Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020649/001.

Names and composition

"EDEX" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ALPROSTADIL.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020649/001 EDEX ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.005MG per VIAL
020649/002 EDEX ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.01MG per VIAL
020649/003 EDEX ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per VIAL
020649/004 EDEX ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.04MG per VIAL
020649/005 EDEX ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.01MG per VIAL
020649/006 EDEX ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per VIAL
020649/007 EDEX ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.04MG per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018484/001 PROSTIN VR PEDIATRIC ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per ML
020379/001 CAVERJECT ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.01MG per VIAL
020379/002 CAVERJECT ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per VIAL
020379/003 CAVERJECT ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.005MG per VIAL
020379/004 CAVERJECT ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.04MG per VIAL
020649/001 EDEX ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.005MG per VIAL
020649/002 EDEX ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.01MG per VIAL
020649/003 EDEX ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per VIAL
020649/004 EDEX ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.04MG per VIAL
020649/005 EDEX ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.01MG per VIAL
020649/006 EDEX ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per VIAL
020649/007 EDEX ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.04MG per VIAL
020700/001 MUSE ALPROSTADIL SUPPOSITORY/URETHRAL 0.125MG
020700/002 MUSE ALPROSTADIL SUPPOSITORY/URETHRAL 0.25MG
020700/003 MUSE ALPROSTADIL SUPPOSITORY/URETHRAL 0.5MG
020700/004 MUSE ALPROSTADIL SUPPOSITORY/URETHRAL 1MG
020755/001 CAVERJECT ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.005MG per ML
020755/002 CAVERJECT ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.01MG per ML
020755/003 CAVERJECT ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML
021212/001 CAVERJECT IMPULSE ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.01MG per VIAL
021212/002 CAVERJECT IMPULSE ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per VIAL
074815/001 ALPROSTADIL ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per ML
075196/001 ALPROSTADIL ALPROSTADIL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per ML

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Edex only gives me an erection 20% of the time.?
Am I missing the correct area to put the needle in to get an erection Asked by Mallie Briglia 1 year ago.

Did you ever get instructions how about to do it in a proper way I inject myself 4 times a day:but was instructed on how and where and the amount.Nothing to do with my penis,folks. Sky If it is only affective 20% of the time you are doing it wrong. See the Dr and ask advice. Answered by Shenika Minhas 1 year ago.

Were you instructed how to self-administer? You should not have been allowed to self-administer until the correct dosage for you was determined, and you were instructed and demonstrated the ability to inject properly. Answered by Tinisha Rucks 1 year ago.

Ouch. Every think of a prosthetic? Answered by Sanda Pape 1 year ago.

"Needle" and "erection" in the same sentence makes me very uncomfortable. You don't . . . tell me you don't, please? Answered by Vergie Alsaqri 1 year ago.


What is "caverject" or "edex" I hear my friend talk about?
He was talking about ED Asked by Nadia Okorududu 1 year ago.

its an injection to make you hard. could last for hours Answered by Mica Tresselt 1 year ago.

If you are talking about medication then probably it is the one that helps men to have an erection. It actually increase the regular blood that flows in the male organ. I don't know if it has a prescription, but it will be best if you consult your doctor about it so that you can make sure if it will be safe for you. Also, for you to know the possible benefits and risks that you might have. If you want to know more about it, here is a source that contains information about it. only do google with pharmacyescrow.org/s3366-s-CAVERJECT Answered by Mariel Slinsky 1 year ago.


Do I need a prescription for Aldrostadil?
Also known as Carverject, Edex and Prostin Asked by Brittaney Filippello 1 year ago.

Call a pharmacy? Answered by Doris Corrigeux 1 year ago.


Are there any cures for erectile dysfunction besides viagra?
I cant take viagra because im taking Catepres. are there any other cures for E.D.? My doctor didnt help me and i was thinking of going to an E.D. specialist at Boston Medical Group, but im not sure that will work. Im so depressed. Asked by Evangeline Ospital 1 year ago.

I use injection therapy, either Caverject or Edex, they both produce an erection that can last up to four hours making it possible for a man to experience multiple orgasms without losing the erection. There is also Muse, a small pill like item they is placed in the opening of the urethra in the penis and it too will produce a solid erection. Other than that, there is also the vacuum pump that can be used along with a c-o-c-k ring to produce an erection. Only other option is surgery and implants. Answered by Tiffany Garia 1 year ago.

Capitalism is the idea of having a government that allows competition among buiness. It is the idea that allows people to climb up the social ladder or get the american dream based on how much of it they do. Those with a lot of work, suceeded while those who barely work at all won't succeed. In retrospect yes beacuase it gets rid of the bad market and helps the good ones prosper. And any big governmnet would want a good economy and all its problems fixed. A government with capitalism keeps improving because new and better people would rise to the top making better changes. Much like viagra fixes and removes the problem in the first place Answered by Eusebia Mather 1 year ago.

Boston Medical Group will give you injection therapy - you inject medicine yourself at the base of your own penis about 5 minutes before intercourse. Answered by Yanira Pavlock 1 year ago.

Medications for erectile dysfunction include: Testosterone Oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors (sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra), and tadalafil (Cialis) Intracavernosa injections Intraurethral suppositories How effective is testosterone in treating erectile dysfunction? In patients with hypogonadism, testosterone treatment can improve libido and erectile dysfunction, but the response of erectile dysfunction in men with hypogonadism to testosterone is not complete; many men still may need additional oral medications such as sildenafil, vardenafil or tadalafil. In men 40 years of age or older, a breast examination, digital examination of the prostate and a PSA level (prostate specific antigen) should be done to exclude breast and prostate cancer before starting testosterone treatment since testosterone can aggravate breast and prostate cancers. Patients who have breast and prostate cancers or are suspected of having them should not use testosterone. Oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors Sildenafil (Viagra) What is sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil (Viagra) was the first oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor approved by the FDA in the United States for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (it is not approved for women). Sildenafil inhibits PDE5, which is an enzyme that destroys cGMP. By inhibiting the destruction of cGMP by PDE5, sildenafil allows cGMP to accumulate. The cGMP in turn prolongs relaxation of the smooth muscle of the corpora cavernosa. Relaxation of the corpora cavernosa smooth muscle allows blood to flow into the penis resulting in increased engorgement of the penis. In short, sildenafil increases blood flow into the penis and decreases blood flow out of the penis. How effective is sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil is used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction of either physical or psychological cause. It has been found to be effective in treating erectile dysfunction in men with coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, depression, coronary artery bypass surgery, and men who are taking antidepressants and several classes of anti-hypertensives. In randomized controlled trials, an estimated 60% of men with diabetes, and 80% of men without diabetes experienced improved erections with sildenafil. How should sildenafil (Viagra) be administered? Sildenafil is available as oral tablets at doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg. It should be taken approximately one hour before sexual activity. In some men, the onset of action of the drug may be as early as 11-20 minutes. Sildenafil should be taken on an empty stomach for best results since absorption and effectiveness of sildenafil can be diminished if it is taken shortly after a meal, particularly a meal that is high in fat. What is the dose of sildenafil (Viagra)? In prescribing sildenafil, a doctor considers the age, general health status, and other medication(s) the patient is taking. The usual starting dose for most men is 50 mg, however, the doctor may increase or decrease the dose depending on side effects and effectiveness. The maximum recommended dose is 100 mg every 24 hours, however, many men will need 100 mg of sildenafil for optimal effectiveness, and some doctors are recommending 100 mg as the starting dose. Metabolism (breakdown) of sildenafil is slowed by aging, liver and kidney dysfunction, and concurrent use of certain medications (such as erythromycin--an antibiotic, and protease inhibitors, for HIV). Slowed breakdown allows sildenafil to accumulate in the body and potentially may increase the risk of side effects. Therefore in men over 65, in men with substantial kidney and liver disease, and in men who also are taking protease inhibitors, the doctor will initiate sildenafil at a lower dose (25 mg) to avoid accumulation of sildenafil in the body. A protease inhibitor ritonavir (Norvir) is especially potent in increasing the accumulation of sildenafil, thus men who are taking Norvir should not take sildenafil doses higher than 25 mg and at a frequency of no greater than once in 48 hours. What are the side effects of sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil has been found to be well tolerated without important side effects. The reported side effects are usually mild, and include headache, flushing, nasal congestion, nausea, dyspepsia, diarrhea, and abnormal vision (seeing a bluish hue or brightness). Sildenafil can cause hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure that can lead to fainting and even shock) when given to patients who are taking nitrates. Therefore, patients taking nitrates daily, even patients taking nitrates only once a day, should not take sildenafil. Nitrates are used most commonly to relieve angina (chest pain due to insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle because of narrowing of the coronary arteries); these include nitroglycerine tablets, patches, ointments, sprays, and pastes, as well as isosorbide dinitrate, and isosorbide mononitrate. Other nitrates such as amyl nitrate and butyl nitrate also are found in some recreational drugs called "poppers". Sildenafil should be used cautiously in men on alpha blockers such as doxazosin (Cardura), terazosin (Hytrin), and tamsulosin (Flomax). There have been occasional reports of low blood pressure in men who have taken the two classes of drugs simultaneously and therefore it is recommended that there be at least a span of 4-6 hours between the ingestion of sildenafil and alpha blockers. There have been rare reports of priapism (prolonged and painful erections lasting more than 6 hours) with the use of PDE5 inhibitors such as sildenafil, vardenafil, and tadalafil, especially when sildenafil is used in combination with injection of medications into the corpora cavernosa or intraurethral suppositories. Patients with blood cell diseases such as sickle cell anemia, leukemia, and multiple myeloma have higher than normal risks of developing priapism. Priapism untreated can cause injury to the penis and lead to permanent impotence. Therefore, sildenafil should not be used in combination with intraurethral suppositories and corpora cavernosa injections. If there is prolonged erection (longer than 4 hours), immediate medical assistance should be obtained. Is it safe for men with heart disease to use sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil has been found to be effective and safe in the treatment of erectile dysfunction in men with stable heart disease due to atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries, provided that they are not on nitrates. The real concern is not as much the safety of sildenafil but the risk of sexual activity in triggering heart attacks or abnormal heart rhythms in patients with heart disease. The risk of developing heart attacks or abnormal heart rhythms during sex is low in men with well controlled hypertension, mild disease of the heart's valves, well controlled heart failure, mild and stable angina (with a favorable treadmill stress test), successful coronary stenting or bypass surgery, and a remote history of heart attack (more than 8 weeks previously). Sildenafil can be used safely in men in these low risk groups. The risk of heart attack or abnormal heart rhythms during sex is higher in men with unstable angina (angina that occurs at rest or with minimal exertion), poorly controlled hypertension, moderate to severe heart failure, moderate to severe disease of the heart's valves, recent heart attack (less than 2 weeks previously), potentially life threatening disorders of heart rhythm such as recurrent ventricular tachycardia, and moderate to severe disease of the heart's muscle. In these men, doctors usually stabilize or treat the heart conditions before prescribing sildenafil. Before starting sildenafil for erectile dysfunction, a doctor may need to determine whether the heart can safely achieve the workload necessary for sexual activity. For example, in men with coronary artery heart disease, a doctor may perform a treadmill stress test to determine whether there is adequate blood supply to the heart muscle while exercising at levels comparable to sexual activity. What are the treatments for erectile dysfunction? Treatments for erectile dysfunction in 2004 include: Working with doctors to select medications that do not impair erectile function, Making life style improvements (for example; quitting smoking, and exercising more), Drugs such as sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra) or tadalafil (Cialis), Inserting medications into the urethra (intraurethral suppositories), Injecting medications into the corpora cavernosae (intracavernosal injections), Vacuum constrictive devices for the penis, Penile prostheses, and Psychotherapy. Adjusting medications Many common medications for treating hypertension, depression, and high blood lipids can contribute to erectile dysfunction (see above). Treatment of hypertension is an example. There are many different types (classes) of anti-hypertensive medications (medications that lower blood pressure); these include beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, diuretics (medications that increase urine volume), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors), and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Anti-hypertensives may be used alone or in combination(s) to control blood pressure. Different classes of anti-hypertensives have different effects on erectile function. Inderal (a beta blocker) and hydrochlorothiazide (a diuretic) are known to cause erectile dysfunction, while calcium channel blockers and ACE inhibitors do not seem to affect erectile function. On the other hand, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) such as losartan (Cozaar) and valsartan (Diovan), may actually increase sexual appetite, improve sexual performance, and decrease erectile dysfunction. Therefore, choosing an optimal anti-hypertensive combination is an important part of treating erectile dysfunction Lifestyle improvements Quitting smoking, exercising regularly, losing excess weight, curtailing excessive alcohol consumption, controlling hypertension, and optimizing blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes are not only important for maintaining good health but also may improve erectile function. Some studies suggest that men who have made lifestyle improvements experience increased rates of success with oral medications. Answered by Basilia Iturralde 1 year ago.


Edex only gives me an erection 20% of the time.?
Am I missing the correct area to put the needle in to get an erection Asked by Ione Katterjohn 1 year ago.

Did you ever get instructions how about to do it in a proper way I inject myself 4 times a day:but was instructed on how and where and the amount.Nothing to do with my penis,folks. Sky If it is only affective 20% of the time you are doing it wrong. See the Dr and ask advice. Answered by Sunni Cerva 1 year ago.

Were you instructed how to self-administer? You should not have been allowed to self-administer until the correct dosage for you was determined, and you were instructed and demonstrated the ability to inject properly. Answered by Bell Pigford 1 year ago.

Ouch. Every think of a prosthetic? Answered by Oralee Rhym 1 year ago.

"Needle" and "erection" in the same sentence makes me very uncomfortable. You don't . . . tell me you don't, please? Answered by Tempie Wessler 1 year ago.


What is "caverject" or "edex" I hear my friend talk about?
He was talking about ED Asked by Ferdinand Zicker 1 year ago.

its an injection to make you hard. could last for hours Answered by Gina Connel 1 year ago.

If you are talking about medication then probably it is the one that helps men to have an erection. It actually increase the regular blood that flows in the male organ. I don't know if it has a prescription, but it will be best if you consult your doctor about it so that you can make sure if it will be safe for you. Also, for you to know the possible benefits and risks that you might have. If you want to know more about it, here is a source that contains information about it. only do google with pharmacyescrow.org/s3366-s-CAVERJECT Answered by Karon Einwalter 1 year ago.


Do I need a prescription for Aldrostadil?
Also known as Carverject, Edex and Prostin Asked by Annalee Lasage 1 year ago.

Call a pharmacy? Answered by Emmaline Ranieri 1 year ago.


Are there any cures for erectile dysfunction besides viagra?
I cant take viagra because im taking Catepres. are there any other cures for E.D.? My doctor didnt help me and i was thinking of going to an E.D. specialist at Boston Medical Group, but im not sure that will work. Im so depressed. Asked by Orlando Tromburg 1 year ago.

I use injection therapy, either Caverject or Edex, they both produce an erection that can last up to four hours making it possible for a man to experience multiple orgasms without losing the erection. There is also Muse, a small pill like item they is placed in the opening of the urethra in the penis and it too will produce a solid erection. Other than that, there is also the vacuum pump that can be used along with a c-o-c-k ring to produce an erection. Only other option is surgery and implants. Answered by Jeromy Lapusnak 1 year ago.

Capitalism is the idea of having a government that allows competition among buiness. It is the idea that allows people to climb up the social ladder or get the american dream based on how much of it they do. Those with a lot of work, suceeded while those who barely work at all won't succeed. In retrospect yes beacuase it gets rid of the bad market and helps the good ones prosper. And any big governmnet would want a good economy and all its problems fixed. A government with capitalism keeps improving because new and better people would rise to the top making better changes. Much like viagra fixes and removes the problem in the first place Answered by Calandra Schoeffler 1 year ago.

Boston Medical Group will give you injection therapy - you inject medicine yourself at the base of your own penis about 5 minutes before intercourse. Answered by Theressa Sosso 1 year ago.

Medications for erectile dysfunction include: Testosterone Oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors (sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra), and tadalafil (Cialis) Intracavernosa injections Intraurethral suppositories How effective is testosterone in treating erectile dysfunction? In patients with hypogonadism, testosterone treatment can improve libido and erectile dysfunction, but the response of erectile dysfunction in men with hypogonadism to testosterone is not complete; many men still may need additional oral medications such as sildenafil, vardenafil or tadalafil. In men 40 years of age or older, a breast examination, digital examination of the prostate and a PSA level (prostate specific antigen) should be done to exclude breast and prostate cancer before starting testosterone treatment since testosterone can aggravate breast and prostate cancers. Patients who have breast and prostate cancers or are suspected of having them should not use testosterone. Oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors Sildenafil (Viagra) What is sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil (Viagra) was the first oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor approved by the FDA in the United States for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (it is not approved for women). Sildenafil inhibits PDE5, which is an enzyme that destroys cGMP. By inhibiting the destruction of cGMP by PDE5, sildenafil allows cGMP to accumulate. The cGMP in turn prolongs relaxation of the smooth muscle of the corpora cavernosa. Relaxation of the corpora cavernosa smooth muscle allows blood to flow into the penis resulting in increased engorgement of the penis. In short, sildenafil increases blood flow into the penis and decreases blood flow out of the penis. How effective is sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil is used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction of either physical or psychological cause. It has been found to be effective in treating erectile dysfunction in men with coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, depression, coronary artery bypass surgery, and men who are taking antidepressants and several classes of anti-hypertensives. In randomized controlled trials, an estimated 60% of men with diabetes, and 80% of men without diabetes experienced improved erections with sildenafil. How should sildenafil (Viagra) be administered? Sildenafil is available as oral tablets at doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg. It should be taken approximately one hour before sexual activity. In some men, the onset of action of the drug may be as early as 11-20 minutes. Sildenafil should be taken on an empty stomach for best results since absorption and effectiveness of sildenafil can be diminished if it is taken shortly after a meal, particularly a meal that is high in fat. What is the dose of sildenafil (Viagra)? In prescribing sildenafil, a doctor considers the age, general health status, and other medication(s) the patient is taking. The usual starting dose for most men is 50 mg, however, the doctor may increase or decrease the dose depending on side effects and effectiveness. The maximum recommended dose is 100 mg every 24 hours, however, many men will need 100 mg of sildenafil for optimal effectiveness, and some doctors are recommending 100 mg as the starting dose. Metabolism (breakdown) of sildenafil is slowed by aging, liver and kidney dysfunction, and concurrent use of certain medications (such as erythromycin--an antibiotic, and protease inhibitors, for HIV). Slowed breakdown allows sildenafil to accumulate in the body and potentially may increase the risk of side effects. Therefore in men over 65, in men with substantial kidney and liver disease, and in men who also are taking protease inhibitors, the doctor will initiate sildenafil at a lower dose (25 mg) to avoid accumulation of sildenafil in the body. A protease inhibitor ritonavir (Norvir) is especially potent in increasing the accumulation of sildenafil, thus men who are taking Norvir should not take sildenafil doses higher than 25 mg and at a frequency of no greater than once in 48 hours. What are the side effects of sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil has been found to be well tolerated without important side effects. The reported side effects are usually mild, and include headache, flushing, nasal congestion, nausea, dyspepsia, diarrhea, and abnormal vision (seeing a bluish hue or brightness). Sildenafil can cause hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure that can lead to fainting and even shock) when given to patients who are taking nitrates. Therefore, patients taking nitrates daily, even patients taking nitrates only once a day, should not take sildenafil. Nitrates are used most commonly to relieve angina (chest pain due to insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle because of narrowing of the coronary arteries); these include nitroglycerine tablets, patches, ointments, sprays, and pastes, as well as isosorbide dinitrate, and isosorbide mononitrate. Other nitrates such as amyl nitrate and butyl nitrate also are found in some recreational drugs called "poppers". Sildenafil should be used cautiously in men on alpha blockers such as doxazosin (Cardura), terazosin (Hytrin), and tamsulosin (Flomax). There have been occasional reports of low blood pressure in men who have taken the two classes of drugs simultaneously and therefore it is recommended that there be at least a span of 4-6 hours between the ingestion of sildenafil and alpha blockers. There have been rare reports of priapism (prolonged and painful erections lasting more than 6 hours) with the use of PDE5 inhibitors such as sildenafil, vardenafil, and tadalafil, especially when sildenafil is used in combination with injection of medications into the corpora cavernosa or intraurethral suppositories. Patients with blood cell diseases such as sickle cell anemia, leukemia, and multiple myeloma have higher than normal risks of developing priapism. Priapism untreated can cause injury to the penis and lead to permanent impotence. Therefore, sildenafil should not be used in combination with intraurethral suppositories and corpora cavernosa injections. If there is prolonged erection (longer than 4 hours), immediate medical assistance should be obtained. Is it safe for men with heart disease to use sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil has been found to be effective and safe in the treatment of erectile dysfunction in men with stable heart disease due to atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries, provided that they are not on nitrates. The real concern is not as much the safety of sildenafil but the risk of sexual activity in triggering heart attacks or abnormal heart rhythms in patients with heart disease. The risk of developing heart attacks or abnormal heart rhythms during sex is low in men with well controlled hypertension, mild disease of the heart's valves, well controlled heart failure, mild and stable angina (with a favorable treadmill stress test), successful coronary stenting or bypass surgery, and a remote history of heart attack (more than 8 weeks previously). Sildenafil can be used safely in men in these low risk groups. The risk of heart attack or abnormal heart rhythms during sex is higher in men with unstable angina (angina that occurs at rest or with minimal exertion), poorly controlled hypertension, moderate to severe heart failure, moderate to severe disease of the heart's valves, recent heart attack (less than 2 weeks previously), potentially life threatening disorders of heart rhythm such as recurrent ventricular tachycardia, and moderate to severe disease of the heart's muscle. In these men, doctors usually stabilize or treat the heart conditions before prescribing sildenafil. Before starting sildenafil for erectile dysfunction, a doctor may need to determine whether the heart can safely achieve the workload necessary for sexual activity. For example, in men with coronary artery heart disease, a doctor may perform a treadmill stress test to determine whether there is adequate blood supply to the heart muscle while exercising at levels comparable to sexual activity. What are the treatments for erectile dysfunction? Treatments for erectile dysfunction in 2004 include: Working with doctors to select medications that do not impair erectile function, Making life style improvements (for example; quitting smoking, and exercising more), Drugs such as sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra) or tadalafil (Cialis), Inserting medications into the urethra (intraurethral suppositories), Injecting medications into the corpora cavernosae (intracavernosal injections), Vacuum constrictive devices for the penis, Penile prostheses, and Psychotherapy. Adjusting medications Many common medications for treating hypertension, depression, and high blood lipids can contribute to erectile dysfunction (see above). Treatment of hypertension is an example. There are many different types (classes) of anti-hypertensive medications (medications that lower blood pressure); these include beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, diuretics (medications that increase urine volume), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors), and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Anti-hypertensives may be used alone or in combination(s) to control blood pressure. Different classes of anti-hypertensives have different effects on erectile function. Inderal (a beta blocker) and hydrochlorothiazide (a diuretic) are known to cause erectile dysfunction, while calcium channel blockers and ACE inhibitors do not seem to affect erectile function. On the other hand, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) such as losartan (Cozaar) and valsartan (Diovan), may actually increase sexual appetite, improve sexual performance, and decrease erectile dysfunction. Therefore, choosing an optimal anti-hypertensive combination is an important part of treating erectile dysfunction Lifestyle improvements Quitting smoking, exercising regularly, losing excess weight, curtailing excessive alcohol consumption, controlling hypertension, and optimizing blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes are not only important for maintaining good health but also may improve erectile function. Some studies suggest that men who have made lifestyle improvements experience increased rates of success with oral medications. Answered by Denice Cahalan 1 year ago.


Edex only gives me an erection 20% of the time.?
Am I missing the correct area to put the needle in to get an erection Asked by Gavin Amacher 1 year ago.

Did you ever get instructions how about to do it in a proper way I inject myself 4 times a day:but was instructed on how and where and the amount.Nothing to do with my penis,folks. Sky If it is only affective 20% of the time you are doing it wrong. See the Dr and ask advice. Answered by Malik Smeathers 1 year ago.

Were you instructed how to self-administer? You should not have been allowed to self-administer until the correct dosage for you was determined, and you were instructed and demonstrated the ability to inject properly. Answered by Rob Jefferies 1 year ago.

Ouch. Every think of a prosthetic? Answered by Carter Steininger 1 year ago.

"Needle" and "erection" in the same sentence makes me very uncomfortable. You don't . . . tell me you don't, please? Answered by Otelia Seddon 1 year ago.


What is "caverject" or "edex" I hear my friend talk about?
He was talking about ED Asked by Violeta Agron 1 year ago.

its an injection to make you hard. could last for hours Answered by Roderick Blafield 1 year ago.

If you are talking about medication then probably it is the one that helps men to have an erection. It actually increase the regular blood that flows in the male organ. I don't know if it has a prescription, but it will be best if you consult your doctor about it so that you can make sure if it will be safe for you. Also, for you to know the possible benefits and risks that you might have. If you want to know more about it, here is a source that contains information about it. only do google with pharmacyescrow.org/s3366-s-CAVERJECT Answered by So Suder 1 year ago.


Do I need a prescription for Aldrostadil?
Also known as Carverject, Edex and Prostin Asked by Vernon Mascroft 1 year ago.

Call a pharmacy? Answered by Debora Valladares 1 year ago.


Are there any cures for erectile dysfunction besides viagra?
I cant take viagra because im taking Catepres. are there any other cures for E.D.? My doctor didnt help me and i was thinking of going to an E.D. specialist at Boston Medical Group, but im not sure that will work. Im so depressed. Asked by Annabell Balza 1 year ago.

I use injection therapy, either Caverject or Edex, they both produce an erection that can last up to four hours making it possible for a man to experience multiple orgasms without losing the erection. There is also Muse, a small pill like item they is placed in the opening of the urethra in the penis and it too will produce a solid erection. Other than that, there is also the vacuum pump that can be used along with a c-o-c-k ring to produce an erection. Only other option is surgery and implants. Answered by Lucius Leab 1 year ago.

Capitalism is the idea of having a government that allows competition among buiness. It is the idea that allows people to climb up the social ladder or get the american dream based on how much of it they do. Those with a lot of work, suceeded while those who barely work at all won't succeed. In retrospect yes beacuase it gets rid of the bad market and helps the good ones prosper. And any big governmnet would want a good economy and all its problems fixed. A government with capitalism keeps improving because new and better people would rise to the top making better changes. Much like viagra fixes and removes the problem in the first place Answered by Veronique Rasbery 1 year ago.

Boston Medical Group will give you injection therapy - you inject medicine yourself at the base of your own penis about 5 minutes before intercourse. Answered by Rebecka Persall 1 year ago.

Medications for erectile dysfunction include: Testosterone Oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors (sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra), and tadalafil (Cialis) Intracavernosa injections Intraurethral suppositories How effective is testosterone in treating erectile dysfunction? In patients with hypogonadism, testosterone treatment can improve libido and erectile dysfunction, but the response of erectile dysfunction in men with hypogonadism to testosterone is not complete; many men still may need additional oral medications such as sildenafil, vardenafil or tadalafil. In men 40 years of age or older, a breast examination, digital examination of the prostate and a PSA level (prostate specific antigen) should be done to exclude breast and prostate cancer before starting testosterone treatment since testosterone can aggravate breast and prostate cancers. Patients who have breast and prostate cancers or are suspected of having them should not use testosterone. Oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors Sildenafil (Viagra) What is sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil (Viagra) was the first oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor approved by the FDA in the United States for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (it is not approved for women). Sildenafil inhibits PDE5, which is an enzyme that destroys cGMP. By inhibiting the destruction of cGMP by PDE5, sildenafil allows cGMP to accumulate. The cGMP in turn prolongs relaxation of the smooth muscle of the corpora cavernosa. Relaxation of the corpora cavernosa smooth muscle allows blood to flow into the penis resulting in increased engorgement of the penis. In short, sildenafil increases blood flow into the penis and decreases blood flow out of the penis. How effective is sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil is used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction of either physical or psychological cause. It has been found to be effective in treating erectile dysfunction in men with coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, depression, coronary artery bypass surgery, and men who are taking antidepressants and several classes of anti-hypertensives. In randomized controlled trials, an estimated 60% of men with diabetes, and 80% of men without diabetes experienced improved erections with sildenafil. How should sildenafil (Viagra) be administered? Sildenafil is available as oral tablets at doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg. It should be taken approximately one hour before sexual activity. In some men, the onset of action of the drug may be as early as 11-20 minutes. Sildenafil should be taken on an empty stomach for best results since absorption and effectiveness of sildenafil can be diminished if it is taken shortly after a meal, particularly a meal that is high in fat. What is the dose of sildenafil (Viagra)? In prescribing sildenafil, a doctor considers the age, general health status, and other medication(s) the patient is taking. The usual starting dose for most men is 50 mg, however, the doctor may increase or decrease the dose depending on side effects and effectiveness. The maximum recommended dose is 100 mg every 24 hours, however, many men will need 100 mg of sildenafil for optimal effectiveness, and some doctors are recommending 100 mg as the starting dose. Metabolism (breakdown) of sildenafil is slowed by aging, liver and kidney dysfunction, and concurrent use of certain medications (such as erythromycin--an antibiotic, and protease inhibitors, for HIV). Slowed breakdown allows sildenafil to accumulate in the body and potentially may increase the risk of side effects. Therefore in men over 65, in men with substantial kidney and liver disease, and in men who also are taking protease inhibitors, the doctor will initiate sildenafil at a lower dose (25 mg) to avoid accumulation of sildenafil in the body. A protease inhibitor ritonavir (Norvir) is especially potent in increasing the accumulation of sildenafil, thus men who are taking Norvir should not take sildenafil doses higher than 25 mg and at a frequency of no greater than once in 48 hours. What are the side effects of sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil has been found to be well tolerated without important side effects. The reported side effects are usually mild, and include headache, flushing, nasal congestion, nausea, dyspepsia, diarrhea, and abnormal vision (seeing a bluish hue or brightness). Sildenafil can cause hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure that can lead to fainting and even shock) when given to patients who are taking nitrates. Therefore, patients taking nitrates daily, even patients taking nitrates only once a day, should not take sildenafil. Nitrates are used most commonly to relieve angina (chest pain due to insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle because of narrowing of the coronary arteries); these include nitroglycerine tablets, patches, ointments, sprays, and pastes, as well as isosorbide dinitrate, and isosorbide mononitrate. Other nitrates such as amyl nitrate and butyl nitrate also are found in some recreational drugs called "poppers". Sildenafil should be used cautiously in men on alpha blockers such as doxazosin (Cardura), terazosin (Hytrin), and tamsulosin (Flomax). There have been occasional reports of low blood pressure in men who have taken the two classes of drugs simultaneously and therefore it is recommended that there be at least a span of 4-6 hours between the ingestion of sildenafil and alpha blockers. There have been rare reports of priapism (prolonged and painful erections lasting more than 6 hours) with the use of PDE5 inhibitors such as sildenafil, vardenafil, and tadalafil, especially when sildenafil is used in combination with injection of medications into the corpora cavernosa or intraurethral suppositories. Patients with blood cell diseases such as sickle cell anemia, leukemia, and multiple myeloma have higher than normal risks of developing priapism. Priapism untreated can cause injury to the penis and lead to permanent impotence. Therefore, sildenafil should not be used in combination with intraurethral suppositories and corpora cavernosa injections. If there is prolonged erection (longer than 4 hours), immediate medical assistance should be obtained. Is it safe for men with heart disease to use sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil has been found to be effective and safe in the treatment of erectile dysfunction in men with stable heart disease due to atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries, provided that they are not on nitrates. The real concern is not as much the safety of sildenafil but the risk of sexual activity in triggering heart attacks or abnormal heart rhythms in patients with heart disease. The risk of developing heart attacks or abnormal heart rhythms during sex is low in men with well controlled hypertension, mild disease of the heart's valves, well controlled heart failure, mild and stable angina (with a favorable treadmill stress test), successful coronary stenting or bypass surgery, and a remote history of heart attack (more than 8 weeks previously). Sildenafil can be used safely in men in these low risk groups. The risk of heart attack or abnormal heart rhythms during sex is higher in men with unstable angina (angina that occurs at rest or with minimal exertion), poorly controlled hypertension, moderate to severe heart failure, moderate to severe disease of the heart's valves, recent heart attack (less than 2 weeks previously), potentially life threatening disorders of heart rhythm such as recurrent ventricular tachycardia, and moderate to severe disease of the heart's muscle. In these men, doctors usually stabilize or treat the heart conditions before prescribing sildenafil. Before starting sildenafil for erectile dysfunction, a doctor may need to determine whether the heart can safely achieve the workload necessary for sexual activity. For example, in men with coronary artery heart disease, a doctor may perform a treadmill stress test to determine whether there is adequate blood supply to the heart muscle while exercising at levels comparable to sexual activity. What are the treatments for erectile dysfunction? Treatments for erectile dysfunction in 2004 include: Working with doctors to select medications that do not impair erectile function, Making life style improvements (for example; quitting smoking, and exercising more), Drugs such as sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra) or tadalafil (Cialis), Inserting medications into the urethra (intraurethral suppositories), Injecting medications into the corpora cavernosae (intracavernosal injections), Vacuum constrictive devices for the penis, Penile prostheses, and Psychotherapy. Adjusting medications Many common medications for treating hypertension, depression, and high blood lipids can contribute to erectile dysfunction (see above). Treatment of hypertension is an example. There are many different types (classes) of anti-hypertensive medications (medications that lower blood pressure); these include beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, diuretics (medications that increase urine volume), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors), and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Anti-hypertensives may be used alone or in combination(s) to control blood pressure. Different classes of anti-hypertensives have different effects on erectile function. Inderal (a beta blocker) and hydrochlorothiazide (a diuretic) are known to cause erectile dysfunction, while calcium channel blockers and ACE inhibitors do not seem to affect erectile function. On the other hand, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) such as losartan (Cozaar) and valsartan (Diovan), may actually increase sexual appetite, improve sexual performance, and decrease erectile dysfunction. Therefore, choosing an optimal anti-hypertensive combination is an important part of treating erectile dysfunction Lifestyle improvements Quitting smoking, exercising regularly, losing excess weight, curtailing excessive alcohol consumption, controlling hypertension, and optimizing blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes are not only important for maintaining good health but also may improve erectile function. Some studies suggest that men who have made lifestyle improvements experience increased rates of success with oral medications. Answered by Christian Corman 1 year ago.


Edex only gives me an erection 20% of the time.?
Am I missing the correct area to put the needle in to get an erection Asked by Tennie Delarge 1 year ago.

Did you ever get instructions how about to do it in a proper way I inject myself 4 times a day:but was instructed on how and where and the amount.Nothing to do with my penis,folks. Sky If it is only affective 20% of the time you are doing it wrong. See the Dr and ask advice. Answered by Maryalice Huaman 1 year ago.

Were you instructed how to self-administer? You should not have been allowed to self-administer until the correct dosage for you was determined, and you were instructed and demonstrated the ability to inject properly. Answered by Nicola Dalhover 1 year ago.

Ouch. Every think of a prosthetic? Answered by Shyla Dolecki 1 year ago.

"Needle" and "erection" in the same sentence makes me very uncomfortable. You don't . . . tell me you don't, please? Answered by Su Wasden 1 year ago.


What is "caverject" or "edex" I hear my friend talk about?
He was talking about ED Asked by Marquita Zinzow 1 year ago.

its an injection to make you hard. could last for hours Answered by Reuben Houston 1 year ago.

If you are talking about medication then probably it is the one that helps men to have an erection. It actually increase the regular blood that flows in the male organ. I don't know if it has a prescription, but it will be best if you consult your doctor about it so that you can make sure if it will be safe for you. Also, for you to know the possible benefits and risks that you might have. If you want to know more about it, here is a source that contains information about it. only do google with pharmacyescrow.org/s3366-s-CAVERJECT Answered by Charles Cainion 1 year ago.


Do I need a prescription for Aldrostadil?
Also known as Carverject, Edex and Prostin Asked by Arron Zurkus 1 year ago.

Call a pharmacy? Answered by Lilly Klingenberg 1 year ago.


Are there any cures for erectile dysfunction besides viagra?
I cant take viagra because im taking Catepres. are there any other cures for E.D.? My doctor didnt help me and i was thinking of going to an E.D. specialist at Boston Medical Group, but im not sure that will work. Im so depressed. Asked by Myra Castronovo 1 year ago.

I use injection therapy, either Caverject or Edex, they both produce an erection that can last up to four hours making it possible for a man to experience multiple orgasms without losing the erection. There is also Muse, a small pill like item they is placed in the opening of the urethra in the penis and it too will produce a solid erection. Other than that, there is also the vacuum pump that can be used along with a c-o-c-k ring to produce an erection. Only other option is surgery and implants. Answered by Luigi Auduong 1 year ago.

Capitalism is the idea of having a government that allows competition among buiness. It is the idea that allows people to climb up the social ladder or get the american dream based on how much of it they do. Those with a lot of work, suceeded while those who barely work at all won't succeed. In retrospect yes beacuase it gets rid of the bad market and helps the good ones prosper. And any big governmnet would want a good economy and all its problems fixed. A government with capitalism keeps improving because new and better people would rise to the top making better changes. Much like viagra fixes and removes the problem in the first place Answered by Parker Mirjah 1 year ago.

Boston Medical Group will give you injection therapy - you inject medicine yourself at the base of your own penis about 5 minutes before intercourse. Answered by My Paola 1 year ago.

Medications for erectile dysfunction include: Testosterone Oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors (sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra), and tadalafil (Cialis) Intracavernosa injections Intraurethral suppositories How effective is testosterone in treating erectile dysfunction? In patients with hypogonadism, testosterone treatment can improve libido and erectile dysfunction, but the response of erectile dysfunction in men with hypogonadism to testosterone is not complete; many men still may need additional oral medications such as sildenafil, vardenafil or tadalafil. In men 40 years of age or older, a breast examination, digital examination of the prostate and a PSA level (prostate specific antigen) should be done to exclude breast and prostate cancer before starting testosterone treatment since testosterone can aggravate breast and prostate cancers. Patients who have breast and prostate cancers or are suspected of having them should not use testosterone. Oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors Sildenafil (Viagra) What is sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil (Viagra) was the first oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor approved by the FDA in the United States for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (it is not approved for women). Sildenafil inhibits PDE5, which is an enzyme that destroys cGMP. By inhibiting the destruction of cGMP by PDE5, sildenafil allows cGMP to accumulate. The cGMP in turn prolongs relaxation of the smooth muscle of the corpora cavernosa. Relaxation of the corpora cavernosa smooth muscle allows blood to flow into the penis resulting in increased engorgement of the penis. In short, sildenafil increases blood flow into the penis and decreases blood flow out of the penis. How effective is sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil is used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction of either physical or psychological cause. It has been found to be effective in treating erectile dysfunction in men with coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, depression, coronary artery bypass surgery, and men who are taking antidepressants and several classes of anti-hypertensives. In randomized controlled trials, an estimated 60% of men with diabetes, and 80% of men without diabetes experienced improved erections with sildenafil. How should sildenafil (Viagra) be administered? Sildenafil is available as oral tablets at doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg. It should be taken approximately one hour before sexual activity. In some men, the onset of action of the drug may be as early as 11-20 minutes. Sildenafil should be taken on an empty stomach for best results since absorption and effectiveness of sildenafil can be diminished if it is taken shortly after a meal, particularly a meal that is high in fat. What is the dose of sildenafil (Viagra)? In prescribing sildenafil, a doctor considers the age, general health status, and other medication(s) the patient is taking. The usual starting dose for most men is 50 mg, however, the doctor may increase or decrease the dose depending on side effects and effectiveness. The maximum recommended dose is 100 mg every 24 hours, however, many men will need 100 mg of sildenafil for optimal effectiveness, and some doctors are recommending 100 mg as the starting dose. Metabolism (breakdown) of sildenafil is slowed by aging, liver and kidney dysfunction, and concurrent use of certain medications (such as erythromycin--an antibiotic, and protease inhibitors, for HIV). Slowed breakdown allows sildenafil to accumulate in the body and potentially may increase the risk of side effects. Therefore in men over 65, in men with substantial kidney and liver disease, and in men who also are taking protease inhibitors, the doctor will initiate sildenafil at a lower dose (25 mg) to avoid accumulation of sildenafil in the body. A protease inhibitor ritonavir (Norvir) is especially potent in increasing the accumulation of sildenafil, thus men who are taking Norvir should not take sildenafil doses higher than 25 mg and at a frequency of no greater than once in 48 hours. What are the side effects of sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil has been found to be well tolerated without important side effects. The reported side effects are usually mild, and include headache, flushing, nasal congestion, nausea, dyspepsia, diarrhea, and abnormal vision (seeing a bluish hue or brightness). Sildenafil can cause hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure that can lead to fainting and even shock) when given to patients who are taking nitrates. Therefore, patients taking nitrates daily, even patients taking nitrates only once a day, should not take sildenafil. Nitrates are used most commonly to relieve angina (chest pain due to insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle because of narrowing of the coronary arteries); these include nitroglycerine tablets, patches, ointments, sprays, and pastes, as well as isosorbide dinitrate, and isosorbide mononitrate. Other nitrates such as amyl nitrate and butyl nitrate also are found in some recreational drugs called "poppers". Sildenafil should be used cautiously in men on alpha blockers such as doxazosin (Cardura), terazosin (Hytrin), and tamsulosin (Flomax). There have been occasional reports of low blood pressure in men who have taken the two classes of drugs simultaneously and therefore it is recommended that there be at least a span of 4-6 hours between the ingestion of sildenafil and alpha blockers. There have been rare reports of priapism (prolonged and painful erections lasting more than 6 hours) with the use of PDE5 inhibitors such as sildenafil, vardenafil, and tadalafil, especially when sildenafil is used in combination with injection of medications into the corpora cavernosa or intraurethral suppositories. Patients with blood cell diseases such as sickle cell anemia, leukemia, and multiple myeloma have higher than normal risks of developing priapism. Priapism untreated can cause injury to the penis and lead to permanent impotence. Therefore, sildenafil should not be used in combination with intraurethral suppositories and corpora cavernosa injections. If there is prolonged erection (longer than 4 hours), immediate medical assistance should be obtained. Is it safe for men with heart disease to use sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil has been found to be effective and safe in the treatment of erectile dysfunction in men with stable heart disease due to atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries, provided that they are not on nitrates. The real concern is not as much the safety of sildenafil but the risk of sexual activity in triggering heart attacks or abnormal heart rhythms in patients with heart disease. The risk of developing heart attacks or abnormal heart rhythms during sex is low in men with well controlled hypertension, mild disease of the heart's valves, well controlled heart failure, mild and stable angina (with a favorable treadmill stress test), successful coronary stenting or bypass surgery, and a remote history of heart attack (more than 8 weeks previously). Sildenafil can be used safely in men in these low risk groups. The risk of heart attack or abnormal heart rhythms during sex is higher in men with unstable angina (angina that occurs at rest or with minimal exertion), poorly controlled hypertension, moderate to severe heart failure, moderate to severe disease of the heart's valves, recent heart attack (less than 2 weeks previously), potentially life threatening disorders of heart rhythm such as recurrent ventricular tachycardia, and moderate to severe disease of the heart's muscle. In these men, doctors usually stabilize or treat the heart conditions before prescribing sildenafil. Before starting sildenafil for erectile dysfunction, a doctor may need to determine whether the heart can safely achieve the workload necessary for sexual activity. For example, in men with coronary artery heart disease, a doctor may perform a treadmill stress test to determine whether there is adequate blood supply to the heart muscle while exercising at levels comparable to sexual activity. What are the treatments for erectile dysfunction? Treatments for erectile dysfunction in 2004 include: Working with doctors to select medications that do not impair erectile function, Making life style improvements (for example; quitting smoking, and exercising more), Drugs such as sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra) or tadalafil (Cialis), Inserting medications into the urethra (intraurethral suppositories), Injecting medications into the corpora cavernosae (intracavernosal injections), Vacuum constrictive devices for the penis, Penile prostheses, and Psychotherapy. Adjusting medications Many common medications for treating hypertension, depression, and high blood lipids can contribute to erectile dysfunction (see above). Treatment of hypertension is an example. There are many different types (classes) of anti-hypertensive medications (medications that lower blood pressure); these include beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, diuretics (medications that increase urine volume), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors), and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Anti-hypertensives may be used alone or in combination(s) to control blood pressure. Different classes of anti-hypertensives have different effects on erectile function. Inderal (a beta blocker) and hydrochlorothiazide (a diuretic) are known to cause erectile dysfunction, while calcium channel blockers and ACE inhibitors do not seem to affect erectile function. On the other hand, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) such as losartan (Cozaar) and valsartan (Diovan), may actually increase sexual appetite, improve sexual performance, and decrease erectile dysfunction. Therefore, choosing an optimal anti-hypertensive combination is an important part of treating erectile dysfunction Lifestyle improvements Quitting smoking, exercising regularly, losing excess weight, curtailing excessive alcohol consumption, controlling hypertension, and optimizing blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes are not only important for maintaining good health but also may improve erectile function. Some studies suggest that men who have made lifestyle improvements experience increased rates of success with oral medications. Answered by Jay Wedige 1 year ago.


Edex only gives me an erection 20% of the time.?
Am I missing the correct area to put the needle in to get an erection Asked by Cheryl Catts 1 year ago.

Did you ever get instructions how about to do it in a proper way I inject myself 4 times a day:but was instructed on how and where and the amount.Nothing to do with my penis,folks. Sky If it is only affective 20% of the time you are doing it wrong. See the Dr and ask advice. Answered by Min Ineson 1 year ago.

Were you instructed how to self-administer? You should not have been allowed to self-administer until the correct dosage for you was determined, and you were instructed and demonstrated the ability to inject properly. Answered by Jeanne Skepple 1 year ago.

Ouch. Every think of a prosthetic? Answered by Lorena Sarne 1 year ago.

"Needle" and "erection" in the same sentence makes me very uncomfortable. You don't . . . tell me you don't, please? Answered by Spencer Korb 1 year ago.


What is "caverject" or "edex" I hear my friend talk about?
He was talking about ED Asked by Stephani Arora 1 year ago.

its an injection to make you hard. could last for hours Answered by Leatha Alavi 1 year ago.

If you are talking about medication then probably it is the one that helps men to have an erection. It actually increase the regular blood that flows in the male organ. I don't know if it has a prescription, but it will be best if you consult your doctor about it so that you can make sure if it will be safe for you. Also, for you to know the possible benefits and risks that you might have. If you want to know more about it, here is a source that contains information about it. only do google with pharmacyescrow.org/s3366-s-CAVERJECT Answered by Wally Kaczmarek 1 year ago.


Do I need a prescription for Aldrostadil?
Also known as Carverject, Edex and Prostin Asked by Tisa Paek 1 year ago.

Call a pharmacy? Answered by Lourdes Henschel 1 year ago.


Are there any cures for erectile dysfunction besides viagra?
I cant take viagra because im taking Catepres. are there any other cures for E.D.? My doctor didnt help me and i was thinking of going to an E.D. specialist at Boston Medical Group, but im not sure that will work. Im so depressed. Asked by Raina Gretsch 1 year ago.

I use injection therapy, either Caverject or Edex, they both produce an erection that can last up to four hours making it possible for a man to experience multiple orgasms without losing the erection. There is also Muse, a small pill like item they is placed in the opening of the urethra in the penis and it too will produce a solid erection. Other than that, there is also the vacuum pump that can be used along with a c-o-c-k ring to produce an erection. Only other option is surgery and implants. Answered by Shan Lafantano 1 year ago.

Capitalism is the idea of having a government that allows competition among buiness. It is the idea that allows people to climb up the social ladder or get the american dream based on how much of it they do. Those with a lot of work, suceeded while those who barely work at all won't succeed. In retrospect yes beacuase it gets rid of the bad market and helps the good ones prosper. And any big governmnet would want a good economy and all its problems fixed. A government with capitalism keeps improving because new and better people would rise to the top making better changes. Much like viagra fixes and removes the problem in the first place Answered by Darin Bohlke 1 year ago.

Boston Medical Group will give you injection therapy - you inject medicine yourself at the base of your own penis about 5 minutes before intercourse. Answered by Gabriel Alls 1 year ago.

Medications for erectile dysfunction include: Testosterone Oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors (sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra), and tadalafil (Cialis) Intracavernosa injections Intraurethral suppositories How effective is testosterone in treating erectile dysfunction? In patients with hypogonadism, testosterone treatment can improve libido and erectile dysfunction, but the response of erectile dysfunction in men with hypogonadism to testosterone is not complete; many men still may need additional oral medications such as sildenafil, vardenafil or tadalafil. In men 40 years of age or older, a breast examination, digital examination of the prostate and a PSA level (prostate specific antigen) should be done to exclude breast and prostate cancer before starting testosterone treatment since testosterone can aggravate breast and prostate cancers. Patients who have breast and prostate cancers or are suspected of having them should not use testosterone. Oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors Sildenafil (Viagra) What is sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil (Viagra) was the first oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor approved by the FDA in the United States for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (it is not approved for women). Sildenafil inhibits PDE5, which is an enzyme that destroys cGMP. By inhibiting the destruction of cGMP by PDE5, sildenafil allows cGMP to accumulate. The cGMP in turn prolongs relaxation of the smooth muscle of the corpora cavernosa. Relaxation of the corpora cavernosa smooth muscle allows blood to flow into the penis resulting in increased engorgement of the penis. In short, sildenafil increases blood flow into the penis and decreases blood flow out of the penis. How effective is sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil is used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction of either physical or psychological cause. It has been found to be effective in treating erectile dysfunction in men with coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, depression, coronary artery bypass surgery, and men who are taking antidepressants and several classes of anti-hypertensives. In randomized controlled trials, an estimated 60% of men with diabetes, and 80% of men without diabetes experienced improved erections with sildenafil. How should sildenafil (Viagra) be administered? Sildenafil is available as oral tablets at doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg. It should be taken approximately one hour before sexual activity. In some men, the onset of action of the drug may be as early as 11-20 minutes. Sildenafil should be taken on an empty stomach for best results since absorption and effectiveness of sildenafil can be diminished if it is taken shortly after a meal, particularly a meal that is high in fat. What is the dose of sildenafil (Viagra)? In prescribing sildenafil, a doctor considers the age, general health status, and other medication(s) the patient is taking. The usual starting dose for most men is 50 mg, however, the doctor may increase or decrease the dose depending on side effects and effectiveness. The maximum recommended dose is 100 mg every 24 hours, however, many men will need 100 mg of sildenafil for optimal effectiveness, and some doctors are recommending 100 mg as the starting dose. Metabolism (breakdown) of sildenafil is slowed by aging, liver and kidney dysfunction, and concurrent use of certain medications (such as erythromycin--an antibiotic, and protease inhibitors, for HIV). Slowed breakdown allows sildenafil to accumulate in the body and potentially may increase the risk of side effects. Therefore in men over 65, in men with substantial kidney and liver disease, and in men who also are taking protease inhibitors, the doctor will initiate sildenafil at a lower dose (25 mg) to avoid accumulation of sildenafil in the body. A protease inhibitor ritonavir (Norvir) is especially potent in increasing the accumulation of sildenafil, thus men who are taking Norvir should not take sildenafil doses higher than 25 mg and at a frequency of no greater than once in 48 hours. What are the side effects of sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil has been found to be well tolerated without important side effects. The reported side effects are usually mild, and include headache, flushing, nasal congestion, nausea, dyspepsia, diarrhea, and abnormal vision (seeing a bluish hue or brightness). Sildenafil can cause hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure that can lead to fainting and even shock) when given to patients who are taking nitrates. Therefore, patients taking nitrates daily, even patients taking nitrates only once a day, should not take sildenafil. Nitrates are used most commonly to relieve angina (chest pain due to insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle because of narrowing of the coronary arteries); these include nitroglycerine tablets, patches, ointments, sprays, and pastes, as well as isosorbide dinitrate, and isosorbide mononitrate. Other nitrates such as amyl nitrate and butyl nitrate also are found in some recreational drugs called "poppers". Sildenafil should be used cautiously in men on alpha blockers such as doxazosin (Cardura), terazosin (Hytrin), and tamsulosin (Flomax). There have been occasional reports of low blood pressure in men who have taken the two classes of drugs simultaneously and therefore it is recommended that there be at least a span of 4-6 hours between the ingestion of sildenafil and alpha blockers. There have been rare reports of priapism (prolonged and painful erections lasting more than 6 hours) with the use of PDE5 inhibitors such as sildenafil, vardenafil, and tadalafil, especially when sildenafil is used in combination with injection of medications into the corpora cavernosa or intraurethral suppositories. Patients with blood cell diseases such as sickle cell anemia, leukemia, and multiple myeloma have higher than normal risks of developing priapism. Priapism untreated can cause injury to the penis and lead to permanent impotence. Therefore, sildenafil should not be used in combination with intraurethral suppositories and corpora cavernosa injections. If there is prolonged erection (longer than 4 hours), immediate medical assistance should be obtained. Is it safe for men with heart disease to use sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil has been found to be effective and safe in the treatment of erectile dysfunction in men with stable heart disease due to atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries, provided that they are not on nitrates. The real concern is not as much the safety of sildenafil but the risk of sexual activity in triggering heart attacks or abnormal heart rhythms in patients with heart disease. The risk of developing heart attacks or abnormal heart rhythms during sex is low in men with well controlled hypertension, mild disease of the heart's valves, well controlled heart failure, mild and stable angina (with a favorable treadmill stress test), successful coronary stenting or bypass surgery, and a remote history of heart attack (more than 8 weeks previously). Sildenafil can be used safely in men in these low risk groups. The risk of heart attack or abnormal heart rhythms during sex is higher in men with unstable angina (angina that occurs at rest or with minimal exertion), poorly controlled hypertension, moderate to severe heart failure, moderate to severe disease of the heart's valves, recent heart attack (less than 2 weeks previously), potentially life threatening disorders of heart rhythm such as recurrent ventricular tachycardia, and moderate to severe disease of the heart's muscle. In these men, doctors usually stabilize or treat the heart conditions before prescribing sildenafil. Before starting sildenafil for erectile dysfunction, a doctor may need to determine whether the heart can safely achieve the workload necessary for sexual activity. For example, in men with coronary artery heart disease, a doctor may perform a treadmill stress test to determine whether there is adequate blood supply to the heart muscle while exercising at levels comparable to sexual activity. What are the treatments for erectile dysfunction? Treatments for erectile dysfunction in 2004 include: Working with doctors to select medications that do not impair erectile function, Making life style improvements (for example; quitting smoking, and exercising more), Drugs such as sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra) or tadalafil (Cialis), Inserting medications into the urethra (intraurethral suppositories), Injecting medications into the corpora cavernosae (intracavernosal injections), Vacuum constrictive devices for the penis, Penile prostheses, and Psychotherapy. Adjusting medications Many common medications for treating hypertension, depression, and high blood lipids can contribute to erectile dysfunction (see above). Treatment of hypertension is an example. There are many different types (classes) of anti-hypertensive medications (medications that lower blood pressure); these include beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, diuretics (medications that increase urine volume), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors), and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Anti-hypertensives may be used alone or in combination(s) to control blood pressure. Different classes of anti-hypertensives have different effects on erectile function. Inderal (a beta blocker) and hydrochlorothiazide (a diuretic) are known to cause erectile dysfunction, while calcium channel blockers and ACE inhibitors do not seem to affect erectile function. On the other hand, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) such as losartan (Cozaar) and valsartan (Diovan), may actually increase sexual appetite, improve sexual performance, and decrease erectile dysfunction. Therefore, choosing an optimal anti-hypertensive combination is an important part of treating erectile dysfunction Lifestyle improvements Quitting smoking, exercising regularly, losing excess weight, curtailing excessive alcohol consumption, controlling hypertension, and optimizing blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes are not only important for maintaining good health but also may improve erectile function. Some studies suggest that men who have made lifestyle improvements experience increased rates of success with oral medications. Answered by Vella Swatloski 1 year ago.


Edex only gives me an erection 20% of the time.?
Am I missing the correct area to put the needle in to get an erection Asked by Claretta Lenart 1 year ago.

Did you ever get instructions how about to do it in a proper way I inject myself 4 times a day:but was instructed on how and where and the amount.Nothing to do with my penis,folks. Sky If it is only affective 20% of the time you are doing it wrong. See the Dr and ask advice. Answered by Damion Hertel 1 year ago.

Were you instructed how to self-administer? You should not have been allowed to self-administer until the correct dosage for you was determined, and you were instructed and demonstrated the ability to inject properly. Answered by Vi Caviggia 1 year ago.

Ouch. Every think of a prosthetic? Answered by Norman Baldree 1 year ago.

"Needle" and "erection" in the same sentence makes me very uncomfortable. You don't . . . tell me you don't, please? Answered by Travis Tornquist 1 year ago.


What is "caverject" or "edex" I hear my friend talk about?
He was talking about ED Asked by Yer Lawhorn 1 year ago.

its an injection to make you hard. could last for hours Answered by Casey Shriner 1 year ago.

If you are talking about medication then probably it is the one that helps men to have an erection. It actually increase the regular blood that flows in the male organ. I don't know if it has a prescription, but it will be best if you consult your doctor about it so that you can make sure if it will be safe for you. Also, for you to know the possible benefits and risks that you might have. If you want to know more about it, here is a source that contains information about it. only do google with pharmacyescrow.org/s3366-s-CAVERJECT Answered by Macy Sanyaro 1 year ago.


Do I need a prescription for Aldrostadil?
Also known as Carverject, Edex and Prostin Asked by Camelia Kasal 1 year ago.

Call a pharmacy? Answered by Jeanice Vanhee 1 year ago.


Are there any cures for erectile dysfunction besides viagra?
I cant take viagra because im taking Catepres. are there any other cures for E.D.? My doctor didnt help me and i was thinking of going to an E.D. specialist at Boston Medical Group, but im not sure that will work. Im so depressed. Asked by Lucrecia Ferdon 1 year ago.

I use injection therapy, either Caverject or Edex, they both produce an erection that can last up to four hours making it possible for a man to experience multiple orgasms without losing the erection. There is also Muse, a small pill like item they is placed in the opening of the urethra in the penis and it too will produce a solid erection. Other than that, there is also the vacuum pump that can be used along with a c-o-c-k ring to produce an erection. Only other option is surgery and implants. Answered by Jenell Chararria 1 year ago.

Capitalism is the idea of having a government that allows competition among buiness. It is the idea that allows people to climb up the social ladder or get the american dream based on how much of it they do. Those with a lot of work, suceeded while those who barely work at all won't succeed. In retrospect yes beacuase it gets rid of the bad market and helps the good ones prosper. And any big governmnet would want a good economy and all its problems fixed. A government with capitalism keeps improving because new and better people would rise to the top making better changes. Much like viagra fixes and removes the problem in the first place Answered by Joey Mcguirk 1 year ago.

Boston Medical Group will give you injection therapy - you inject medicine yourself at the base of your own penis about 5 minutes before intercourse. Answered by Santos Plover 1 year ago.

Medications for erectile dysfunction include: Testosterone Oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors (sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra), and tadalafil (Cialis) Intracavernosa injections Intraurethral suppositories How effective is testosterone in treating erectile dysfunction? In patients with hypogonadism, testosterone treatment can improve libido and erectile dysfunction, but the response of erectile dysfunction in men with hypogonadism to testosterone is not complete; many men still may need additional oral medications such as sildenafil, vardenafil or tadalafil. In men 40 years of age or older, a breast examination, digital examination of the prostate and a PSA level (prostate specific antigen) should be done to exclude breast and prostate cancer before starting testosterone treatment since testosterone can aggravate breast and prostate cancers. Patients who have breast and prostate cancers or are suspected of having them should not use testosterone. Oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors Sildenafil (Viagra) What is sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil (Viagra) was the first oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor approved by the FDA in the United States for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (it is not approved for women). Sildenafil inhibits PDE5, which is an enzyme that destroys cGMP. By inhibiting the destruction of cGMP by PDE5, sildenafil allows cGMP to accumulate. The cGMP in turn prolongs relaxation of the smooth muscle of the corpora cavernosa. Relaxation of the corpora cavernosa smooth muscle allows blood to flow into the penis resulting in increased engorgement of the penis. In short, sildenafil increases blood flow into the penis and decreases blood flow out of the penis. How effective is sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil is used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction of either physical or psychological cause. It has been found to be effective in treating erectile dysfunction in men with coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, depression, coronary artery bypass surgery, and men who are taking antidepressants and several classes of anti-hypertensives. In randomized controlled trials, an estimated 60% of men with diabetes, and 80% of men without diabetes experienced improved erections with sildenafil. How should sildenafil (Viagra) be administered? Sildenafil is available as oral tablets at doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg. It should be taken approximately one hour before sexual activity. In some men, the onset of action of the drug may be as early as 11-20 minutes. Sildenafil should be taken on an empty stomach for best results since absorption and effectiveness of sildenafil can be diminished if it is taken shortly after a meal, particularly a meal that is high in fat. What is the dose of sildenafil (Viagra)? In prescribing sildenafil, a doctor considers the age, general health status, and other medication(s) the patient is taking. The usual starting dose for most men is 50 mg, however, the doctor may increase or decrease the dose depending on side effects and effectiveness. The maximum recommended dose is 100 mg every 24 hours, however, many men will need 100 mg of sildenafil for optimal effectiveness, and some doctors are recommending 100 mg as the starting dose. Metabolism (breakdown) of sildenafil is slowed by aging, liver and kidney dysfunction, and concurrent use of certain medications (such as erythromycin--an antibiotic, and protease inhibitors, for HIV). Slowed breakdown allows sildenafil to accumulate in the body and potentially may increase the risk of side effects. Therefore in men over 65, in men with substantial kidney and liver disease, and in men who also are taking protease inhibitors, the doctor will initiate sildenafil at a lower dose (25 mg) to avoid accumulation of sildenafil in the body. A protease inhibitor ritonavir (Norvir) is especially potent in increasing the accumulation of sildenafil, thus men who are taking Norvir should not take sildenafil doses higher than 25 mg and at a frequency of no greater than once in 48 hours. What are the side effects of sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil has been found to be well tolerated without important side effects. The reported side effects are usually mild, and include headache, flushing, nasal congestion, nausea, dyspepsia, diarrhea, and abnormal vision (seeing a bluish hue or brightness). Sildenafil can cause hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure that can lead to fainting and even shock) when given to patients who are taking nitrates. Therefore, patients taking nitrates daily, even patients taking nitrates only once a day, should not take sildenafil. Nitrates are used most commonly to relieve angina (chest pain due to insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle because of narrowing of the coronary arteries); these include nitroglycerine tablets, patches, ointments, sprays, and pastes, as well as isosorbide dinitrate, and isosorbide mononitrate. Other nitrates such as amyl nitrate and butyl nitrate also are found in some recreational drugs called "poppers". Sildenafil should be used cautiously in men on alpha blockers such as doxazosin (Cardura), terazosin (Hytrin), and tamsulosin (Flomax). There have been occasional reports of low blood pressure in men who have taken the two classes of drugs simultaneously and therefore it is recommended that there be at least a span of 4-6 hours between the ingestion of sildenafil and alpha blockers. There have been rare reports of priapism (prolonged and painful erections lasting more than 6 hours) with the use of PDE5 inhibitors such as sildenafil, vardenafil, and tadalafil, especially when sildenafil is used in combination with injection of medications into the corpora cavernosa or intraurethral suppositories. Patients with blood cell diseases such as sickle cell anemia, leukemia, and multiple myeloma have higher than normal risks of developing priapism. Priapism untreated can cause injury to the penis and lead to permanent impotence. Therefore, sildenafil should not be used in combination with intraurethral suppositories and corpora cavernosa injections. If there is prolonged erection (longer than 4 hours), immediate medical assistance should be obtained. Is it safe for men with heart disease to use sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil has been found to be effective and safe in the treatment of erectile dysfunction in men with stable heart disease due to atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries, provided that they are not on nitrates. The real concern is not as much the safety of sildenafil but the risk of sexual activity in triggering heart attacks or abnormal heart rhythms in patients with heart disease. The risk of developing heart attacks or abnormal heart rhythms during sex is low in men with well controlled hypertension, mild disease of the heart's valves, well controlled heart failure, mild and stable angina (with a favorable treadmill stress test), successful coronary stenting or bypass surgery, and a remote history of heart attack (more than 8 weeks previously). Sildenafil can be used safely in men in these low risk groups. The risk of heart attack or abnormal heart rhythms during sex is higher in men with unstable angina (angina that occurs at rest or with minimal exertion), poorly controlled hypertension, moderate to severe heart failure, moderate to severe disease of the heart's valves, recent heart attack (less than 2 weeks previously), potentially life threatening disorders of heart rhythm such as recurrent ventricular tachycardia, and moderate to severe disease of the heart's muscle. In these men, doctors usually stabilize or treat the heart conditions before prescribing sildenafil. Before starting sildenafil for erectile dysfunction, a doctor may need to determine whether the heart can safely achieve the workload necessary for sexual activity. For example, in men with coronary artery heart disease, a doctor may perform a treadmill stress test to determine whether there is adequate blood supply to the heart muscle while exercising at levels comparable to sexual activity. What are the treatments for erectile dysfunction? Treatments for erectile dysfunction in 2004 include: Working with doctors to select medications that do not impair erectile function, Making life style improvements (for example; quitting smoking, and exercising more), Drugs such as sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra) or tadalafil (Cialis), Inserting medications into the urethra (intraurethral suppositories), Injecting medications into the corpora cavernosae (intracavernosal injections), Vacuum constrictive devices for the penis, Penile prostheses, and Psychotherapy. Adjusting medications Many common medications for treating hypertension, depression, and high blood lipids can contribute to erectile dysfunction (see above). Treatment of hypertension is an example. There are many different types (classes) of anti-hypertensive medications (medications that lower blood pressure); these include beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, diuretics (medications that increase urine volume), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors), and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Anti-hypertensives may be used alone or in combination(s) to control blood pressure. Different classes of anti-hypertensives have different effects on erectile function. Inderal (a beta blocker) and hydrochlorothiazide (a diuretic) are known to cause erectile dysfunction, while calcium channel blockers and ACE inhibitors do not seem to affect erectile function. On the other hand, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) such as losartan (Cozaar) and valsartan (Diovan), may actually increase sexual appetite, improve sexual performance, and decrease erectile dysfunction. Therefore, choosing an optimal anti-hypertensive combination is an important part of treating erectile dysfunction Lifestyle improvements Quitting smoking, exercising regularly, losing excess weight, curtailing excessive alcohol consumption, controlling hypertension, and optimizing blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes are not only important for maintaining good health but also may improve erectile function. Some studies suggest that men who have made lifestyle improvements experience increased rates of success with oral medications. Answered by Rachele Merisier 1 year ago.


Edex only gives me an erection 20% of the time.?
Am I missing the correct area to put the needle in to get an erection Asked by Anna Baldacci 1 year ago.

Did you ever get instructions how about to do it in a proper way I inject myself 4 times a day:but was instructed on how and where and the amount.Nothing to do with my penis,folks. Sky If it is only affective 20% of the time you are doing it wrong. See the Dr and ask advice. Answered by Emeline Nau 1 year ago.

Were you instructed how to self-administer? You should not have been allowed to self-administer until the correct dosage for you was determined, and you were instructed and demonstrated the ability to inject properly. Answered by Lovetta Abshear 1 year ago.

Ouch. Every think of a prosthetic? Answered by Noble Sandez 1 year ago.

"Needle" and "erection" in the same sentence makes me very uncomfortable. You don't . . . tell me you don't, please? Answered by Margart Brissett 1 year ago.


What is "caverject" or "edex" I hear my friend talk about?
He was talking about ED Asked by Asha Rayas 1 year ago.

its an injection to make you hard. could last for hours Answered by Iola Hrabal 1 year ago.

If you are talking about medication then probably it is the one that helps men to have an erection. It actually increase the regular blood that flows in the male organ. I don't know if it has a prescription, but it will be best if you consult your doctor about it so that you can make sure if it will be safe for you. Also, for you to know the possible benefits and risks that you might have. If you want to know more about it, here is a source that contains information about it. only do google with pharmacyescrow.org/s3366-s-CAVERJECT Answered by Mirta Alarie 1 year ago.


Do I need a prescription for Aldrostadil?
Also known as Carverject, Edex and Prostin Asked by Hiedi Pirillo 1 year ago.

Call a pharmacy? Answered by Leia Garnder 1 year ago.


Are there any cures for erectile dysfunction besides viagra?
I cant take viagra because im taking Catepres. are there any other cures for E.D.? My doctor didnt help me and i was thinking of going to an E.D. specialist at Boston Medical Group, but im not sure that will work. Im so depressed. Asked by Art Winesberry 1 year ago.

I use injection therapy, either Caverject or Edex, they both produce an erection that can last up to four hours making it possible for a man to experience multiple orgasms without losing the erection. There is also Muse, a small pill like item they is placed in the opening of the urethra in the penis and it too will produce a solid erection. Other than that, there is also the vacuum pump that can be used along with a c-o-c-k ring to produce an erection. Only other option is surgery and implants. Answered by Regenia Griffing 1 year ago.

Capitalism is the idea of having a government that allows competition among buiness. It is the idea that allows people to climb up the social ladder or get the american dream based on how much of it they do. Those with a lot of work, suceeded while those who barely work at all won't succeed. In retrospect yes beacuase it gets rid of the bad market and helps the good ones prosper. And any big governmnet would want a good economy and all its problems fixed. A government with capitalism keeps improving because new and better people would rise to the top making better changes. Much like viagra fixes and removes the problem in the first place Answered by Gale Traxler 1 year ago.

Boston Medical Group will give you injection therapy - you inject medicine yourself at the base of your own penis about 5 minutes before intercourse. Answered by Hassie Fillinger 1 year ago.

Medications for erectile dysfunction include: Testosterone Oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors (sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra), and tadalafil (Cialis) Intracavernosa injections Intraurethral suppositories How effective is testosterone in treating erectile dysfunction? In patients with hypogonadism, testosterone treatment can improve libido and erectile dysfunction, but the response of erectile dysfunction in men with hypogonadism to testosterone is not complete; many men still may need additional oral medications such as sildenafil, vardenafil or tadalafil. In men 40 years of age or older, a breast examination, digital examination of the prostate and a PSA level (prostate specific antigen) should be done to exclude breast and prostate cancer before starting testosterone treatment since testosterone can aggravate breast and prostate cancers. Patients who have breast and prostate cancers or are suspected of having them should not use testosterone. Oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors Sildenafil (Viagra) What is sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil (Viagra) was the first oral phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor approved by the FDA in the United States for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (it is not approved for women). Sildenafil inhibits PDE5, which is an enzyme that destroys cGMP. By inhibiting the destruction of cGMP by PDE5, sildenafil allows cGMP to accumulate. The cGMP in turn prolongs relaxation of the smooth muscle of the corpora cavernosa. Relaxation of the corpora cavernosa smooth muscle allows blood to flow into the penis resulting in increased engorgement of the penis. In short, sildenafil increases blood flow into the penis and decreases blood flow out of the penis. How effective is sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil is used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction of either physical or psychological cause. It has been found to be effective in treating erectile dysfunction in men with coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, depression, coronary artery bypass surgery, and men who are taking antidepressants and several classes of anti-hypertensives. In randomized controlled trials, an estimated 60% of men with diabetes, and 80% of men without diabetes experienced improved erections with sildenafil. How should sildenafil (Viagra) be administered? Sildenafil is available as oral tablets at doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg. It should be taken approximately one hour before sexual activity. In some men, the onset of action of the drug may be as early as 11-20 minutes. Sildenafil should be taken on an empty stomach for best results since absorption and effectiveness of sildenafil can be diminished if it is taken shortly after a meal, particularly a meal that is high in fat. What is the dose of sildenafil (Viagra)? In prescribing sildenafil, a doctor considers the age, general health status, and other medication(s) the patient is taking. The usual starting dose for most men is 50 mg, however, the doctor may increase or decrease the dose depending on side effects and effectiveness. The maximum recommended dose is 100 mg every 24 hours, however, many men will need 100 mg of sildenafil for optimal effectiveness, and some doctors are recommending 100 mg as the starting dose. Metabolism (breakdown) of sildenafil is slowed by aging, liver and kidney dysfunction, and concurrent use of certain medications (such as erythromycin--an antibiotic, and protease inhibitors, for HIV). Slowed breakdown allows sildenafil to accumulate in the body and potentially may increase the risk of side effects. Therefore in men over 65, in men with substantial kidney and liver disease, and in men who also are taking protease inhibitors, the doctor will initiate sildenafil at a lower dose (25 mg) to avoid accumulation of sildenafil in the body. A protease inhibitor ritonavir (Norvir) is especially potent in increasing the accumulation of sildenafil, thus men who are taking Norvir should not take sildenafil doses higher than 25 mg and at a frequency of no greater than once in 48 hours. What are the side effects of sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil has been found to be well tolerated without important side effects. The reported side effects are usually mild, and include headache, flushing, nasal congestion, nausea, dyspepsia, diarrhea, and abnormal vision (seeing a bluish hue or brightness). Sildenafil can cause hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure that can lead to fainting and even shock) when given to patients who are taking nitrates. Therefore, patients taking nitrates daily, even patients taking nitrates only once a day, should not take sildenafil. Nitrates are used most commonly to relieve angina (chest pain due to insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle because of narrowing of the coronary arteries); these include nitroglycerine tablets, patches, ointments, sprays, and pastes, as well as isosorbide dinitrate, and isosorbide mononitrate. Other nitrates such as amyl nitrate and butyl nitrate also are found in some recreational drugs called "poppers". Sildenafil should be used cautiously in men on alpha blockers such as doxazosin (Cardura), terazosin (Hytrin), and tamsulosin (Flomax). There have been occasional reports of low blood pressure in men who have taken the two classes of drugs simultaneously and therefore it is recommended that there be at least a span of 4-6 hours between the ingestion of sildenafil and alpha blockers. There have been rare reports of priapism (prolonged and painful erections lasting more than 6 hours) with the use of PDE5 inhibitors such as sildenafil, vardenafil, and tadalafil, especially when sildenafil is used in combination with injection of medications into the corpora cavernosa or intraurethral suppositories. Patients with blood cell diseases such as sickle cell anemia, leukemia, and multiple myeloma have higher than normal risks of developing priapism. Priapism untreated can cause injury to the penis and lead to permanent impotence. Therefore, sildenafil should not be used in combination with intraurethral suppositories and corpora cavernosa injections. If there is prolonged erection (longer than 4 hours), immediate medical assistance should be obtained. Is it safe for men with heart disease to use sildenafil (Viagra)? Sildenafil has been found to be effective and safe in the treatment of erectile dysfunction in men with stable heart disease due to atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries, provided that they are not on nitrates. The real concern is not as much the safety of sildenafil but the risk of sexual activity in triggering heart attacks or abnormal heart rhythms in patients with heart disease. The risk of developing heart attacks or abnormal heart rhythms during sex is low in men with well controlled hypertension, mild disease of the heart's valves, well controlled heart failure, mild and stable angina (with a favorable treadmill stress test), successful coronary stenting or bypass surgery, and a remote history of heart attack (more than 8 weeks previously). Sildenafil can be used safely in men in these low risk groups. The risk of heart attack or abnormal heart rhythms during sex is higher in men with unstable angina (angina that occurs at rest or with minimal exertion), poorly controlled hypertension, moderate to severe heart failure, moderate to severe disease of the heart's valves, recent heart attack (less than 2 weeks previously), potentially life threatening disorders of heart rhythm such as recurrent ventricular tachycardia, and moderate to severe disease of the heart's muscle. In these men, doctors usually stabilize or treat the heart conditions before prescribing sildenafil. Before starting sildenafil for erectile dysfunction, a doctor may need to determine whether the heart can safely achieve the workload necessary for sexual activity. For example, in men with coronary artery heart disease, a doctor may perform a treadmill stress test to determine whether there is adequate blood supply to the heart muscle while exercising at levels comparable to sexual activity. What are the treatments for erectile dysfunction? Treatments for erectile dysfunction in 2004 include: Working with doctors to select medications that do not impair erectile function, Making life style improvements (for example; quitting smoking, and exercising more), Drugs such as sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra) or tadalafil (Cialis), Inserting medications into the urethra (intraurethral suppositories), Injecting medications into the corpora cavernosae (intracavernosal injections), Vacuum constrictive devices for the penis, Penile prostheses, and Psychotherapy. Adjusting medications Many common medications for treating hypertension, depression, and high blood lipids can contribute to erectile dysfunction (see above). Treatment of hypertension is an example. There are many different types (classes) of anti-hypertensive medications (medications that lower blood pressure); these include beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, diuretics (medications that increase urine volume), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors), and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Anti-hypertensives may be used alone or in combination(s) to control blood pressure. Different classes of anti-hypertensives have different effects on erectile function. Inderal (a beta blocker) and hydrochlorothiazide (a diuretic) are known to cause erectile dysfunction, while calcium channel blockers and ACE inhibitors do not seem to affect erectile function. On the other hand, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) such as losartan (Cozaar) and valsartan (Diovan), may actually increase sexual appetite, improve sexual performance, and decrease erectile dysfunction. Therefore, choosing an optimal anti-hypertensive combination is an important part of treating erectile dysfunction Lifestyle improvements Quitting smoking, exercising regularly, losing excess weight, curtailing excessive alcohol consumption, controlling hypertension, and optimizing blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes are not only important for maintaining good health but also may improve erectile function. Some studies suggest that men who have made lifestyle improvements experience increased rates of success with oral medications. Answered by Gayla Bierbower 1 year ago.


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