thirst •increased frequency and urgency to pass urine •muscle twitches •nausea •skin rash •stomach bloating, full feeling •trembling of the hands What should I watch for while taking lithium? (Back to top) Visit your prescriber or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. It can take several weeks of treatment to get improvement in your condition. You must continue to take lithium at regular intervals even when your symptoms are better. Do not stop taking lithium except on your prescriber's advice. The amount of lithium you take is very important. Taking more than the prescribed dose can cause serious side effects. The amount of salt (sodium) in your body influences the effects of lithium, and lithium can increase salt loss from the body. Eat a normal diet that includes salt. Do not change to salt substitutes. Avoid changes involving diet, or medications that include large amounts of sodium (such as sodium bicarbonate). Ask your prescriber or health care professional for advice if you are not sure. Drink plenty of fluids while you are taking lithium. Avoid drinks that contain caffeine, such as coffee, tea and colas. You will need extra fluids if you have diarrhea or sweat a lot. This will help prevent toxic effects from lithium. Be careful not to get overheated during exercise, saunas, hot baths, and hot weather. Consult your prescriber or health care professional if you have a high fever or persistent diarrhea. You may get dizzy, drowsy, or have blurred vision. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how lithium affects you. Make sure that family members or friends know of early signs of lithium toxicity (see side effects above). If you are going to have surgery, tell your prescriber or health care professional that you are taking lithium. Where can I keep my medicine? (Back to top) Keep out of the reach of children in a container that small children cannot open. Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Keep container tightly closed. Protect from light. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date. Lithium is one of the best drugs to use for bipolar disorder because it helps to manage the mania and depression associated with it. You just have to be careful because there is a small range between the therapeutic levels and the levels of toxicity Answered by Emmanuel Borsari 4 months ago.

As someone who is bipolar, and not taking meds, I would have to say that unless you have a religious calling (are very devout and can depend on that to keep from committing suicide or becoming sociopathic) you are better off getting a proper prescription to stabilize you. Personally, I believe that God made me this way for a reason, and the visions that I have when I am manic are not necessarily a bad thing. More often than not, the clarity that I have when manic, even though I see things that other people don't, allows me to see things that almost always turn out to be true. When I am in fellowship with other Christians, it gives me enough strength to endure the pain that comes with the chronic depressions. I have pretty much given up the hope of ever having a normal life, but I hold on to the belief that there is a reason for it. Without that support and religious devotion, I would have surely committed suicide. Just so you know, the depressions were much milder when I was young... not much more than a normal teenage angst. If you try to live without medication, you absolutely MUST have the love and support of friends and family, and I wouldn't do it unless you feel that you have a religious calling, because it certainly will prevent you from having normal relationships with people. If you want to have a normal life, you should see a doctor and a psychiatrist and get a proper prescription. Answered by Corrine Kragh 4 months ago.

Lithium is one of the best drugs to use for bipolar disorder because it helps to manage the mania and depression associated with it. You just have to be careful because there is a small range between the therapeutic levels and the levels of toxicity. Answered by Kimberely Stabell 4 months ago.

Psychotic mania and psychotic depression will end you up in a loony bin before you kill yourself Answered by Shayla Marello 4 months ago.


What meds are best for bipolar with mania?
i need to be stable.i have children. Asked by Gabrielle Spadaccini 4 months ago.

Lithium (Carbolith, Duralith, Lithobid, Lithizine, Eskalith, Lithane) is one of the standard mood stabilizing drugs for bipolar disorder. Lithium is extremely helpful for most patients and it significantly reduces the rate of hospitalizations in bipolar disorder. Some studies report the following advantages of lithium: Lithium is effective in 60 - 80% of all hypomanic and manic episodes. (Valproate may be better in patients with multiple manic episodes, mixed episodes, and rapid cycling.) It helps to prevent relapses. It helps psychosocial functioning. It may help reduce the risk for suicide regardless of its effects on stabilizing mood. It may act directly on the nerve clusters affecting the circadian rhythm and slow down the cycle of this "biologic clock." (There is some evidence that patients with bipolar disorder have a faster biologic clock.) It works well for most patients even if they have discontinued taking it and wish to restart treatment. Antiseizure drugs, also called anti-epileptics or anticonvulsants, affect the neurotransmitter gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), which helps prevent nerve cells from over-firing. These drugs may be an alternative for patients (especially substance abusers) who do not tolerate or respond to lithium. They also may be used in combination with lithium, atypical antipsychotics, or other drugs. Standard Antiseizure Drugs. Valproate (Depakote), also called valproic acid or divalproex, is now a first option for many bipolar disorder patients. Valproate also helps migraine headaches, a common problem among patients. Lamotrigine (Lamictal) is approved for maintenance treatment of adults with bipolar I disorder. It also appears to be be better for treating bipolar depression than other mood stabilizers. Carbamazepine (Epitol, Tegretol) is a standard alternative antiseizure drug used for mood stabilizing. In 2004, the FDA approved an extended release form of carbamazepine (Equetro). Oxcarbazepine (Trileptal) is another drug that is similar to carbamezepine. Atypical antipsychotics are standard drugs for schizophrenia. They are now proving to be beneficial for bipolar disorder when used alone or in combination with the mood stabilizers that treat mania. These drugs include clozapine (Clozaril) (the first atypical antipsychotic), olanzapine (Zyprexa), risperidone (Risperdal), quetiapine (Seroquel), aripiprazole (Abilify) and ziprasidone (Geodon). Olanzapine was the first atypical antipsychotic approved for treatment of bipolar disorder. In 2000, the FDA approved it to treat bipolar mania and mixed states. In 2004, the drug became the first atypical antipsychotic approved for bipolar maintenance treatment. Symbyax, a drug that combines olanzapine and the antidepressant fluoxetine, was approved in 2003 for treatment of bipolar depression. Risperidone, ziprasidone, and ariprazole have been approved for treatment of bipolar mania and mixed states. Quetiapine is approved only for treatment of bipolar mania but is also being investigated for bipolar depression. Clozapine has not yet been approved for treatment of bipolar disorder, but has shown promise in investigative studies. However, this drug has more significant side effects than other atypical antipsychotics. It poses a risk of white blood cell reduction (agranulocytosis) and has the highest risk of weight gain of all atypicals. Antidepressants are sometimes used for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder, but their use is controversial. They trigger mania in 12 - 28% of patients. In addition, a number of studies report no additional benefits from antidepressants. A 2002 study suggested that they may be helpful for patients whose depression occurs after an episode-free period (rather than after a manic or hypomanic episode.) Specific antidepressants may be beneficial in certain circumstances. However, any patient on antidepressants who develops symptoms of hypomania should stop taking these drugs, since hypomania is often a sign of impending mania. All antidepressants should be tapered off after the mood has been stabilized for a month. Bupropion. The antidepressant bupropion (Wellbutrin) appears to pose a lower risk for triggering mania than do other antidepressants. Side effects include restlessness, agitation, sleeplessness, headache, rashes, stomach problems, and in rare cases, hallucinations and bizarre thinking. Initial weight loss occurs in about 25% of patients. High doses may cause seizures. This side effect is uncommon and tends to occur in patients with eating disorders (anorexia or bulimia) or those with risk factors for seizures. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as fluoxetine (Prozac), citalopram (Celexa), sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), are sometimes used to treat bipolar depression, but their benefits have not yet been established. They may be useful in patients whose depression does not respond to lithium; they do not appear to be useful as an add-on treatment to lithium. Answered by Veronique Bison 4 months ago.

Wow i feel for you i once lived with a Bipolar person and know a few more and grew up with my older sister being Bipolar as well (at that time they did not know what it was) some drugs make them much worse but they all had one thing in common and that is smoking pot which seemed to help the best i don't and never did smoke it so i am not saying that because i believe in it but it seemed to work the best hope this helps Michael Answered by Hattie Raycroft 4 months ago.

I have bipolar and have been lucky with only one medication. But, others I know have taken the same medication and haven't been that lucky. Everyone is different. And a pill won't cure everything. Therapy and other types of therapy need to be addressed as well when taking meds. Answered by Eric Briddick 4 months ago.

Lithium. Eflexor-8. Answered by Yadira Sommerville 4 months ago.

Only your doctor can tell you what is best for you. I could give you a whole list of medications used for these conditions. But a doctor needs to evaluate your symptoms and decide what medications are best for you. Check out these web sites for Bipolar disease and Mania www.webmd.com www.medscape.com Answered by Kip Timpson 4 months ago.

That is something you would have to discuss with your doctor. One kind of medication could work great for one person, and not help the other at all. Doctors sometimes try different ones until they find one that works. A lot of people don't like the way some medications make them feel, it's all about finding the right one. Answered by Francine Crossland 4 months ago.

My daughter was diagnosed at 17 and lithium worked for almost 10 years for her. In her 30 s and now 40 s so has had to adjust her meds multiple times along with ECT. Recently she was able to ween herself off of all but three drugs, lithium being one of them. She remained stable for 6 months and then she started to have trouble sleeping and lots of anxiety. Unfortunately, she has had to restart clozapine which she feels makes one feel like a walking zombie. It is a day to day battle for those suffering from any form of mental illness. Seeing her continue to fight this demon, makes me extremely proud to call her my daughter. Answered by Lurline Heaps 4 months ago.

we are all different depending on too many factors to name I take lithium, wellbutrin and lexapro it has been working for a long time now good luck and listen to your doctor, don't fight the meds they will help you keep your sanity in the end Answered by Hilma Thingvold 4 months ago.

There is no one med that is best for everyone. What works for me, may not work for you. Paxil and Zoloft are the most popular. Again, they may or may not work for you. Answered by Carley Riculfy 4 months ago.


Has anyone succeeded with seroquel?
My son takes eskalith, risperdal and now seroquel but he seems worse than ever. Anyone succeed with seroquel? Asked by Brigid Hovanec 4 months ago.

I have a friend who has Bipolar Disorder. He appears to be doing well on a combination of Seroquel and Depakote. His condition seems to have improved over the last 2 years or so. Response to a particular medication can be very individual; what works well for one person might not work for another. Some people respond to a certain drug right away, while others have a hard time finding the right drug or drug combination. Be sure to talk to the doctor about it this. I used to take Seroquel for Major Depression; it did help a great deal with my sleep, but I personally thought it was too strong for me and I am doing well on Paxil alone. My job is very understanding if I have to be late, so I don't think my sleep is that big of a problem. That's just me of course, what works for your son might be very different. Answered by Matha Seay 4 months ago.

Seroquel is a mood stabilizer. There are others out there, but I've been taking Seroquel for three years and it has helped me. Talk to your doctor. It might be that Seroquel isn't what your son needs. The idea is to get your son's behavior under control, not make it worse. Answered by Liliana Conely 4 months ago.

I know everyone reacts differently, but when I was taking the same 3 meds as your son, the doctor was able to determine it was the risperdal that was causing the terrible side effects. Apparently it doesn't work too well with other meds. Seroquel is very, very strong and until your body adjusts to it, it will knock you out cold in less then 10 minutes. It's called a mood stabilizer..but ask anyone and they'll say it's to help them sleep. I loved it once my body adjusted to it, and having a full 8 hours of sleep back made a huge difference in everything. Best of Luck to you and your son! Answered by Loretta Knost 4 months ago.

Hi. I take eskalith (lithium) and seroquel. I love it. It calms me down and really helps calm my mind. It took a while for it to work and I did gain some weight, but I really think it is a great medication. Good luck trying to find the right "cocktail" of medicines. It can be difficult. PS: Actually Seroquel is classified as an anti-psychotic BUT it has mood stabilizing properties. Answered by Sherman Kerstetter 4 months ago.

It all depends on the person's body chemistry. My husband had a severe reaction to seroquel, shaking and chills and his psychiatrist didn't make the connection. On risperdal, he was mouthy, on Prozac with Zyprexa - I actually liked him! He doesn't take any meds for long, though. He can't deal with the fact that he's got a chemical imbalance. Answered by Roslyn Williama 4 months ago.

If the therapy had part results that werent making you consider higher. Call your Dr instantly and or stroll into the health center the following industry day, inform them you ought to get a brand new therapy and check out it .Do say what the unhealthy results had been and ask for a ninety day prescription. Make an appt on the DR workplace for the MONTH that the prescription is due to run out and notice the DR earlier than the meds run out . its your accountability to preserve to peer the Dr in your consistent refills and to file while the drug isn't running for you. He isnt a brain reader. You ought to TELL HIM the entire disorders or matters you've Answered by Ma Founds 4 months ago.

i am bipolar and take lithium, ive been taking seroquel for a few months to help me sleep as i also suffer from insomnia. my moods have been very inbalanced and changing, i would not reccommend seroquel to any body. Answered by Kennith Topolewski 4 months ago.

if your son's medications are not helping him, you probably need to address the situation to your doctor. in my observation, being mentally ill, doctors want to shove all sorts of medications down our throats, and leave it at that.... i have had to switch meds many times, because they don't work properly or "overwork". sometimes doseages need to be adjusted, etc. i hope things work out. your doctor really needs to take the time to work WITH your son! HUGS Answered by Sterling Fetters 4 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016860/001 ESKALITH LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
017971/001 ESKALITH LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016782/001 LITHONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
016834/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
016860/001 ESKALITH LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
016980/001 LITHOTABS LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
017812/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
017812/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
017812/003 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
017971/001 ESKALITH LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018027/001 LITHOBID LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
018152/001 ESKALITH CR LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018558/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018833/001 LITHANE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070407/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
072542/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
076121/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
076170/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076243/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
076243/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
076366/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG
076382/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076490/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG
076691/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG
076795/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
076823/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
076823/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
076823/003 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
076832/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
078715/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
078763/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
079139/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
079139/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
079139/003 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
079159/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
079159/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
079159/003 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
090702/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
090702/002 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
090702/003 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE CAPSULE/ORAL 600MG
091027/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
091544/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
091616/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG
202219/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG
202288/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
204445/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
204779/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
205532/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
205663/001 LITHIUM CARBONATE LITHIUM CARBONATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 450MG

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