Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 013174/001.

Names and composition

"DYRENIUM" is the commercial name of a drug composed of TRIAMTERENE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
013174/001 DYRENIUM TRIAMTERENE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
013174/002 DYRENIUM TRIAMTERENE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
013174/001 DYRENIUM TRIAMTERENE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
013174/002 DYRENIUM TRIAMTERENE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG

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Answered questions

Is triamterene a blood thinner?
dose is 50mg/25mg once aday of hctz Asked by Lakisha Brosch 1 year ago.

No. Triamterene (Dyrenium) is a potassium-sparing diuretic used in combination with thiazide diuretics for the treatment of hypertension. Triamterene works by directly blocking the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) on the lumen side of the kidney collecting tubule. By increasing the sodium concentration in the urine, water follows, thus effectively reducing circulating volume. Answered by Gino Mccarren 1 year ago.

Talk to your doctor and ask him why he is placing you on each of your medications. (This is especially good to do if you are seeing multiple doctors- they are often not aware of what other practitioners are putting you on. The easiest thing is to put all of your medications/supplements/vitamins in a bag and bring it in to him.) Since I don't know your medical history, here's where I think your doctor is going with this. The most compelling reason to place you on a blood thinner is probably due to your CHF. In CHF, your heart doesn't pump blood very well. So blood doesn't move around very well and it tends to sit and pool in the lower legs and lungs. Blood that sits tends to clot easier than blood that circulates well. So the blood thinner is to help prevent clots from forming in stagnant blood. Don't start aspirin if your doctor didn't place you on it. Even though it is OTC and available without a prescription, it does not mean that it is safe for YOU. Only take medications as guided by your doctor. Answered by Tommie Barb 1 year ago.

triamterene is a potassium sparing diuretic. It is given for hypertension, fluid retention and used in congestive heart failure. Answered by Roland Villane 1 year ago.


Can high blood pressure medication cause nervous system side effects?
I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high... Asked by Alex Cechini 1 year ago.

I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high blood pressure medication cause such or is this some unrelated condition that I should seek out? Answered by Sheron Schnieder 1 year ago.

Possible Side Effects of Drugs That Lower Blood Pressure Some of the drugs listed below can affect certain functions of the body, resulting in bad side effects. However, drugs that lower blood pressure have proven effective over the years. The benefits of using them far outweigh the risk of side effects. Most people who’ve taken these drugs haven’t had any problems. Diuretics — Some of these drugs may decrease your body's supply of a mineral called potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. You can prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic, if your doctor recommends it. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar), spironolactone (Aldactone) or triamterene (Dyrenium) are called "potassium sparing" agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide, Dyazide, Maxzide or Moduretic. Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn't common and can be managed by other treatment. In people with diabetes, diuretic drugs may increase the blood sugar level. A change in drug, diet, insulin or oral antidiabetic dosage corrects this in most cases. Your doctor can change your treatment. Most of the time the degree of increase in blood sugar isn't much. Impotence may also occur in a small percentage of people. Beta-blockers — Acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal) or timolol (Blocadren) may cause insomnia, cold hands and feet, tiredness or depression, a slow heartbeat or symptoms of asthma. Impotence may occur. If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely. ACE inhibitors — These drugs, such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril or Prinivil), may cause a skin rash; loss of taste; a chronic dry, hacking cough; and in rare instances, kidney damage. Angiotensin II receptor blockers — These drugs may cause occasional dizziness. Calcium channel blockers — Diltiazem (Cardizem), nicardipine (Cardene), Nifedipine (Procardia) and verapamil (Calan or Isoptin) may cause palpitations, swollen ankles, constipation, headache or dizziness. Side effects with each of these drugs differ a great deal. Alpha blockers — These drugs may cause fast heart rate, dizziness or a drop in blood pressure when you stand up. Combined alpha and beta blockers — People taking these drugs may experience a drop in blood pressure when they stand up. Central agonists — Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet) may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you're in an upright position (standing or walking) and may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication. Clonidine (Catapres), guanabenz (Wytensin) or guanfacine (Tenex) may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you're taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly, because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels. Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors — Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren't severe and no treatment is required other than to change the amount of drugs taken. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor. You should stop using the drugs. Guanadrel (Hylorel) or guanethidine (Ismelin) may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions — and if they persist for more than a minute or two — sit or lie down and either reduce or omit the next dose of the drug. If symptoms continue, contact your doctor. When you're taking guanethidine, don't keep standing in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if this occurs. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help. Blood vessel dilators — Hydralzine (Apresoline) may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn't usually used by itself. Minoxidil (Loniten) is a potent drug that's usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth. Answered by Carmelina Lonabaugh 1 year ago.

You really should speak to your doctor, while yes, high blood pressure meds do have "Side Effects" to some of those effects, you really should make doubly sure that you can take them, and they will not harm you. So speak to your doctor. I take blood pressure meds and the least I get is light headiness, when my blood pressure drops to "Normal" from being too high. Answered by Fonda Scarpello 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Leota Leonor 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Millicent Yannantuono 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Merle Tresler 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Yung Emde 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Bianca Croyle 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Therese Yeropoli 1 year ago.


What is a common hypertension medication?
Asked by Catrice Slaby 1 year ago.

Diuretics ("water pills") examples: Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Furosemide (Lasix®) Indapamide (Lozol®) Metolazone (Zaroxolyn®) Spirnolactone (Aldactone®) Torsemide (Demadex®) Triamterene (Dyrenium®) Beta blockers examples: Atenolol (Tenormin®) Bisoprolol (Zebeta®) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Metoprolol (iLopressor®, Toprol SL®) Timolol (Blockadren®) Calcium channel blockers examples: Amlodipine (Norvasc®) Felodipine (Plendil®) Idradipine (DynaCirc®) Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nisoldipine (Sular®) ACE inhibitors examples: Benazepril (Lotensin®) Captopril (Capoten®) Enalapril (Vasotec®) Fosinopril (Monopril®) Lisinopril (Prinivil®, Zestril®) Quinapril (Accupril®) Ramipril (Altace®) Trandolapril (Mavik®) Angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs) examples: Candesartan (Atacand®) Irbesartin (Avapro®) Losartin (Cozaar®) Telmisartin (Micardis®) Valsartan (Diovan®) Answered by Claris Hassanein 1 year ago.

A very common hypertension medicine is hydrochlorathiazide(HCTZ). It's a diuertic. It's what I've had to take for the last 6 months. It's well tolerated. Others are; Norvasc, Lopressor, Cozaar, and the list goes on and on. Yes, like all medications, they have side effects. Natural medicines also have side effects or do nothing at all. HCTZ-diuretic Norvasc-calcium channel blocker Cozaar-ACE inhibitor are all very well tolerated. Their cautions and side effects are well known, and they have been around forever. Lopressor is a beta blocker. I wouldn't take those as first line treatment unless a few other conditions were being address. Beta blockers have well established uses, but the side effects can be a bit more than some other groups of hypertension medications. Answered by Maybell Laureno 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Marshall Sandona 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Marquetta Stallons 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Filiberto Lossing 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Elena Degeare 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Jaunita Darnall 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Chaya Fontneau 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Torrie Delgrande 1 year ago.


What time is proper to take my medications? I take several. I do not know if I should take them in AM or PM?
The reason for asking this here is two-fold.First, I consider the brain-trust of members of YA to be second to none. When we get multiple responses, it is all the better.Second, it helps others who also have the same type of question get an answer without them having to ask it.Thank you for all who... Asked by Josh Christman 1 year ago.

I take the following medications: Ranitidine Gemfibrozil Metformin Benicar If you know the proper time of day to take these medications, I would love to hear it. If you know of a website that gives this information in a easy to understand fashion, I would also appreciate that as well. I am also looking for a website which allows me to enter all my medications and which tells me which should not be taken together because of their side-effects. Thank you for you help. Answered by Kaitlyn Wanberg 1 year ago.

The reason for asking this here is two-fold. First, I consider the brain-trust of members of YA to be second to none. When we get multiple responses, it is all the better. Second, it helps others who also have the same type of question get an answer without them having to ask it. Thank you for all who have given their two-cents worth. I really appreciate it, even from those who did not respond with an answer. Answered by Bradley Molette 1 year ago.

When you get your meds from the pharmacy they tell you when to take them. The info would be on the education page. These meds are not just AM or PM meds, they are also with or without food. Of course as usual, you could be off most of these meds if you would just watch your diet and exercise. You know I have to add that last little ditty. Love ya, Steph Answered by Drusilla Rogriguez 1 year ago.

How often do you take them? Metformin you should take before meals. Gemfribrozil 30 minutes before meals Benicar can be taken whenever, with or without food Ranitidine has many different types -s o it depends Answered by Dalia Hogy 1 year ago.

Metformin should be taken prior to meals as it is a diabetic medication. Ranitidine is Zantac which is for your stomach. You may take that AM and before bed if that is the way it is prescribed. Answered by Emmie Radakovich 1 year ago.

You Doctor and Pharmacist should both of advised you when to take your meds, and if they haven't should be reported. I think it is completely irresponsible of them. The doctor should also have told you if one interferes with the other. I would certainly be on the phone to either of them and not try to learn about it here. Answered by Hank Zita 1 year ago.

are you me? I asked the same thing but I take about 22 different meds and was gonna go to the pharmacist and dump them out and ask him, but thats too much to do, so I just sit at home and get calls and letters from all these med companies that want me to be studied by them do to taking all their meds. good luck! Answered by Giovanni Ingmire 1 year ago.

all the medicines you mentioned are to be taken best in the morning at least and hour before having breakfast... most medicines are to be taken with food so it doesnt irritate the stomache. Answered by Ludivina Mccroy 1 year ago.

Why in the world ask very important questions like those here? It's your health, you should be asking your dr. who knows you, not people who are basically total strangers. Answered by Anette Leetch 1 year ago.


Counteractive meds why?
Why do doctors put someone on Lasix to take fluid out and then Potassium because that level goes way down from the Lasix. Then trembling should be controlled by cholesterol meds but that's not important let's choke you to death with lasix first.Isn't there a better way to treat congestive heart... Asked by Julene Shenkman 1 year ago.

Why do doctors put someone on Lasix to take fluid out and then Potassium because that level goes way down from the Lasix. Then trembling should be controlled by cholesterol meds but that's not important let's choke you to death with lasix first. Isn't there a better way to treat congestive heart failure for a woman in late 50s? Answered by Layla Zoulek 1 year ago.

Hi Ms Heard Hearted Hanna, You have a way with asking questions(hard hearted?). Any way coming to your question...... There are diuretics (unlike Lasix) that are 'potassium sparing' types. This means that these do not lose body potassium. They include amiloride hydrochloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone), and triamterene (Dyrenium), among others. Most commonly used is Spironolactone. Potassium-sparing diuretics cause the kidneys to hold potassium in the body. When you are taking these medications you generally should not take potassium supplements because your potassium levels might rise too high. Now, when these meds are available, why did your doctor prescribe Lasix? Be a bit soft hearted. He/she may have his/her own reasons. Ask why, the next time you meet him/her (the doc may curse the internet). Anyway, if you feel too weak due over-depletion of potassium, you have a potential non-potassium choice. Feel free to fire your cholesterol meds question. Cheers. Answered by Darcey Dallago 1 year ago.

It's a choice: do you want painful swollen legs, or to take the lasix and have to supplement potassium? Also important: are you staying on a low sodium diet? If you eat lots of salt or salty foods (including most fried or canned foods), it will make the potassium losses from lasix even worse. More importantly, they can exacerbate your heart failure, and you could end up in the hospital with serious problems. Please be very strict on yourself -- you cannot eat like a healthy person. You also have to make sure you are taking all of your other meds for heart failure. Call your doctor's office to make sure you have all the meds that were prescribed, and that you are taking them correctly. Answered by Nickolas Labadie 1 year ago.

Lasix is only symptomatic treatment the best drugs are ACE inhibitors and certain beta blockers. A diuretic still may be necessary but often can be gradually reduced. Diuretics alone don't improve survival, beta blockers & ACE inhibitors do Answered by Queen Stiltner 1 year ago.

it is the drug of choice, and it is a life saving medicine, it reduces the pre-load and after-load, no other drug has the benificial effects while treating ccf and lvf. Answered by Aldo Deloach 1 year ago.


White blood cells count and disease diagnosis?
how can the w.b.c. count help doctors diagnose diseases (increase ... decrease ...wbc types ...etc.) ? (please try to mention all the disease that w.b.c. count can be an indicator to. )* this question is posted on behalf of a volunteer works in a remote area in Africa, in a lab that is poorly equipped, and... Asked by Johnie Venere 1 year ago.

how can the w.b.c. count help doctors diagnose diseases (increase ... decrease ...wbc types ...etc.) ? (please try to mention all the disease that w.b.c. count can be an indicator to. ) * this question is posted on behalf of a volunteer works in a remote area in Africa, in a lab that is poorly equipped, and there are very few tests that can be done there, so please try to give a detailed answer. Answered by Dee Steidinger 1 year ago.

Increased white blood cell count indicates an infection. This is only one factor. All the signs and symptoms would be also be used to make a diagnosis. Listing all the diseases that have a variation in WBC would be too numerous to be of any help. Answered by Consuela Gearlds 1 year ago.

If you have all had a negative result then you really don't need to worry about it being HIV! If you have had liver cirrhosis then chances are your immune system has been compromised- the liver has a huge amount of functions in the body including producing hormones and chemicals which make your immune system do its job. I assume you have been to the doctor since you have had a HIV test- go back and ask for their advice! If your WBC count is so low then i am surprised that they are not already testing to find out why. Good luck. Answered by Tomiko Rands 1 year ago.

A WBC count is normally ordered as part of the complete(or full) blood count (CBC)(FBC), which is ordered for a wide variety of reasons. A WBC count also may be ordered to monitor recovery from illness. Counts that continue to rise or fall to abnormal levels indicate that the condition is getting worse. Counts that return to normal indicate improvement. Unfortunately, a standard reference range is not available for this test. Because reference values are dependent on many factors, including patient age, gender, sample population, and test method, numeric test results have different meanings in different labs. The lab report should include the specific reference range for the test. The first step in determining a given reference range is to define the population to which the reference range will apply, for example, healthy females between 20 and 30 years old. A large number of individuals from this category would be tested for a specific laboratory test. The results would be averaged and a range (plus or minus 2 standard deviations of the average) of normal values would be established. The term "reference range" is preferred over "normal range" because the reference population can be clearly defined. Rather than implying that the test results are being compared with some ill-defined concept of "normal," the reference range means the results are being considered in the most relevant context. When you examine test results from different populations, you quickly discover that what is "normal" for one group is not necessarily normal for another group. For example, pregnancy changes many aspects of the body’s chemistry, so pregnant women have their own set of reference ranges. An elevated number of white blood cells is called leukocytosis. This can result from bacterial infections, inflammation, leukemia, trauma, or stress. A decreased WBC count is called leukopenia. It can result from many different situations, such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or diseases of the immune system. Eating, physical activity, and stress can cause an increased WBC count. Pregnancy in the final month and labour may be associated with increased WBC levels. If the spleen has been removed, there may be a persistent mild to moderate increased WBC count. The WBC count tends to be lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon. WBC counts are age-related. On average, normal newborns and infants have higher WBC counts than adults. It is not uncommon for the elderly to fail to develop leukocytosis as a response to infection. There are many drugs that cause both increased and decreased WBC counts. Sometimes the cause of a low white blood cell count can't be determined (idiopathic). Known causes of a low white blood cell count (leukopenia) include - Infections, such as viral infections and HIV. Autoimmune disorders, such as lupus. Certain medications, especially those used in chemotherapy and some antibiotics. Radiation therapy. Bone marrow disease, such as leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes.White blood cells help fight infection in your body. A “normal” white blood cell count ranges from 4,500 to 10,000 cells per microlitre of blood. A mild decrease in white blood cells below 4,500 cells per microliter doesn't necessarily indicate a serious illness. However, a dangerously low white blood cell count — below 2,500 cells per microlitre — increases the risk of serious infection. Without discussing individual diseases and conditions and their possible range of results, I will stop this discussion here. Hope this is of some help matador 89 Answered by Mamie Kerfoot 1 year ago.

Increased white blood cells in lab results signify infection somewhere in the body. Answered by Tommy Aicklen 1 year ago.

most infections results in elevated counts of WBC's more than the normal range 4.000-10.000/mm^3. as following: - Bacterial infection >>> elevated Granulocytes - Viral & Funjal infection >>> elevated Lymphocytes - infection with AIDS results in VERY DECREASED count of LYMPHOCYTES thats all Answered by Youlanda Denhartog 1 year ago.


Is triamterene a blood thinner?
dose is 50mg/25mg once aday of hctz Asked by Annita Zurovec 1 year ago.

No. Triamterene (Dyrenium) is a potassium-sparing diuretic used in combination with thiazide diuretics for the treatment of hypertension. Triamterene works by directly blocking the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) on the lumen side of the kidney collecting tubule. By increasing the sodium concentration in the urine, water follows, thus effectively reducing circulating volume. Answered by Lanita Klave 1 year ago.

Talk to your doctor and ask him why he is placing you on each of your medications. (This is especially good to do if you are seeing multiple doctors- they are often not aware of what other practitioners are putting you on. The easiest thing is to put all of your medications/supplements/vitamins in a bag and bring it in to him.) Since I don't know your medical history, here's where I think your doctor is going with this. The most compelling reason to place you on a blood thinner is probably due to your CHF. In CHF, your heart doesn't pump blood very well. So blood doesn't move around very well and it tends to sit and pool in the lower legs and lungs. Blood that sits tends to clot easier than blood that circulates well. So the blood thinner is to help prevent clots from forming in stagnant blood. Don't start aspirin if your doctor didn't place you on it. Even though it is OTC and available without a prescription, it does not mean that it is safe for YOU. Only take medications as guided by your doctor. Answered by Reuben Paulas 1 year ago.

triamterene is a potassium sparing diuretic. It is given for hypertension, fluid retention and used in congestive heart failure. Answered by Mariana Baier 1 year ago.


Can high blood pressure medication cause nervous system side effects?
I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high... Asked by Luanne Mcgunnigle 1 year ago.

I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high blood pressure medication cause such or is this some unrelated condition that I should seek out? Answered by Magaly Hartranft 1 year ago.

Possible Side Effects of Drugs That Lower Blood Pressure Some of the drugs listed below can affect certain functions of the body, resulting in bad side effects. However, drugs that lower blood pressure have proven effective over the years. The benefits of using them far outweigh the risk of side effects. Most people who’ve taken these drugs haven’t had any problems. Diuretics — Some of these drugs may decrease your body's supply of a mineral called potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. You can prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic, if your doctor recommends it. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar), spironolactone (Aldactone) or triamterene (Dyrenium) are called "potassium sparing" agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide, Dyazide, Maxzide or Moduretic. Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn't common and can be managed by other treatment. In people with diabetes, diuretic drugs may increase the blood sugar level. A change in drug, diet, insulin or oral antidiabetic dosage corrects this in most cases. Your doctor can change your treatment. Most of the time the degree of increase in blood sugar isn't much. Impotence may also occur in a small percentage of people. Beta-blockers — Acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal) or timolol (Blocadren) may cause insomnia, cold hands and feet, tiredness or depression, a slow heartbeat or symptoms of asthma. Impotence may occur. If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely. ACE inhibitors — These drugs, such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril or Prinivil), may cause a skin rash; loss of taste; a chronic dry, hacking cough; and in rare instances, kidney damage. Angiotensin II receptor blockers — These drugs may cause occasional dizziness. Calcium channel blockers — Diltiazem (Cardizem), nicardipine (Cardene), Nifedipine (Procardia) and verapamil (Calan or Isoptin) may cause palpitations, swollen ankles, constipation, headache or dizziness. Side effects with each of these drugs differ a great deal. Alpha blockers — These drugs may cause fast heart rate, dizziness or a drop in blood pressure when you stand up. Combined alpha and beta blockers — People taking these drugs may experience a drop in blood pressure when they stand up. Central agonists — Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet) may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you're in an upright position (standing or walking) and may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication. Clonidine (Catapres), guanabenz (Wytensin) or guanfacine (Tenex) may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you're taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly, because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels. Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors — Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren't severe and no treatment is required other than to change the amount of drugs taken. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor. You should stop using the drugs. Guanadrel (Hylorel) or guanethidine (Ismelin) may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions — and if they persist for more than a minute or two — sit or lie down and either reduce or omit the next dose of the drug. If symptoms continue, contact your doctor. When you're taking guanethidine, don't keep standing in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if this occurs. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help. Blood vessel dilators — Hydralzine (Apresoline) may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn't usually used by itself. Minoxidil (Loniten) is a potent drug that's usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth. Answered by Cori Herra 1 year ago.

You really should speak to your doctor, while yes, high blood pressure meds do have "Side Effects" to some of those effects, you really should make doubly sure that you can take them, and they will not harm you. So speak to your doctor. I take blood pressure meds and the least I get is light headiness, when my blood pressure drops to "Normal" from being too high. Answered by Kaye Athayde 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Nadene Turinetti 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Daniell Wember 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Candyce Trumpp 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Gracie Kasmarek 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Elina Dininno 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Rod Stred 1 year ago.


What is a common hypertension medication?
Asked by Valeria Demro 1 year ago.

Diuretics ("water pills") examples: Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Furosemide (Lasix®) Indapamide (Lozol®) Metolazone (Zaroxolyn®) Spirnolactone (Aldactone®) Torsemide (Demadex®) Triamterene (Dyrenium®) Beta blockers examples: Atenolol (Tenormin®) Bisoprolol (Zebeta®) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Metoprolol (iLopressor®, Toprol SL®) Timolol (Blockadren®) Calcium channel blockers examples: Amlodipine (Norvasc®) Felodipine (Plendil®) Idradipine (DynaCirc®) Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nisoldipine (Sular®) ACE inhibitors examples: Benazepril (Lotensin®) Captopril (Capoten®) Enalapril (Vasotec®) Fosinopril (Monopril®) Lisinopril (Prinivil®, Zestril®) Quinapril (Accupril®) Ramipril (Altace®) Trandolapril (Mavik®) Angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs) examples: Candesartan (Atacand®) Irbesartin (Avapro®) Losartin (Cozaar®) Telmisartin (Micardis®) Valsartan (Diovan®) Answered by Helene Loehner 1 year ago.

A very common hypertension medicine is hydrochlorathiazide(HCTZ). It's a diuertic. It's what I've had to take for the last 6 months. It's well tolerated. Others are; Norvasc, Lopressor, Cozaar, and the list goes on and on. Yes, like all medications, they have side effects. Natural medicines also have side effects or do nothing at all. HCTZ-diuretic Norvasc-calcium channel blocker Cozaar-ACE inhibitor are all very well tolerated. Their cautions and side effects are well known, and they have been around forever. Lopressor is a beta blocker. I wouldn't take those as first line treatment unless a few other conditions were being address. Beta blockers have well established uses, but the side effects can be a bit more than some other groups of hypertension medications. Answered by Elina Putzier 1 year ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Carletta Fantozzi 1 year ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Janelle Sheehan 1 year ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Ashli Andrick 1 year ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Tracey Carreras 1 year ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Lanelle Lapete 1 year ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Luba Sanes 1 year ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Geneva Mautner 1 year ago.


What time is proper to take my medications? I take several. I do not know if I should take them in AM or PM?
The reason for asking this here is two-fold.First, I consider the brain-trust of members of YA to be second to none. When we get multiple responses, it is all the better.Second, it helps others who also have the same type of question get an answer without them having to ask it.Thank you for all who... Asked by Francina Timone 1 year ago.

I take the following medications: Ranitidine Gemfibrozil Metformin Benicar If you know the proper time of day to take these medications, I would love to hear it. If you know of a website that gives this information in a easy to understand fashion, I would also appreciate that as well. I am also looking for a website which allows me to enter all my medications and which tells me which should not be taken together because of their side-effects. Thank you for you help. Answered by Terese Ober 1 year ago.

The reason for asking this here is two-fold. First, I consider the brain-trust of members of YA to be second to none. When we get multiple responses, it is all the better. Second, it helps others who also have the same type of question get an answer without them having to ask it. Thank you for all who have given their two-cents worth. I really appreciate it, even from those who did not respond with an answer. Answered by Aubrey Vanhee 1 year ago.

When you get your meds from the pharmacy they tell you when to take them. The info would be on the education page. These meds are not just AM or PM meds, they are also with or without food. Of course as usual, you could be off most of these meds if you would just watch your diet and exercise. You know I have to add that last little ditty. Love ya, Steph Answered by Malinda Swineford 1 year ago.

How often do you take them? Metformin you should take before meals. Gemfribrozil 30 minutes before meals Benicar can be taken whenever, with or without food Ranitidine has many different types -s o it depends Answered by Dana Fornkohl 1 year ago.

Metformin should be taken prior to meals as it is a diabetic medication. Ranitidine is Zantac which is for your stomach. You may take that AM and before bed if that is the way it is prescribed. Answered by Harold Haggan 1 year ago.

You Doctor and Pharmacist should both of advised you when to take your meds, and if they haven't should be reported. I think it is completely irresponsible of them. The doctor should also have told you if one interferes with the other. I would certainly be on the phone to either of them and not try to learn about it here. Answered by Kayleigh Foth 1 year ago.

are you me? I asked the same thing but I take about 22 different meds and was gonna go to the pharmacist and dump them out and ask him, but thats too much to do, so I just sit at home and get calls and letters from all these med companies that want me to be studied by them do to taking all their meds. good luck! Answered by Lashaun Skroch 1 year ago.

all the medicines you mentioned are to be taken best in the morning at least and hour before having breakfast... most medicines are to be taken with food so it doesnt irritate the stomache. Answered by Allen Janise 1 year ago.

Why in the world ask very important questions like those here? It's your health, you should be asking your dr. who knows you, not people who are basically total strangers. Answered by Pandora Sachtleben 1 year ago.


Counteractive meds why?
Why do doctors put someone on Lasix to take fluid out and then Potassium because that level goes way down from the Lasix. Then trembling should be controlled by cholesterol meds but that's not important let's choke you to death with lasix first.Isn't there a better way to treat congestive heart... Asked by Lauri Calloway 1 year ago.

Why do doctors put someone on Lasix to take fluid out and then Potassium because that level goes way down from the Lasix. Then trembling should be controlled by cholesterol meds but that's not important let's choke you to death with lasix first. Isn't there a better way to treat congestive heart failure for a woman in late 50s? Answered by Lynne Lambson 1 year ago.

Hi Ms Heard Hearted Hanna, You have a way with asking questions(hard hearted?). Any way coming to your question...... There are diuretics (unlike Lasix) that are 'potassium sparing' types. This means that these do not lose body potassium. They include amiloride hydrochloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone), and triamterene (Dyrenium), among others. Most commonly used is Spironolactone. Potassium-sparing diuretics cause the kidneys to hold potassium in the body. When you are taking these medications you generally should not take potassium supplements because your potassium levels might rise too high. Now, when these meds are available, why did your doctor prescribe Lasix? Be a bit soft hearted. He/she may have his/her own reasons. Ask why, the next time you meet him/her (the doc may curse the internet). Anyway, if you feel too weak due over-depletion of potassium, you have a potential non-potassium choice. Feel free to fire your cholesterol meds question. Cheers. Answered by Lincoln Pitta 1 year ago.

It's a choice: do you want painful swollen legs, or to take the lasix and have to supplement potassium? Also important: are you staying on a low sodium diet? If you eat lots of salt or salty foods (including most fried or canned foods), it will make the potassium losses from lasix even worse. More importantly, they can exacerbate your heart failure, and you could end up in the hospital with serious problems. Please be very strict on yourself -- you cannot eat like a healthy person. You also have to make sure you are taking all of your other meds for heart failure. Call your doctor's office to make sure you have all the meds that were prescribed, and that you are taking them correctly. Answered by Glinda Bertuzzi 1 year ago.

Lasix is only symptomatic treatment the best drugs are ACE inhibitors and certain beta blockers. A diuretic still may be necessary but often can be gradually reduced. Diuretics alone don't improve survival, beta blockers & ACE inhibitors do Answered by Cherish Massar 1 year ago.

it is the drug of choice, and it is a life saving medicine, it reduces the pre-load and after-load, no other drug has the benificial effects while treating ccf and lvf. Answered by Bradly Brelje 1 year ago.


White blood cells count and disease diagnosis?
how can the w.b.c. count help doctors diagnose diseases (increase ... decrease ...wbc types ...etc.) ? (please try to mention all the disease that w.b.c. count can be an indicator to. )* this question is posted on behalf of a volunteer works in a remote area in Africa, in a lab that is poorly equipped, and... Asked by Helen Jehl 1 year ago.

how can the w.b.c. count help doctors diagnose diseases (increase ... decrease ...wbc types ...etc.) ? (please try to mention all the disease that w.b.c. count can be an indicator to. ) * this question is posted on behalf of a volunteer works in a remote area in Africa, in a lab that is poorly equipped, and there are very few tests that can be done there, so please try to give a detailed answer. Answered by Ranee Sweezy 1 year ago.

Increased white blood cell count indicates an infection. This is only one factor. All the signs and symptoms would be also be used to make a diagnosis. Listing all the diseases that have a variation in WBC would be too numerous to be of any help. Answered by Lesa Davis 1 year ago.

If you have all had a negative result then you really don't need to worry about it being HIV! If you have had liver cirrhosis then chances are your immune system has been compromised- the liver has a huge amount of functions in the body including producing hormones and chemicals which make your immune system do its job. I assume you have been to the doctor since you have had a HIV test- go back and ask for their advice! If your WBC count is so low then i am surprised that they are not already testing to find out why. Good luck. Answered by Mariette Assaf 1 year ago.

A WBC count is normally ordered as part of the complete(or full) blood count (CBC)(FBC), which is ordered for a wide variety of reasons. A WBC count also may be ordered to monitor recovery from illness. Counts that continue to rise or fall to abnormal levels indicate that the condition is getting worse. Counts that return to normal indicate improvement. Unfortunately, a standard reference range is not available for this test. Because reference values are dependent on many factors, including patient age, gender, sample population, and test method, numeric test results have different meanings in different labs. The lab report should include the specific reference range for the test. The first step in determining a given reference range is to define the population to which the reference range will apply, for example, healthy females between 20 and 30 years old. A large number of individuals from this category would be tested for a specific laboratory test. The results would be averaged and a range (plus or minus 2 standard deviations of the average) of normal values would be established. The term "reference range" is preferred over "normal range" because the reference population can be clearly defined. Rather than implying that the test results are being compared with some ill-defined concept of "normal," the reference range means the results are being considered in the most relevant context. When you examine test results from different populations, you quickly discover that what is "normal" for one group is not necessarily normal for another group. For example, pregnancy changes many aspects of the body’s chemistry, so pregnant women have their own set of reference ranges. An elevated number of white blood cells is called leukocytosis. This can result from bacterial infections, inflammation, leukemia, trauma, or stress. A decreased WBC count is called leukopenia. It can result from many different situations, such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or diseases of the immune system. Eating, physical activity, and stress can cause an increased WBC count. Pregnancy in the final month and labour may be associated with increased WBC levels. If the spleen has been removed, there may be a persistent mild to moderate increased WBC count. The WBC count tends to be lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon. WBC counts are age-related. On average, normal newborns and infants have higher WBC counts than adults. It is not uncommon for the elderly to fail to develop leukocytosis as a response to infection. There are many drugs that cause both increased and decreased WBC counts. Sometimes the cause of a low white blood cell count can't be determined (idiopathic). Known causes of a low white blood cell count (leukopenia) include - Infections, such as viral infections and HIV. Autoimmune disorders, such as lupus. Certain medications, especially those used in chemotherapy and some antibiotics. Radiation therapy. Bone marrow disease, such as leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes.White blood cells help fight infection in your body. A “normal” white blood cell count ranges from 4,500 to 10,000 cells per microlitre of blood. A mild decrease in white blood cells below 4,500 cells per microliter doesn't necessarily indicate a serious illness. However, a dangerously low white blood cell count — below 2,500 cells per microlitre — increases the risk of serious infection. Without discussing individual diseases and conditions and their possible range of results, I will stop this discussion here. Hope this is of some help matador 89 Answered by Griselda Terris 1 year ago.

Increased white blood cells in lab results signify infection somewhere in the body. Answered by Alejandra Laneaux 1 year ago.

most infections results in elevated counts of WBC's more than the normal range 4.000-10.000/mm^3. as following: - Bacterial infection >>> elevated Granulocytes - Viral & Funjal infection >>> elevated Lymphocytes - infection with AIDS results in VERY DECREASED count of LYMPHOCYTES thats all Answered by Lavada Biernacki 1 year ago.


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