DYNAPEN Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 050337/002.

Names and composition

"DYNAPEN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM.

Answered questions

How do you get rid of boils?
Asked by Hermila Nabozny 3 months ago.

In serious cases, prescription oral antibiotics such as dicloxacillin (Dynapen) or cephalexin (Keflex), or topical antibiotics, are commonly used. For patients allergic to penicillin-based drugs, erythromycin (E-base, Erycin) may also be used. However, some boils are caused by a super bug known as Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, or CA-MRSA. Appropriate drugs, active against MRSA, must be prescribed relatively soon after such a boil has started to form. MRSA tends to increase the speed of growth of the infection. Magnesium sulphate (epsom salt) paste applied to the affected area can prevent the growth of bacteria and reduce boils by absorbing pus and drying up the lesion. Answered by Frances Briguglio 3 months ago.


Can a woman take birth control pills with diet pills and still have the pill be effective?
I am currently on loestrin24e and was wondering is there any research proving that the pill will not be effective if the person takes the pill also? Asked by Marcos Stockman 3 months ago.

The birth control pill consists of hormones which essentially make your body think it is pregnant. Your ovaries will then not release an egg each month, meaning that sperm would have nothing to fertilize. Advantages- very effective when taken properly, can lessen PMS symptoms, lighten "period" bleedings Disadvantages- must remember to take a pill every day, at around the same time. some people experience other side effects. After you stop taking the pill, the extra hormones go away and you can become pregnant again. Your period does not go away completely, but it is more correctly called a "withdrawal bleed," since it is not a true period and is just a break in the hormone dose to allow your body to continue to regulate itself. The pill AND a condom is one of the most effective methods of preventing pregnancy! Perfect use of both methods is over 99% effective. Answered by Ben Weyand 3 months ago.


Ampicillan while pregnant, is ok to use.?
I was told by my dentist today that I have a really bad tooth infection and he put me on ampicillan, I am worried this could cause problems to my pregnancy, im 7 weeks pregnant. I asked the dentist if it was safe to take while pregnant, he said yes. But I still want reassurance on this. Please let me know if you... Asked by Shirely Mailliard 3 months ago.

I was told by my dentist today that I have a really bad tooth infection and he put me on ampicillan, I am worried this could cause problems to my pregnancy, im 7 weeks pregnant. I asked the dentist if it was safe to take while pregnant, he said yes. But I still want reassurance on this. Please let me know if you think its ok to take. Thank you! Answered by Amee Winzler 3 months ago.

Ampicillin is an antibiotic in the penicillin group of drugs. It fights bacteria in your body. Ampicillin is used to treat many different types of infections caused by bacteria, such as ear infections, bladder infections, pneumonia, gonorrhea, and E. coli or salmonella infection. Ampicillin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide. What is the most important information I should know about ampicillin? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to ampicillin or to any other penicillin antibiotic, such as amoxicillin (Amoxil), carbenicillin (Geocillin), dicloxacillin (Dycill, Dynapen), oxacillin (Bactocill), penicillin (Beepen-VK, Ledercillin VK, Pen-V, Pen-Vee K, Pfizerpen, V-Cillin K, Veetids), and others. Before using ampicillin, tell your doctor if you are allergic to cephalosporins such as Ceclor, Ceftin, Duricef, Keflex, and others, or if you have asthma, kidney disease, a bleeding or blood clotting disorder, mononucleosis (also called "mono"), or a history of any type of allergy. Ampicillin can make birth control pills less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Before taking ampicillin, tell your doctor if you use birth control pills. Take this medication for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor. Your symptoms may get better before the infection is completely treated. Ampicillin will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu. Do not give this medication to another person, even if they have the same symptoms you do. Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or has blood in it, call your doctor. Do not use any medicine to stop the diarrhea unless your doctor has told you to. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking ampicillin? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to ampicillin or to any other penicillin antibiotic, such as: amoxicillin (Amoxil, Amoxicot, Biomox, Dispermox, Trimox); carbenicillin (Geocillin); dicloxacillin (Dycill, Dynapen); oxacillin (Bactocill); or penicillin (Beepen-VK, Ledercillin VK, Pen-V, Pen-Vee K, Pfizerpen, V-Cillin K, Veetids, and others). Before using ampicillin, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs (especially cephalosporins such as Ceclor, Ceftin, Duricef, Keflex, and others), or if you have: asthma; kidney disease; a bleeding or blood clotting disorder; mononucleosis (also called "mono"); a history of diarrhea caused by taking antibiotics; or a history of any type of allergy. If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take ampicillin. FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Ampicillin can make birth control pills less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Before taking ampicillin, tell your doctor if you use birth control pills. Ampicillin can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Answered by Shante Hambric 3 months ago.

You don't have a period when pregnant. Go and see a doctor asap and for the love of God get some birth control information and products. You are both too young to be having babies. Stop having sex until you see the doctor and find out what is going on with your body and get protection. Answered by Eleonore Mattiello 3 months ago.

i would call your obgyn to make sure. Answered by Cathie Shader 3 months ago.


Use of broad-spec antibiotic and resistance concern?
Is Amoxicillin still effective for RTIs, UTIs, otis media, sinusitis?How come alot of dentists use it?Amoxicillin is NOT resistant to B-lactamase/penicillilnase but it is the most commonly prescribed penicillin for adults and kids. Why is a non-penicillinase-resistant penicillin more commonly used than... Asked by Nila Vanbeek 3 months ago.

Is Amoxicillin still effective for RTIs, UTIs, otis media, sinusitis? How come alot of dentists use it? Amoxicillin is NOT resistant to B-lactamase/penicillilnase but it is the most commonly prescribed penicillin for adults and kids. Why is a non-penicillinase-resistant penicillin more commonly used than penicillinase-resistant penicillins, such as say...cloxacillin (cloxapen) or dicloxacillin (dynapen)? In the hospital setting, if the point of using broad-spectrum antibiotic (such as Amoxicillin) is pre-C&S/identification of the offending M.O., isn't this going to just create more resistance when an appropriate antibiotic is later used? Answered by Myesha Layous 3 months ago.

all of the cillins are interrelated and as such, becoming resistent to one means resistence to all. there are other antibiotics that are better broad spectrum antibiotics, however, there are many strains of bacteria not resistent to cillins, yet. dentists, doctors give amoxicillin first because it is spozedly the mildest form of antibiotic. does not always work. if it does not work--after 5 doses, or 2 days use--more than 24 hours-----scall your doctor or dentist and he will prescriber something else. Answered by Eula Smuck 3 months ago.

Right now the idea is to use the least potent drug that is effective, not only because of the possible extra side effects (if there happen to be any), but also because we want to limit the emergence of new resistant strains. If we went around using cloxacillin, dicloxacillin, or vancomycin on every patient that we needed a broad-spectrum for, we would select for resistant mutants to those drugs as well. There have already been a few reports of VRSA (vancomycin resistant staph. aureus). Answered by Elfriede Deloatch 3 months ago.

The best thing to do is have the bacteria cultured to see what it is NOT resistant to. While Vanco is a good one and works in most cases, a culture could say the opposite. As far as the primitive penns, I think they are becoming a waste of everyones time. Answered by Joselyn Fortenberry 3 months ago.


Antiobiotics and birth control! uh oh!?
it is called dynapen, and it says "may interfere with combination-type birth control" what does combination-type birth control mean? just any type that is in your bloodstream?? Asked by Lacy Osbment 3 months ago.

my doctor did not tell me that antibiotics interfered with birth control. and i had unprotected sex the day i started the antiobiotics. so i only had one dosage before i had sex. do you think that would interfere? i now know to use backup protection, but i am getting awfully worried. how often does it interfere with birth control? please help! i worry very easily! Answered by Leonila Weng 3 months ago.

Antibiotics can in fact decrease the effectiveness of BC. However, there may be good news. Since you started it the day you had sex more than likely, the medicine did not really get into your system completely. You are supposed to use a second backup, but I would just double check with your Dr. Depending on what day you are in your cycle too u should be ok. You are only able to get preggo a few days in the month after you ovulate. This generally happens somewhere around day 14 or so. Take a deep breath, count to 10 and I bet you are ok.... Answered by Lavonna Seavey 3 months ago.

Only SOME antibiotics interfere with the pill- the tetracyclines and a few antituberculosis ones- and the evidence for tetracyclines are only patchy. Depending on where you are in your pill packet it should be fine- the evidence for all but the antituberculosis ones is ancedotal and they think confused by the fact that lots of antibiotics cause diarrhoea and it is the diarrhoea that affects pill absorption not the antibiotic itself. If you only had sex on the first day, it will take a few days after a missed dose to ovulate (if you even do at all) and the sperm inside you will most likely be dead by then. If you have been on the pill for years, it is VERY unlikely you will ovulate as it normally takes a little while for your ovaries to wake up. If your doctor didn't warn you, it seems likely he probably put you on an antibiotic that doesn't really interfere. I am sure if you name the antibiotic, someone can help you further. Answered by Tami Bilson 3 months ago.

I too am currently on antibiotics for a sinus/ear infection. I take birth control and just began a pack, but the entire cycle is null and void thanks to the antibiotics. Your doctor was irresponsible for not telling you, but considering you just started the antibiotics the day you also took birth control, the likelihood of pregnancy is not high. But it is still a possibility. More than likely though you are fine. Just be sure to use a back up method til you are done w/ the birth control pack. Also, if it hasn't been too long and you're no longer on antibiotics, maybe try the morning after pill. But call your dr. first and say what he/she says. Stop worrying! Positive thinking goes a long way! Answered by Luba Denyer 3 months ago.

I don't think that if you only took one antibiotic pill before you had sex that it would be strong enough in your system to interfere with your birth control at that point. However, i am by no means an expert. Also, you would have to have had sex during the 1-3 days of your monthly cycle that you are actually fertile (generally in the middle of your cycle) to even become pregnant so your chances are very low of being pregnant. Answered by Odette Blaker 3 months ago.

Everyone is different and there is no way of knowing for sure, I do know that a lot of it just depends on timing, my aunt was in a car accident, nothing serious, but she was given meds for it at the hospital when she was checked out. She was given them at the hospital only once but those meds interfered with her BC and nine months later my little cousin was born. Don't stress about it too much because you have done everything you can. You will most likely be fine, but take a test in a few weeks just to double check. You can also do an online fertility calendar in reverse, to see how fertile you were on that day, they are pretty accurate and that will hopefully give you more information about your chances of conception. There are many free online ones you can try. A good one is www.yourdays.com. Good luck! Answered by Branden Sarber 3 months ago.

Yes! Antibiotics interfere significantly with birth control. I have had 2 friends that got pregnant immediately after taking one dosage of antibiotics. Last time I was at the Dr's they also told me that it basically makes the birth control ineffective! Answered by Odelia Boeckmann 3 months ago.

I don't know the statistics of it but I am pretty sure antibiotics negate the effects of your birth control. If it has been less than 48 hours you can still get the morning after pill if you choose other than that you just have to wait and see. best of luck to you. Answered by Joye Habegger 3 months ago.

it does definitely reduce the effectiveness of birth control. i think it happens no matter what because when i took antibiotics a month or so ago my period came really early (never happens) and it lasted until i was off. my doctor said it was normal. antibiotics are harsh, so if your worried about pregnancy, see the doctor. i don't want you to worry because your body is not mine, but thats what i know from my doctor. Answered by Shakita Simonelli 3 months ago.

antibiotics always interfer with birth control so always use a back up method if this happened within the last 120 hours you can probably take the morning after pill (plan B) and be safe from pregnancy.....call your gyn Answered by Chu Maddern 3 months ago.

You should be ok with just the one dose of antibiotics, but make sure you use backup until your next pack. Definately check with your doc or pharmacist to make sure you don't have to do anything else. Answered by Granville Bronaugh 3 months ago.


Boil or pimple how do u get rid of it?
i've been getting these pimple like on my inner thigh butt cheek.i think its a boil cuz ive tried popping it but it wont pop its just real hard and nothing comes out when i squeeze iti've read online u get them cuz of ingrown hair and i havent shaved in a while so that might be it how do i get rid of... Asked by Lane Rabassa 3 months ago.

i've been getting these pimple like on my inner thigh butt cheek. i think its a boil cuz ive tried popping it but it wont pop its just real hard and nothing comes out when i squeeze iti've read online u get them cuz of ingrown hair and i havent shaved in a while so that might be it how do i get rid of this! and how do you get them? Answered by Armanda Marallo 3 months ago.

Here is information on Boils and Pimples: This one is on Boils ( Below) The symptoms of boils are red, pus-filled lumps that are tender, warm, and/or painful. A yellow or white point at the center of the lump can be seen when the boil is ready to drain or discharge pus. In a severe infection, multiple boils may develop and the patient may experience fever and swollen lymph nodes. A recurring boil is called chronic furunculosis. In some people, itching may develop before the lumps begin to form. Boils are most often found on the back, stomach, underarms, shoulders, face, lip, eyes, nose, thighs and buttocks, but may be found elsewhere. Sometimes boils will emit an unpleasant smell, particularly when drained or when discharge is present, due to the presence of bacteria in the discharge. Most boils run their course within 4 to 10 days. For most people, self-care by applying a warm compress or soaking the boil in warm water can help alleviate the pain and hasten draining of the pus (colloquially referred to as "bringing the boil to a head"). Once the boil drains, the area should be washed with antibacterial soap and bandaged well. The maturing process may be accelerated by applying Ichthammol-based salve.[citation needed] In serious cases, prescription oral antibiotics such as dicloxacillin (Dynapen) or cephalexin (Keflex), or topical antibiotics, are commonly used. For patients allergic to penicillin-based drugs, erythromycin (E-base, Erycin) may also be used. However, some boils are caused by a super bug known as Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, or CA-MRSA. Appropriate drugs, active against MRSA, must be prescribed relatively soon after such a boil has started to form. MRSA tends to increase the speed of growth of the infection. Magnesium sulphate (epsom salt) paste applied to the affected area can prevent the growth of bacteria and reduce boils by absorbing pus and drying up the lesion.[citation needed] When boils recur, daily use of a soap/cleanser containing triclosan, triclocarban or chlorhexidine can suppress staph bacteria on the skin. here is the information about pimples: A pimple is a result of a blockage of the skin's pore. It can be a pustule or papule. Inside the pore are sebaceous glands which produce sebum. When the outer layers of skin shed (as they do continuously), the dead skin cells left behind may become 'glued' together by the sebum. This causes a blockage in the pore, especially when the skin becomes thicker at puberty.[2] The sebaceous glands produce more sebum which builds up behind the blockage, and this sebum harbours various bacteria including the species Propionibacterium acnes. There are many products available for the treatment of acne, many of which are without any scientifically-proven effects. Generally speaking, successful treatments show little improvement within the first two weeks, instead taking a period of approximately three months to improve and start flattening out. Many treatments that promise big improvements within two weeks are likely to be largely disappointing. However, short bursts of cortisone can give very quick results, and other treatments can rapidly improve some active spots, but usually not all active spots. Modes of improvement are not necessarily fully understood but in general treatments are believed to work in at least 4 different ways (with many of the best treatments providing multiple simultaneous effects): * normalising shedding into the pore to prevent blockage * killing Propionibacterium acnes * anti-inflammatory effects * hormonal manipulation * Contact hyperthermia A combination of treatments can greatly reduce the amount and severity of acne in many cases. Those treatments that are most effective tend to have greater potential for side effects and need a greater degree of monitoring, so a step-wise approach is often taken. Many people consult with doctors when deciding which treatments to use, especially when considering using any treatments in combination. There are a number of treatments that have been proven effective: Benzoyl peroxide cream. [edit] Topical bactericidals Widely available OTC bactericidal products containing benzoyl peroxide may be used in mild to moderate acne. The gel or cream containing benzoyl peroxide is rubbed, twice daily, into the pores over the affected region. Bar soaps or washes may also be used and vary from 2 to 10% in strength. In addition to its therapeutic effect as a keratolytic (a chemical that dissolves the keratin plugging the pores) benzoyl peroxide also prevents new lesions by killing P. acnes. In one study, roughly 70% of participants using a 10% benzoyl peroxide solution experienced a reduction in acne lesions after 6 weeks.[46]Unlike antibiotics, benzoyl peroxide has the advantage of being a strong oxidizer (essentially a mild bleach) and thus does not appear to generate bacterial resistance. Howeve Answered by Chung Chinick 3 months ago.

Hi, I am a dermatologist by profession and within a careeer of 10 years I have seen lots of acne problems. According to me Red and white pimples are the worst and painful. Acneprone skin is very sensitive, even if you touch it once the redness will increase with itching. According to me there is no magical way to heal your pimples over night as this is the puffed part of your skin due to the bacteria. In simple words try to improve your diet and have lots of water that helps in healingg process. Un-necessary oily food should be avoided to get a healthy spotless skin. Answered by Benton Terazes 3 months ago.

how long have you had it? cuz my bro gets these pimple things on him all the time, they like hurt him, and they won't pop, and he's always complaining abt it. but eventually a little puss comes out and it goes away by itself. oh and btw the docter says they are caused by stress. Answered by Leatha Zarycki 3 months ago.


Differences between cyst ,boils and abcess?
What are the differences between:cysts,abcesses and boils?What are the causes of each and what are the treatments of each? Asked by Lina Hipps 3 months ago.

CYST: A cyst is a closed sac having a distinct membrane and developing abnormally in a cavity or structure of the body. Cysts may occur as a result of a developmental error in the embryo during pregnancy or they may be caused by infections. However, sometimes they arise spontaneously with no apparent cause. Cysts are often dangerous as they may have negative effects (for instance, compression) on the nearby tissue. They may contain air, fluids, or semi-solid material. A collection of pus is called an abscess, not a cyst. A cyst may also be a sack that encloses an organism during a dormant period, such as in the case of certain parasites. This type of cyst may, for instance, protect a parasite from the churning acid of the stomach so it may pass through to the intestines unharmed where it can then break out. Cystic fibrosis is an example of a genetic disorder whereby cysts develop in lung tissue and release mucus into the lungs (see Alveoli) reducing lung capacity and causing persistent coughing. --------------------------------------... BOILS: Boil or furuncle is a skin disease caused by the inflammation of hair follicles, thus resulting in the localized accumulation of pus and dead tissues. Individual boils can cluster together and form an interconnected network of boils called carbuncles. In severe cases, boils may develop to form abscesses. CAUSES of BOILS: Boils are generally caused by an infection of the hair follicles by Staphylococcus aureus or staph, a strain of bacteria that normally live on the skin surface. It is thought that a tiny cut of the skin allows this bacterium to enter the follicles and cause an infection. This can happen during bathing while using a razor. People with immune system disorders, diabetes, poor hygiene or malnutrition (Vitamin A or E deficiency) are particularly susceptible to getting boils. However they may also occur in healthy, hygienic individuals. Hidradenitis suppurativa causes frequent boils. TREATMENTS: Most boils run their course within 4 to 10 days. For most people, self-care by applying a warm compress or soaking the boil in warm water can help alleviate the pain and hasten draining of the pus (colloquially referred to as "bringing the boil to a head"). Once the boil drains, the area should be washed with antibacterial soap and bandaged well. For recurring cases, sufferers may benefit from diet supplements of Vitamin A and E. In serious cases, prescription oral antibiotics such as dicloxacillin (Dynapen) or cephalexin (Keflex), or topical antibiotics, are commonly used. For patients allergic to penicillin-based drugs, erythromycin (E-base, Erycin) may also be used. However, some boils are caused by a superbug known as community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or CA-MRSA. Bactrim or other sulfa drugs must be prescribed relatively soon after boil has started to form. MRSA tends to increase the speed of growth of the infection. Magnesium sulfate paste applied to the affected area can prevent the growth of bacteria and reduce boils by absorbing pus and drying up the lesion. --------------------------------------... ABCESS: An abscess is a collection of pus that has accumulated in a cavity formed by the tissue on the basis of an infectious process (usually caused by bacteria or parasites) or other foreign materials (e.g. splinters or bullet wounds). It is a defensive reaction of the tissue to prevent the spread of infectious materials to other parts of the body. The organisms or foreign materials that gain access to a part of tissue kill the local cells, release toxins and trigger an inflammatory response by drawing huge amounts of white blood cells to the area and increasing the regional blood flow. The final structure of the abscess is an abscess wall that is formed by the adjacent healthy cells in an attempt to build a barrier around the pus that limits the infected material from neighboring structures. TREATMENTS: The abscess should be inspected to identify if foreign objects are a cause, requiring surgical removal. Surgical drainage of the abscess (e.g. lancing) is usually indicated once the abscess has developed from a harder serous inflammation to a softer pus stage. This is expressed in the Latin medical aphorism Ubi pus, ibi evacua. As Staphylococcus aureus bacteria is a common cause, an anti-Staphylococcus antibiotic such as Flucloxacillin or dicloxacillin is used. It is important to note that antibiotic therapy alone without surgical drainage of the abscess is seldom effective. If foreign objects are not the cause, surgical removal is not needed, but for a normal infection a doctor will prescribe antibiotics and painkillers to treat the abscess. In critical areas where surgery presents a high risk (such as the brain), surgery may be delayed or used as a last resort. The drainage of a lung abscess may be performed by positioning the patient in a way that enables the contents to be discharged via the respiratory tract. Warm compresses and elevation of the limb may be beneficial for skin abscess. Answered by Georgina Cruff 3 months ago.

Boil Vs Cyst Answered by Hee Arkenberg 3 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: differences between cyst ,boils and abcess? What are the differences between:cysts,abcesses and boils?What are the causes of each and what are the treatments of each? Answered by Muoi Curvey 3 months ago.

Dry and/or greasy skin due to poor oil composition of the skin. Thick greasy oils clog pores, lack of oil leads to dryness and irritation. You need thin oils to moisturize while dissolving and clearing gunk in your poors. Try fish oil or seafood. 2 tsp fish oil a day or 4 servings of seafood a week. Stick it out for at least 2 months; it will take a long time to replace all your oil. Any effect after 1-2 days is temporary or random; so even if it makes you break out a little at first, you haven't given it a full try yet. In the short term you can wash and moisturize well, but that will only go so far. Plus excessive washing can be drying and excessive moisturizing can be clogging. Use a small amount of a light moisturizer, made with oil not jelly or grease. Often that means soybean oil or mineral oil. Mineral oil means mined from the ground. So soybean oil is usually better, though mineral oil won't cause too much harm. Clean with soap and water, not a harsh acne cleanser. Even then they only work so well. So you really need the seafood. Antibiotics aren't really good for bacteria long term, they'll come back in force after. Short term they may help. After you get off them find some kefir with acidophilus listed first or 2nd to replace the friendly bacteria they destroyed. Studies show less illness when you have these bacteria, even outside the stomach in places such as the lungs and elsewhere. You want friendly bacteria to fill the void when the antibiotics stop, not harmful ones. In the short term you might also try 100,000+ iu retinol vitamin A (a megadose, and too much for normal use) or one of the acne drugs that is similar to retinol vitamin A. It's some minor harm to your organs, but it helps against bacteria on your skin. At least it doesn't have the other long term drawbacks to your skin that antibiotics and many scrubs do. If you would like to learn how to treat your acne permanently and regain your health and wellbeing, without drugs, without typical acne treatments, and without any side effects, then this will be the most important letter you will ever read. Weird Trick Forces Your Body To Eliminate Your Acne Giving You Beautiful Clear Skin In 30-60 Days? Make sure your sound is turned on! Answered by Vanessa Malmquist 3 months ago.

Boils And Cysts Answered by Ching Blemel 3 months ago.

differences cyst boils abcess Answered by Clelia Casseday 3 months ago.

A CYST IS USUALLY FORMED BY A CORE SOMEWHAT SWIRLING WHICH EXTRACTS SOME FOUL SMELLING FLUID INTO A SAC FROM OUR BODY AND THE SAC SWELLS UP NEEDING PUNCTURE TO RELIEVE...SOME CYSTS ARE FORMED IN THE EMBRYONIC STAGE OF DEVELOPMENT.....BOILS ARE BACTERIAL INFECTED HAIR FOLICLES THAT ARE PUS-FILLED NEEDING PUNCTURING EXTRACTION......ABSCESS IS THE GENERAL NAME OF A PUS (RETIRED ANTI-BODIES AND/OR BACTERIA) CAVITY... Answered by Edra Galpin 3 months ago.


My doc just gave me samples of loestrin 24 fe. I take lexapro, antidepressant. anyone else take this combo?
Asked by Casimira Kuck 3 months ago.

the sample is the same as the real one, the brown actualy dont contain any of the birthcontrol supplement they are iron to help during your period, also they are to help you remeber to take your pill everyday at the same time! Answered by Virginia Wash 3 months ago.


I have "strep throat", how long until it goes away (i am using antibiotics.) also I feel like im floating, why?
I'm feeling really floaty and empty inside, is that normal? Also how long will it last (using antibiotics) Asked by Aleisha Dechant 3 months ago.

Because of potential significant complications, if strep throat is detected, it must be treated adequately with antibiotics. It is important to take the full course of antibiotics as prescribed and not to stop the medication when symptoms resolve. Prematurely discontinuing antibiotics can result in the infection being inadequately treated, with potentially adverse consequences or relapse of the infection and develop heart valve diseases. Streptococcus is highly responsive to penicillin and the cephalosporin antibiotics. Penicillin has shown good effectiveness, and it is reliable and cheap. Oral penicillin V (Pen-Vee-K, Veetids) is the preferred oral form of penicillin for strep throat. The usual dose is 250 milligrams three times a day or 500 milligrams twice a day. A full 10 day course must be completed although patients usually feel better only after two to three days. Injectable penicillin G (Bicillin) is also very effective and may be used in individuals who may not reliably take 10 days of antibiotics orally. The drug may last in the body for up to 21 days and can therefore adequately treat the infection. Other penicillin derivatives such as amoxicillin (Amoxil), amoxicillin-clavulanate (Augmentin), cloxacillin (Cloxapen, Tegopen), and dicloxacillin (Dynapen) are all adequate treatments for strep. They may be even slightly more effective than penicillin because of better absorption and greater potency. Cephalosporin antibiotics are also a very effective in treating group A streptococcus. In some studies, they were found to be better than penicillin, and there is some suggestion that they may be the first choice antibiotic for this infection. For now, they remain a very good choice in patients with mild penicillin allergies. Other options are macrolides, such as erythromycin (E-Mycin, Eryc, Ery-Tab, PCE, Pediazole, Ilosone), azithromycin (Zithromax), and clarithromycin (Biaxin). These antibiotics have shown similar to superior effectiveness compared to penicillin for the treatment of group A streptococcus. Erythromycin is thought to be the optimum choice for people with severe penicillin allergy. The current recommendations still list penicillin as the first choice for the treatment of group A streptococcus. Erythromycin is recommended as the first choice in penicillin-allergic individuals. First generation cephalosporins such as cephalexin and cefadroxil, are alternatives to erythromycin. Answered by Ines Sligar 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
050337/002 DYNAPEN DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL EQ 62.5MG BASE per 5ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
050011/002 PATHOCIL DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 250MG BASE
050011/003 PATHOCIL DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 500MG BASE
050092/001 PATHOCIL DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL EQ 62.5MG BASE per 5ML
050337/002 DYNAPEN DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL EQ 62.5MG BASE per 5ML
060254/002 DYCILL DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 250MG BASE
060254/003 DYCILL DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 500MG BASE
061454/001 DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 250MG BASE
061454/002 DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 125MG BASE
061454/003 DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 500MG BASE
061455/001 DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL EQ 62.5MG BASE per 5ML
062238/001 DYCILL DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 250MG BASE
062238/002 DYCILL DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 500MG BASE
062286/001 DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 250MG BASE
062286/002 DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM DICLOXACILLIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 500MG BASE

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