Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 010028/004.

Names and composition

"EQUANIL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MEPROBAMATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010028/004 EQUANIL MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
010028/005 EQUANIL MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
012455/002 EQUANIL MEPROBAMATE CAPSULE/ORAL 400MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009698/002 MILTOWN MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009698/004 MILTOWN MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
010028/004 EQUANIL MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
010028/005 EQUANIL MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
011284/001 MEPROSPAN MEPROBAMATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
011284/002 MEPROSPAN MEPROBAMATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 400MG
012455/002 EQUANIL MEPROBAMATE CAPSULE/ORAL 400MG
014322/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
014322/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
014359/001 NEURAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
014359/002 NEURAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
014368/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
014368/004 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
014474/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
014474/004 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
014547/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
014547/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
014601/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
014882/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
014882/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
015072/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
015139/005 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
015139/006 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
015417/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
015417/003 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
015426/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
015426/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
015438/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
015438/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
016069/001 MEPRIAM MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
016249/001 TRANMEP MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
016928/003 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
040797/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
040797/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
080380/001 BAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
080380/002 BAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
080655/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
080699/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
080699/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
083304/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
083308/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
083343/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
083442/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
083494/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
083618/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
083830/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
083919/001 MILTOWN MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 600MG
084030/001 AMOSENE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
084153/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
084181/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 600MG
084220/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
084230/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 600MG
084274/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 600MG
084329/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 600MG
084332/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 600MG
084369/001 TRANMEP MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
084435/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
084438/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
084546/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
084547/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
084589/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
084744/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
084744/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
084804/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
084804/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
085719/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 600MG
085720/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
085721/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
086299/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
087825/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
087826/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
088011/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
089538/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
090122/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
090122/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
200998/001 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
200998/002 MEPROBAMATE MEPROBAMATE TABLET/ORAL 400MG

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Over the counter anti-depressants?
what anti-depressants can i buy over the counter and where from? Asked by Rigoberto Spanos 1 year ago.

Equanil, Nardil, Iproniazid are effective tranquilizers yet u should take physician's advice Answered by Shanta Wondra 1 year ago.

i dont really think you can. Depression is diagnosed by a trained personnel. I wouldnt reccomend it without consulting somebody anyway, because the side effects are dangerous, and your doctor will know more than you which is best for you! Answered by Margarito Tavolario 1 year ago.

There are no over the counter antidepressants that have any evidenced based efficacy. Answered by Kisha Mulligan 1 year ago.


The dose on hand is 400 mg tabs.how many tab(s) are given?
the physician orders 0.2 g meprobamate (equanil,miltown) tabs. The dose on hand is 400 mg tabs.how many tab(s) are given? Asked by Agustin Blankenbecler 1 year ago.

one-half of one tablet Answered by Valeri Vogel 1 year ago.

Here's the formula....desired (what is ordered by the physician) divided by what you have on hand times the quantity (in this case tablets). 0.2 grams / 400 mg X 1 tablet first you will have to convert the 0.2 g to milligrams by moving the decimal 3 places to the right making for 200 mg. now you have 200 mg / 400 mg X 1 tablet. I'll let you do the math from here. Answered by Palma Dinan 1 year ago.


What chemical substances can be used to treat sleep deprivation?
Sorry, scratch out that caffeine part. Asked by Ida Caperton 1 year ago.

Hypnotic drugs such as seconal, veronal, equanil, nembutal can be used. Answered by Jimmie Twiford 1 year ago.

If the cause of sleep deprivation is depression, you would need to increase Serotonin levels in the brain. Depression could be a major cause of insomnia in which case a doctor would assign drugs that are used to increase serotonin Answered by Nakesha Niner 1 year ago.

Wont caffeine make it worse? You should treat it with sleeping pills. Answered by Duane Fontanilla 1 year ago.


I have a question about synthetic compounds- is there any way to figure this out?
Someone asked me a random question about whether the drugs chlorpromazine and miltown share the same synthetic compound. I have no idea what this means. Do you know the answer, ot could you at least point me in the right direction to finding out? Asked by Tobi Bevels 1 year ago.

Warning to users of tranquilizing drugs: they should not be taken with alcohol... Tranquilizer: Chlorpromazine (brand name: Thorazine)... Meprobamate: (brand names: Miltown, Equanil)... Meprobamate (brand names: Miltown, Equanil) effects marked improvement in a somewhat smaller percentage of hospital patients than chlorpromazine or reserpine, but is most popular with the patients, as well as with millions of walkie-talkie neurotics. Noted for its sleep-inducing action and lack of side effects, it also seems to check excessive sweating (which some of the other drugs aggravate)... Chlorpromazine (brand name: Thorazine), first of the ataraxics or tranquilizing drugs used in North America, has clinched its leadership as the one most generally effective in treating the severe mental illnesses that usually need hospitalization. The earlier used, the better. It is best in agitated cases, least effective (and occasionally harmful) in the depressed. After three years of experience with it, doctors are less jittery, though still wary, about undesirable reactions—lowering of blood pressure, damage to the liver or white blood cells... Answered by Ila Ferrao 1 year ago.


Why the meprobamate 400 used in treatment of last-stages-of-colon-cancer?
why the meprobamate 400 used in treatment of last-stages-of-colon-cancer Asked by Arlene Derocher 1 year ago.

Meprobamate has no anticancer use but it is given as anxiolytic in last stage cancer. MEPROBAMATE (Equanil®, Miltown®, Trancot®) has a sedative action that can cause relaxation and help reduce tension or anxiety. It is recommended for short-term use only. Meprobamate is sometimes used as a sedative before surgical procedures. Federal law prohibits the transfer of meprobamate to any person other than the patient for whom it was prescribed. Generic meprobamate tablets are available. Answered by Moises Roxas 1 year ago.

It isn't used as treatment for any cancer. It's used for anxiety DISORDERS. The stress of everyday life does not qualify for its use, but I can see it being used for severe anxiety that comes with the stress of having cancer, BUT can not see justification in it being used in an end of life treatment. Answered by Fred Saephan 1 year ago.


Can anyone honestly tell me all the side effects of Somas?
I am not sure how it is spelled, so I hope you know the medication I am trying to ask about. Asked by Bernardo Rudes 1 year ago.

I have not heard of this drug prescribed in years. There is something out there in the news relating to Soma Compound. I know that I took it for a muscle relaxer years ago. I gave one to a friend at work and he lived about thirty minutes from the airport. He told me the next day that he had to pull over to the side of the road and take a nap. As for me I don't think it affected me to that extreme. Answered by Rosario Vaisman 1 year ago.

Unfortunately, I have no idea what drug you are referring to. You didn't even mention what the drug is for. Assuming you are in the US, here in Australia it may be released under a different name. I suggest you locate the DRUG INFO number either in your phone book, or on the medication box itself, and seek your information that way. For future reference, it is best to use the active ingredient when asking about drugs, as the names change around the world. Good luck, and I hope you find what you need. Answered by Alexander Cother 1 year ago.

Common side effects : chest pain, chills, cold sweats, confusion, convulsions, cough, dizziness, faintness, lightheadedness, fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat or pulse, fever, loss of bladder control, muscle spasm or jerking of all extremities, painful or difficult urination, shortness of breath, sore throat, sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth, sudden loss of consciousness, swollen glands, unusual bleeding or bruising, unusual tiredness or weakness etc. Answered by Arnulfo Mavropoulos 1 year ago.


How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates?
I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only... Asked by Janina Lucena 1 year ago.

I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only cough syrup. Also, what and how does it get broken down? What illicits drugs can they break down? Answered by Zenaida Chevrier 1 year ago.

Any toxicology lab will be able to detect the "broken down" metabolites of any substance they want to find: If cough syrup is all your worried about then tell "them" exactly what you took and they can tell if it's the same compounds or not using GC/MS (gas chromotography/mass spec) Drug Profile, Urine (Nine Drugs), Immunoassay With GC/MS Confirmation Synonyms: IA-9 Test Includes: Amphetamines; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; cannabinoids (marijuana); cocaine; methadone (Dolophine®); opiates (codeine, morphine only); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene Specimen: Urine (random) Volume: 45 mL (about 4 tablespoons) Container: Use plastic urine drug bottle and evidence tape or tamper-evident container for forensic specimen. Collection kits are available by request from the laboratory. GC/MS confirmation Methodology: Initial test by immunoassay; confirmation of positives by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) ---------------------- For a typical drug screen usually 20 mL of urine should be enough for additional drug testing. (per LabCorp.com) If a compound wants to be detected, it can be found using the instrumentation available in most toxicology labs. •Volatiles: acetone; ethanol; isopropanol; methanol •*Amphetamines: amphetamine (Dexedrine®), ephedrine/pseudoephedrine; methamphetamine (Desoxyn®); phenmetrazine (Preludin®); phentermine (Ionamin®); phenylpropanolamine •*Antidepressants: amitriptyline (Elavil®); desipramine (Norpramin®); doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®); imipramine (Tofranil®); nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •*Barbiturates: amobarbital (Amytal®); butabarbital (Butisol Sodium®); pentobarbital (Nembutal®); phenobarbital (Luminal®); secobarbital (Seconal®) •*Benzodiazepines: chlordiazepoxide (Librium®); diazepam (Valium®) •*Opiates: codeine; morphine •*Phenothiazines: chlorpromazine (Thorazine®); promazine (Sparine®); thioridazine (Mellaril®) •Others: acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Datril®); caffeine; carbamazepine (Tegretol®); cimetidine (Tagamet®); cocaine and/or metabolite; diphenhydramine (Benadryl®); ethchlorvynol (Placidyl®); glutethimide (Doriden®); meperidine (Demerol®); meprobamate (Miltown®, Equanil); methadone (Dolophine®); nicotine; pentazocine (Talwin®); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene (Darvon®) or its metabolite norpropoxyphene; quinine/quinidine *Reported as a class if negative. Listed drugs reported if positive. Urine testing shows drug use over the last 2 or 3 days for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates. Marijuana and its metabolites, cannabinoids, may be detectable for several weeks. Hair samples, which test the root end of the hair, reflect drug use within the last 2 to 3 months but not the most recent 2-3 weeks - the amount of time it takes for the hair to grow. Saliva detects which drugs have been used in the last 24 hours. Samples of sweat may be collected on an absorbent patch worn for several days to weeks and therefore can indicate drug use at any point during that extended period of time. These other types of samples are often used for specific purposes. For instance, hair samples may be used as an alternative to urine testing for employment or accident drug testing. Sweat testing may be used as a court-ordered monitoring tool in those who have been convicted of drug use, while saliva is often used by the insurance industry to test insurance applicants for drug use. Answered by Lance Blatt 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates? I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up... Answered by Terrance Kendrick 1 year ago.

It is possible he will fail the lab test. The home tests are not the same and aren't as good as the lab tests. There is a bit of misinformation out there and that is cocaine is out of your system in 2-3 days. Well while that might be true LABS DON'T TEST FOR THE DRUG ITSELF. Yes, that is true, they look for the metabolite. A metabolite is something that the body produces when it ingests something, in the case of cocaine it is "benzoylecgonine" that will stay around long after the drug is gone, up to 30 days for a frequent user. THE DRUG ITSELF can stay in your bloodstream up to 72 hours. It can stay in your urine for about 1 or up to 3 days after single use. Habitual or chronic use can be detected in urine for up to 12 weeks depending on quantity, duration, and frequency of use. Answered by Derrick Cavanaugh 1 year ago.

Who is "they"? Are you on probation or parole and court-ordered to submit to drug testing? Is this a pre-employment or random employment drug testing in accordance with your company's policies? If not, then no one can drug test you without your consent. Whatever you do, don't use synthetic urine. I used it once and it came back positive for THC. Answered by Rickie Koury 1 year ago.


What are some phsycoactive drugs?
Asked by Maye Ivancich 1 year ago.

A psychoactive/psychotropic drug is defined as a substance of natural, semisynthetic, or synthetic origin that may or may not be legal or have medical value and affects the nervous system, primarily the central nervous system, and alters brain function, resulting in changes in cognition, perception, mood, and/or behaviour. Examples include: Benzodiazepines: Xanax (alprazolam), Librium (chlordiazepoxide), Klonopin, Rivotril (clonazepam), Valium (diazepam), Ativan (lorazepam), Rohypnol (flunitrazepam), Restoril, Normison, Euhypnos (temazepam), Halcion (triazolam), and Mogadon (nitrazepam) Barbiturates Luminal (phenobarbital), Nembutal (pentobarbital), Mebaral (mephobarbital), Seconal (secobarbital), Butisol (butabarbital), and Amytal (amobarbital) Amphetamines Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts), Desoxyn (methamphetamine), Dexedrine (dextroamphetamine), Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine), and methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy). Opioids (narcotics) Codeine (Tylenol #3, Codeine Contin), Morphine (MS Contin, MS-IR), Hydrocodone (Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Lorcet), Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Oxy-IR), Oxymorphone (Opana), Hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo, Hydromorph Contin), Diacetylmorphine/diamorphine (Heroin), Fentanyl (Duragesic), Pethidine/meperidine (Demerol), and Methadone (Dolophine). Antihistamines Vistaril, Atarax (hydroxyzine), Diclectin (doxylamine), and Benadryl (diphenhydramine) Hallucinogens Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), mescaline, psilocybin/psilocin mushrooms, and Salvia divinorum Antipsychotics (neuroleptics) Haldol (haloperidol), Thorazine, Largactil (chlorpromazine), Stelazine (trifluoperazine), Abilify (aripiprazole), Geodon, Zeldox (ziprasidone), Risperdal (risperidone), Seroquel (quetiapine), and Zyprexa (olanzapine). Antidepressants Elavil (amitriptyline), Tofranil (imipramine), Nardil (phenelzine), Paxil (paroxetine), Prozac (fluoxetine), Zoloft (sertraline), Effexor (venlafaxine), Desyrel (trazodone), and Wellbutrin (bupropion) Mood stabilizers/anticonvulsants/antiepilepti... (AEDs) Eskalith (lithium carbonate), PMS-Lithium Citrate (lithium citrate), Keppra (levetiracetam), Dilantin (phenytoin), Lamictal (lamotrigine), Tegretol (carbamazepine), Trileptal (oxcarbazepine), Topamax (topiramate), Neurontin (gabapentin), and Depakote (valproate semisodium, divalproex sodium) Anxiolytics/tranquilizers Miltown, Equanil (meprobamate), Lyrica (pregabalin), and most barbiturates and benzodiazepines are also anxiolytics/tranquilizers. Sedative/Hypnotics Ambien (zolpidem), Sonata, Starnoc (zaleplon), Imovane, Rhovane (zopiclone), Lunesta (eszopiclone), Heminevrin (clomethiazole, chlormethiazole), Somnote, Noctec (chloral hydrate), Rozerem (ramelteon), Placidyl (ethchlorvynol), Doriden (glutethimide), Quaalude (methaqualone) and most barbiturates and benzodiazepines are also used as sedative/hypnotics. Stimulants/ sympathomimetics Focalin (dexmethylphenidate), Ritalin, Attenta, Concerta, Methylin, Metadate CD, Metadate ER, Methylin ER, Ritalin LA, Ritalin SR, Daytrana (methylphenidate), Provigil, Alertec (modafinil), Nuvigil (armodafanil), cocaine/crack, caffeine, nicotine, and all amphetamines are also stimulants/ sympathomimetics Lastly drugs are classified either by their clinical classification or their chemical classification. Clinical classification is more commonly used and more difficult to understand- examples include antidepressants, pain killers, sleeping pills, narcotics, anti-anxiety medications, uppers, downers, stimulants, and depressants. This terminology is over simplified and does not take into account the fact that all drugs have multiple uses. Also using clinical classifications is typically ambiguous since people may define things differently- for example many people consider downers/depressants to include opioids and many believe that depressants cause depression (which is rarely true). I have listed a mix of drugs, some classified chemically (amphetamines, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, opioids) and some classified clinically to make it a bit less complicated. Answered by Wes Gotham 1 year ago.

Erowid.org. You'll find info on every known psychoactive. Answered by Cira Hachey 1 year ago.


Over the counter anti-depressants?
what anti-depressants can i buy over the counter and where from? Asked by Jonelle Keilty 1 year ago.

Equanil, Nardil, Iproniazid are effective tranquilizers yet u should take physician's advice Answered by Harold Bleakley 1 year ago.

i dont really think you can. Depression is diagnosed by a trained personnel. I wouldnt reccomend it without consulting somebody anyway, because the side effects are dangerous, and your doctor will know more than you which is best for you! Answered by Ellie Javellana 1 year ago.

There are no over the counter antidepressants that have any evidenced based efficacy. Answered by Luanna Kuster 1 year ago.


The dose on hand is 400 mg tabs.how many tab(s) are given?
the physician orders 0.2 g meprobamate (equanil,miltown) tabs. The dose on hand is 400 mg tabs.how many tab(s) are given? Asked by Neoma Imbrogno 1 year ago.

one-half of one tablet Answered by Georgeanna Blihovde 1 year ago.

Here's the formula....desired (what is ordered by the physician) divided by what you have on hand times the quantity (in this case tablets). 0.2 grams / 400 mg X 1 tablet first you will have to convert the 0.2 g to milligrams by moving the decimal 3 places to the right making for 200 mg. now you have 200 mg / 400 mg X 1 tablet. I'll let you do the math from here. Answered by Jame Vayner 1 year ago.


What chemical substances can be used to treat sleep deprivation?
Sorry, scratch out that caffeine part. Asked by Minerva Berkowitz 1 year ago.

Hypnotic drugs such as seconal, veronal, equanil, nembutal can be used. Answered by Dirk Burgett 1 year ago.

If the cause of sleep deprivation is depression, you would need to increase Serotonin levels in the brain. Depression could be a major cause of insomnia in which case a doctor would assign drugs that are used to increase serotonin Answered by Gala Lanoue 1 year ago.

Wont caffeine make it worse? You should treat it with sleeping pills. Answered by Loyce Pingitore 1 year ago.


I have a question about synthetic compounds- is there any way to figure this out?
Someone asked me a random question about whether the drugs chlorpromazine and miltown share the same synthetic compound. I have no idea what this means. Do you know the answer, ot could you at least point me in the right direction to finding out? Asked by Jerica Hootsell 1 year ago.

Warning to users of tranquilizing drugs: they should not be taken with alcohol... Tranquilizer: Chlorpromazine (brand name: Thorazine)... Meprobamate: (brand names: Miltown, Equanil)... Meprobamate (brand names: Miltown, Equanil) effects marked improvement in a somewhat smaller percentage of hospital patients than chlorpromazine or reserpine, but is most popular with the patients, as well as with millions of walkie-talkie neurotics. Noted for its sleep-inducing action and lack of side effects, it also seems to check excessive sweating (which some of the other drugs aggravate)... Chlorpromazine (brand name: Thorazine), first of the ataraxics or tranquilizing drugs used in North America, has clinched its leadership as the one most generally effective in treating the severe mental illnesses that usually need hospitalization. The earlier used, the better. It is best in agitated cases, least effective (and occasionally harmful) in the depressed. After three years of experience with it, doctors are less jittery, though still wary, about undesirable reactions—lowering of blood pressure, damage to the liver or white blood cells... Answered by Catrice Wackerbarth 1 year ago.


Why the meprobamate 400 used in treatment of last-stages-of-colon-cancer?
why the meprobamate 400 used in treatment of last-stages-of-colon-cancer Asked by Dusti Burnaugh 1 year ago.

Meprobamate has no anticancer use but it is given as anxiolytic in last stage cancer. MEPROBAMATE (Equanil®, Miltown®, Trancot®) has a sedative action that can cause relaxation and help reduce tension or anxiety. It is recommended for short-term use only. Meprobamate is sometimes used as a sedative before surgical procedures. Federal law prohibits the transfer of meprobamate to any person other than the patient for whom it was prescribed. Generic meprobamate tablets are available. Answered by Haywood Clouden 1 year ago.

It isn't used as treatment for any cancer. It's used for anxiety DISORDERS. The stress of everyday life does not qualify for its use, but I can see it being used for severe anxiety that comes with the stress of having cancer, BUT can not see justification in it being used in an end of life treatment. Answered by Drew Tagalog 1 year ago.


Can anyone honestly tell me all the side effects of Somas?
I am not sure how it is spelled, so I hope you know the medication I am trying to ask about. Asked by Sidney Bossi 1 year ago.

I have not heard of this drug prescribed in years. There is something out there in the news relating to Soma Compound. I know that I took it for a muscle relaxer years ago. I gave one to a friend at work and he lived about thirty minutes from the airport. He told me the next day that he had to pull over to the side of the road and take a nap. As for me I don't think it affected me to that extreme. Answered by Vida Kimble 1 year ago.

Unfortunately, I have no idea what drug you are referring to. You didn't even mention what the drug is for. Assuming you are in the US, here in Australia it may be released under a different name. I suggest you locate the DRUG INFO number either in your phone book, or on the medication box itself, and seek your information that way. For future reference, it is best to use the active ingredient when asking about drugs, as the names change around the world. Good luck, and I hope you find what you need. Answered by Ninfa Beardsley 1 year ago.

Common side effects : chest pain, chills, cold sweats, confusion, convulsions, cough, dizziness, faintness, lightheadedness, fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat or pulse, fever, loss of bladder control, muscle spasm or jerking of all extremities, painful or difficult urination, shortness of breath, sore throat, sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth, sudden loss of consciousness, swollen glands, unusual bleeding or bruising, unusual tiredness or weakness etc. Answered by Percy Riblet 1 year ago.


How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates?
I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only... Asked by Towanda Granquist 1 year ago.

I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only cough syrup. Also, what and how does it get broken down? What illicits drugs can they break down? Answered by Jade Dorning 1 year ago.

Any toxicology lab will be able to detect the "broken down" metabolites of any substance they want to find: If cough syrup is all your worried about then tell "them" exactly what you took and they can tell if it's the same compounds or not using GC/MS (gas chromotography/mass spec) Drug Profile, Urine (Nine Drugs), Immunoassay With GC/MS Confirmation Synonyms: IA-9 Test Includes: Amphetamines; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; cannabinoids (marijuana); cocaine; methadone (Dolophine®); opiates (codeine, morphine only); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene Specimen: Urine (random) Volume: 45 mL (about 4 tablespoons) Container: Use plastic urine drug bottle and evidence tape or tamper-evident container for forensic specimen. Collection kits are available by request from the laboratory. GC/MS confirmation Methodology: Initial test by immunoassay; confirmation of positives by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) ---------------------- For a typical drug screen usually 20 mL of urine should be enough for additional drug testing. (per LabCorp.com) If a compound wants to be detected, it can be found using the instrumentation available in most toxicology labs. •Volatiles: acetone; ethanol; isopropanol; methanol •*Amphetamines: amphetamine (Dexedrine®), ephedrine/pseudoephedrine; methamphetamine (Desoxyn®); phenmetrazine (Preludin®); phentermine (Ionamin®); phenylpropanolamine •*Antidepressants: amitriptyline (Elavil®); desipramine (Norpramin®); doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®); imipramine (Tofranil®); nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •*Barbiturates: amobarbital (Amytal®); butabarbital (Butisol Sodium®); pentobarbital (Nembutal®); phenobarbital (Luminal®); secobarbital (Seconal®) •*Benzodiazepines: chlordiazepoxide (Librium®); diazepam (Valium®) •*Opiates: codeine; morphine •*Phenothiazines: chlorpromazine (Thorazine®); promazine (Sparine®); thioridazine (Mellaril®) •Others: acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Datril®); caffeine; carbamazepine (Tegretol®); cimetidine (Tagamet®); cocaine and/or metabolite; diphenhydramine (Benadryl®); ethchlorvynol (Placidyl®); glutethimide (Doriden®); meperidine (Demerol®); meprobamate (Miltown®, Equanil); methadone (Dolophine®); nicotine; pentazocine (Talwin®); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene (Darvon®) or its metabolite norpropoxyphene; quinine/quinidine *Reported as a class if negative. Listed drugs reported if positive. Urine testing shows drug use over the last 2 or 3 days for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates. Marijuana and its metabolites, cannabinoids, may be detectable for several weeks. Hair samples, which test the root end of the hair, reflect drug use within the last 2 to 3 months but not the most recent 2-3 weeks - the amount of time it takes for the hair to grow. Saliva detects which drugs have been used in the last 24 hours. Samples of sweat may be collected on an absorbent patch worn for several days to weeks and therefore can indicate drug use at any point during that extended period of time. These other types of samples are often used for specific purposes. For instance, hair samples may be used as an alternative to urine testing for employment or accident drug testing. Sweat testing may be used as a court-ordered monitoring tool in those who have been convicted of drug use, while saliva is often used by the insurance industry to test insurance applicants for drug use. Answered by Ji Pater 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates? I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up... Answered by Toya Keyworth 1 year ago.

It is possible he will fail the lab test. The home tests are not the same and aren't as good as the lab tests. There is a bit of misinformation out there and that is cocaine is out of your system in 2-3 days. Well while that might be true LABS DON'T TEST FOR THE DRUG ITSELF. Yes, that is true, they look for the metabolite. A metabolite is something that the body produces when it ingests something, in the case of cocaine it is "benzoylecgonine" that will stay around long after the drug is gone, up to 30 days for a frequent user. THE DRUG ITSELF can stay in your bloodstream up to 72 hours. It can stay in your urine for about 1 or up to 3 days after single use. Habitual or chronic use can be detected in urine for up to 12 weeks depending on quantity, duration, and frequency of use. Answered by Kenda Skane 1 year ago.

Who is "they"? Are you on probation or parole and court-ordered to submit to drug testing? Is this a pre-employment or random employment drug testing in accordance with your company's policies? If not, then no one can drug test you without your consent. Whatever you do, don't use synthetic urine. I used it once and it came back positive for THC. Answered by Adrien Boerma 1 year ago.


What are some phsycoactive drugs?
Asked by Renay Sayles 1 year ago.

A psychoactive/psychotropic drug is defined as a substance of natural, semisynthetic, or synthetic origin that may or may not be legal or have medical value and affects the nervous system, primarily the central nervous system, and alters brain function, resulting in changes in cognition, perception, mood, and/or behaviour. Examples include: Benzodiazepines: Xanax (alprazolam), Librium (chlordiazepoxide), Klonopin, Rivotril (clonazepam), Valium (diazepam), Ativan (lorazepam), Rohypnol (flunitrazepam), Restoril, Normison, Euhypnos (temazepam), Halcion (triazolam), and Mogadon (nitrazepam) Barbiturates Luminal (phenobarbital), Nembutal (pentobarbital), Mebaral (mephobarbital), Seconal (secobarbital), Butisol (butabarbital), and Amytal (amobarbital) Amphetamines Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts), Desoxyn (methamphetamine), Dexedrine (dextroamphetamine), Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine), and methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy). Opioids (narcotics) Codeine (Tylenol #3, Codeine Contin), Morphine (MS Contin, MS-IR), Hydrocodone (Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Lorcet), Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Oxy-IR), Oxymorphone (Opana), Hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo, Hydromorph Contin), Diacetylmorphine/diamorphine (Heroin), Fentanyl (Duragesic), Pethidine/meperidine (Demerol), and Methadone (Dolophine). Antihistamines Vistaril, Atarax (hydroxyzine), Diclectin (doxylamine), and Benadryl (diphenhydramine) Hallucinogens Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), mescaline, psilocybin/psilocin mushrooms, and Salvia divinorum Antipsychotics (neuroleptics) Haldol (haloperidol), Thorazine, Largactil (chlorpromazine), Stelazine (trifluoperazine), Abilify (aripiprazole), Geodon, Zeldox (ziprasidone), Risperdal (risperidone), Seroquel (quetiapine), and Zyprexa (olanzapine). Antidepressants Elavil (amitriptyline), Tofranil (imipramine), Nardil (phenelzine), Paxil (paroxetine), Prozac (fluoxetine), Zoloft (sertraline), Effexor (venlafaxine), Desyrel (trazodone), and Wellbutrin (bupropion) Mood stabilizers/anticonvulsants/antiepilepti... (AEDs) Eskalith (lithium carbonate), PMS-Lithium Citrate (lithium citrate), Keppra (levetiracetam), Dilantin (phenytoin), Lamictal (lamotrigine), Tegretol (carbamazepine), Trileptal (oxcarbazepine), Topamax (topiramate), Neurontin (gabapentin), and Depakote (valproate semisodium, divalproex sodium) Anxiolytics/tranquilizers Miltown, Equanil (meprobamate), Lyrica (pregabalin), and most barbiturates and benzodiazepines are also anxiolytics/tranquilizers. Sedative/Hypnotics Ambien (zolpidem), Sonata, Starnoc (zaleplon), Imovane, Rhovane (zopiclone), Lunesta (eszopiclone), Heminevrin (clomethiazole, chlormethiazole), Somnote, Noctec (chloral hydrate), Rozerem (ramelteon), Placidyl (ethchlorvynol), Doriden (glutethimide), Quaalude (methaqualone) and most barbiturates and benzodiazepines are also used as sedative/hypnotics. Stimulants/ sympathomimetics Focalin (dexmethylphenidate), Ritalin, Attenta, Concerta, Methylin, Metadate CD, Metadate ER, Methylin ER, Ritalin LA, Ritalin SR, Daytrana (methylphenidate), Provigil, Alertec (modafinil), Nuvigil (armodafanil), cocaine/crack, caffeine, nicotine, and all amphetamines are also stimulants/ sympathomimetics Lastly drugs are classified either by their clinical classification or their chemical classification. Clinical classification is more commonly used and more difficult to understand- examples include antidepressants, pain killers, sleeping pills, narcotics, anti-anxiety medications, uppers, downers, stimulants, and depressants. This terminology is over simplified and does not take into account the fact that all drugs have multiple uses. Also using clinical classifications is typically ambiguous since people may define things differently- for example many people consider downers/depressants to include opioids and many believe that depressants cause depression (which is rarely true). I have listed a mix of drugs, some classified chemically (amphetamines, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, opioids) and some classified clinically to make it a bit less complicated. Answered by Winona Futter 1 year ago.

Erowid.org. You'll find info on every known psychoactive. Answered by Landon Asma 1 year ago.


Over the counter anti-depressants?
what anti-depressants can i buy over the counter and where from? Asked by William Talford 1 year ago.

Equanil, Nardil, Iproniazid are effective tranquilizers yet u should take physician's advice Answered by Mui Dannatt 1 year ago.

i dont really think you can. Depression is diagnosed by a trained personnel. I wouldnt reccomend it without consulting somebody anyway, because the side effects are dangerous, and your doctor will know more than you which is best for you! Answered by Leopoldo Tress 1 year ago.

There are no over the counter antidepressants that have any evidenced based efficacy. Answered by Dane Mckenzie 1 year ago.


The dose on hand is 400 mg tabs.how many tab(s) are given?
the physician orders 0.2 g meprobamate (equanil,miltown) tabs. The dose on hand is 400 mg tabs.how many tab(s) are given? Asked by Isaias Perrota 1 year ago.

one-half of one tablet Answered by Britteny Entress 1 year ago.

Here's the formula....desired (what is ordered by the physician) divided by what you have on hand times the quantity (in this case tablets). 0.2 grams / 400 mg X 1 tablet first you will have to convert the 0.2 g to milligrams by moving the decimal 3 places to the right making for 200 mg. now you have 200 mg / 400 mg X 1 tablet. I'll let you do the math from here. Answered by Anh Tegtmeyer 1 year ago.


What chemical substances can be used to treat sleep deprivation?
Sorry, scratch out that caffeine part. Asked by Pamila Eckard 1 year ago.

Hypnotic drugs such as seconal, veronal, equanil, nembutal can be used. Answered by Catina Luchesi 1 year ago.

If the cause of sleep deprivation is depression, you would need to increase Serotonin levels in the brain. Depression could be a major cause of insomnia in which case a doctor would assign drugs that are used to increase serotonin Answered by Isabelle Fiveash 1 year ago.

Wont caffeine make it worse? You should treat it with sleeping pills. Answered by Adelina Mallery 1 year ago.


I have a question about synthetic compounds- is there any way to figure this out?
Someone asked me a random question about whether the drugs chlorpromazine and miltown share the same synthetic compound. I have no idea what this means. Do you know the answer, ot could you at least point me in the right direction to finding out? Asked by Bonny Abo 1 year ago.

Warning to users of tranquilizing drugs: they should not be taken with alcohol... Tranquilizer: Chlorpromazine (brand name: Thorazine)... Meprobamate: (brand names: Miltown, Equanil)... Meprobamate (brand names: Miltown, Equanil) effects marked improvement in a somewhat smaller percentage of hospital patients than chlorpromazine or reserpine, but is most popular with the patients, as well as with millions of walkie-talkie neurotics. Noted for its sleep-inducing action and lack of side effects, it also seems to check excessive sweating (which some of the other drugs aggravate)... Chlorpromazine (brand name: Thorazine), first of the ataraxics or tranquilizing drugs used in North America, has clinched its leadership as the one most generally effective in treating the severe mental illnesses that usually need hospitalization. The earlier used, the better. It is best in agitated cases, least effective (and occasionally harmful) in the depressed. After three years of experience with it, doctors are less jittery, though still wary, about undesirable reactions—lowering of blood pressure, damage to the liver or white blood cells... Answered by Emmaline Antunes 1 year ago.


Why the meprobamate 400 used in treatment of last-stages-of-colon-cancer?
why the meprobamate 400 used in treatment of last-stages-of-colon-cancer Asked by Etta Pizzino 1 year ago.

Meprobamate has no anticancer use but it is given as anxiolytic in last stage cancer. MEPROBAMATE (Equanil®, Miltown®, Trancot®) has a sedative action that can cause relaxation and help reduce tension or anxiety. It is recommended for short-term use only. Meprobamate is sometimes used as a sedative before surgical procedures. Federal law prohibits the transfer of meprobamate to any person other than the patient for whom it was prescribed. Generic meprobamate tablets are available. Answered by Jospeh Chhun 1 year ago.

It isn't used as treatment for any cancer. It's used for anxiety DISORDERS. The stress of everyday life does not qualify for its use, but I can see it being used for severe anxiety that comes with the stress of having cancer, BUT can not see justification in it being used in an end of life treatment. Answered by Twana Manny 1 year ago.


Can anyone honestly tell me all the side effects of Somas?
I am not sure how it is spelled, so I hope you know the medication I am trying to ask about. Asked by Katrice Tamez 1 year ago.

I have not heard of this drug prescribed in years. There is something out there in the news relating to Soma Compound. I know that I took it for a muscle relaxer years ago. I gave one to a friend at work and he lived about thirty minutes from the airport. He told me the next day that he had to pull over to the side of the road and take a nap. As for me I don't think it affected me to that extreme. Answered by Lashaunda Bradigan 1 year ago.

Unfortunately, I have no idea what drug you are referring to. You didn't even mention what the drug is for. Assuming you are in the US, here in Australia it may be released under a different name. I suggest you locate the DRUG INFO number either in your phone book, or on the medication box itself, and seek your information that way. For future reference, it is best to use the active ingredient when asking about drugs, as the names change around the world. Good luck, and I hope you find what you need. Answered by Alene Breedon 1 year ago.

Common side effects : chest pain, chills, cold sweats, confusion, convulsions, cough, dizziness, faintness, lightheadedness, fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat or pulse, fever, loss of bladder control, muscle spasm or jerking of all extremities, painful or difficult urination, shortness of breath, sore throat, sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth, sudden loss of consciousness, swollen glands, unusual bleeding or bruising, unusual tiredness or weakness etc. Answered by Chauncey Stadtmiller 1 year ago.


How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates?
I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only... Asked by Nana Ullah 1 year ago.

I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up that it was only cough syrup. Also, what and how does it get broken down? What illicits drugs can they break down? Answered by Paola Conforti 1 year ago.

Any toxicology lab will be able to detect the "broken down" metabolites of any substance they want to find: If cough syrup is all your worried about then tell "them" exactly what you took and they can tell if it's the same compounds or not using GC/MS (gas chromotography/mass spec) Drug Profile, Urine (Nine Drugs), Immunoassay With GC/MS Confirmation Synonyms: IA-9 Test Includes: Amphetamines; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; cannabinoids (marijuana); cocaine; methadone (Dolophine®); opiates (codeine, morphine only); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene Specimen: Urine (random) Volume: 45 mL (about 4 tablespoons) Container: Use plastic urine drug bottle and evidence tape or tamper-evident container for forensic specimen. Collection kits are available by request from the laboratory. GC/MS confirmation Methodology: Initial test by immunoassay; confirmation of positives by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) ---------------------- For a typical drug screen usually 20 mL of urine should be enough for additional drug testing. (per LabCorp.com) If a compound wants to be detected, it can be found using the instrumentation available in most toxicology labs. •Volatiles: acetone; ethanol; isopropanol; methanol •*Amphetamines: amphetamine (Dexedrine®), ephedrine/pseudoephedrine; methamphetamine (Desoxyn®); phenmetrazine (Preludin®); phentermine (Ionamin®); phenylpropanolamine •*Antidepressants: amitriptyline (Elavil®); desipramine (Norpramin®); doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®); imipramine (Tofranil®); nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •*Barbiturates: amobarbital (Amytal®); butabarbital (Butisol Sodium®); pentobarbital (Nembutal®); phenobarbital (Luminal®); secobarbital (Seconal®) •*Benzodiazepines: chlordiazepoxide (Librium®); diazepam (Valium®) •*Opiates: codeine; morphine •*Phenothiazines: chlorpromazine (Thorazine®); promazine (Sparine®); thioridazine (Mellaril®) •Others: acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Datril®); caffeine; carbamazepine (Tegretol®); cimetidine (Tagamet®); cocaine and/or metabolite; diphenhydramine (Benadryl®); ethchlorvynol (Placidyl®); glutethimide (Doriden®); meperidine (Demerol®); meprobamate (Miltown®, Equanil); methadone (Dolophine®); nicotine; pentazocine (Talwin®); phencyclidine (PCP); propoxyphene (Darvon®) or its metabolite norpropoxyphene; quinine/quinidine *Reported as a class if negative. Listed drugs reported if positive. Urine testing shows drug use over the last 2 or 3 days for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates. Marijuana and its metabolites, cannabinoids, may be detectable for several weeks. Hair samples, which test the root end of the hair, reflect drug use within the last 2 to 3 months but not the most recent 2-3 weeks - the amount of time it takes for the hair to grow. Saliva detects which drugs have been used in the last 24 hours. Samples of sweat may be collected on an absorbent patch worn for several days to weeks and therefore can indicate drug use at any point during that extended period of time. These other types of samples are often used for specific purposes. For instance, hair samples may be used as an alternative to urine testing for employment or accident drug testing. Sweat testing may be used as a court-ordered monitoring tool in those who have been convicted of drug use, while saliva is often used by the insurance industry to test insurance applicants for drug use. Answered by Linwood Falkner 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much urine is needed to do an extensive lab test break down of opiates? I know they had about 3 oz to do multiple tests after delivery of my baby. I know they wanted to test for illicit drug use. Opiates did come up in my system. I was prescribed cough syrup that had morphine in it and i want to make sure they had enough urine to do the extensive lab work to back up... Answered by Erasmo Declet 1 year ago.

It is possible he will fail the lab test. The home tests are not the same and aren't as good as the lab tests. There is a bit of misinformation out there and that is cocaine is out of your system in 2-3 days. Well while that might be true LABS DON'T TEST FOR THE DRUG ITSELF. Yes, that is true, they look for the metabolite. A metabolite is something that the body produces when it ingests something, in the case of cocaine it is "benzoylecgonine" that will stay around long after the drug is gone, up to 30 days for a frequent user. THE DRUG ITSELF can stay in your bloodstream up to 72 hours. It can stay in your urine for about 1 or up to 3 days after single use. Habitual or chronic use can be detected in urine for up to 12 weeks depending on quantity, duration, and frequency of use. Answered by Elinore Paplow 1 year ago.

Who is "they"? Are you on probation or parole and court-ordered to submit to drug testing? Is this a pre-employment or random employment drug testing in accordance with your company's policies? If not, then no one can drug test you without your consent. Whatever you do, don't use synthetic urine. I used it once and it came back positive for THC. Answered by Chan Monk 1 year ago.


What are some phsycoactive drugs?
Asked by Caron Nagai 1 year ago.

A psychoactive/psychotropic drug is defined as a substance of natural, semisynthetic, or synthetic origin that may or may not be legal or have medical value and affects the nervous system, primarily the central nervous system, and alters brain function, resulting in changes in cognition, perception, mood, and/or behaviour. Examples include: Benzodiazepines: Xanax (alprazolam), Librium (chlordiazepoxide), Klonopin, Rivotril (clonazepam), Valium (diazepam), Ativan (lorazepam), Rohypnol (flunitrazepam), Restoril, Normison, Euhypnos (temazepam), Halcion (triazolam), and Mogadon (nitrazepam) Barbiturates Luminal (phenobarbital), Nembutal (pentobarbital), Mebaral (mephobarbital), Seconal (secobarbital), Butisol (butabarbital), and Amytal (amobarbital) Amphetamines Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts), Desoxyn (methamphetamine), Dexedrine (dextroamphetamine), Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine), and methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy). Opioids (narcotics) Codeine (Tylenol #3, Codeine Contin), Morphine (MS Contin, MS-IR), Hydrocodone (Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Lorcet), Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Oxy-IR), Oxymorphone (Opana), Hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo, Hydromorph Contin), Diacetylmorphine/diamorphine (Heroin), Fentanyl (Duragesic), Pethidine/meperidine (Demerol), and Methadone (Dolophine). Antihistamines Vistaril, Atarax (hydroxyzine), Diclectin (doxylamine), and Benadryl (diphenhydramine) Hallucinogens Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), mescaline, psilocybin/psilocin mushrooms, and Salvia divinorum Antipsychotics (neuroleptics) Haldol (haloperidol), Thorazine, Largactil (chlorpromazine), Stelazine (trifluoperazine), Abilify (aripiprazole), Geodon, Zeldox (ziprasidone), Risperdal (risperidone), Seroquel (quetiapine), and Zyprexa (olanzapine). Antidepressants Elavil (amitriptyline), Tofranil (imipramine), Nardil (phenelzine), Paxil (paroxetine), Prozac (fluoxetine), Zoloft (sertraline), Effexor (venlafaxine), Desyrel (trazodone), and Wellbutrin (bupropion) Mood stabilizers/anticonvulsants/antiepilepti... (AEDs) Eskalith (lithium carbonate), PMS-Lithium Citrate (lithium citrate), Keppra (levetiracetam), Dilantin (phenytoin), Lamictal (lamotrigine), Tegretol (carbamazepine), Trileptal (oxcarbazepine), Topamax (topiramate), Neurontin (gabapentin), and Depakote (valproate semisodium, divalproex sodium) Anxiolytics/tranquilizers Miltown, Equanil (meprobamate), Lyrica (pregabalin), and most barbiturates and benzodiazepines are also anxiolytics/tranquilizers. Sedative/Hypnotics Ambien (zolpidem), Sonata, Starnoc (zaleplon), Imovane, Rhovane (zopiclone), Lunesta (eszopiclone), Heminevrin (clomethiazole, chlormethiazole), Somnote, Noctec (chloral hydrate), Rozerem (ramelteon), Placidyl (ethchlorvynol), Doriden (glutethimide), Quaalude (methaqualone) and most barbiturates and benzodiazepines are also used as sedative/hypnotics. Stimulants/ sympathomimetics Focalin (dexmethylphenidate), Ritalin, Attenta, Concerta, Methylin, Metadate CD, Metadate ER, Methylin ER, Ritalin LA, Ritalin SR, Daytrana (methylphenidate), Provigil, Alertec (modafinil), Nuvigil (armodafanil), cocaine/crack, caffeine, nicotine, and all amphetamines are also stimulants/ sympathomimetics Lastly drugs are classified either by their clinical classification or their chemical classification. Clinical classification is more commonly used and more difficult to understand- examples include antidepressants, pain killers, sleeping pills, narcotics, anti-anxiety medications, uppers, downers, stimulants, and depressants. This terminology is over simplified and does not take into account the fact that all drugs have multiple uses. Also using clinical classifications is typically ambiguous since people may define things differently- for example many people consider downers/depressants to include opioids and many believe that depressants cause depression (which is rarely true). I have listed a mix of drugs, some classified chemically (amphetamines, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, opioids) and some classified clinically to make it a bit less complicated. Answered by Rosalyn Kiehm 1 year ago.

Erowid.org. You'll find info on every known psychoactive. Answered by Corrie Kopf 1 year ago.


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