EPIVIR-HBV Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 021003/001.

Names and composition

"EPIVIR-HBV" is the commercial name of a drug composed of LAMIVUDINE.

Answered questions

What are some of the side effects of Lamivudine?
I am particularly interested in hearing from anyone who is taking, or has taken, the drug. Thank you for your answers. Asked by Doria Foshay 3 months ago.

I found this on-line. Good luck, hope its not for you. If it is for you, may you be at peace with your existential self. Lamivudine should not be taken together with Combivir, a medication that contains a combination of lamivudine and zidovudine. Lamivudine may cause lactic acidosis (the build up of lactic acid in the body). Lactic acidosis symptoms can start slowly and gradually get worse. Symptoms include unusual muscle pain and weakness, trouble breathing, fast or uneven heart rate, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, and numbness or cold feeling in your arms or legs. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these symptoms, even if they are only mild. Early signs of lactic acidosis generally get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Lamivudine can also cause severe or life-threatening effects on your liver or pancreas. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these symptoms while taking lamivudine: severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, fast heart rate, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, low fever, dark urine, clay-colored stools, or jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). Before taking lamivudine, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, liver disease, a history of pancreatitis, or if you have used a medicine similar to lamivudine in the past, such as abacavir (Ziagen), didanosine (Videx), stavudine (Zerit), tenofovir (Viread), zalcitabine (Hivid), or zidovudine (Retrovir). Related Articles » More other Articles If you have hepatitis B you may develop liver symptoms after you stop taking lamivudine, even months after stopping. Your doctor may want to check your liver function on a regular basis for several months after you stop using this medication. Do not miss any scheduled visits. Epivir tablets and liquid contain a higher dose of lamivudine than Epivir-HBV. Epivir is for treating HIV and Epivir-HBV is for treating hepatitis B. Each time you get a refill of this medication, be sure you have received the correct brand to treat your condition. What is lamivudine? Lamivudine is an antiviral medication that prevents human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cells from multiplying in your body. The Epivir brand of lamivudine is used to treat HIV, which causes the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Lamivudine is not a cure for HIV or AIDS. The Epivir-HBV brand of lamivudine is used to treat chronic hepatitis B. Epivir-HBV should not be used in people who are infected with both hepatitis B and HIV. Lamivudine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking lamivudine? Do not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a medicine containing lamivudine, including Combivir, Epzicom, or Trizivir. You should not take lamivudine if you are also taking Combivir (lamivudine/zidovudine). Before taking lamivudine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: kidney disease; liver disease (including hepatitis B); a history of pancreatitis; or if you have used a medicine similar to lamivudine in the past, such as abacavir (Ziagen), didanosine (Videx), stavudine (Zerit), tenofovir (Viread), zalcitabine (Hivid), or zidovudine (Retrovir). If you have any of the conditions listed above, you may not be able to use lamivudine or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. Lamivudine may cause lactic acidosis (the build up of lactic acid in the body). Lactic acidosis symptoms can start slowly and gradually get worse. Symptoms include unusual muscle pain and weakness, trouble breathing, fast or uneven heart rate, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, and numbness or cold feeling in your arms or legs. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these symptoms, even if they are only mild. Early signs of lactic acidosis generally get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Lamivudine can also cause severe or life-threatening effects on your liver or pancreas. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these symptoms while taking lamivudine: severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, fast heart rate, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, low fever, dark urine, clay-colored stools, or jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. HIV can be passed to the baby if the mother is not properly treated during pregnancy. Lamivudine may also be more likely to cause pancreatitis in a pregnant woman. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Take all of your HIV medicines as directed to control your infection while you are pregnant. Your name may need to be listed on an antiviral pregnancy registry when you start using lamivudine. The purpose of this registry is to track the outcome of the pregnancy and delivery to evaluate whether lamivudine had any effect on the baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using lamivudine. Women with HIV or AIDS should not breast-feed at all. Even if your baby is born without HIV, you may still pass the virus to the baby in your breast milk. If you have diabetes, you should know that the liquid forms of this medication contain 3 to 4 grams of sucrose (sugar) per dose. How should I take lamivudine? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take lamivudine with a full glass of water. Lamivudine can be taken with or without food. Measure the liquid form of lamivudine with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one. Epivir tablets and liquid contain a higher dose of lamivudine than Epivir-HBV. Epivir is for treating HIV and Epivir-HBV is for treating hepatitis B. Each time you get a refill of this medication, be sure you have received the correct brand to treat your condition. HIV/AIDS is usually treated with a combination of different drugs. To best treat your condition, use all of your medications as directed by your doctor. Be sure to read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each of your medications. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without advice from your doctor. Every person with HIV or AIDS should remain under the care of a doctor. To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Your liver function may also need to be tested. It is important that you not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor. If you have hepatitis B you may develop liver symptoms after you stop taking this medication, even months after stopping. Your doctor may want to check your liver function at regular visits for several months after you stop using lamivudine. Do not miss any scheduled visits. Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat. You may keep the oral solution (liquid) in the refrigerator but do not let it freeze. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. The symptoms of a lamivudine overdose are not known. What should I avoid while taking lamivudine? Avoid drinking alcohol while taking lamivudine. Alcohol may increase the risk of damage to the pancreas and/or liver. Taking lamivudine will not prevent you from passing HIV to other people through unprotected sex or sharing of needles. Talk with your doctor about safe methods of preventing HIV transmission during sex, such as using a condom and spermicide. Sharing drug or medicine needles is never safe, even for a healthy person. What are the possible side effects of lamivudine? Stop using lamivudine and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these other serious side effects: liver damage - nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); lactic acidosis - muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, nausea with vomiting, and fast or uneven heart rate; pancreatitis - severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, fast heart rate; peripheral neuropathy - numbness, tingling, or pain in your hands or feet; easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness, pale skin; white patches or sores inside your mouth or on your lips; fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms; or any other signs of new infection. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as: cough; sleep problems (insomnia), strange dreams; nausea, vomiting, diarrhea; joint or muscle pain; dizziness, headache, tired feeling; or changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, face, neck, breasts, and trunk). Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect lamivudine? Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: interferon-alfa (Rofe Answered by Sharla Duh 3 months ago.

lamivudine has caused severe (sometimes fatal) liver and blood acid-base problems (lactic acidosis). Immediately notify your doctor if you develop dark urine, unusual fatigue, yellowing of the skin or eyes, rapid breathing, drowsiness, muscle aches, or stomach/abdominal pain. Answered by Marilu Kawski 3 months ago.

Monitor your blood glucose levels. If you have diabetes, monitoring your blood glucose levels will help keep your blood glucose under control and may help improve your neuropathy. Answered by Kathie Vitro 3 months ago.

go to webmd.com it will help out. Answered by Melony Dunderman 3 months ago.

u cant when taking heart pills that i know............ Answered by Tammera Laforte 3 months ago.


Does anyone know the latest treatments for Hepatitis B?
My Fiancée was just diagnosed with Hepatitis B, she lives in the Philippines. What is the latest therapy available for treating this deadly disease? There are ways, I am sure, to arrest and/or even reverse the damage the Hepatitis B virus causes. What are they? The more information you can give the better. Thanks Asked by Jayne Hanry 3 months ago.

If you know you've been exposed to hepatitis B virus, call your doctor immediately. Receiving an injection of hepatitis B immune globulin within 24 hours of coming in contact with the virus may help protect you from developing hepatitis B. You should also receive the first in a series of three shots of the hepatitis B vaccine. Once you've developed chronic hepatitis B, few treatment options exist. In some cases — especially if you don't have signs and symptoms or liver damage — your doctor may suggest monitoring, rather than treating, your condition. In other cases, your doctor may recommend treatment with antiviral medications. When liver damage is severe, liver transplantation may be the only option. Drug therapies Doctors use five drugs to treat chronic HBV infection Interferon. Your body naturally produces interferon to help protect against invading organisms such as viruses. Taking additional interferon that has been made in a laboratory may stimulate your body's immune response to HBV and help prevent the virus from replicating in your cells. Not everyone is a candidate for treatment with interferon. In a few cases, interferon eliminates the virus completely, although the infection can later return. Interferon has a number of side effects — many of which resemble signs and symptoms of hepatitis B. These include depression, fatigue, muscle pains, body aches, fever and nausea. Signs and symptoms are usually worse during the first two weeks of treatment and in the first four to six hours after receiving an injection of interferon. A more serious side effect that may occur over time is a decreased production of red blood cells. Two interferon medications are available — interferon alfa-2b (Intron A) and peginterferon alfa-2a (Pegasys). Intron A is given by injection several times a week. Pegasys is given by injection once a week. Telbivudine (Tyzeka). This antiviral medication helps prevent HBV from replicating in your cells. It's taken in pill form once a day and has almost no side effects for up to a year. Studies show telbivudine is more effective than are other common treatments such as lamivudine and adefovir dipivoxil. However, you can experience a severe worsening of symptoms when you stop taking the drug. And telbivudine can cause a drug-resistant form of HBV, particularly when taken as a long-term treatment. Entecavir (Baraclude). This antiviral medication is taken once a day in pill form. Studies comparing Baraclude with lamivudine found Baraclude to be more effective. Baraclude may cause serious worsening of symptoms when the drug is stopped. Lamivudine (Epivir-HBV). This older antiviral medication is similar to telbivudine, though slightly less strong. It's usually taken in pill form once a day. Side effects during treatment are generally minimal, but you may experience a severe worsening of symptoms when you stop taking the drug. Lamivudine can also cause a drug-resistant form of HBV, particularly when taken as a long-term treatment. Tell your doctor if you have kidney problems or a history of pancreatitis before starting this medication. If you experience worsening jaundice or any unusual bruising, bleeding or fatigue while taking lamivudine, call your doctor right away. Adefovir dipivoxil (Hepsera). This drug, taken in pill form once daily, also helps prevent HBV from replicating in your cells. An added benefit is that it's effective in people who are resistant to lamivudine. Like lamivudine, side effects during treatment usually are minimal, but symptoms may worsen when you go off the medication. And Hepsera may cause kidney problems. Liver transplantation When your liver has been severely damaged, a liver transplant may be an option. The encouraging news is that these transplants are increasingly successful. Unfortunately, not enough donor organs are available for every person who needs a transplant. Answered by Birdie Lepera 3 months ago.

There is a treatment out there called 'o-zone', it clears your body of toxins and even hepatitis. It is used by Anthony Kiedis of Red Hot Chilli Peppers. It is illegal in some countries though and can be difficult to obtain. Another answer is the oral drugs administered by your local health clinic or even a form of chemotherapy. Answered by Bettina Eber 3 months ago.

They have been using antiviral chemotherapy for HBV with some success. It will consist of time released interferon and an oral antiviral medication such as ribavirin. You can call the American Liver Foundation to find out more or visit their website! :o) Answered by Ligia Highbaugh 3 months ago.


Treatment for Hepatitis B?
Asked by Bridgette Vanschoyck 3 months ago.

There are four medications currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of active hepatitis B infection. * Alfa Interferon (Brand names: INTRON A, INFERGEN, ROFERON): Interferon is an antiviral agent with antiproliferative and immunomodulatory agent that is administered by subcutaneous injection daily or three times per week, for 12-16 weeks or longer. With adequate teaching, the injections can easily be administered at home by patients. High pretreatment ALT and lower levels of HBV DNA are the most important predictors of response to alfa interferon therapy. Virologic response to alfa interferon occurs in less than 10 percent of patients with normal ALT. A sustained response can be seen in 15 - 30 percent of patients with HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B and less than half of the responders show sustained clearance of HBsAg. Side Effects: Depression – this is more commonly seen in patients with a prior history of depression. Muscle aches, fatigue, and low grade fevers are common and may be minimized by taking Tylenol (acetaminophen). Occasionally, patients may develop low white blood cell count, headaches, irritability, and thyroid dysfunction. Underlying autoimmune disorders may also be unmasked. * b) Lamivudine (Epivir-HBV, 3TC): inhibits hepatitis B viral DNA synthesis. It should be taken orally, once daily. It is approved for use in adults and children and is usually tolerated well. Occasionally, it may cause a rise in the liver enzyme ALT. Pretreatment ALT is an important predictor of response, with HBeAg conversion occurring in over a third of patients when the ALT is greater than five times normal. While Lamivudine benefits patients with HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B, the vast majority of patients relapse once treatment is stopped. * Adefovir dipivoxil (Hepsera): inhibits DNA polymerase activity and reverse transcriptase. This drug is administered orally on a daily basis and is typically well tolerated. It can be associated with kidney dysfunction, particularly if used in high doses. The optimal duration of therapy is not yet clear. About 50 - 60 percent of HBeAg positive and negative hepatitis B patients respond to this medication; data regarding the durability of response is awaited. * Baraclude (Entecavir): is the latest drug approved by the FDA for treatment of chronic hepatitis B. It works by inhibiting the function of Hepatitis B virus polymerase. Side effects include headache, fatigue, dizziness, nausea, and transient elevation in liver enzymes. This drug is taken orally, once daily and the optimal duration of therapy is not yet established. In patients with severe liver dysfunction, a liver transplant may be required. Answered by Adrien Demoney 3 months ago.

each of the 4 treatments the previous poster listed are phenomenally expensive so let's hope you got great insurance also, not everyone with hepatitis b requires treatment. there are multiple stages of the disease some people have a chronic but inactive disease, and this requires no treatment i believe, but not sure those with active hep b (as indicated by high viral loads from a PCR (polymerase chain reaction) test are candidates for treatment anyone with hep b or hep c should absolutely not be drinking any alcohol of any kind. the risk for developing liver cancer (HCC, or hepatocellular carcinoma) is exponentially increased if you do and anyone with hepatitis already has a much higher relative risk of liver cancer than those without hep Answered by Janay Steil 3 months ago.

A pedometer can help keep an eye on your steps. If you're definitely not getting 10, 000 steps a day, you're not moving enough. Answered by Shanon Greensfelder 3 months ago.

Natural applesauce is a good dip for fruits such because bananas and melons. Answered by Ping Andras 3 months ago.

Tired of eating your salad on the plate? Fill a whole wheat pita with salad as well as a splash of lemon for any twist. Answered by Otis Twedell 3 months ago.

Never eat any snack food from the box, carton or bag it came in. You're less gonna overeat if you separate snack foods into appropriate fist-sized servings. Answered by Jake Coggsdale 3 months ago.

this is not a question - cut and paste it in your search and you will find answers - if you meant is there treatment for hep the answer is yes Answered by Shanita Entz 3 months ago.

Natural applesauce is a wonderful dip for fruits such while bananas and melons. Answered by Olevia Guilbert 3 months ago.


What's the best treatment for hepatitis B?
Asked by Alesha Mulaney 3 months ago.

[email protected] for more info There is no specific treatment for acute hepatitis B; in 95 percent of adults, the immune system controls the infection and eliminates the virus within about six months. In people who develop chronic hepatitis, the goals of treatment are to stop the virus from multiplying while liver damage is still reversible. General measures — All persons infected with chronic hepatitis B should be vaccinated against hepatitis A unless they are already known to be immune. Pneumococcal vaccine and yearly influenza vaccination should be considered in patients who have developed cirrhosis. Regular screening for liver cancer is also recommended, particularly for older individuals, those with cirrhosis, and patients with family history of liver cancer. In general, this entails an annual or biannual ultrasound examination and blood test for serum alpha fetoprotein level (a protein frequently produced by liver tumors, which is detectable in blood). The best approach to screening for liver cancer has not been determined. Antiviral therapy — Four currently available drugs slow or stop multiplication of the hepatitis B virus: lamivudine, adefovir, entecavir and interferon-alpha. Not all hepatitis B patients will benefit from approved treatments. The physician and the patient should discuss treatment options after a careful assessment of the individual's conditions. Regular monitoring is needed during treatment to assess for response, side effects and drug resistance, and for relapse after treatment is stopped. Regular monitoring is also needed if treatment is deferred, as some patients may benefit from treatment when the hepatitis becomes more active later on. Lamivudine — Lamivudine (Epivir-HBV) is a good first treatment for people with chronic hepatitis B who have detectable virus activity and ongoing liver inflammation. Lamivudine is also appropriate for people who have had a poor response to interferon-alpha, people who have worsening cirrhosis, and people who experience sudden liver failure. Studies suggest that long-term treatment with lamivudine (treatment for at least one year) decreases virus levels and reduces inflammation of the liver. Lamivudine is taken orally, usually at a dosage of 100 mg/day, for at least one year. Although it is very safe, the drug can trigger a flare of hepatitis in some people and can also be associated with uncommon side effects that you should discuss with your doctor. The major problem with lamivudine is that a resistant form of hepatitis B virus (referred to as a YMDD mutant) frequently develops in patients on long-term treatment. Appearance of the mutant virus may be accompanied by a marked increase in virus level and a flare of hepatitis, and in rare instances liver failure. As new drugs with lower rates of drug resistance become available, lamivudine is used less commonly in patients who require long-term treatment. Adefovir — Adefovir (Hepsera) is an alternative initial choice for people who have detectable virus activity and ongoing liver inflammation. An advantage of adefovir compared to lamivudine is that resistance to the drug occurs at much lower rates. In addition, adefovir can suppress lamivudine- resistant hepatitis B mutants. Adefovir has been associated with kidney problems when used in high doses or for long durations, so kidney function needs to be checked before and during treatment. Adefovir is taken orally, at a dosage of 10 mg/day, for at least one year. Most patients will need long-term treatment to maintain control of the hepatitis B virus. Entecavir — Entecavir (Baraclude) is another choice for people who have detectable virus activity and ongoing liver inflammation. It is a relatively new drug so its benefits and safety are still being determined. An advantage compared with lamivudine and adefovir is its greater potency against the hepatitis B virus. So far, resistance seems to be very rare. A disadvantage is its relatively higher cost relative to lamivudine. It is also effective against lamivudine-resistant hepatitis B but it is not as potent as adefovir in this condition. Entecavir is taken orally, at a dosage of 0.5 mg daily for patients who have no prior treatment and 1.0 mg daily for patients who have resistance to lamivudine, for at least one year. Most patients will need long-term treatment to maintain control of the hepatitis B virus. Interferon-alpha — Interferon-alpha is an appropriate treatment for people with chronic hepatitis B infection who have detectable virus activity and ongoing liver inflammation. Currently, only the conventional interferon (which has to be given daily or three times a week) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Interferon-alpha is not appropriate for people with cirrhosis who have liver failure or for people who have a recurrence of hepatitis after liver transplantation. Studies suggest that four to six months of treatment with interferon-alpha produces favorable changes in the blood markers for hepatitis (decrease in serum HBV DNA levels and loss of HBeAg) in about 30 to 40 percent of people and halts liver inflammation; in people who have a good response to the drug, it also reduces the risk of liver failure and liver cancer, and reduces the risk of dying from liver disease. Interferon-alpha must be taken by injection. The drug triggers a flare of hepatitis in 30 to 50 percent of people who are HBeAg positive but flares are uncommon in those who are HBeAg negative. The major downside of interferon-alpha is that it has many side effects, which you should discuss with your doctor. Interferon-alpha may be considered in young patients who do not have advanced liver disease, and who do not wish to be on long-term treatment. Liver transplantation — Liver transplantation may be the only option in those who have developed advanced cirrhosis. The transplantation process is elaborate, involving an extensive screening process for eligibility. Thus, not all patients with cirrhosis are eligible, and only those with the most advanced cirrhosis and otherwise good medical and social conditions will be put on the transplant waiting list. WHAT IS THE PROGNOSIS?— As discussed above, the clinical course of hepatitis B can vary widely. Certain factors help predict prognosis. Likelihood of developing chronic infection — The likelihood of acute hepatitis progressing to chronic hepatitis largely depends on a person's age at the time of infection. Chronic infection develops in about 90 percent of children who are infected at birth, in 20 to 50 percent of children who are infected between the ages of 1 and 5 years, and in less than 5 percent of people infected during adulthood. Factors that influence prognosis — Several factors affect the prognosis of chronic hepatitis. Prognosis is largely influenced by the extent of viral multiplication and the immune system's ability to control the infection. Other factors that appear to worsen the course of hepatitis include male gender, habitual alcohol consumption, and coinfection with other hepatitis viruses. I HAVE CHRONIC HEPATITIS B, WHAT CAN I DO TO HELP MY LIVER? — As discussed above, the majority of people with acute hepatitis B spontaneously clear the infection. Those who develop chronic infection should be evaluated by a physician with expertise in liver disease (usually a gastroenterologist or hepatologist) who can discuss treatment options. In addition to the routine vaccinations discussed above and possibly screening for liver cancer, a number of other issues are commonly discussed: Diet — No specific diet has been shown to improve the outcome in patients with hepatitis B. The best advice is to eat a normal healthy and balanced diet. Alcohol — Alcohol should be avoided since it can worsen liver damage. All types of alcoholic beverages can be harmful to the liver. Patients with liver disease may worsen even with small amounts of drinking. Exercise — Exercise is good for your overall health and is encouraged, but has no effect on the virus. Prescription and nonprescription drugs — Many drugs require metabolism by the liver. Thus, it is always best to check with your doctor or pharmacist before starting a new prescription. As a general rule, unless your liver is already scarred, most drugs are as safe as for people without hepatitis B. An important possible exception is acetaminophen (Tylenol), the maximum dose of which should not be more than 2 grams (in divided doses) per 24 hours. Herbal medications — Although many claims about herbal medications have been made (particularly on the internet) please beware. None has been proven to improve outcomes in patients with hepatitis B, and some have been associated with serious liver toxicity. Support — Do not underestimate the value of sharing your concerns with other people with hepatitis B. Ask your doctor about support groups. IMPLICATIONS FOR YOUR FAMILY — Acute and chronic hepatitis B are contagious. Thus, you should discuss with your doctor the proper measures needed to reduce the risk of infecting others. This usually entails counseling on ways to minimize blood and fluid contacts, and testing your immediate family and household members, and vaccinating those at risk for acquiring the infection. Answered by Saran Gulbrandsen 3 months ago.

There is no treatment for acute hepatitis B, other than supportive care, which aims to alleviate symptoms. In rare cases, an episode of acute hepatitis can be unusually severe and may require hospital treatment. A small number of people will develop liver failure, and may need a liver transplant. Liver failure can lead to death. Acute hepatitis B usually goes away by itself and does not require medical treatment. If very severe, symptoms such as vomiting or diarrhea may require treatment to restore fluids and electrolytes. There are no medications that can prevent acute hepatitis B from becoming chronic. Not all people with chronic hepatitis B require treatment. Treatment of chronic hepatitis B may involve the use of medications such as the antiviral medication alpha interferon. Other medications may include ribavirin, lamivudine, steroids, and antibiotics. Antiviral medications such as interferon (Intron-A), lamivudine (Epivir), and adefovir dipivoxil (Hepsera) may be used for a person whose blood contains viral particles (antigens), if his or her liver is not functioning properly, and who has had a biopsy that shows evidence of liver damage. People with signs of progressive chronic liver disease can be considered for a liver transplant. Although this procedure can be life saving, the new liver usually becomes infected with hepatitis B eventually. Answered by Lindsey Halbrooks 3 months ago.

what is the best treatment for hepatitis Answered by Lidia Savastano 3 months ago.


Any possible cure for hepatitis B?
Asked by Luanne Hathorn 3 months ago.

There is no cure for hepatitis B. Treatment includes rest and proper diet. Although there is still no complete cure for hepatitis B, there are 7 approved drugs for adults (2 for children) and many promising new drugs in development. Current treatments seem to be most effective in those who show signs of active liver disease Not every person with chronic hepatitis B needs to be on medication. You should talk to your doctor about whether you are a good candidate for drug therapy or a clinical trial. Be sure that you understand the pros and cons of each treatment option. Whether you decide to start treatment or not, it is very important to be seen by a liver specialist or doctor knowledgeable about hepatitis B on a regular basis. Approved Hepatitis B Drugs in the United States * Interferon Alpha (Intron A) is given by injection several times a week for six months to a year, or sometimes longer. The drug can cause side effects such as flu-like symptoms, depression, and headaches. Approved 1991 and available for both children and adults. * Pegylated Interferon (Pegasys) is given by injection once a week usually for six months to a year. The drug can cause side effects such as flu-like symptoms and depression. Approved May 2005 and available only for adults. * Lamivudine (Epivir-HBV, Zeffix, or Heptodin) is a pill that is taken once a day, with few side effects, for at least one year or longer. Approved 1998 and available for both children and adults. * Adefovir Dipivoxil (Hepsera) is a pill taken once a day, with few side effects, for at least one year or longer. Approved September 2002 for adults. Pediatric clinical trials are in progress. * Entecavir (Baraclude) is a pill taken once a day, with few side effects, for at least one year or longer. Approved April 2005 for adults. Pediatric clinical trials are in progress. * Telbivudine (Tyzeka, Sebivo) is a pill taken once a day, with few side effects, for at least one year or longer. Approved October 2006 for adults. * Tenofovir (Viread) is a pill taken once a day, with few side effects, for at least one year or longer. Approved August 2008 for adults. Although the FDA has approved these seven drugs for chronic hepatitis B, they do not provide a complete cure, except in rare cases (a "cure" generally means that a person loses the hepatitis B virus and develops protective surface antibodies). Answered by Ivory Heiberg 3 months ago.

is it possible to have both A and B? Answered by Angel Burkey 3 months ago.

No its definatly not curable. Answered by Cindy Loura 3 months ago.


Injections for cure of hepatits-b...are there any side effects..?
i have come to know that there are some type of injections available that can cure hepatits-b completely.But i have heared that they have side effects too and these injections are very costly too.the person given that injections lossed hairs from whole boady and also looses alomst 40% wieght.IS it true..??they... Asked by Gabrielle Baranow 3 months ago.

i have come to know that there are some type of injections available that can cure hepatits-b completely.But i have heared that they have side effects too and these injections are very costly too.the person given that injections lossed hairs from whole boady and also looses alomst 40% wieght.IS it true..?? they cost alsomt 2.5 lac...are they available below tat cost.. pls help as i am suffering from this disease and wanna get curesd witihn nex 3 months. i will be very very thankful to those who helped me in gewtting fully cured within 3 months. Answered by Latoyia Brisky 3 months ago.

There are different stages of hepatitis B, and the majority of patients do not require treatments. There is an acute infection with hepatitis B. About 80% of people infected with hepatitis B have the acute infection which lasts for weeks, and then they clear the infection and would not have any further problems with hepatitis B in the future. Hepatitis B immunoglobulin (antibodies) can be given after a known exposure to hepatitis B (if not immunized) to prevent the acute hepatitis B infection. I don't think this is the injection you are talking about though. Treatment for acute hepatitis B is usually supportive care only. Rarely if it is severe then anti-viral therapy is considered in acute hepatitis. The other 20% of patients infected with hepatitis B do not clear the infection and go onto chronic hepatitis B. It is actually a little more complex than this, because the rate of going on to the chronic phase depends on the age of infection. For example, 90% of infants born with hepatitis B will go onto the chronic phase, 20-50% of individuals infected between ages 2-5 will go onto the chronic phase, and less than 5% of adults infected will go onto the chronic phase. Most patients with hepatitis B do not have symptoms. Some patients in the chronic phase are just carriers and do not have much liver damage. Other patients may have high viral loads and have progressive liver damage. The goal of treatment is to reduce the viral load, reduce liver damage to prevent progression to cirrhosis, and help the immune system clear the infection. Cure is usually not possible because even with therapy the virus may remain in the body. The decision to treat is determined by lab tests, including the degree of elevation of liver function tests, tests for liver function (PT/INR, albumin), whether certain markers of the virus are positive (Hepatitis B Surface Antigen and Hepatitis B E Antigen) and sometimes liver biopsy results. Usually a Hepatologist or Infectious Disease Physician evaluates these and determines if treatment should be started and the appropriate treatment for the individual. There are several treatments approved for chronic hepatitis B and I will discuss them. These treatments have been shown to reduce viral load, sometimes help clear the infection, but none of them technically "cure" hepatitis B. Response to therapy varies also. Pegylated Interferon (Pegasys) is given by injection once a week usually for six months to a year. The drug can cause side effects such as flu-like symptoms, headache, hair loss, fatigue, insomnia, nausea, diarrhea and depression. This is the only injection approved for Hepatitis B and it has the most side effects of the treatments available. It is also used with Ribavirin for hepatitis C. This is what your friend was probably taking. Lamivudine (Epivir-HBV, Zeffix, or Heptodin) is a pill that is taken once a day for at least one year or longer. The most common reported side effects include headache, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea and insomnia. Adefovir Dipivoxil (Hepsera) is a pill taken once a day for at least one year or longer. The most common reported side effects are headache, abdominal pain, diarrhea, weakness, and worsening liver function within 12 weeks of discontinuing. Entecavir (Baraclude) is a pill taken once a day for at least one year or longer. Side effects are less common with this than the other treatments, but it can be associated with worsening liver tests when discontinued. Telbivudine (Tyzeka, Sebivo) is a pill taken once a day for at least one year or longer. The most common side effects are headache and fatigue. Tenofovir (Viread) is a pill taken once a day for at least one year or longer. The most common side effects reported are chest pain, other pain, nausea, diarrhea and weakness. As I said before, you need to discuss this with your doctor to determine if treatment is appropriate in your case and the best option in your case. Good luck to you. Answered by Ozie Depaul 3 months ago.


Does anyone know how to cure or treat hepatitis B?
Asked by Stevie Wilchek 3 months ago.

If you're one of the 20% or so who is not able to clear the virus through your own immune system, then a gastroenterologist or infectious disease doctor can treat you. Fourantivirals - lamivudine (brand name Epivir-HBV), adefovir (Hepsera), entecavir (Baraclude), and telbivudine (Tyzeka), have been approved for hepatitis B in adults. Some of these drugs work well to supress HBV up to a point, at which the person can develop a drug resistance. Recently, a Hep c medication, pegylated interferon, has been approved to treat HBV. Treatment for chronic HBV is important because unlike other forms of hepatitis, HBV can lead to liver cancer without going into cirrhosis first. HBV is one of the leading causes of liver cancer and the need for liver transplants. Best wishes, hope this helps. Answered by Errol Mounce 3 months ago.

Most people who get hepatitis B will get rid of it on their own without needing treatment. Some people do end up developing a chronic infection that can lead to liver cancer or cirrhosis. In this case, it cannot be cured, but it can often be controlled with antiviral medication. If you have chronic hepatitis you should be talking to your doctor about treatment, not the internet. But there's really no reason to get Hep B in the first place if you live in a western country because there's a vaccine for it and nowadays it's given to everyone. Answered by Kandra Cuther 3 months ago.

there is both a cure and vaccination for hepatitis A, B, D, E, and G but not however for Hep C Answered by Korey Delgato 3 months ago.

I once heard a health care provider say: Hepatitis: Make a blender "green drink" of: - 2 Cups of Orange / Pineapple juice - 1 Tablespoon of Alfalfa powder or Spirulina powder - Blend well, enjoy 2 large servings a day, continue as long as needed. This helps to inactivate viral infection, provide nutrients for the cells and cleanse the system. I thought that was pretty good ;-) Answered by Tatyana Moorefield 3 months ago.

The only way to treat Hep B is through your doctor. Answered by Evelin Ollie 3 months ago.

I believe the treatment is Interferon. But you should've gotten a vaccine when you were younger that is extremly effective Answered by Margery Siske 3 months ago.

cut off the affected persons head with a dull butter knife Answered by Carl Italia 3 months ago.


I will like to know the treatment for Hapetitis B?
Asked by Alyse Daghita 3 months ago.

Hepatitis B that lasts beyond 6 months or becomes serious may be treated with several different medications, but not every case needs to be treated. Whether or not an individual with hepatitis B is taking medication, regular visits to a doctor who specializes in liver diseases are very important. Laboratory tests that measure liver function, need to be performed regularly to track disease progression and to determine possible complications. Because no cure has been found for hepatitis B, treatment is aimed at decreasing the ability of the virus to multiply, decreasing inflammation and damage to the liver, and increasing the immune system’s ability to fight the virus. Currently, drug treatments seem to be most helpful for individuals who have liver disease caused by hepatitis B. Unfortunately, there is no drug treatment for the acute phase of hepatitis B. Nausea and vomiting often seen with early infection is treated with fluid replacement. In the United States, the four drugs that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating chronic hepatitis B are: Interferon-alpha (Intron A and Pegasys) Lamivudine (Epivir-HBV) Lamivudine (Epivir-HBV) Entecavir (Baraclude) Therapy with one drug is still considered to be the first line treatment approach and the choice of drug is specific to each patient with chronic hepatitis B. Combination therapy with interferon alpha and a nucleoside analog (like lamivudine or entecavir) may be used to prevent viral resistance and has shown promising results in reducing viral replication. However, further studies are needed to fully evaluate the benefit of combination therapy over treatment with one drug. Your doctor may run tests to check the health of your liver if you are on medicines like adefovir, lamivudine, or entecavir. If you are on any of these medicines, tell your doctor if you experience abdominal pain, skin discoloration, orange or dark urine, and frequent diarrhea or constipation. Answered by Zula Powal 3 months ago.

Hepatitis B (HBV) is usually transmitted by injection of contaminated blood, through intravenous (IV) drug use, or through sexual activity. HBV can be transmitted during pregnancy or childbirth. Diagnosis & Tests - If hepatitis is suspected, your health care provider will feel and tap your chest and back to determine if your liver or spleen is enlarged or tender. Your provider will request a blood test, possibly a urine test and, in a few cases, a liver biopsy. Hepatitis B: Numerous nutritional and herbal treatments are available. Along with any medication you take, it’s important to adopt and maintain a healthful diet that includes complete avoidance of any substance that might tax your liver. This means avoiding alcohol, certain drugs, tobacco, environmental toxins, and chemically-laced foods. Consider eating strictly organic foods to avoid toxic pesticides and herbicides. A good nutritional supplement program is a must, one that includes a variety of herbs and other compounds to help your liver and immune system keep the virus at bay. Vitamin C : 1,000 mg 3 times a day. Vitamin E: 400 IU a day. Check with your doctor if taking anticoagulant drugs. Milk Thistle : 150 mg 3 times a day. Standardized to contain at least 70% silymarin. Licorice: 200 mg 3 times a day for a maximum of 10 days. Standardized to contain 22% glycyrrhizin or glycyrrhizinic acid; can raise blood pressure. Lipotropic Combination: 2 pills twice a day. Should contain milk thistle, choline, inositol, and other ingredients. Alpha-lipoic Acid : 200 mg 3 times a day. Can be taken with or without food. Dandelion Root : 500 mg standardized extract twice a day. May be contained in lipotropic combination formulas. Answered by Anitra Banvelos 3 months ago.

Hi KADUA T. Hepatitis B is caused by a hepadnavirus, which can cause both acute and chronic hepatitis. Chronic hepatitis develops in the 15% of patients who are unable to eliminate the virus after an initial infection. Identified methods of transmission include blood (blood transfusion, now rare), tattoos (both amateur and professionally done), sexually (through sexual intercourse or through contact with blood or bodily fluids), or in utero (from mother to her unborn child, as the virus can cross the placenta). However, in about half of cases the source of infection cannot be determined. Blood contact can occur by sharing syringes in intravenous drug use, shaving accessories such as razor blades, or touching wounds on infected persons. Needle-exchange programs have been created in many countries as a form of prevention. In the United States, 95% of patients clear their infection and develop antibodies against hepatitis B virus. 5% of patients do not clear the infection and develop chronic infection; only these people are at risk of long term complications of hepatitis B. Patients with chronic hepatitis B have antibodies against hepatitis B, but these antibodies are not enough to clear the infection that establishes itself in the DNA of the affected liver cells. The continued production of virus combined with antibodies is a likely cause of immune complex disease seen in these patients. A vaccine is available that will prevent infection from hepatitis B for life. Hepatitis B infections result in 500,000 to 1,200,000 deaths per year worldwide due to the complications of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatitis B is endemic in a number of (mainly South-East Asian) countries, making cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma big killers. There are six FDA-approved treatment options available for persons with a chronic hepatitis B infection: alpha-interferon, pegylated interferon adefovir, entecavir, telbivudine and lamivudine. About 45% of persons on treatment achieve a sustained response.(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) Jason Homan Answered by Joaquin Graff 3 months ago.

Walk with a co-worker's desk to chat as opposed to instant messaging. Answered by Dede Simonet 3 months ago.

Enroll in an active art work class, such as sculpture or maybe ceramics. Answered by Refugia Govea 3 months ago.

Get hold of a plant for your office—watering it will eventually make you more active. Answered by Verena Dunmire 3 months ago.

In the mood for some sort of hot meal? Make a big pot of veggie bean soup, divide into two-cup containers, and store from the freezer. Before bed, place a container in the fridge, then grab it before heading out the door in the morning. Answered by Krishna Manecke 3 months ago.

For sandwich-lovers, use spinach or swiss chard leaves rather than a wrap, skip the peel of cheese, and load up on the veggies. Answered by Danilo Croghan 3 months ago.

Don’t focus on your flaws, spotlight your best bits. Tiny waist? Belt it in. Wonderful bust? Lower the neckline. Nicely toned butt? Rock tight jeans. Alluring legs? Show ‘em off. It’s really that easy. Answered by Jeanice Gamma 3 months ago.


Hepatitis B?
HI, I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW IF THERE IS A CURE FOR HEPATITIS B, WHAT ARE THE SYMTOMS OF IT? THANK U Asked by Marty Phillis 3 months ago.

HEPATITIS- B is a serious liver infection caused by the * hepatitis B virus (HBV). For some people, the infection becomes chronic, leading to liver failure, liver cancer, or cirrhosis — a condition that causes permanent scarring of the liver. * Signs and symptoms Most infants and children with hepatitis B never develop signs and symptoms. The same is true for some adults. Signs and symptoms usually appear 12 weeks after you're infected and can range from mild to severe. They may include some or all of the following: * Loss of appetite * Nausea and vomiting * Weakness and fatigue * Abdominal pain, especially around your liver * Dark urine * Yellowing of your skin and the whites of your eyes (jaundice) * Joint pain Hepatitis B can damage your liver — and spread to other people — even if you don't have any signs and symptoms. That's why it's important to be tested if you think you've been exposed to hepatitis B or if you engage in behavior that puts you at risk. Drug therapies Doctors use four drugs to treat HBV infection: * Interferon. Your body naturally produces interferon to help protect against invading organisms such as viruses. Giving additional interferon that has been manufactured in a laboratory may stimulate your body's immune response to HBV and help prevent the virus from replicating in your cells. Not everyone is a candidate for treatment with interferon. In a few cases, interferon eliminates the virus completely, although the infection can later return. Interferon has a number of side effects — many of which resemble signs and symptoms of hepatitis B. * Lamivudine (Epivir-HBV). This antiviral medication helps prevent HBV from replicating in your cells. It's usually taken in pill form once a day. Side effects during treatment are generally minimal, but you may experience a severe worsening of symptoms when you stop taking the drug. Lamivudine can also cause a drug-resistant form of HBV to develop, particularly when taken as a long-term treatment. * Adefovir dipivoxil (Hepsera). This drug, taken by pill once daily, also helps prevent HBV from replicating in your cells. An added benefit is that it's effective in people who are resistant to lamivudine. * Entecavir (Baraclude). This antiviral medication, approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in March 2005, is taken once a day in pill form. * Telbivudine (Tyzeka, Sebivo). This antiviral medication, approved by the FDA in October 2006, is similar to lamivudine, though slightly stronger.- Answered by Pandora Dack 3 months ago.

each will smash your liver in outcome will rationale jaundice the yellow discoloration of your dermis and eyes. each ends up in liver cirrhosis or liver CA if left untreated the sufferers dies Answered by Merri Driscol 3 months ago.


Medicine for hepatitis b?
best medicine for hepatitis b Asked by Anibal Petrunger 3 months ago.

Some of the different medications used in the treatment of Hepatitis B include: Lamivudine Combivir Epivir Epivir HBV Trizivir Adefovir Hepsera Answered by Donovan Tufo 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
021003/001 EPIVIR-HBV LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
021004/001 EPIVIR-HBV LAMIVUDINE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020564/001 EPIVIR LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
020564/003 EPIVIR LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
020596/001 EPIVIR LAMIVUDINE SOLUTION/ORAL 10MG per ML
021003/001 EPIVIR-HBV LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
021004/001 EPIVIR-HBV LAMIVUDINE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per ML
077221/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
077221/002 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
077357/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ ORAL 150MG
077464/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
077464/002 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
077695/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE SOLUTION/ORAL 10MG per ML
077980/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE SOLUTION/ ORAL 10MG per ML
078545/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ ORAL 150MG
078636/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ ORAL 150MG
078636/002 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ ORAL 300MG
078850/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ ORAL 150MG
078850/002 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ ORAL 300MG
090198/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ ORAL 150MG
090198/002 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ ORAL 300MG
090433/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ ORAL 150MG
090457/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ ORAL 150MG
090457/002 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ ORAL 300MG
091475/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE SOLUTION/ ORAL 10MG per ML
091606/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
091606/002 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
200406/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ ORAL 150MG
200406/002 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ ORAL 300MG
202032/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
202032/002 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
202941/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
203260/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
203277/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
203277/002 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
203564/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE SOLUTION/ORAL 10MG per ML
203586/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
204002/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
204528/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
204528/002 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
205217/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
205217/002 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
206974/001 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
206974/002 LAMIVUDINE LAMIVUDINE TABLET/ORAL 300MG

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - Blog - All rights reserved