DROPERIDOL Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 070992/001.

Names and composition

"DROPERIDOL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DROPERIDOL.
It belongs to the class Antidopaminergics and is used in Nausea, vomiting (Central Nervous System)

Answered questions

What is neurolept anaesthesia?
eg: droperidol & fentanyl Asked by Casey Suriano 3 months ago.

It's an intravenous anesthetic. In simpler words, it's an injection that is administered during certain interventions like surgery, so that you don't feel what's happening. While a person is under the effect of this anesthetic they will be partially conscious. The patient that is sedated with this, will not remember what happened during surgery, and won't feel any pain during the intervention. Hope my answer was clear enough. Answered by Yuri Shackelton 3 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what is neurolept anaesthesia? eg: droperidol & fentanyl Answered by Lucienne Keno 3 months ago.

No, any form of pain you feel when getting a tattoo is APART of the experience. If you can't suck it up for that short while then don't bother getting a tattoo. I thought it'd be the worst pain of my life when I got mine in the middle of my back. It was hardly painful,and completely bearable! My rib tattoo may be another story,but hey the end results will be very much so worth it. Answered by Sol Bareilles 3 months ago.


I want to find out if these drugs below have been globally banned?
ANALGIN: CISAPRIDE: DROPERIDOL: FURAZOLIDONE: ANALGIN: CISAPRIDE: DROPERIDOL: FURAZOLIDONE: NIMESULIDE: NITROFURAZONE: _ Asked by Hallie Fraile 3 months ago.

The only one of the list that has been banned is Nimesulide in combination forms due to side effects. Answered by Derek Thrush 3 months ago.

If you have a presription for these drugs you're ok Answered by Corey Locante 3 months ago.


Atypical AP's as anti emetics?
thanks for your answer. :)metoclopramide is around, but as you say, not good for post op, which mostly what I see. (I see mostly trauma cases, due to the nature of my working enviroment) but its my perferred one for treating migraine related queasyness.Ondansetron- we dont have it at all at the unit and... Asked by Mayme Mandeville 3 months ago.

Hello, I am a russian armed forces medical tech. (blah..hard to discribe..we are basically medics/paramedics with extra training and do some of the less complex work of doctors and nurses to free them up for more serious things) anyways, I was wondering if any doctor or nurse has expierence in using atypical antiphysotics for anti emitic medication. We mostly use Prochlorperazine and Droperidol, but these older, typical AP's have very pronouced side effects like akatisia and other extraprymadial effects. I was seeing if maybe I can provide better care and reduce suffering in my charges with using quentiapine or olazapine instead. I am thinking any drug which produces a blockaide at the pre-synaptic dopamine receptor should be able to produce an anti emitic effect, yes? not to mention quentiapine also has pronounced anti Mus type acetylcholine antagonism, thus added to its antiemetic effect, no? There is nothing in the Russian language literature about this, so I figured I would ask online and try to read some english literature as well. (excuse my english, not my first langauge.) Answered by Mackenzie Asselin 3 months ago.

thanks for your answer. :) metoclopramide is around, but as you say, not good for post op, which mostly what I see. (I see mostly trauma cases, due to the nature of my working enviroment) but its my perferred one for treating migraine related queasyness. Ondansetron- we dont have it at all at the unit and field triage centre level. Otherwise I would try it out. We do have injections of olazapine however, hence my question as to its other uses. (We use it to control combat stress reaction, and sometimes, just knock a soldier out after a stressful operation or amphetamine for stimulant purposes) local regulations allow to use more or less anything we want off label for any reason we want. they took droperidol away in UK? that is a shame...it does work really well. Just I do get alot of people who respond with akatisa.. thanks again for your input, it was helpful, unlike the other persons. Answered by Ava Larry 3 months ago.

yikes, I'm not getting involved in the english debate. Droperidol (known in these parts by some as Drop-Dead-erol) is no longer licensed for use in the UK, shame as it was a good anti-emetic. The ones I use on a regular basis: Ondansetron - serotonin receptor antagonist - good for post op. No effect on dopamine receptors Metoclopramide - dopamine receptor antagonist - works best if the nausea/vomiting is caused by an emetic drug. Not much use post-op or in motion sickness. Can have extrapyramidal effects, so be wary of parkinsons patients as this can cause a worsening of their symptoms. (domperidone is another antidopaminergic drug which can be used as an anti-emetic) Dexamethasone - glucocorticoid steroid, I also use this in the post-op period Cyclizine - antihistamine, works well with motion sickness and post op nausea, and nausea related to opioids. Try looking up metoclopramide or domperidone. Olanzipine is, as far as I'm aware, not licensed for use as an anti-emetic, so check local guidelines! Answered by Maryjo Whillock 3 months ago.

Interesting question. Your command of english is quite good, so good in fact, I find it hard to believe you are a Russian medic. Be that as it may... A lot of the older antipsychotics had a bit of spillover into anticholinergic, antihistaminergic and antiseritonergic action which may have been more important in their benefits as antiemetics than their primary D2 blockade. The very fact that the newer atypicals are more selective probably makes them less effective for nausea. Most antiemetics have 5HT antagonist effects and some of the newest atypicals actually have some 5HT agonist properties. Clozapine > olanzapine > quetiapine do have a fairly high degree of anticholinergic and antihistaminergic effect and probably would work to a degree, but I suspect the primary effect would be through sedation. I wouldn't want to make any bets on risperidone, ziprazodone or aripiprazole having any antiemetic effect. If you have any reason to think they would be beneficial, I am interested in your rationale. Answered by Ruthe Weigert 3 months ago.


How would I solve this IV injection problem?
The MD orders droperidol 3.5 mg IV, 30 minutes before chemotherapy. What is the rate of administration for this dose? Droperidol: Rate of Administration- IV injection: 10 mg or fraction thereof over 1 minute Asked by Arron Marshman 3 months ago.

open your eyes and your brain. You have the answer right there. 1 MINUTE!!!!! Answered by Chantay Jakeman 3 months ago.


What is dioperictol?
spelling could be wrong. I know it's a medication but never heard or seen this. any clues to what this is? Asked by Germaine Yow 3 months ago.

If it is droperidol, it is a antipsychotic like haloperidol. If you mention for what purpose it is used, it will help. good luck! Answered by Hye Scivally 3 months ago.


Do antipsychotics lessen the effects of meth?
Since they both target the dopamine system in the brain I was thinking that they might interact. Asked by Sulema Piening 3 months ago.

In emergency situations involving methamphetamine or amphetamine toxicity (overdose) antipsychotics, typically high potent antipsychotics like Haldol (haloperidol), Inapsine (droperidol), or Zyprexa (olanzapine), which antagonize dopamine receptors to mitigate the excess dopamine produced from methamphetamine toxicity are commonly used. Multiple human and animal studies attest to the efficacy of droperidol and haloperidol in acute methamphetamine toxicity, olanzapine and other atypical antipsychotics are not as well studied. In addition benzodiazepines, particularly Ativan (lorazepam), Valium (diazepam), or Versed (midazolam) may be used to help calm a patient, to prevent seizure, and work with the antipsychotic to control a patients psychosis, agitation, and anxiety. In severe cases of toxicity Luminal (phenobarbital) may be required to control seizures (it also causes sedation, and other effects of drugs like Ativan and Valium). 5-10 mg of Haldol (haloperidol) with 2-4 mg of Ativan (lorazepam) are common combination used. However there are times when people take an antipsychotic and an amphetamine stimulant, including methamphetamine, for medical use without problems. When used appropriately both types of drugs (antipsychotics/dopamine antagonists and amphetamines) can be used together. Answered by Marx Guedea 3 months ago.

They certainly will interact. It is interesting you ask this, to me, because I see now that they are advertising anti-psychotics for the use of depression. I am dismayed by this because the anti-psychotics have terrible side-effects. I was depressed and given anti-psychotics and suffered several life-threatening side-effects. Knowing a lot of people use meth, and that it will interact with the anti-psychotics they may be on, is disturbing to say the least. Good question. I hope you get some answers. And I hope people know what they are doing when they take anti-psychotics. Answered by Jacinta Wiedeman 3 months ago.

The effects of meth? Do you mean our bodies pathetic attempt to rid itself from this poison once ingested? If so , the first mucus membrane is the mouth resulting in the rotting of teeth from the roots on down. they do not lesson the effect one bit. That legacy is very real in it's physicality and loudly announces the cost this Sisyphean predicament exacts on the tweekers that imbibe. Answered by Ellan Bakley 3 months ago.


On psychiatric medications?
Which of the following drugs is the most sedating:Chlorpromazine, Droperidol, Fluphenazine, Fluphenthixol, Haloperidol, Pericyazine, Pimozide, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Trifluoperazine, Zuclopphenthixol, Amilsipride, Olanzapine, Seroquel, Risperidone, Clozapine, Aripiprazole.These are all major... Asked by Darius Sandidge 3 months ago.

Which of the following drugs is the most sedating: Chlorpromazine, Droperidol, Fluphenazine, Fluphenthixol, Haloperidol, Pericyazine, Pimozide, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Trifluoperazine, Zuclopphenthixol, Amilsipride, Olanzapine, Seroquel, Risperidone, Clozapine, Aripiprazole. These are all major tranquilizers. I want to know which is the most sedating. I want something to knock me flat. Thanks People. Answered by Marian Leet 3 months ago.

I'm sure Haloperidol is pretty strong... I mean, that's what they use in psychiatric patients in the middle of severe episodes. Answered by Curt Conforti 3 months ago.

It really depends on the person & their symptoms. The antipsychotics are more sedating than benzodiazepines. Speak to a psychiatrist. Answered by Darline Genzel 3 months ago.

these are all not tranq's, try xanax, that will knock you out Answered by Elfrieda Henerson 3 months ago.


Why do I get Restless Leg Syndrome when I take Nyquil?
I get it when I take Nyquil or Tylenol PM. It's terrible because I am nearly asleep physically, my brain is shutting down and I can't keep my eyes open, but my legs feel like they're being electrocuted! I don't get them any other time... Am I allergic? Asked by Charlesetta Vallieres 3 months ago.

****Certain medications-such as antinausea drugs (prochlorperazine or metoclopramide), antiseizure drugs (phenytoin or droperidol), antipsychotic drugs (haloperidol or phenothiazine derivatives), and some cold and allergy medications-may aggravate symptoms. Patients can talk with their physicians about the possibility of changing medications.****** Researchers also have found that caffeine, alcohol, and tobacco may aggravate or trigger symptoms in patients who are predisposed to develop RLS. Some studies have shown that a reduction or complete elimination of such substances may relieve symptoms, although it remains unclear whether elimination of such substances can prevent RLS symptoms from occurring at all. Answered by Burma Yock 3 months ago.

I get this, too! I never called it this, though. I understand that it's your body "relaxing" and all your muscles are involuntarily "going to sleep," but your body is still tense, hence the twitches and pins and needles and zaps. It's like your brain going to sleep before everything gets a chance to settle down. Answered by Derrick Cousens 3 months ago.

NYQUIL USUALLY PUT YOU TO SLEEP. RLS USUALLY ACT UP WHEN IT'S TIME TO RELAX, SO THAT COULD BE THE PROBLEM. Answered by Terese Hilbrand 3 months ago.

most pepole agree that restless leg syndrome is a mental trick used to make pepole think theres something wrong with them. think about it for a minute... your saying two compleately difrent chemical compounds are causing a reaction that effects your centrel nervios system but only in your legs... odes that sound right? its your imagination but if it helps i hear m&ms will help... not really but if you beleve they will then 2 a night will do ya Answered by Albertha Pallant 3 months ago.

dont take nyquil! DUH Answered by Mikki Talkington 3 months ago.


Can mixing like 20mg of clonazepam and 30 mg of risperdal cause a overdose?
I just want to know. Asked by Laurie Dieudonne 3 months ago.

What drug(s) may interact with risperidone? * alcohol * arsenic trioxide * astemizole * bromocriptine * cabergoline * carbamazepine * clarithromycin * cimetidine * cisapride * droperidol * erythromycin * halofantrine * imatinib, STI-571 * levodopa and other medications for Parkinson's disease * levomethadyl * medicines for high blood pressure * medicines for irregular heartbeats * medicines for sleep or sedation * medicines for treating seizures (convulsions) * other medicines for mental anxiety, depression or psychotic disturbances * pentamidine * prescription pain medications * probucol * rifampin * ritonavir * some medicines for infertility * some medicines for the hormonal treatment of cancer * some quinolone antibiotics for treating infections (gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, sparfloxacin * terfenadine Answered by Mable Gillen 3 months ago.

How long have you ever been taking it? I basically began clonazepam and paxil back and be attentive to that i'm drained each and all of the time and anticipate it from any medicine as a element result. If it does not give up in approximately 2 week to a month you will desire to communicate on your well-being practitioner nevertheless. yet whilst shall all of us undergo in strategies that drugs artwork differentlyon diverse human beings, when I take day time medicine, I crash, when I take night medicine, I stay unsleeping for what sounds like constantly. Answered by Jaquelyn Hilfiker 3 months ago.

You shouldn't take more than 20mg of Klonopin within 24 hours alone so mixed with Risperidone is deadly. Answered by Danielle Cheadle 3 months ago.

I feel like people are either asking for a "suicide recipe" with these kinds of questions. I think if this is a valid question because you feel that your doctor is over prescribing you need to be contacting your doctor or pharmacist. YA! is definitely not the place to look for definitive medical advice. Answered by Alonzo Brizuela 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
070992/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070993/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
071645/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
071750/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
071754/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
071755/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
071941/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL Injectable/ Injection 2.5MG per ML
071942/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL Injectable/ Injection 2.5MG per ML
071981/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072018/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072019/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072020/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072021/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072123/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072272/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072335/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
073520/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
073521/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
073523/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016796/001 INAPSINE DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070992/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
070993/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
071645/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
071750/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
071754/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
071755/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
071941/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL Injectable/ Injection 2.5MG per ML
071942/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL Injectable/ Injection 2.5MG per ML
071981/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072018/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072019/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072020/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072021/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072123/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072272/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
072335/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
073520/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
073521/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
073523/001 DROPERIDOL DROPERIDOL INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Kyowa Kirin International

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