Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 011793/005.

Names and composition

"ESIDRIX" is the commercial name of a drug composed of HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011793/005 ESIDRIX HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
011793/008 ESIDRIX HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
011793/009 ESIDRIX HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011793/005 ESIDRIX HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
011793/008 ESIDRIX HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
011793/009 ESIDRIX HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
011835/003 HYDRODIURIL HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
011835/006 HYDRODIURIL HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
011835/007 HYDRODIURIL HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
011971/001 ORETIC HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
011971/002 ORETIC HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
020504/001 MICROZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 12.5MG
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040412/002 HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
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040735/002 HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
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040770/001 HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
040774/001 HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
040774/002 HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
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040857/001 HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
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078164/001 HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 12.5MG
078389/001 HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 12.5MG
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203018/002 HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG

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Answered questions

Which medicine is Good to bring down your BP. Please suggest medicine which are available in indian market.?
Asked by Traci Musgrave 1 year ago.

The following drugs are used in hypertension in India 1)Diuretics, Lasix ,Esidrix, Aldactone, make it difficult for the kidneys to retain water and salt, which are then filtered out into the urine. Increasing the amount of urine reduces the amount of fluid in the bloodstream, and hence the pressure on artery walls. 2)Beta blockers reduce high blood pressure by throttling back the force and speed of the heart. They may also reduce blood pressure by a direct effect on the body's master controls, the central nervous system. Propranolol (Inderal) is the main drug of beta-blocker family and other one is Atenolol 3)ACE inhibitors , which include Enalapril and Ramipril block the production of angiotensin II, a chemical the body produces to raise blood pressure. 4)Calcium channel blockers are the drugs such as Amlodipine and Diltiazem In India doctors prescribe one or a combination of drugs. Diuretics form a part of any combination as they reduce diastolic pressure more effectively Answered by Estell Froyd 1 year ago.


Is there any over the counter medicine for high blood pressure?
Asked by Narcisa Horal 1 year ago.

There are 8 types of over-the-counter medicine, available by a doctor's prescription, to treat high blood pressure: Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). Good Luck ! Answered by Bernardine Zeman 1 year ago.

Drop Blood Pressure Below 120/80 Answered by Minnie Sobenes 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Paz Moe 1 year ago.

Hey I'm here for the first time. I found this question and I find the answers really helpful. I am hoping to give something back and assist others too. Answered by Alanna Haws 1 year ago.

Not for that particular purpose. Some drugs may lower blood pressure as a side effect. To control high blood pressure without drugs, one can exercise, watch your weight, and avoid salty foods. DK Answered by Patrica Poole 1 year ago.

I have heard that garlic can lower blood pressure, which is why you should tell your Dr. if you are taking any herbal, or natural remedies. They may either assist or combat the effects of the medicine they prescribe for you. I hear that you should not drink grapefruit juice if you are taking hypertension medicine as well. Answered by Glen Schehl 1 year ago.

No; certainly nothing safe and effective. High blood pressure is serious business, to be managed by real prescription medications under a doctor's care. Answered by Refugio Leona 1 year ago.

"Over the Counter" means without doctor s prescription, if anybody didn t know. Answered by Tomika Brenek 1 year ago.


What are the brand names for the following generic drugs: tri-sprintec, methyldopa, and hydrochlorothiazide?
Asked by Lexie Buckmiller 1 year ago.

GENERIC - BRAND methyldopa - Aldomet methyldopa + hydrochlorothiazide - Aldoril hydrochlorothiazide - Esidrix hydrochlorothiazide - Hydrodiuril hydrochlorothiazide - Microzide Tri - Sprintec - Ortho Tri-Cyclen and/or Ortho Cyclen norgestimate + ethinyl estradiol - Tri - Sprintec Answered by Barbar Gossin 1 year ago.

Go to webmd.com and type those names in they will give you info on the drug and generic names Answered by Mandie Janowiec 1 year ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Jessenia Rosenstock 1 year ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Pattie Stuber 1 year ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Jaimee Taibi 1 year ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Jalisa Murata 1 year ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Moriah Yamashita 1 year ago.


Home remedies for light-headedness, dizziness (high blood pressure-related)?
My mother is in her 60s. She has high blood pressure, and is taking medication for that (Lisinopril, a generic for Prinivil). She also has been having sporadic light-headedness and dizzy spells. Sometimes it's when she wakes up, sometimes it's after work at 6pm-- the timing is random, whether or not she eats... Asked by Nicolle Dowdle 1 year ago.

My mother is in her 60s. She has high blood pressure, and is taking medication for that (Lisinopril, a generic for Prinivil). She also has been having sporadic light-headedness and dizzy spells. Sometimes it's when she wakes up, sometimes it's after work at 6pm-- the timing is random, whether or not she eats anything. Generally she doesn't eat breakfast or much at all during the day (she had a Twinkie for today's breakfast, for instance). She's also taking medication for dizziness-- Hydrochlorothiazise, a generic for Oretic/Esidrix that, randomly enough, says it may cause dizziness on the bottle. Her dizziness is so bad that she doesn't want to drive, for fear of passing out. She started taking the dizziness pills on Wednesday, the blood pressure pills on Thursday. The doctor said her blood pressure medication might take about two weeks to start working properly. Until then, I figure that whatever the cause, whether it's her blood pressure or the medication, similar home remedies would work to help her get over the light-headedness, right? Does anyone have any recommendations of food or actions to take that could help my mother get over her light-headedness and dizzy spells until her blood-pressure medication starts working? Answered by Jesusita Borre 1 year ago.

If she's not on potassium she should be eating lots of bananas. I am on lisinopril, metoprolol, potassium and triamterine hydrocholathiazide for high blood pressure. Answered by Omer Otis 1 year ago.

I assume you mean 180/125. If this is one of a number of readings, or has come from a 24 hour monitor, it is quite high. If it is a one off, performed in a chemist or on a home machine, it is meaningless and simply needs repeated by your GP or practice nurse. Three things lower BP 1) Being no more than your ideal weight 2)Taking regular vigorous exercise 3)Reducing your salt intake. If your 180/125 is a valid reading these will NOT be sufficient to normalise your BP! If your BP is at this level your stroke and heart attack risk will be elevated and you MUST take conventional therapy to reduce this risk. I am afraid no homeopathic,herbal or natural remedy will be of any real benefit. I am disappointed and concerned that so many of the answers given include the suggestions that homeopathic remedies will lower your blood pressure. There is overwhelming evidence that they do not. Such advise, if your blood pressure is truly at this level will put your health at VERY serious risk. I am also appalled that, I presume the homeopaths, have given thumbs down to the three answers suggesting conventional therapy, as they will undoubtedly to my answer. It really shows how many poorly educated, unscientific and dangerous answers do appear on Answers! Answered by Shira Huard 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Ludie Simonin 1 year ago.


What are the benefits of a diuretic?
coffee, jamaica, etc... Asked by Emile Larmer 1 year ago.

Diuretics, which cause reduction of water and sodium, have been the mainstays of anti-hypertensive therapy.Diuretics are inexpensive and are the drug of choice for most people with hypertension. Diuretics significantly reduce the risk for stroke; they may in fact be the most important anti-hypertensive agent for preventing this brain attack. They also appear to protect against stroke in people without hypertension. They are associated with lower risk for heart attack (although this is not as significant as their protection against stroke). They may protect against blood clots. Diuretics may help reduce the risk for dementia and the rate of fractures in elderly people who have taken them for a long time. Three primary types of diuretics exist: Thiazides. Thiazides often serve as the basis for high blood pressure treatment, either taken alone for mild to moderate hypertension or used in combination with other types of drugs. There are many thiazides and thiazide-related drugs; some common ones are chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Hygroton), indapamide (Lozol), and hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix, HydroDiuril). Loop diuretics. Loop diuretics block sodium transport in parts of the kidney; they act faster than thiazides and have a great diuretic effect. It is important therefore to control the medication and avoid dehydration and potassium loss. Loop diuretics include bumetanide (Bumex), furosemide (Lasix), and ethacrynic acid (Edecrin). Potassium sparing agents. Some potassium-sparing diuretics include amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone), and triamterene (Dyrenium). I hope this was helpful,Take Care!!! :) Answered by Laurena Vevea 1 year ago.

gets out excess fluids if you are retaining them. Answered by Cherryl Heaslip 1 year ago.


What are the tests made to diagnose kidney stones?
does anybody knows.. what are the posible medications given to patients with this kind of disease? Asked by Olimpia Barbalich 1 year ago.

Kidney stones (renal calculi)are formed of mineral deposits, most commonly calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate; however uric acid, struvite, and cystine are also calculus formers. Renal calculi can remain asymptomatic until passed into a ureter and/or urine flow is obstructed. A person with kidney stones may report history of recent/ chronic UTI; previous obstruction (calculi); decreased urinary output, bladder fullnes, burning sensation and urgency with urination, diarrhea, hematuria (presence of blood in the urine), pyuria (pus in the urine), and alterations in voiding pattern. Person may also report nausea, vomiting, abdominal tenderness, diet high in purines, calcium oxalate, and/or phosphates, insufficient fluid intake, does not drink fluids well; exhibits abdominal distention, flank pain, elevated BP/pulse, decreased/absent bowel sounds. diagnostic studies include: 1. urinalysis: color may be yellow, dark brown, bloody. commonly shows RBCs, WBCs, crystals (cystine, uric acid, calcium oxalate), casts, minerals, bacteria, pus; pH may be less than 5 (promotes cystine and uric acid stones) or higher than 7.5 (promotes magnesium, struvite, phosphate, or calcium phosphate stones). 2. biochemical survey: elevated levels of magnesium, calcium, uric acid, phosphate, protein, electrolytes 3. serum and urine BUN/Cr: abnormal (high in serum/low in urine) secondary to high obstructive stone in kidney causing ischemia/necrosis 4. serum chloride and bicarbonate levels: elevation of chloride and decreased levels of bicarbonate suggests developing renal tubular acidosis 5. CBC: Hgb/Hct:abnormal if client is severely dehydrated or polycythemia is present (encourage precipitation of solids), or client is anemic (hemorrhage, kidney dysfunction or failure) RBCs: usually normal WBCs: may be increased (indicating infection or septicemia) KUB xray: show presence of calculi and/or anatomical changes in the area of the kidney or along the course of the ureter IVP: provides rapid confirmation of urolithiasis as a cause of abdominal or flank pain. shows abnormalities in anatomical structures (distended ureter) and outline of calculi cystoureteroscopy: direct visualization of bladder and ureter may reveal stone and/or obstructive effects CT scan: identify/delineates calculi and other masses; kidney, ureteral, and bladder distention Kidney Ultrasound: to determine obstructive change, location of stone; without the risk of failure induced by contrast medium Medications to be given will depend greatly on the type of stones formed. narcotics e.g., meperidine (demerol), morphine: to promote muscle relaxation antispasmodics, e.g., flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan): to decrease reflex spasm, colic and pain corticosteroids: to reduce tissue edema to facilitate movement of stone Acetazolamide (Diamox), allopurinol (Zyloprim); increase urine pH and reduce formation of acid stones. antigout agents such as allopurinol (Zyloprim) also lower uric acid production and potential of stone formation. Hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix, HydroDIURIL), chlorthalidone (Hygroton); may be given to prevent urinary stasis and decrease calcium stone formation if not caused by underlying disease process such as primary hyperthyroidism or vitamin D abnormalities. Ammonium chloride; potassium or sodium phosphate; reduce phosphate stone formation Antibiotics; presence of UTI/ alkaline urine potentiates stone formation Sodium bicarbonate; replaces losses incurred during bicarbonate wasting and/or alkalinization of urine; may reduce/prevent formation of some calculi Ascorbic acid; acidifies urine to prevent recurrence of alkaline stone formation Answered by Laila Yellow 1 year ago.

There are several ways they can diagnose kidney stones. One is to do an ultrasound of your kidneys. This is pretty reliable but if you are overweight it can be hard. Another way is to have a CT scan. But the most popular test is the good ole IVP. This test is given with dye. The big stones usually don't cause much pain. It is usually the little bitty stones that will put you on the floor. All medications given for this problem is usually based on the make up of the stones. Answered by Clayton Cange 1 year ago.

okay ivee had kidney stones twice now- once during pregnancy that required surgical removal since the stone was a 10 mm most stones that cause pain are 3-4 mm....the testing done is an IVP you have to get an injection in the arm and then they xray you using the dye the injected to examine the kidneys, another way is by ultrasound but this can be blurry for DRs so they prefer a more sufficent test..they sometimes use a CT scan for diagnosis.....unless yuo are pregnant- then all they can do is an ultrasound since all other test can cause stress and possibly injury to the baby....once your diagnosed youd usually get pain meds but some doctors dont prefer to give since these meds will often challenge your kidneys even more- it kinda depends on the person...theyll usually give you vicodin or percocet but if it is to the point where they are moving alot- youll know when this is because it is very and i mean very painful the pain willl come in waves and possibly cause nausea...theyre often compared to labor pains and if you were to be treated in an emergency room they may give you morphine-itll burn when they first inject it but the pain will become more bearable and at that point the doctor will decide how to remove them if he wants- often a doc will tell the patient to return when theyre having severe pain -if he does remove theres 3 surguries and depending on where the stone is located (in kidney or in the tube that passes your urine to your kidney) that ll be the decideing factor on what type surgery- the do and ultrasonic ping where its ultrasonically shattered and you pass it , laser removale is another and worst case- theyll cut ya and dig it out ( this was my surgery) as for meds i dont know the name but i was told by my doctor that the medications that aid in preventing stones are often not worth taking since they cause ill side affects to the user and should only be considered in severe repeatious cases....one thing they can do is try to figure out what caused the stones by a metabolic work up by your doc and they can let you know how to possible (no guarentees) avoid the pain in the future.....good luck!!! Answered by Christiana Mcduffy 1 year ago.

A Urologist. You need to go to the hospital and have a I.V.P done. That will tell the doctor exactly where the stone is. You don't need to drink anymore if it's not coming out. That meens the stone is too big and is blocking your urethra. You need to go to the hospital. I know, I just went through all this 4 months ago and had to have a stent put in because of scare tissue from it. Get it checked ASAP. I know what I am talking about, PROMISE! Answered by Loni Garner 1 year ago.

hi everyone ,if anyone else wants to learn about kidney stones treatment try Imforda Simple Stones Guide (should be on google have a look ) ? Ive heard some amazing things about it and my m8 got amazing success with it. Answered by Carey Cornella 1 year ago.

An Adominal ultrasound is painless and free from radiation and they can now disperse kidney stones with a lazer no surgery involved Answered by Lakendra Saralegui 1 year ago.

The main test is the IVP, they shoot dye in your arm and look at your kidneys under Xray. Answered by Sabine Lansing 1 year ago.


Which medicine is Good to bring down your BP. Please suggest medicine which are available in indian market.?
Asked by Ila Skapura 1 year ago.

The following drugs are used in hypertension in India 1)Diuretics, Lasix ,Esidrix, Aldactone, make it difficult for the kidneys to retain water and salt, which are then filtered out into the urine. Increasing the amount of urine reduces the amount of fluid in the bloodstream, and hence the pressure on artery walls. 2)Beta blockers reduce high blood pressure by throttling back the force and speed of the heart. They may also reduce blood pressure by a direct effect on the body's master controls, the central nervous system. Propranolol (Inderal) is the main drug of beta-blocker family and other one is Atenolol 3)ACE inhibitors , which include Enalapril and Ramipril block the production of angiotensin II, a chemical the body produces to raise blood pressure. 4)Calcium channel blockers are the drugs such as Amlodipine and Diltiazem In India doctors prescribe one or a combination of drugs. Diuretics form a part of any combination as they reduce diastolic pressure more effectively Answered by Edwin Walbridge 1 year ago.


Is there any over the counter medicine for high blood pressure?
Asked by Latina Arguelles 1 year ago.

There are 8 types of over-the-counter medicine, available by a doctor's prescription, to treat high blood pressure: Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). Good Luck ! Answered by Katrice Sipe 1 year ago.

Drop Blood Pressure Below 120/80 Answered by Hertha Trejos 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Angelique Courcy 1 year ago.

Hey I'm here for the first time. I found this question and I find the answers really helpful. I am hoping to give something back and assist others too. Answered by Florrie Purwin 1 year ago.

Not for that particular purpose. Some drugs may lower blood pressure as a side effect. To control high blood pressure without drugs, one can exercise, watch your weight, and avoid salty foods. DK Answered by Zelma Concepcion 1 year ago.

I have heard that garlic can lower blood pressure, which is why you should tell your Dr. if you are taking any herbal, or natural remedies. They may either assist or combat the effects of the medicine they prescribe for you. I hear that you should not drink grapefruit juice if you are taking hypertension medicine as well. Answered by Arvilla Henkin 1 year ago.

No; certainly nothing safe and effective. High blood pressure is serious business, to be managed by real prescription medications under a doctor's care. Answered by Graig Henretta 1 year ago.

"Over the Counter" means without doctor s prescription, if anybody didn t know. Answered by Melodi Ropes 1 year ago.


What are the brand names for the following generic drugs: tri-sprintec, methyldopa, and hydrochlorothiazide?
Asked by Marina Flynn 1 year ago.

GENERIC - BRAND methyldopa - Aldomet methyldopa + hydrochlorothiazide - Aldoril hydrochlorothiazide - Esidrix hydrochlorothiazide - Hydrodiuril hydrochlorothiazide - Microzide Tri - Sprintec - Ortho Tri-Cyclen and/or Ortho Cyclen norgestimate + ethinyl estradiol - Tri - Sprintec Answered by Mandy Hussong 1 year ago.

Go to webmd.com and type those names in they will give you info on the drug and generic names Answered by Dalton Tuckerson 1 year ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Victor Blinston 1 year ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Corey Godwyn 1 year ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Stanley Oren 1 year ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Beata Olide 1 year ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Nichole Rabinovich 1 year ago.


Home remedies for light-headedness, dizziness (high blood pressure-related)?
My mother is in her 60s. She has high blood pressure, and is taking medication for that (Lisinopril, a generic for Prinivil). She also has been having sporadic light-headedness and dizzy spells. Sometimes it's when she wakes up, sometimes it's after work at 6pm-- the timing is random, whether or not she eats... Asked by Lorie Tourtelotte 1 year ago.

My mother is in her 60s. She has high blood pressure, and is taking medication for that (Lisinopril, a generic for Prinivil). She also has been having sporadic light-headedness and dizzy spells. Sometimes it's when she wakes up, sometimes it's after work at 6pm-- the timing is random, whether or not she eats anything. Generally she doesn't eat breakfast or much at all during the day (she had a Twinkie for today's breakfast, for instance). She's also taking medication for dizziness-- Hydrochlorothiazise, a generic for Oretic/Esidrix that, randomly enough, says it may cause dizziness on the bottle. Her dizziness is so bad that she doesn't want to drive, for fear of passing out. She started taking the dizziness pills on Wednesday, the blood pressure pills on Thursday. The doctor said her blood pressure medication might take about two weeks to start working properly. Until then, I figure that whatever the cause, whether it's her blood pressure or the medication, similar home remedies would work to help her get over the light-headedness, right? Does anyone have any recommendations of food or actions to take that could help my mother get over her light-headedness and dizzy spells until her blood-pressure medication starts working? Answered by Riley Budworth 1 year ago.

If she's not on potassium she should be eating lots of bananas. I am on lisinopril, metoprolol, potassium and triamterine hydrocholathiazide for high blood pressure. Answered by Elva Roseberry 1 year ago.

I assume you mean 180/125. If this is one of a number of readings, or has come from a 24 hour monitor, it is quite high. If it is a one off, performed in a chemist or on a home machine, it is meaningless and simply needs repeated by your GP or practice nurse. Three things lower BP 1) Being no more than your ideal weight 2)Taking regular vigorous exercise 3)Reducing your salt intake. If your 180/125 is a valid reading these will NOT be sufficient to normalise your BP! If your BP is at this level your stroke and heart attack risk will be elevated and you MUST take conventional therapy to reduce this risk. I am afraid no homeopathic,herbal or natural remedy will be of any real benefit. I am disappointed and concerned that so many of the answers given include the suggestions that homeopathic remedies will lower your blood pressure. There is overwhelming evidence that they do not. Such advise, if your blood pressure is truly at this level will put your health at VERY serious risk. I am also appalled that, I presume the homeopaths, have given thumbs down to the three answers suggesting conventional therapy, as they will undoubtedly to my answer. It really shows how many poorly educated, unscientific and dangerous answers do appear on Answers! Answered by Mitchell Wadlow 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Elliot Silveira 1 year ago.


What are the benefits of a diuretic?
coffee, jamaica, etc... Asked by Danial Windsor 1 year ago.

Diuretics, which cause reduction of water and sodium, have been the mainstays of anti-hypertensive therapy.Diuretics are inexpensive and are the drug of choice for most people with hypertension. Diuretics significantly reduce the risk for stroke; they may in fact be the most important anti-hypertensive agent for preventing this brain attack. They also appear to protect against stroke in people without hypertension. They are associated with lower risk for heart attack (although this is not as significant as their protection against stroke). They may protect against blood clots. Diuretics may help reduce the risk for dementia and the rate of fractures in elderly people who have taken them for a long time. Three primary types of diuretics exist: Thiazides. Thiazides often serve as the basis for high blood pressure treatment, either taken alone for mild to moderate hypertension or used in combination with other types of drugs. There are many thiazides and thiazide-related drugs; some common ones are chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Hygroton), indapamide (Lozol), and hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix, HydroDiuril). Loop diuretics. Loop diuretics block sodium transport in parts of the kidney; they act faster than thiazides and have a great diuretic effect. It is important therefore to control the medication and avoid dehydration and potassium loss. Loop diuretics include bumetanide (Bumex), furosemide (Lasix), and ethacrynic acid (Edecrin). Potassium sparing agents. Some potassium-sparing diuretics include amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone), and triamterene (Dyrenium). I hope this was helpful,Take Care!!! :) Answered by Aurelia Motton 1 year ago.

gets out excess fluids if you are retaining them. Answered by Tynisha Mcgunnis 1 year ago.


What are the tests made to diagnose kidney stones?
does anybody knows.. what are the posible medications given to patients with this kind of disease? Asked by Rod Blaeser 1 year ago.

Kidney stones (renal calculi)are formed of mineral deposits, most commonly calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate; however uric acid, struvite, and cystine are also calculus formers. Renal calculi can remain asymptomatic until passed into a ureter and/or urine flow is obstructed. A person with kidney stones may report history of recent/ chronic UTI; previous obstruction (calculi); decreased urinary output, bladder fullnes, burning sensation and urgency with urination, diarrhea, hematuria (presence of blood in the urine), pyuria (pus in the urine), and alterations in voiding pattern. Person may also report nausea, vomiting, abdominal tenderness, diet high in purines, calcium oxalate, and/or phosphates, insufficient fluid intake, does not drink fluids well; exhibits abdominal distention, flank pain, elevated BP/pulse, decreased/absent bowel sounds. diagnostic studies include: 1. urinalysis: color may be yellow, dark brown, bloody. commonly shows RBCs, WBCs, crystals (cystine, uric acid, calcium oxalate), casts, minerals, bacteria, pus; pH may be less than 5 (promotes cystine and uric acid stones) or higher than 7.5 (promotes magnesium, struvite, phosphate, or calcium phosphate stones). 2. biochemical survey: elevated levels of magnesium, calcium, uric acid, phosphate, protein, electrolytes 3. serum and urine BUN/Cr: abnormal (high in serum/low in urine) secondary to high obstructive stone in kidney causing ischemia/necrosis 4. serum chloride and bicarbonate levels: elevation of chloride and decreased levels of bicarbonate suggests developing renal tubular acidosis 5. CBC: Hgb/Hct:abnormal if client is severely dehydrated or polycythemia is present (encourage precipitation of solids), or client is anemic (hemorrhage, kidney dysfunction or failure) RBCs: usually normal WBCs: may be increased (indicating infection or septicemia) KUB xray: show presence of calculi and/or anatomical changes in the area of the kidney or along the course of the ureter IVP: provides rapid confirmation of urolithiasis as a cause of abdominal or flank pain. shows abnormalities in anatomical structures (distended ureter) and outline of calculi cystoureteroscopy: direct visualization of bladder and ureter may reveal stone and/or obstructive effects CT scan: identify/delineates calculi and other masses; kidney, ureteral, and bladder distention Kidney Ultrasound: to determine obstructive change, location of stone; without the risk of failure induced by contrast medium Medications to be given will depend greatly on the type of stones formed. narcotics e.g., meperidine (demerol), morphine: to promote muscle relaxation antispasmodics, e.g., flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan): to decrease reflex spasm, colic and pain corticosteroids: to reduce tissue edema to facilitate movement of stone Acetazolamide (Diamox), allopurinol (Zyloprim); increase urine pH and reduce formation of acid stones. antigout agents such as allopurinol (Zyloprim) also lower uric acid production and potential of stone formation. Hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix, HydroDIURIL), chlorthalidone (Hygroton); may be given to prevent urinary stasis and decrease calcium stone formation if not caused by underlying disease process such as primary hyperthyroidism or vitamin D abnormalities. Ammonium chloride; potassium or sodium phosphate; reduce phosphate stone formation Antibiotics; presence of UTI/ alkaline urine potentiates stone formation Sodium bicarbonate; replaces losses incurred during bicarbonate wasting and/or alkalinization of urine; may reduce/prevent formation of some calculi Ascorbic acid; acidifies urine to prevent recurrence of alkaline stone formation Answered by Deidra Dykhoff 1 year ago.

There are several ways they can diagnose kidney stones. One is to do an ultrasound of your kidneys. This is pretty reliable but if you are overweight it can be hard. Another way is to have a CT scan. But the most popular test is the good ole IVP. This test is given with dye. The big stones usually don't cause much pain. It is usually the little bitty stones that will put you on the floor. All medications given for this problem is usually based on the make up of the stones. Answered by Effie Hanly 1 year ago.

okay ivee had kidney stones twice now- once during pregnancy that required surgical removal since the stone was a 10 mm most stones that cause pain are 3-4 mm....the testing done is an IVP you have to get an injection in the arm and then they xray you using the dye the injected to examine the kidneys, another way is by ultrasound but this can be blurry for DRs so they prefer a more sufficent test..they sometimes use a CT scan for diagnosis.....unless yuo are pregnant- then all they can do is an ultrasound since all other test can cause stress and possibly injury to the baby....once your diagnosed youd usually get pain meds but some doctors dont prefer to give since these meds will often challenge your kidneys even more- it kinda depends on the person...theyll usually give you vicodin or percocet but if it is to the point where they are moving alot- youll know when this is because it is very and i mean very painful the pain willl come in waves and possibly cause nausea...theyre often compared to labor pains and if you were to be treated in an emergency room they may give you morphine-itll burn when they first inject it but the pain will become more bearable and at that point the doctor will decide how to remove them if he wants- often a doc will tell the patient to return when theyre having severe pain -if he does remove theres 3 surguries and depending on where the stone is located (in kidney or in the tube that passes your urine to your kidney) that ll be the decideing factor on what type surgery- the do and ultrasonic ping where its ultrasonically shattered and you pass it , laser removale is another and worst case- theyll cut ya and dig it out ( this was my surgery) as for meds i dont know the name but i was told by my doctor that the medications that aid in preventing stones are often not worth taking since they cause ill side affects to the user and should only be considered in severe repeatious cases....one thing they can do is try to figure out what caused the stones by a metabolic work up by your doc and they can let you know how to possible (no guarentees) avoid the pain in the future.....good luck!!! Answered by Oleta Chirino 1 year ago.

A Urologist. You need to go to the hospital and have a I.V.P done. That will tell the doctor exactly where the stone is. You don't need to drink anymore if it's not coming out. That meens the stone is too big and is blocking your urethra. You need to go to the hospital. I know, I just went through all this 4 months ago and had to have a stent put in because of scare tissue from it. Get it checked ASAP. I know what I am talking about, PROMISE! Answered by Brock Kant 1 year ago.

hi everyone ,if anyone else wants to learn about kidney stones treatment try Imforda Simple Stones Guide (should be on google have a look ) ? Ive heard some amazing things about it and my m8 got amazing success with it. Answered by Rheba Capek 1 year ago.

An Adominal ultrasound is painless and free from radiation and they can now disperse kidney stones with a lazer no surgery involved Answered by Roderick Husfelt 1 year ago.

The main test is the IVP, they shoot dye in your arm and look at your kidneys under Xray. Answered by Josh Akemon 1 year ago.


Which medicine is Good to bring down your BP. Please suggest medicine which are available in indian market.?
Asked by Meg Braband 1 year ago.

The following drugs are used in hypertension in India 1)Diuretics, Lasix ,Esidrix, Aldactone, make it difficult for the kidneys to retain water and salt, which are then filtered out into the urine. Increasing the amount of urine reduces the amount of fluid in the bloodstream, and hence the pressure on artery walls. 2)Beta blockers reduce high blood pressure by throttling back the force and speed of the heart. They may also reduce blood pressure by a direct effect on the body's master controls, the central nervous system. Propranolol (Inderal) is the main drug of beta-blocker family and other one is Atenolol 3)ACE inhibitors , which include Enalapril and Ramipril block the production of angiotensin II, a chemical the body produces to raise blood pressure. 4)Calcium channel blockers are the drugs such as Amlodipine and Diltiazem In India doctors prescribe one or a combination of drugs. Diuretics form a part of any combination as they reduce diastolic pressure more effectively Answered by Sau Dipasquale 1 year ago.


Is there any over the counter medicine for high blood pressure?
Asked by Rachel Shukert 1 year ago.

There are 8 types of over-the-counter medicine, available by a doctor's prescription, to treat high blood pressure: Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). Good Luck ! Answered by Penelope Charpia 1 year ago.

Drop Blood Pressure Below 120/80 Answered by Darcy Furgeson 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Santos Peccia 1 year ago.

Hey I'm here for the first time. I found this question and I find the answers really helpful. I am hoping to give something back and assist others too. Answered by Susanne Aughe 1 year ago.

Not for that particular purpose. Some drugs may lower blood pressure as a side effect. To control high blood pressure without drugs, one can exercise, watch your weight, and avoid salty foods. DK Answered by Bernarda Gales 1 year ago.

I have heard that garlic can lower blood pressure, which is why you should tell your Dr. if you are taking any herbal, or natural remedies. They may either assist or combat the effects of the medicine they prescribe for you. I hear that you should not drink grapefruit juice if you are taking hypertension medicine as well. Answered by Nadene Goodly 1 year ago.

No; certainly nothing safe and effective. High blood pressure is serious business, to be managed by real prescription medications under a doctor's care. Answered by Francisca Ariola 1 year ago.

"Over the Counter" means without doctor s prescription, if anybody didn t know. Answered by Ambrose Zaring 1 year ago.


What are the brand names for the following generic drugs: tri-sprintec, methyldopa, and hydrochlorothiazide?
Asked by Edith Katzenbach 1 year ago.

GENERIC - BRAND methyldopa - Aldomet methyldopa + hydrochlorothiazide - Aldoril hydrochlorothiazide - Esidrix hydrochlorothiazide - Hydrodiuril hydrochlorothiazide - Microzide Tri - Sprintec - Ortho Tri-Cyclen and/or Ortho Cyclen norgestimate + ethinyl estradiol - Tri - Sprintec Answered by Nobuko Kubiak 1 year ago.

Go to webmd.com and type those names in they will give you info on the drug and generic names Answered by Carrol Dorning 1 year ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Ina Felde 1 year ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Shawnna Falor 1 year ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Abby Cipolone 1 year ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Keith Durrette 1 year ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Cecila Warsme 1 year ago.


Home remedies for light-headedness, dizziness (high blood pressure-related)?
My mother is in her 60s. She has high blood pressure, and is taking medication for that (Lisinopril, a generic for Prinivil). She also has been having sporadic light-headedness and dizzy spells. Sometimes it's when she wakes up, sometimes it's after work at 6pm-- the timing is random, whether or not she eats... Asked by Dana Manaugh 1 year ago.

My mother is in her 60s. She has high blood pressure, and is taking medication for that (Lisinopril, a generic for Prinivil). She also has been having sporadic light-headedness and dizzy spells. Sometimes it's when she wakes up, sometimes it's after work at 6pm-- the timing is random, whether or not she eats anything. Generally she doesn't eat breakfast or much at all during the day (she had a Twinkie for today's breakfast, for instance). She's also taking medication for dizziness-- Hydrochlorothiazise, a generic for Oretic/Esidrix that, randomly enough, says it may cause dizziness on the bottle. Her dizziness is so bad that she doesn't want to drive, for fear of passing out. She started taking the dizziness pills on Wednesday, the blood pressure pills on Thursday. The doctor said her blood pressure medication might take about two weeks to start working properly. Until then, I figure that whatever the cause, whether it's her blood pressure or the medication, similar home remedies would work to help her get over the light-headedness, right? Does anyone have any recommendations of food or actions to take that could help my mother get over her light-headedness and dizzy spells until her blood-pressure medication starts working? Answered by Florentino Vick 1 year ago.

If she's not on potassium she should be eating lots of bananas. I am on lisinopril, metoprolol, potassium and triamterine hydrocholathiazide for high blood pressure. Answered by Nelson Davney 1 year ago.

I assume you mean 180/125. If this is one of a number of readings, or has come from a 24 hour monitor, it is quite high. If it is a one off, performed in a chemist or on a home machine, it is meaningless and simply needs repeated by your GP or practice nurse. Three things lower BP 1) Being no more than your ideal weight 2)Taking regular vigorous exercise 3)Reducing your salt intake. If your 180/125 is a valid reading these will NOT be sufficient to normalise your BP! If your BP is at this level your stroke and heart attack risk will be elevated and you MUST take conventional therapy to reduce this risk. I am afraid no homeopathic,herbal or natural remedy will be of any real benefit. I am disappointed and concerned that so many of the answers given include the suggestions that homeopathic remedies will lower your blood pressure. There is overwhelming evidence that they do not. Such advise, if your blood pressure is truly at this level will put your health at VERY serious risk. I am also appalled that, I presume the homeopaths, have given thumbs down to the three answers suggesting conventional therapy, as they will undoubtedly to my answer. It really shows how many poorly educated, unscientific and dangerous answers do appear on Answers! Answered by Jacques Bayardo 1 year ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Rivka Beachem 1 year ago.


What are the benefits of a diuretic?
coffee, jamaica, etc... Asked by Bernadette Cashatt 1 year ago.

Diuretics, which cause reduction of water and sodium, have been the mainstays of anti-hypertensive therapy.Diuretics are inexpensive and are the drug of choice for most people with hypertension. Diuretics significantly reduce the risk for stroke; they may in fact be the most important anti-hypertensive agent for preventing this brain attack. They also appear to protect against stroke in people without hypertension. They are associated with lower risk for heart attack (although this is not as significant as their protection against stroke). They may protect against blood clots. Diuretics may help reduce the risk for dementia and the rate of fractures in elderly people who have taken them for a long time. Three primary types of diuretics exist: Thiazides. Thiazides often serve as the basis for high blood pressure treatment, either taken alone for mild to moderate hypertension or used in combination with other types of drugs. There are many thiazides and thiazide-related drugs; some common ones are chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Hygroton), indapamide (Lozol), and hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix, HydroDiuril). Loop diuretics. Loop diuretics block sodium transport in parts of the kidney; they act faster than thiazides and have a great diuretic effect. It is important therefore to control the medication and avoid dehydration and potassium loss. Loop diuretics include bumetanide (Bumex), furosemide (Lasix), and ethacrynic acid (Edecrin). Potassium sparing agents. Some potassium-sparing diuretics include amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone), and triamterene (Dyrenium). I hope this was helpful,Take Care!!! :) Answered by Tomi Piscopo 1 year ago.

gets out excess fluids if you are retaining them. Answered by Yuri Boria 1 year ago.


What are the tests made to diagnose kidney stones?
does anybody knows.. what are the posible medications given to patients with this kind of disease? Asked by Rubye Majica 1 year ago.

Kidney stones (renal calculi)are formed of mineral deposits, most commonly calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate; however uric acid, struvite, and cystine are also calculus formers. Renal calculi can remain asymptomatic until passed into a ureter and/or urine flow is obstructed. A person with kidney stones may report history of recent/ chronic UTI; previous obstruction (calculi); decreased urinary output, bladder fullnes, burning sensation and urgency with urination, diarrhea, hematuria (presence of blood in the urine), pyuria (pus in the urine), and alterations in voiding pattern. Person may also report nausea, vomiting, abdominal tenderness, diet high in purines, calcium oxalate, and/or phosphates, insufficient fluid intake, does not drink fluids well; exhibits abdominal distention, flank pain, elevated BP/pulse, decreased/absent bowel sounds. diagnostic studies include: 1. urinalysis: color may be yellow, dark brown, bloody. commonly shows RBCs, WBCs, crystals (cystine, uric acid, calcium oxalate), casts, minerals, bacteria, pus; pH may be less than 5 (promotes cystine and uric acid stones) or higher than 7.5 (promotes magnesium, struvite, phosphate, or calcium phosphate stones). 2. biochemical survey: elevated levels of magnesium, calcium, uric acid, phosphate, protein, electrolytes 3. serum and urine BUN/Cr: abnormal (high in serum/low in urine) secondary to high obstructive stone in kidney causing ischemia/necrosis 4. serum chloride and bicarbonate levels: elevation of chloride and decreased levels of bicarbonate suggests developing renal tubular acidosis 5. CBC: Hgb/Hct:abnormal if client is severely dehydrated or polycythemia is present (encourage precipitation of solids), or client is anemic (hemorrhage, kidney dysfunction or failure) RBCs: usually normal WBCs: may be increased (indicating infection or septicemia) KUB xray: show presence of calculi and/or anatomical changes in the area of the kidney or along the course of the ureter IVP: provides rapid confirmation of urolithiasis as a cause of abdominal or flank pain. shows abnormalities in anatomical structures (distended ureter) and outline of calculi cystoureteroscopy: direct visualization of bladder and ureter may reveal stone and/or obstructive effects CT scan: identify/delineates calculi and other masses; kidney, ureteral, and bladder distention Kidney Ultrasound: to determine obstructive change, location of stone; without the risk of failure induced by contrast medium Medications to be given will depend greatly on the type of stones formed. narcotics e.g., meperidine (demerol), morphine: to promote muscle relaxation antispasmodics, e.g., flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan): to decrease reflex spasm, colic and pain corticosteroids: to reduce tissue edema to facilitate movement of stone Acetazolamide (Diamox), allopurinol (Zyloprim); increase urine pH and reduce formation of acid stones. antigout agents such as allopurinol (Zyloprim) also lower uric acid production and potential of stone formation. Hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix, HydroDIURIL), chlorthalidone (Hygroton); may be given to prevent urinary stasis and decrease calcium stone formation if not caused by underlying disease process such as primary hyperthyroidism or vitamin D abnormalities. Ammonium chloride; potassium or sodium phosphate; reduce phosphate stone formation Antibiotics; presence of UTI/ alkaline urine potentiates stone formation Sodium bicarbonate; replaces losses incurred during bicarbonate wasting and/or alkalinization of urine; may reduce/prevent formation of some calculi Ascorbic acid; acidifies urine to prevent recurrence of alkaline stone formation Answered by Clair Boulier 1 year ago.

There are several ways they can diagnose kidney stones. One is to do an ultrasound of your kidneys. This is pretty reliable but if you are overweight it can be hard. Another way is to have a CT scan. But the most popular test is the good ole IVP. This test is given with dye. The big stones usually don't cause much pain. It is usually the little bitty stones that will put you on the floor. All medications given for this problem is usually based on the make up of the stones. Answered by Azzie Cratch 1 year ago.

okay ivee had kidney stones twice now- once during pregnancy that required surgical removal since the stone was a 10 mm most stones that cause pain are 3-4 mm....the testing done is an IVP you have to get an injection in the arm and then they xray you using the dye the injected to examine the kidneys, another way is by ultrasound but this can be blurry for DRs so they prefer a more sufficent test..they sometimes use a CT scan for diagnosis.....unless yuo are pregnant- then all they can do is an ultrasound since all other test can cause stress and possibly injury to the baby....once your diagnosed youd usually get pain meds but some doctors dont prefer to give since these meds will often challenge your kidneys even more- it kinda depends on the person...theyll usually give you vicodin or percocet but if it is to the point where they are moving alot- youll know when this is because it is very and i mean very painful the pain willl come in waves and possibly cause nausea...theyre often compared to labor pains and if you were to be treated in an emergency room they may give you morphine-itll burn when they first inject it but the pain will become more bearable and at that point the doctor will decide how to remove them if he wants- often a doc will tell the patient to return when theyre having severe pain -if he does remove theres 3 surguries and depending on where the stone is located (in kidney or in the tube that passes your urine to your kidney) that ll be the decideing factor on what type surgery- the do and ultrasonic ping where its ultrasonically shattered and you pass it , laser removale is another and worst case- theyll cut ya and dig it out ( this was my surgery) as for meds i dont know the name but i was told by my doctor that the medications that aid in preventing stones are often not worth taking since they cause ill side affects to the user and should only be considered in severe repeatious cases....one thing they can do is try to figure out what caused the stones by a metabolic work up by your doc and they can let you know how to possible (no guarentees) avoid the pain in the future.....good luck!!! Answered by Joyce Leahman 1 year ago.

A Urologist. You need to go to the hospital and have a I.V.P done. That will tell the doctor exactly where the stone is. You don't need to drink anymore if it's not coming out. That meens the stone is too big and is blocking your urethra. You need to go to the hospital. I know, I just went through all this 4 months ago and had to have a stent put in because of scare tissue from it. Get it checked ASAP. I know what I am talking about, PROMISE! Answered by Blondell Deteso 1 year ago.

hi everyone ,if anyone else wants to learn about kidney stones treatment try Imforda Simple Stones Guide (should be on google have a look ) ? Ive heard some amazing things about it and my m8 got amazing success with it. Answered by Clay Nanas 1 year ago.

An Adominal ultrasound is painless and free from radiation and they can now disperse kidney stones with a lazer no surgery involved Answered by Laine Imhoff 1 year ago.

The main test is the IVP, they shoot dye in your arm and look at your kidneys under Xray. Answered by Anja Mulcahy 1 year ago.


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