Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020897/001.

Names and composition

"DITROPAN XL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020897/001 DITROPAN XL OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 5MG
020897/002 DITROPAN XL OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 10MG
020897/003 DITROPAN XL OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017577/001 DITROPAN OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018211/001 DITROPAN OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 5MG per 5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020897/001 DITROPAN XL OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 5MG
020897/002 DITROPAN XL OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 10MG
020897/003 DITROPAN XL OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
022204/001 GELNIQUE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE GEL/TRANSDERMAL 10%(100MG per PACKET)
070746/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
071655/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
072296/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
072485/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074520/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
074625/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
074868/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
074997/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
075039/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
075079/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
075137/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
076644/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 10MG
076644/002 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
076682/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE SYRUP/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
076702/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 5MG
076745/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
076745/002 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 5MG
076745/003 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 10MG
078503/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 5MG
078503/002 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 10MG
078503/003 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
202332/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 5MG
202332/002 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 10MG
202332/003 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
204010/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 5MG
204010/002 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 10MG
204010/003 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
206121/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 5MG
206121/002 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 10MG
206121/003 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
207138/001 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 5MG
207138/002 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 10MG
207138/003 OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE OXYBUTYNIN CHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG

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Answered questions

Will ditropan xl tablet get rid of water swelling in my legs?
my feet are swollen becouse of water retantion will ditropan xl tablet help get rid of water in my legs ??? Asked by Marry Hemp 1 year ago.

Highly unlikely that it will get rid of the water in your legs/feet. Ditropan XL Extended-Release Tablets are used for relieving symptoms of bladder problems (urinary urgency, frequency, or leakage; loss of bladder control; and painful urination) in certain patients. It may also be used in children with overactive bladder muscle (detrusor) caused by certain conditions (eg, spina bifida). Ditropan XL Extended-Release Tablets is an anticholinergic. It works by relaxing muscles in the bladder. I would suggest that you see your doctor for a check up, as there may be underlying medical problems which are causing the water retention in your legs. It's more likely that you will need a diuretic to get rid of the water. Answered by Fallon Gignac 1 year ago.


I found a pill?
I was not going to take the pill I just need to know what is going on in my house thanks for all your answers Asked by Anika Carullo 1 year ago.

It is a Ditropan XL 10mg tablet There is a picture of the tablet half way down the page linked below Answered by Dorian Montis 1 year ago.

Is it round in shape? Sounds like Ditropan XL, a urinary/bladder drug (stops bladder spasms). You can use a pill ID site whenever you have an unidentified pill. Answered by Randee Corrio 1 year ago.

If that pill was not a prescription for you (apparently not), dump it. What do you want to do with a found pill. You might even not know the expiry date. I consider it as a risk to use found medicine. Answered by Hwa Smutz 1 year ago.

if it does not have a name or generic type name on it i would take it to the pharmacy. Or you could go to Drugs.com which has a pill identifier on it. Answered by Maira Naito 1 year ago.

take it to the pharmacy they can id it easily Answered by Cedrick Sjulstad 1 year ago.


What is another prescription medication, for urinary incontinence, that would do the same thing as Detrol LA?
I take care of my mother. She was given samples of Detrol LA (for urinary Incontenence). Her doctor gave her a prescription, only to discover that her insurance will not pay for it. She has both Tenncare & Medicare (Wellcare). I called & left a message for the doctor, asking him if he could call in something... Asked by Annette Prow 1 year ago.

I take care of my mother. She was given samples of Detrol LA (for urinary Incontenence). Her doctor gave her a prescription, only to discover that her insurance will not pay for it. She has both Tenncare & Medicare (Wellcare). I called & left a message for the doctor, asking him if he could call in something similar, that Wellcare would pay for. His nurse called me back & said for me contact the insurance, find out what a good substitute was & call them back to let them know & the doctor would call it in. Odd he doesn't know. But I'm too busy to call & be placed on hold w/the insurance co, so I was hoping someone on here would know & could tell me some other prescription urinary incontinence medications, that work the same as Detrol LA. I can check online if Wellcare pays for it for a not. So just some prescription names would be very helpful. Thank you! Answered by Jayson Schlemmer 1 year ago.

Ditropan, Ditropan XL, Oxytrol, Sanctura, Vesicare, and Enablex. They all run at varying costs, one of them should be cheaper than Detrol. Answered by Allena Woznick 1 year ago.


How do you treat hyperhydrosis?
I'm always sweating in the underarm area. No matter what the temerature is! I've tried every anti-perspirant. NO LUCK with any. Has anybody tried the botox solution and if so does it work? Any other suggestions? Asked by Coreen Hastert 1 year ago.

Usually very effective treatment. Medications Aluminium chloride is used in regular antiperspirants. However, hyperhidrosis sufferers need solutions with a much higher concentration to effectively treat the symptoms of the condition. Its main secondary effect is that it can cause irritation. Also, the solution is usually not effective for hand and foot hyperhidrosis. For severe cases of palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis there is some success using conservative measures such as aluminium chloride antiperspirants. Botulinum toxin type A injections are used to disable the sweat glands. The effects can last from 4–9 months depending on the site of injections. This procedure used for underarm sweating has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Several anticholinergic drugs reduce hyperhidrosis. Oxybutynin (brand name Ditropan) is one that has shown promise, although it has important side effects, which include drowsiness, visual symptoms and dryness in the mouth and other mucus membranes. A time release version of the drug is also available (Ditropan XL), with purportedly reduced effectiveness. Glycopyrrolate (Robinul) is another drug used on an off-label basis. The drug seems to be almost as effective as oxybutynin and has similar side-effects. Other anticholinergic agents that have been tried include propantheline bromide (Probanthine) and benzatropine (Cogentin). Antidepressants and anxiolytics were formerly used on the belief that primary hyperhidrosis was related to an anxious personality style. Surgical procedures In endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS), the main sympathetic chain that runs alongside the spine, often with the addition of nearby nerve ganglia, are either cut out, burned, or clamped. Clamping is intended to permit the reversal of the procedure. ETS is generally considered a "safe, reproducible, and effective procedure and most patients are satisfied with the results of the surgery". Satisfaction rates above 80% have been reported, and are higher for children. The procedure causes relief of excessive hand sweating in about 85-95% of patients. ETS may be helpful in treating axillary hyperhidrosis, facial blushing and facial sweating; however, patients with facial blushing and/or excessive facial sweating experience higher failure rates, and patients may be more likely to experience unwanted side effects, although this has not been established in a controlled trial or independent study. ETS side effects have been described as ranging from trivial to devastating. The most common secondary effect of ETS is compensatory sweating. Major drawbacks related to compensatory sweating are seen in 20-80%. Most people find the compensatory sweating to be tolerable while 1-51% claim that their quality of life decreased as a result of compensatory sweating." Total body perspiration in response to heat has been reported to increase after sympathectomy. Compensatory sweating is often a temporary, self-limiting condition. Additionally, the original sweating problem may recur due to nerve regeneration, sometimes within 6 months of the procedure. Other side effects include Horner's Syndrome (about 1%), gustatory sweating (less than 25%) and on occasion very dry hands (sandpaper hands). Some patients have also been shown to experience a cardiac sympathetic denervation, which results in a 10% lowered heartbeat during both rest and exercise; leading to an impairment of the heart rate to workload relationship. Lumbar sympathectomy is a relatively new procedure aimed at those patients for whom endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy has not relieved excessive plantar (foot) sweating. With this procedure the sympathetic chain in the lumbar region is clipped or divided in order to relieve the severe or excessive foot sweating. The success rate is about 90% and the operation should be carried out only if patients first have tried other conservative measures. This type of sympathectomy is also controversial, as patients undergoing the procedure often end up with hypotension, (a sign of autonomic dysfunction), and in males retrograde ejaculation (male infertility) and inability to maintain erection has been reported. New information has become available and shown that the issues of retrograde ejaculation, inability to maintain erection and hypertension are not validated. In a 2007 paper none of the patients experienced sexual dysfunction. Other used techniques are sweat gland suction and percutaneous sympathectomy. Sweat gland suction is a technique adapted from liposuction, in which approximately 30% of the sweat glands are removed, with a proportionate reduction in sweat.Percutaneous sympathectomy is a minimally invasive procedure in which the nerve is blocked by an injection of phenol.The procedure allows for temporary relief in most cases. Some medical professionals advocate the use of this more conservative procedure before the permanent surgical sympathectomy. O Answered by Marvella Chojnowski 1 year ago.

Yes. Butox works but you must first check your thyroid hormones. Hyperthyroidism is an important cause. Besides, anxiety could be a Contributing factor. If organic problems are ruled out, then you could proceed to butox., cheers. Answered by Chun Hovick 1 year ago.

yes, your GP should be your first port of call, as there are many untried and more importantly UNTESTED products on the market, there is a good one you can get from your gp, which is in a blue box (its name eludes me) and another good one is PIT-ROCK, family members have gotten these and they worked brilliantly. Another more scary option, would be to have botox injections in the glands under the arms to paralyze the glands and stop te perspiration. Answered by Aleta Cortner 1 year ago.

acupuncture is not a hoax or a scam!!! most people that do not believe in alternative medicine live off pills and prescriptions, what they tend not to care about is that when it is time to get off the prescription they have the same problem. acupuncture works on about 90% of my patients, as a practitioner i will dismiss the patients i don't think it is helping and refer them to another health care provider. with your condition i think you will have good results. chinese medicine is one of the oldest forms of medicine, it is widely used as a last resort and in most cases it is the only one that works. Answered by Johnnie Mathys 1 year ago.

there is a deodorant the doctor prescribed me because i started to smell like a ferret. it worked great. in fact, my pits didn't even sweat at all. Answered by Hildred Crieghton 1 year ago.

They do make prescription deodorants... Answered by Ellie Girardot 1 year ago.


Sweaty/clammy palms help?
What can i do about sweaty palms? Asked by Lita Tagala 1 year ago.

Medications Aluminium chloride (hexahydrate) solution: While aluminium chloride is used in regular antiperspirants, hyperhidrosis sufferers need a much higher concentration to effectively treat the symptoms of the condition. A 15% aluminium chloride solution or higher usually takes about a week of nightly use to stop the sweating and one or two nightly applications per week to maintain the results[citation needed]. An aluminium chloride solution can be very effective, however a minority of patients cannot tolerate the irritation that it can cause. Also, the solution is usually not effective for palmar (hand) and plantar (foot) hyperhidrosis - for which iontophoresis (see below) may yield better results in some circumstances. For the severe cases of palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis there is a low level of success using conservative measures such as Aluminium chloride antiperspirants[citation needed]. Botulinum toxin type A (including Botox ): Injections of the botulinum toxin are used to disable the sweat glands.[1] The effects can last from 4-9 months depending on the site of injections. With proper anesthesia the hand and foot injections are almost painless. The procedure when used for underarm sweating has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and some American insurance companies pay partially for the treatments.[citation needed] Oral medication: There are several oral drugs available to treat the condition with varying degrees of success.[citation needed] A class of anticholinergic drugs is available that has been shown to reduce hyperhidrosis. Ditropan (generic name: oxybutynin) is one that has shown promise.[2] However, most people cannot tolerate the side effects associated with the drug, which include drowsiness, visual symptoms and dryness in the mouth and in other mucus membranes. A time release version of the drug is also available, called Ditropan XL , with purportedly reduced effectiveness. Robinul (generic name: glycopyrrolate) is another drug used on an off-label basis. The drug seems to be almost as effective as oxybutynin, with similar side-effects such as a dry mouth or dry throat often leading to pain in these areas. Other less effective anticholinergic agents that have been tried include propantheline bromide (Probanthine ) and benztropine (Cogentin ). A different class of drugs known as beta-blockers has also been tried, but does not seem to be very effective. Antidepressants and anxiolytics (anti-anxiety medications) are more archaic, related to the former, false belief that Primary Hyperhidrosis was related to an anxious personality style. Surgical procedures Surgery (Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy or ETS): Select sympathetic nerves or nerve ganglia in the chest are either excised (cut out), burned, or clamped (theoretically allowing for the reversal of the procedure). The procedure causes relief of excessive hand sweating in about 85-95%. Major drawbacks related to compensatory sweating are seen in 20-80%. In a series in India, the incidence was found to be 62%[citation needed].Other side effects include Horner's Syndrome (about 1%), gustatory sweating (less than 25%) and on occasion very dry hands (sandpaper hands). Most people find the compensatory sweating to be tolerable while 1-4% find it worse than the initial condition. Some patients have also been shown to experience a cardiac sympathetic denervation, which results in a 10% lowered heartbeat during both rest and exercise. ETS was thought to be helpful in treating axillary hyperhidrosis, facial blushing and facial sweating. Yet, palmar hyperhidrosis patients have the best results and some surgeons only offer ETS for this group. Statistics have shown that when treated for facial blushing and/or excessive facial sweating, the failure rate of ETS for those two clinical presentations is higher and patients are more prone to side effects. [3] Surgery (Lumbar Sympathectomy): Lumbar sympathectomy is a relatively new procedure aimed at those patients for whom endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy has not relieved excessive plantar (foot) sweating. With this procedure the sympathetic chain in the lumbar region is clipped or divided in order to relieve the severe or excessive foot sweating. The success rate is about 90% and the operation should be carried out only if patients first have tried other conservative measures. [4] More recently leading surgeons who perform endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy are doing it only for excessive hand sweating (palmar hyperhidrosis). Surgery (Sweat gland suction): In a new and novel technique adapted and modified from liposuction,[5] approximately 30% of the sweat glands are removed with a proportionate reduction in sweat. Percutaneous Sympathectomy: a minimally invasive procedure in which the nerve is blocked by an injection of phenol.[6] Other Iontophoresis: This method was originally described in the 1950s, and its exact mode of action remains elusi Answered by Jannie Seirer 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Sweaty/clammy palms help? What can i do about sweaty palms? Answered by Annabel Skowyra 1 year ago.


Any home remedies/natural ways to prevent UTI?
I suffer from chronic UTI's almost monthly, and will all the meds im on to prevent them (ditropan XL, detrol LA, and Bactrim) along with drinking plenty of water, not drinking soda or teas and taking cranberry supplements. What are some other natural or home remedies to try to help me out? Also has anyone ever... Asked by Cuc Kazanjian 1 year ago.

I suffer from chronic UTI's almost monthly, and will all the meds im on to prevent them (ditropan XL, detrol LA, and Bactrim) along with drinking plenty of water, not drinking soda or teas and taking cranberry supplements. What are some other natural or home remedies to try to help me out? Also has anyone ever tried clear tract or tried d-mannose? Thanks! Answered by Lilliana Lohrey 1 year ago.

I have heard good reports about d-mannose. I know one medical doctor who has juvenile diabetes & it helps w/ protein in urine for him & has (he believes) extended his life. Here are some herbs known to be urinary antiseptics: Angelica root, Bearberry (Uva Ursi), Celery seed, Goldenrod, Juniper, Meadowsweet (also soothing & pain relieving), Saw Palmetto, Yarrow. Try making any one of these into a tea and drinking one or more cups per day. I would lean toward Angelica root, which is a digestive, or Meadowsweet, which contains salycin (like aspirin). Saw Palmetto, Juniper & Bearberry are all somewhat harsh and only for short term use. Years ago when I was taking birth control pills I also had frequent UTIs. Got some relief by a surgeon enlarging the opening of my bladder. The problem didn't completely stop until I stopped taking the pill. Answered by Jazmine Pittsenbarger 1 year ago.

Curing a UTI straight answers: A lot of water and cranberry pills. Cranberry Juice just fills you up and has a lot of sugar in some. For the pain: A heating pad on bladder area helps a lot and also decreases the need to pee. I use ThermalOn pads (the ones you use for back or shoulder pain) its good when you don't want to be home in bed. Preventing: Make sure you drink water everyday. Answered by Tamra Pults 1 year ago.

Utis. Sounds like you're doing it all right. Cranbury juice..drinking it several times a day is known to help. Also if you are sexually active...CLEANLINESS.. Both you and your partner..both before and after.. Lastly..when on toilet..always wipe front to back..Alot of docs agree that poor toilet habits..can cause frequency of UTi's... Wear cotton underwear or any underwear that has cotton crotch area.. These all seem to assist.. Good luck, Nurse Andrea RN . Answered by Lavona Connealy 1 year ago.

Increase your vit C and take an herbal immune system booster like echinacea with goldenseal or astragalus when you feel a UTI coming on. Rest. Definitely keep up the cranberry intake. Echinacea and astragalus cannot be taken for more than a week or else they become ineffective for your system. Answered by Anabel Mandolfo 1 year ago.

ba zheng san, a chinese formula blend. 3 grams three times a day for avg size person. d-mannose is also worth a try. Evidentally the sugar does not easily absorb, passes through the body and binds to the bacteria on the bladder walls causing you to uriinate them out. What ever you choose drink a lot of water to flush and take probiotics in between Answered by Chastity Solages 1 year ago.

The two natural antibiotics colloidal silver and garlic oil will both help for prevention if you take them every day. Answered by Breanna Arendz 1 year ago.


How can i get rid of my hyperhidrosis?
hey i would make the appt. myself but i wouldnt be able to drive there by myself or anything. plus i think i should tell my parents before scheduling any time of appt. Asked by Elly Matteson 1 year ago.

i told my mom that i have get sweaty hands already and i was like i need to go to the dermatologist and shes like no we need to see the doctor first. well she never made the appt. and ive been suffering with sweaty hands and feet for years now and its ruining my life, i want to tell my parents but i am so embarrassed i cant bring myself to tell them AGAIN and then have them do nothing about it. oh and they have totally forgot about it, like they have no idea im struggling with this. I need help. any good ways of telling them about it? also what are the best treatments? iontopherisis? Answered by Ailene Barjas 1 year ago.

Hey A.K. :) How can you get rid of your hyperhydrosis? Well, first of all, why don't you make the appointment yourself instead of relying on your mom? Just do it...if they're not going to help you, you have to help yourself. Anyways, as far as "best treatments" are concerned, you should really seek advice from a doctor. But here are some options: Medications * Aluminium chloride (hexahydrate) solution: While aluminium chloride is used in regular antiperspirants, hyperhidrosis sufferers need a much higher concentration to effectively treat the symptoms of the condition. A 15% aluminium chloride solution or higher usually takes about a week of nightly use to stop the sweating, with one or two nightly applications per week to maintain the results. An aluminium chloride solution can be very effective; some people, however, cannot tolerate the irritation that it can cause but these constitute a minority of all patients. Also, the solution is usually not effective for palmar (hand) and plantar (foot) hyperhidrosis - for which iontophoresis (see below) may yield better results in some circumstances. For the severe cases of palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis there is a low level of success using conservative measures such as Aluminium chloride antiperspirants. * Botulinum toxin type A (including Botox ®): Injections of the botulinum toxin are used to disable the sweat glands.[1] The effects can last from 4-9 months depending on the site of injections. With proper anesthesia the hand and foot injections are almost painless. The procedure when used for underarm sweating has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and now some insurance companies pay partially for the treatments.[citation needed] * Oral medication: There are several oral drugs available to treat the condition with varying degrees of success.[citation needed] o A class of anticholinergic drugs are available that have shown to reduce hyperhidrosis. Ditropan ® (generic name: oxybutynin) is one that has been the most promising.[2] For some people, however, the drowsiness and dry-mouth associated with the drug cannot be tolerated. A time release version of the drug is also available, called Ditropan XL ®, with purportedly reduced effectiveness. Robinul ® (generic name: glycopyrrolate) is another drug used on an off-label basis. The drug seems to be almost as effective as oxybutynin, with similar side-effects such as a dry mouth or dry throat often leading to pain in these areas. Other less effective anticholinergic agents that have been tried include propantheline bromide (Probanthine ®) and benztropine (Cogentin ®). o A different class of drugs known as beta-blockers has also been tried, but does not seem to be nearly as effective. o Since the disorder is often caused by or exacerbated by high-anxiety, antidepressant drugs can help alleviate symptoms. Surgical procedures * Surgery (Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy or ETS): Select sympathetic nerves or nerve ganglia in the chest are either cut or burned (completely destroying their ability to transmit impulses), or clamped (theoretically allowing for the reversal of the procedure). The procedure often causes anhidrosis from the mid-chest upwards, a disturbing condition. Major drawbacks to the procedure include thermo regulatory dysfunction (Goldstien, 2005), lowered fear and alertness[3] and the overwhelming incidence of compensatory hyperhidrosis. Some people find this sweating to be tolerable while others find the compensatory hyperhidrosis to be worse than the initial condition. It has also been established that there is a low (less than 1%) chance of Horner's syndrome. Other risks common to minimally-invasive chest surgery, though rare, do exist. Patients have also been shown to experience a cardiac sympathetic denervation, which results in a 10% lowered heartbeat during both rest and exercise. ETS was thought to be helpful in treating facial blushing and facial sweating. According to Dr. Reisfeld, the only indication for ETS at present is severe palmar hyperhidrosis (too much hand sweating). Statistics have shown that when treated for facial blushing and/or excessive facial sweating, the failure rate of ETS for those two clinical presentations is higher and patients are more prone to side effects. * Surgery (Sweat gland suction): A new technique adapted and modified from liposuction. On an out-patient basis with only local anesthesia, the sweat glands are permanently removed in a gentle, non-aggressive manner. The sweat glands and armpits are first softened and anesthetized with a special solution. After a short period, the sweat glands can then be removed in a manner similar to liposuction. Only small incisions above and under the armpits are required to remove the sweat glands through quick suction. The entire minimally invasive operation takes between 60 and 90 minutes. Patients can go home directly after the procedure. Some can even return to work after leaving the practice, although taking the rest of the day off is recommended. Over 95% of patients report considerably less discomfort and permanent dryness. * Iontophoresis: This method was originally described in the 1950s, and its exact mode of action remains elusive to date. The affected area is placed in a device that has two pails of water with a conductor in each one. The hand or foot acts like a conductor between the positively- and negatively-charged pails. As the low current passes through the area, the minerals in the water clog the sweat glands, limiting the amount of sweat released. Common brands of tap water iontophoresis devices are the Drionic®, Idrostar and MD-1A (RA Fischer). Some people have seen great results while others see no effect. However, since the device can be painful to some (it is important to note that pain is usually limited to small wounds and that over time the body adjusts to the procedure) and a great deal of time is required, no cessation of sweating in some people may be the result of not using the device as required. The device is usually used for the hands and feet, but there has been a device created for the axillae (armpit) area and for the stump region of amputees. Answered by Francisco Mawyer 1 year ago.

Drink 3 cups of sage tea every day. A cup in the morning, one in the afternoon and one before you go to sleep. In a week, your sweating will decrease by 50-70%. If you want to make it really dry then soak your hand in the tea (when it cools down) for 20 minutes. I plant and drink my own sage but you can buy it in stores and online, shop around because prices vary. Also lose your body fat by working out and eating healthier like becoming pescetarian, this way you can keep your heart rate in check when you're outside. You can never cure hyperhidrosis but with good habits and constantly monitoring your progress you'll be able to reduce it to a more comfortable level. Good luck. Answered by Clifton Sok 1 year ago.

Try iontophoresis. It worked for my and has completely changed my life. I no longer have to worry about sweaty hands at all. I know talking to your parents about it can be difficult and embarrassing but you will feel so much better if you let them know about it so they can help you. Let them know how much it's making you suffer. I don't think it is that they don't care about your problem but rather that they don't understand what it's like to have this issue. No one without sweaty hands can know what kind of a burden this issue can be, so you have to help them understand. Iontophoresis is expensive, but it is a one time deal as far as buying the machine and you don't need a doctor to order one. Please at least give it a shot. I did and it was the best decision I have ever made. Answered by Nyla Edgcomb 1 year ago.

Frustrating for you, I'm sure. But why not give your mom a second (or 10th, heh heh) chance? I am a busy mom and I am also incredibly forgetful. The kindest thing you could do would be to write a note, asking mumsy to make you an appt. for your sweaty hands, and tape it to her bathroom mirror, where she'll see it every day. Make sure the note is a nice one. Tell her that after she makes the appt. you'll rub her shoulders, or something you know she likes. Then, every time you notice your hands are wet, casually go up to your mom and sort of rub her arm. (It'll only work if she's wearing short sleeves, lol) As the days pass, it should do the trick. I had a problem with really bad "night sweats" awhile back, and my doc prescribed Hytrin, 1 mg. per day. Hytrin is for high blood pressure or something like that, so your doc may or may not be willing to give it to you; besides, it might not work for what you have. As far as treatment for your hands: I saw a special on Discovery Health that addressed your condition: if a person's job requires long periods at a keyboard or something in which it simply doesn't work to be dripping wet, there is a laser procedure, very expensive and time-consuming, that can be done, but they won't do anything for your feet, as far as I know. It is a pain, though, and I wish you the best in getting to the bottom of it all. :) Answered by Zofia Affelt 1 year ago.

Just try reminding your mom about this and don't be embarrassed. If you go to the doctor and you're not calm, he or she might diagnose you with an anxiety disorder. Answered by Jerrold Olsen 1 year ago.

Try telling your mom again. Or, you can try holding her hand so she could feel how sweaty your hand really is. There's really nothing to be ashamed about it. All my family members know about mine, and we laugh about it. Don't think they understand how much i hate it though. Answered by Jess Hoiness 1 year ago.


Will ditropan xl tablet get rid of water swelling in my legs?
my feet are swollen becouse of water retantion will ditropan xl tablet help get rid of water in my legs ??? Asked by Asha Benitz 1 year ago.

Highly unlikely that it will get rid of the water in your legs/feet. Ditropan XL Extended-Release Tablets are used for relieving symptoms of bladder problems (urinary urgency, frequency, or leakage; loss of bladder control; and painful urination) in certain patients. It may also be used in children with overactive bladder muscle (detrusor) caused by certain conditions (eg, spina bifida). Ditropan XL Extended-Release Tablets is an anticholinergic. It works by relaxing muscles in the bladder. I would suggest that you see your doctor for a check up, as there may be underlying medical problems which are causing the water retention in your legs. It's more likely that you will need a diuretic to get rid of the water. Answered by Shellie Roulston 1 year ago.


I found a pill?
I was not going to take the pill I just need to know what is going on in my house thanks for all your answers Asked by Oralee Marinello 1 year ago.

It is a Ditropan XL 10mg tablet There is a picture of the tablet half way down the page linked below Answered by Kimber Cotherman 1 year ago.

Is it round in shape? Sounds like Ditropan XL, a urinary/bladder drug (stops bladder spasms). You can use a pill ID site whenever you have an unidentified pill. Answered by Jodie Garabedian 1 year ago.

If that pill was not a prescription for you (apparently not), dump it. What do you want to do with a found pill. You might even not know the expiry date. I consider it as a risk to use found medicine. Answered by Janis Strek 1 year ago.

if it does not have a name or generic type name on it i would take it to the pharmacy. Or you could go to Drugs.com which has a pill identifier on it. Answered by Laronda Billiar 1 year ago.

take it to the pharmacy they can id it easily Answered by Olimpia Porchia 1 year ago.


What is another prescription medication, for urinary incontinence, that would do the same thing as Detrol LA?
I take care of my mother. She was given samples of Detrol LA (for urinary Incontenence). Her doctor gave her a prescription, only to discover that her insurance will not pay for it. She has both Tenncare & Medicare (Wellcare). I called & left a message for the doctor, asking him if he could call in something... Asked by Marie Linch 1 year ago.

I take care of my mother. She was given samples of Detrol LA (for urinary Incontenence). Her doctor gave her a prescription, only to discover that her insurance will not pay for it. She has both Tenncare & Medicare (Wellcare). I called & left a message for the doctor, asking him if he could call in something similar, that Wellcare would pay for. His nurse called me back & said for me contact the insurance, find out what a good substitute was & call them back to let them know & the doctor would call it in. Odd he doesn't know. But I'm too busy to call & be placed on hold w/the insurance co, so I was hoping someone on here would know & could tell me some other prescription urinary incontinence medications, that work the same as Detrol LA. I can check online if Wellcare pays for it for a not. So just some prescription names would be very helpful. Thank you! Answered by Gino Murtagh 1 year ago.

Ditropan, Ditropan XL, Oxytrol, Sanctura, Vesicare, and Enablex. They all run at varying costs, one of them should be cheaper than Detrol. Answered by Dinah Amesquieto 1 year ago.


How do you treat hyperhydrosis?
I'm always sweating in the underarm area. No matter what the temerature is! I've tried every anti-perspirant. NO LUCK with any. Has anybody tried the botox solution and if so does it work? Any other suggestions? Asked by Tracey Opher 1 year ago.

Usually very effective treatment. Medications Aluminium chloride is used in regular antiperspirants. However, hyperhidrosis sufferers need solutions with a much higher concentration to effectively treat the symptoms of the condition. Its main secondary effect is that it can cause irritation. Also, the solution is usually not effective for hand and foot hyperhidrosis. For severe cases of palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis there is some success using conservative measures such as aluminium chloride antiperspirants. Botulinum toxin type A injections are used to disable the sweat glands. The effects can last from 4–9 months depending on the site of injections. This procedure used for underarm sweating has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Several anticholinergic drugs reduce hyperhidrosis. Oxybutynin (brand name Ditropan) is one that has shown promise, although it has important side effects, which include drowsiness, visual symptoms and dryness in the mouth and other mucus membranes. A time release version of the drug is also available (Ditropan XL), with purportedly reduced effectiveness. Glycopyrrolate (Robinul) is another drug used on an off-label basis. The drug seems to be almost as effective as oxybutynin and has similar side-effects. Other anticholinergic agents that have been tried include propantheline bromide (Probanthine) and benzatropine (Cogentin). Antidepressants and anxiolytics were formerly used on the belief that primary hyperhidrosis was related to an anxious personality style. Surgical procedures In endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS), the main sympathetic chain that runs alongside the spine, often with the addition of nearby nerve ganglia, are either cut out, burned, or clamped. Clamping is intended to permit the reversal of the procedure. ETS is generally considered a "safe, reproducible, and effective procedure and most patients are satisfied with the results of the surgery". Satisfaction rates above 80% have been reported, and are higher for children. The procedure causes relief of excessive hand sweating in about 85-95% of patients. ETS may be helpful in treating axillary hyperhidrosis, facial blushing and facial sweating; however, patients with facial blushing and/or excessive facial sweating experience higher failure rates, and patients may be more likely to experience unwanted side effects, although this has not been established in a controlled trial or independent study. ETS side effects have been described as ranging from trivial to devastating. The most common secondary effect of ETS is compensatory sweating. Major drawbacks related to compensatory sweating are seen in 20-80%. Most people find the compensatory sweating to be tolerable while 1-51% claim that their quality of life decreased as a result of compensatory sweating." Total body perspiration in response to heat has been reported to increase after sympathectomy. Compensatory sweating is often a temporary, self-limiting condition. Additionally, the original sweating problem may recur due to nerve regeneration, sometimes within 6 months of the procedure. Other side effects include Horner's Syndrome (about 1%), gustatory sweating (less than 25%) and on occasion very dry hands (sandpaper hands). Some patients have also been shown to experience a cardiac sympathetic denervation, which results in a 10% lowered heartbeat during both rest and exercise; leading to an impairment of the heart rate to workload relationship. Lumbar sympathectomy is a relatively new procedure aimed at those patients for whom endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy has not relieved excessive plantar (foot) sweating. With this procedure the sympathetic chain in the lumbar region is clipped or divided in order to relieve the severe or excessive foot sweating. The success rate is about 90% and the operation should be carried out only if patients first have tried other conservative measures. This type of sympathectomy is also controversial, as patients undergoing the procedure often end up with hypotension, (a sign of autonomic dysfunction), and in males retrograde ejaculation (male infertility) and inability to maintain erection has been reported. New information has become available and shown that the issues of retrograde ejaculation, inability to maintain erection and hypertension are not validated. In a 2007 paper none of the patients experienced sexual dysfunction. Other used techniques are sweat gland suction and percutaneous sympathectomy. Sweat gland suction is a technique adapted from liposuction, in which approximately 30% of the sweat glands are removed, with a proportionate reduction in sweat.Percutaneous sympathectomy is a minimally invasive procedure in which the nerve is blocked by an injection of phenol.The procedure allows for temporary relief in most cases. Some medical professionals advocate the use of this more conservative procedure before the permanent surgical sympathectomy. O Answered by Jacinta Erlenbusch 1 year ago.

Yes. Butox works but you must first check your thyroid hormones. Hyperthyroidism is an important cause. Besides, anxiety could be a Contributing factor. If organic problems are ruled out, then you could proceed to butox., cheers. Answered by Gabriel Sanmarco 1 year ago.

yes, your GP should be your first port of call, as there are many untried and more importantly UNTESTED products on the market, there is a good one you can get from your gp, which is in a blue box (its name eludes me) and another good one is PIT-ROCK, family members have gotten these and they worked brilliantly. Another more scary option, would be to have botox injections in the glands under the arms to paralyze the glands and stop te perspiration. Answered by Jeanne Direnzo 1 year ago.

acupuncture is not a hoax or a scam!!! most people that do not believe in alternative medicine live off pills and prescriptions, what they tend not to care about is that when it is time to get off the prescription they have the same problem. acupuncture works on about 90% of my patients, as a practitioner i will dismiss the patients i don't think it is helping and refer them to another health care provider. with your condition i think you will have good results. chinese medicine is one of the oldest forms of medicine, it is widely used as a last resort and in most cases it is the only one that works. Answered by Shanel Ochotorena 1 year ago.

there is a deodorant the doctor prescribed me because i started to smell like a ferret. it worked great. in fact, my pits didn't even sweat at all. Answered by Donny Croskey 1 year ago.

They do make prescription deodorants... Answered by Danielle Uzun 1 year ago.


Sweaty/clammy palms help?
What can i do about sweaty palms? Asked by Waltraud Thiede 1 year ago.

Medications Aluminium chloride (hexahydrate) solution: While aluminium chloride is used in regular antiperspirants, hyperhidrosis sufferers need a much higher concentration to effectively treat the symptoms of the condition. A 15% aluminium chloride solution or higher usually takes about a week of nightly use to stop the sweating and one or two nightly applications per week to maintain the results[citation needed]. An aluminium chloride solution can be very effective, however a minority of patients cannot tolerate the irritation that it can cause. Also, the solution is usually not effective for palmar (hand) and plantar (foot) hyperhidrosis - for which iontophoresis (see below) may yield better results in some circumstances. For the severe cases of palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis there is a low level of success using conservative measures such as Aluminium chloride antiperspirants[citation needed]. Botulinum toxin type A (including Botox ): Injections of the botulinum toxin are used to disable the sweat glands.[1] The effects can last from 4-9 months depending on the site of injections. With proper anesthesia the hand and foot injections are almost painless. The procedure when used for underarm sweating has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and some American insurance companies pay partially for the treatments.[citation needed] Oral medication: There are several oral drugs available to treat the condition with varying degrees of success.[citation needed] A class of anticholinergic drugs is available that has been shown to reduce hyperhidrosis. Ditropan (generic name: oxybutynin) is one that has shown promise.[2] However, most people cannot tolerate the side effects associated with the drug, which include drowsiness, visual symptoms and dryness in the mouth and in other mucus membranes. A time release version of the drug is also available, called Ditropan XL , with purportedly reduced effectiveness. Robinul (generic name: glycopyrrolate) is another drug used on an off-label basis. The drug seems to be almost as effective as oxybutynin, with similar side-effects such as a dry mouth or dry throat often leading to pain in these areas. Other less effective anticholinergic agents that have been tried include propantheline bromide (Probanthine ) and benztropine (Cogentin ). A different class of drugs known as beta-blockers has also been tried, but does not seem to be very effective. Antidepressants and anxiolytics (anti-anxiety medications) are more archaic, related to the former, false belief that Primary Hyperhidrosis was related to an anxious personality style. Surgical procedures Surgery (Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy or ETS): Select sympathetic nerves or nerve ganglia in the chest are either excised (cut out), burned, or clamped (theoretically allowing for the reversal of the procedure). The procedure causes relief of excessive hand sweating in about 85-95%. Major drawbacks related to compensatory sweating are seen in 20-80%. In a series in India, the incidence was found to be 62%[citation needed].Other side effects include Horner's Syndrome (about 1%), gustatory sweating (less than 25%) and on occasion very dry hands (sandpaper hands). Most people find the compensatory sweating to be tolerable while 1-4% find it worse than the initial condition. Some patients have also been shown to experience a cardiac sympathetic denervation, which results in a 10% lowered heartbeat during both rest and exercise. ETS was thought to be helpful in treating axillary hyperhidrosis, facial blushing and facial sweating. Yet, palmar hyperhidrosis patients have the best results and some surgeons only offer ETS for this group. Statistics have shown that when treated for facial blushing and/or excessive facial sweating, the failure rate of ETS for those two clinical presentations is higher and patients are more prone to side effects. [3] Surgery (Lumbar Sympathectomy): Lumbar sympathectomy is a relatively new procedure aimed at those patients for whom endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy has not relieved excessive plantar (foot) sweating. With this procedure the sympathetic chain in the lumbar region is clipped or divided in order to relieve the severe or excessive foot sweating. The success rate is about 90% and the operation should be carried out only if patients first have tried other conservative measures. [4] More recently leading surgeons who perform endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy are doing it only for excessive hand sweating (palmar hyperhidrosis). Surgery (Sweat gland suction): In a new and novel technique adapted and modified from liposuction,[5] approximately 30% of the sweat glands are removed with a proportionate reduction in sweat. Percutaneous Sympathectomy: a minimally invasive procedure in which the nerve is blocked by an injection of phenol.[6] Other Iontophoresis: This method was originally described in the 1950s, and its exact mode of action remains elusi Answered by Jarred Almonte 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Sweaty/clammy palms help? What can i do about sweaty palms? Answered by Willy Edith 1 year ago.


Any home remedies/natural ways to prevent UTI?
I suffer from chronic UTI's almost monthly, and will all the meds im on to prevent them (ditropan XL, detrol LA, and Bactrim) along with drinking plenty of water, not drinking soda or teas and taking cranberry supplements. What are some other natural or home remedies to try to help me out? Also has anyone ever... Asked by Latonya Puzon 1 year ago.

I suffer from chronic UTI's almost monthly, and will all the meds im on to prevent them (ditropan XL, detrol LA, and Bactrim) along with drinking plenty of water, not drinking soda or teas and taking cranberry supplements. What are some other natural or home remedies to try to help me out? Also has anyone ever tried clear tract or tried d-mannose? Thanks! Answered by Serafina Francione 1 year ago.

I have heard good reports about d-mannose. I know one medical doctor who has juvenile diabetes & it helps w/ protein in urine for him & has (he believes) extended his life. Here are some herbs known to be urinary antiseptics: Angelica root, Bearberry (Uva Ursi), Celery seed, Goldenrod, Juniper, Meadowsweet (also soothing & pain relieving), Saw Palmetto, Yarrow. Try making any one of these into a tea and drinking one or more cups per day. I would lean toward Angelica root, which is a digestive, or Meadowsweet, which contains salycin (like aspirin). Saw Palmetto, Juniper & Bearberry are all somewhat harsh and only for short term use. Years ago when I was taking birth control pills I also had frequent UTIs. Got some relief by a surgeon enlarging the opening of my bladder. The problem didn't completely stop until I stopped taking the pill. Answered by Johnny Nate 1 year ago.

Curing a UTI straight answers: A lot of water and cranberry pills. Cranberry Juice just fills you up and has a lot of sugar in some. For the pain: A heating pad on bladder area helps a lot and also decreases the need to pee. I use ThermalOn pads (the ones you use for back or shoulder pain) its good when you don't want to be home in bed. Preventing: Make sure you drink water everyday. Answered by Ebonie Bentancourt 1 year ago.

Utis. Sounds like you're doing it all right. Cranbury juice..drinking it several times a day is known to help. Also if you are sexually active...CLEANLINESS.. Both you and your partner..both before and after.. Lastly..when on toilet..always wipe front to back..Alot of docs agree that poor toilet habits..can cause frequency of UTi's... Wear cotton underwear or any underwear that has cotton crotch area.. These all seem to assist.. Good luck, Nurse Andrea RN . Answered by Hollis Toten 1 year ago.

Increase your vit C and take an herbal immune system booster like echinacea with goldenseal or astragalus when you feel a UTI coming on. Rest. Definitely keep up the cranberry intake. Echinacea and astragalus cannot be taken for more than a week or else they become ineffective for your system. Answered by Harry Chauvin 1 year ago.

ba zheng san, a chinese formula blend. 3 grams three times a day for avg size person. d-mannose is also worth a try. Evidentally the sugar does not easily absorb, passes through the body and binds to the bacteria on the bladder walls causing you to uriinate them out. What ever you choose drink a lot of water to flush and take probiotics in between Answered by Jeneva Guthmiller 1 year ago.

The two natural antibiotics colloidal silver and garlic oil will both help for prevention if you take them every day. Answered by Dannie Folden 1 year ago.


How can i get rid of my hyperhidrosis?
hey i would make the appt. myself but i wouldnt be able to drive there by myself or anything. plus i think i should tell my parents before scheduling any time of appt. Asked by Shaneka Ragar 1 year ago.

i told my mom that i have get sweaty hands already and i was like i need to go to the dermatologist and shes like no we need to see the doctor first. well she never made the appt. and ive been suffering with sweaty hands and feet for years now and its ruining my life, i want to tell my parents but i am so embarrassed i cant bring myself to tell them AGAIN and then have them do nothing about it. oh and they have totally forgot about it, like they have no idea im struggling with this. I need help. any good ways of telling them about it? also what are the best treatments? iontopherisis? Answered by Maia Chhum 1 year ago.

Hey A.K. :) How can you get rid of your hyperhydrosis? Well, first of all, why don't you make the appointment yourself instead of relying on your mom? Just do it...if they're not going to help you, you have to help yourself. Anyways, as far as "best treatments" are concerned, you should really seek advice from a doctor. But here are some options: Medications * Aluminium chloride (hexahydrate) solution: While aluminium chloride is used in regular antiperspirants, hyperhidrosis sufferers need a much higher concentration to effectively treat the symptoms of the condition. A 15% aluminium chloride solution or higher usually takes about a week of nightly use to stop the sweating, with one or two nightly applications per week to maintain the results. An aluminium chloride solution can be very effective; some people, however, cannot tolerate the irritation that it can cause but these constitute a minority of all patients. Also, the solution is usually not effective for palmar (hand) and plantar (foot) hyperhidrosis - for which iontophoresis (see below) may yield better results in some circumstances. For the severe cases of palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis there is a low level of success using conservative measures such as Aluminium chloride antiperspirants. * Botulinum toxin type A (including Botox ®): Injections of the botulinum toxin are used to disable the sweat glands.[1] The effects can last from 4-9 months depending on the site of injections. With proper anesthesia the hand and foot injections are almost painless. The procedure when used for underarm sweating has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and now some insurance companies pay partially for the treatments.[citation needed] * Oral medication: There are several oral drugs available to treat the condition with varying degrees of success.[citation needed] o A class of anticholinergic drugs are available that have shown to reduce hyperhidrosis. Ditropan ® (generic name: oxybutynin) is one that has been the most promising.[2] For some people, however, the drowsiness and dry-mouth associated with the drug cannot be tolerated. A time release version of the drug is also available, called Ditropan XL ®, with purportedly reduced effectiveness. Robinul ® (generic name: glycopyrrolate) is another drug used on an off-label basis. The drug seems to be almost as effective as oxybutynin, with similar side-effects such as a dry mouth or dry throat often leading to pain in these areas. Other less effective anticholinergic agents that have been tried include propantheline bromide (Probanthine ®) and benztropine (Cogentin ®). o A different class of drugs known as beta-blockers has also been tried, but does not seem to be nearly as effective. o Since the disorder is often caused by or exacerbated by high-anxiety, antidepressant drugs can help alleviate symptoms. Surgical procedures * Surgery (Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy or ETS): Select sympathetic nerves or nerve ganglia in the chest are either cut or burned (completely destroying their ability to transmit impulses), or clamped (theoretically allowing for the reversal of the procedure). The procedure often causes anhidrosis from the mid-chest upwards, a disturbing condition. Major drawbacks to the procedure include thermo regulatory dysfunction (Goldstien, 2005), lowered fear and alertness[3] and the overwhelming incidence of compensatory hyperhidrosis. Some people find this sweating to be tolerable while others find the compensatory hyperhidrosis to be worse than the initial condition. It has also been established that there is a low (less than 1%) chance of Horner's syndrome. Other risks common to minimally-invasive chest surgery, though rare, do exist. Patients have also been shown to experience a cardiac sympathetic denervation, which results in a 10% lowered heartbeat during both rest and exercise. ETS was thought to be helpful in treating facial blushing and facial sweating. According to Dr. Reisfeld, the only indication for ETS at present is severe palmar hyperhidrosis (too much hand sweating). Statistics have shown that when treated for facial blushing and/or excessive facial sweating, the failure rate of ETS for those two clinical presentations is higher and patients are more prone to side effects. * Surgery (Sweat gland suction): A new technique adapted and modified from liposuction. On an out-patient basis with only local anesthesia, the sweat glands are permanently removed in a gentle, non-aggressive manner. The sweat glands and armpits are first softened and anesthetized with a special solution. After a short period, the sweat glands can then be removed in a manner similar to liposuction. Only small incisions above and under the armpits are required to remove the sweat glands through quick suction. The entire minimally invasive operation takes between 60 and 90 minutes. Patients can go home directly after the procedure. Some can even return to work after leaving the practice, although taking the rest of the day off is recommended. Over 95% of patients report considerably less discomfort and permanent dryness. * Iontophoresis: This method was originally described in the 1950s, and its exact mode of action remains elusive to date. The affected area is placed in a device that has two pails of water with a conductor in each one. The hand or foot acts like a conductor between the positively- and negatively-charged pails. As the low current passes through the area, the minerals in the water clog the sweat glands, limiting the amount of sweat released. Common brands of tap water iontophoresis devices are the Drionic®, Idrostar and MD-1A (RA Fischer). Some people have seen great results while others see no effect. However, since the device can be painful to some (it is important to note that pain is usually limited to small wounds and that over time the body adjusts to the procedure) and a great deal of time is required, no cessation of sweating in some people may be the result of not using the device as required. The device is usually used for the hands and feet, but there has been a device created for the axillae (armpit) area and for the stump region of amputees. Answered by Yetta Cazeault 1 year ago.

Drink 3 cups of sage tea every day. A cup in the morning, one in the afternoon and one before you go to sleep. In a week, your sweating will decrease by 50-70%. If you want to make it really dry then soak your hand in the tea (when it cools down) for 20 minutes. I plant and drink my own sage but you can buy it in stores and online, shop around because prices vary. Also lose your body fat by working out and eating healthier like becoming pescetarian, this way you can keep your heart rate in check when you're outside. You can never cure hyperhidrosis but with good habits and constantly monitoring your progress you'll be able to reduce it to a more comfortable level. Good luck. Answered by Maurine Trueluck 1 year ago.

Try iontophoresis. It worked for my and has completely changed my life. I no longer have to worry about sweaty hands at all. I know talking to your parents about it can be difficult and embarrassing but you will feel so much better if you let them know about it so they can help you. Let them know how much it's making you suffer. I don't think it is that they don't care about your problem but rather that they don't understand what it's like to have this issue. No one without sweaty hands can know what kind of a burden this issue can be, so you have to help them understand. Iontophoresis is expensive, but it is a one time deal as far as buying the machine and you don't need a doctor to order one. Please at least give it a shot. I did and it was the best decision I have ever made. Answered by Virgilio Dilalla 1 year ago.

Frustrating for you, I'm sure. But why not give your mom a second (or 10th, heh heh) chance? I am a busy mom and I am also incredibly forgetful. The kindest thing you could do would be to write a note, asking mumsy to make you an appt. for your sweaty hands, and tape it to her bathroom mirror, where she'll see it every day. Make sure the note is a nice one. Tell her that after she makes the appt. you'll rub her shoulders, or something you know she likes. Then, every time you notice your hands are wet, casually go up to your mom and sort of rub her arm. (It'll only work if she's wearing short sleeves, lol) As the days pass, it should do the trick. I had a problem with really bad "night sweats" awhile back, and my doc prescribed Hytrin, 1 mg. per day. Hytrin is for high blood pressure or something like that, so your doc may or may not be willing to give it to you; besides, it might not work for what you have. As far as treatment for your hands: I saw a special on Discovery Health that addressed your condition: if a person's job requires long periods at a keyboard or something in which it simply doesn't work to be dripping wet, there is a laser procedure, very expensive and time-consuming, that can be done, but they won't do anything for your feet, as far as I know. It is a pain, though, and I wish you the best in getting to the bottom of it all. :) Answered by Garret Gerton 1 year ago.

Just try reminding your mom about this and don't be embarrassed. If you go to the doctor and you're not calm, he or she might diagnose you with an anxiety disorder. Answered by Mafalda Sticklen 1 year ago.

Try telling your mom again. Or, you can try holding her hand so she could feel how sweaty your hand really is. There's really nothing to be ashamed about it. All my family members know about mine, and we laugh about it. Don't think they understand how much i hate it though. Answered by Anjelica Amorin 1 year ago.


Will ditropan xl tablet get rid of water swelling in my legs?
my feet are swollen becouse of water retantion will ditropan xl tablet help get rid of water in my legs ??? Asked by Olinda Santillan 1 year ago.

Highly unlikely that it will get rid of the water in your legs/feet. Ditropan XL Extended-Release Tablets are used for relieving symptoms of bladder problems (urinary urgency, frequency, or leakage; loss of bladder control; and painful urination) in certain patients. It may also be used in children with overactive bladder muscle (detrusor) caused by certain conditions (eg, spina bifida). Ditropan XL Extended-Release Tablets is an anticholinergic. It works by relaxing muscles in the bladder. I would suggest that you see your doctor for a check up, as there may be underlying medical problems which are causing the water retention in your legs. It's more likely that you will need a diuretic to get rid of the water. Answered by Toi Nibbe 1 year ago.


I found a pill?
I was not going to take the pill I just need to know what is going on in my house thanks for all your answers Asked by Tifany Sallis 1 year ago.

It is a Ditropan XL 10mg tablet There is a picture of the tablet half way down the page linked below Answered by Pansy Alexader 1 year ago.

Is it round in shape? Sounds like Ditropan XL, a urinary/bladder drug (stops bladder spasms). You can use a pill ID site whenever you have an unidentified pill. Answered by Madeline Greene 1 year ago.

If that pill was not a prescription for you (apparently not), dump it. What do you want to do with a found pill. You might even not know the expiry date. I consider it as a risk to use found medicine. Answered by Beth Wewerka 1 year ago.

if it does not have a name or generic type name on it i would take it to the pharmacy. Or you could go to Drugs.com which has a pill identifier on it. Answered by Laverne Alberry 1 year ago.

take it to the pharmacy they can id it easily Answered by Jannette Spunt 1 year ago.


What is another prescription medication, for urinary incontinence, that would do the same thing as Detrol LA?
I take care of my mother. She was given samples of Detrol LA (for urinary Incontenence). Her doctor gave her a prescription, only to discover that her insurance will not pay for it. She has both Tenncare & Medicare (Wellcare). I called & left a message for the doctor, asking him if he could call in something... Asked by Jacquetta Coak 1 year ago.

I take care of my mother. She was given samples of Detrol LA (for urinary Incontenence). Her doctor gave her a prescription, only to discover that her insurance will not pay for it. She has both Tenncare & Medicare (Wellcare). I called & left a message for the doctor, asking him if he could call in something similar, that Wellcare would pay for. His nurse called me back & said for me contact the insurance, find out what a good substitute was & call them back to let them know & the doctor would call it in. Odd he doesn't know. But I'm too busy to call & be placed on hold w/the insurance co, so I was hoping someone on here would know & could tell me some other prescription urinary incontinence medications, that work the same as Detrol LA. I can check online if Wellcare pays for it for a not. So just some prescription names would be very helpful. Thank you! Answered by Lon Laycock 1 year ago.

Ditropan, Ditropan XL, Oxytrol, Sanctura, Vesicare, and Enablex. They all run at varying costs, one of them should be cheaper than Detrol. Answered by Thora Riska 1 year ago.


How do you treat hyperhydrosis?
I'm always sweating in the underarm area. No matter what the temerature is! I've tried every anti-perspirant. NO LUCK with any. Has anybody tried the botox solution and if so does it work? Any other suggestions? Asked by Charlie Mitchem 1 year ago.

Usually very effective treatment. Medications Aluminium chloride is used in regular antiperspirants. However, hyperhidrosis sufferers need solutions with a much higher concentration to effectively treat the symptoms of the condition. Its main secondary effect is that it can cause irritation. Also, the solution is usually not effective for hand and foot hyperhidrosis. For severe cases of palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis there is some success using conservative measures such as aluminium chloride antiperspirants. Botulinum toxin type A injections are used to disable the sweat glands. The effects can last from 4–9 months depending on the site of injections. This procedure used for underarm sweating has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Several anticholinergic drugs reduce hyperhidrosis. Oxybutynin (brand name Ditropan) is one that has shown promise, although it has important side effects, which include drowsiness, visual symptoms and dryness in the mouth and other mucus membranes. A time release version of the drug is also available (Ditropan XL), with purportedly reduced effectiveness. Glycopyrrolate (Robinul) is another drug used on an off-label basis. The drug seems to be almost as effective as oxybutynin and has similar side-effects. Other anticholinergic agents that have been tried include propantheline bromide (Probanthine) and benzatropine (Cogentin). Antidepressants and anxiolytics were formerly used on the belief that primary hyperhidrosis was related to an anxious personality style. Surgical procedures In endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS), the main sympathetic chain that runs alongside the spine, often with the addition of nearby nerve ganglia, are either cut out, burned, or clamped. Clamping is intended to permit the reversal of the procedure. ETS is generally considered a "safe, reproducible, and effective procedure and most patients are satisfied with the results of the surgery". Satisfaction rates above 80% have been reported, and are higher for children. The procedure causes relief of excessive hand sweating in about 85-95% of patients. ETS may be helpful in treating axillary hyperhidrosis, facial blushing and facial sweating; however, patients with facial blushing and/or excessive facial sweating experience higher failure rates, and patients may be more likely to experience unwanted side effects, although this has not been established in a controlled trial or independent study. ETS side effects have been described as ranging from trivial to devastating. The most common secondary effect of ETS is compensatory sweating. Major drawbacks related to compensatory sweating are seen in 20-80%. Most people find the compensatory sweating to be tolerable while 1-51% claim that their quality of life decreased as a result of compensatory sweating." Total body perspiration in response to heat has been reported to increase after sympathectomy. Compensatory sweating is often a temporary, self-limiting condition. Additionally, the original sweating problem may recur due to nerve regeneration, sometimes within 6 months of the procedure. Other side effects include Horner's Syndrome (about 1%), gustatory sweating (less than 25%) and on occasion very dry hands (sandpaper hands). Some patients have also been shown to experience a cardiac sympathetic denervation, which results in a 10% lowered heartbeat during both rest and exercise; leading to an impairment of the heart rate to workload relationship. Lumbar sympathectomy is a relatively new procedure aimed at those patients for whom endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy has not relieved excessive plantar (foot) sweating. With this procedure the sympathetic chain in the lumbar region is clipped or divided in order to relieve the severe or excessive foot sweating. The success rate is about 90% and the operation should be carried out only if patients first have tried other conservative measures. This type of sympathectomy is also controversial, as patients undergoing the procedure often end up with hypotension, (a sign of autonomic dysfunction), and in males retrograde ejaculation (male infertility) and inability to maintain erection has been reported. New information has become available and shown that the issues of retrograde ejaculation, inability to maintain erection and hypertension are not validated. In a 2007 paper none of the patients experienced sexual dysfunction. Other used techniques are sweat gland suction and percutaneous sympathectomy. Sweat gland suction is a technique adapted from liposuction, in which approximately 30% of the sweat glands are removed, with a proportionate reduction in sweat.Percutaneous sympathectomy is a minimally invasive procedure in which the nerve is blocked by an injection of phenol.The procedure allows for temporary relief in most cases. Some medical professionals advocate the use of this more conservative procedure before the permanent surgical sympathectomy. O Answered by Anthony Espericueta 1 year ago.

Yes. Butox works but you must first check your thyroid hormones. Hyperthyroidism is an important cause. Besides, anxiety could be a Contributing factor. If organic problems are ruled out, then you could proceed to butox., cheers. Answered by Lupe Allphin 1 year ago.

yes, your GP should be your first port of call, as there are many untried and more importantly UNTESTED products on the market, there is a good one you can get from your gp, which is in a blue box (its name eludes me) and another good one is PIT-ROCK, family members have gotten these and they worked brilliantly. Another more scary option, would be to have botox injections in the glands under the arms to paralyze the glands and stop te perspiration. Answered by Horacio Mullican 1 year ago.

acupuncture is not a hoax or a scam!!! most people that do not believe in alternative medicine live off pills and prescriptions, what they tend not to care about is that when it is time to get off the prescription they have the same problem. acupuncture works on about 90% of my patients, as a practitioner i will dismiss the patients i don't think it is helping and refer them to another health care provider. with your condition i think you will have good results. chinese medicine is one of the oldest forms of medicine, it is widely used as a last resort and in most cases it is the only one that works. Answered by Kathie Pruneau 1 year ago.

there is a deodorant the doctor prescribed me because i started to smell like a ferret. it worked great. in fact, my pits didn't even sweat at all. Answered by Jolynn Enslen 1 year ago.

They do make prescription deodorants... Answered by Jessenia Pert 1 year ago.


Sweaty/clammy palms help?
What can i do about sweaty palms? Asked by Chiquita Lima 1 year ago.

Medications Aluminium chloride (hexahydrate) solution: While aluminium chloride is used in regular antiperspirants, hyperhidrosis sufferers need a much higher concentration to effectively treat the symptoms of the condition. A 15% aluminium chloride solution or higher usually takes about a week of nightly use to stop the sweating and one or two nightly applications per week to maintain the results[citation needed]. An aluminium chloride solution can be very effective, however a minority of patients cannot tolerate the irritation that it can cause. Also, the solution is usually not effective for palmar (hand) and plantar (foot) hyperhidrosis - for which iontophoresis (see below) may yield better results in some circumstances. For the severe cases of palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis there is a low level of success using conservative measures such as Aluminium chloride antiperspirants[citation needed]. Botulinum toxin type A (including Botox ): Injections of the botulinum toxin are used to disable the sweat glands.[1] The effects can last from 4-9 months depending on the site of injections. With proper anesthesia the hand and foot injections are almost painless. The procedure when used for underarm sweating has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and some American insurance companies pay partially for the treatments.[citation needed] Oral medication: There are several oral drugs available to treat the condition with varying degrees of success.[citation needed] A class of anticholinergic drugs is available that has been shown to reduce hyperhidrosis. Ditropan (generic name: oxybutynin) is one that has shown promise.[2] However, most people cannot tolerate the side effects associated with the drug, which include drowsiness, visual symptoms and dryness in the mouth and in other mucus membranes. A time release version of the drug is also available, called Ditropan XL , with purportedly reduced effectiveness. Robinul (generic name: glycopyrrolate) is another drug used on an off-label basis. The drug seems to be almost as effective as oxybutynin, with similar side-effects such as a dry mouth or dry throat often leading to pain in these areas. Other less effective anticholinergic agents that have been tried include propantheline bromide (Probanthine ) and benztropine (Cogentin ). A different class of drugs known as beta-blockers has also been tried, but does not seem to be very effective. Antidepressants and anxiolytics (anti-anxiety medications) are more archaic, related to the former, false belief that Primary Hyperhidrosis was related to an anxious personality style. Surgical procedures Surgery (Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy or ETS): Select sympathetic nerves or nerve ganglia in the chest are either excised (cut out), burned, or clamped (theoretically allowing for the reversal of the procedure). The procedure causes relief of excessive hand sweating in about 85-95%. Major drawbacks related to compensatory sweating are seen in 20-80%. In a series in India, the incidence was found to be 62%[citation needed].Other side effects include Horner's Syndrome (about 1%), gustatory sweating (less than 25%) and on occasion very dry hands (sandpaper hands). Most people find the compensatory sweating to be tolerable while 1-4% find it worse than the initial condition. Some patients have also been shown to experience a cardiac sympathetic denervation, which results in a 10% lowered heartbeat during both rest and exercise. ETS was thought to be helpful in treating axillary hyperhidrosis, facial blushing and facial sweating. Yet, palmar hyperhidrosis patients have the best results and some surgeons only offer ETS for this group. Statistics have shown that when treated for facial blushing and/or excessive facial sweating, the failure rate of ETS for those two clinical presentations is higher and patients are more prone to side effects. [3] Surgery (Lumbar Sympathectomy): Lumbar sympathectomy is a relatively new procedure aimed at those patients for whom endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy has not relieved excessive plantar (foot) sweating. With this procedure the sympathetic chain in the lumbar region is clipped or divided in order to relieve the severe or excessive foot sweating. The success rate is about 90% and the operation should be carried out only if patients first have tried other conservative measures. [4] More recently leading surgeons who perform endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy are doing it only for excessive hand sweating (palmar hyperhidrosis). Surgery (Sweat gland suction): In a new and novel technique adapted and modified from liposuction,[5] approximately 30% of the sweat glands are removed with a proportionate reduction in sweat. Percutaneous Sympathectomy: a minimally invasive procedure in which the nerve is blocked by an injection of phenol.[6] Other Iontophoresis: This method was originally described in the 1950s, and its exact mode of action remains elusi Answered by Kena Currie 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Sweaty/clammy palms help? What can i do about sweaty palms? Answered by Marhta Brott 1 year ago.


Any home remedies/natural ways to prevent UTI?
I suffer from chronic UTI's almost monthly, and will all the meds im on to prevent them (ditropan XL, detrol LA, and Bactrim) along with drinking plenty of water, not drinking soda or teas and taking cranberry supplements. What are some other natural or home remedies to try to help me out? Also has anyone ever... Asked by Valorie Mooreland 1 year ago.

I suffer from chronic UTI's almost monthly, and will all the meds im on to prevent them (ditropan XL, detrol LA, and Bactrim) along with drinking plenty of water, not drinking soda or teas and taking cranberry supplements. What are some other natural or home remedies to try to help me out? Also has anyone ever tried clear tract or tried d-mannose? Thanks! Answered by Azalee Mcanulty 1 year ago.

I have heard good reports about d-mannose. I know one medical doctor who has juvenile diabetes & it helps w/ protein in urine for him & has (he believes) extended his life. Here are some herbs known to be urinary antiseptics: Angelica root, Bearberry (Uva Ursi), Celery seed, Goldenrod, Juniper, Meadowsweet (also soothing & pain relieving), Saw Palmetto, Yarrow. Try making any one of these into a tea and drinking one or more cups per day. I would lean toward Angelica root, which is a digestive, or Meadowsweet, which contains salycin (like aspirin). Saw Palmetto, Juniper & Bearberry are all somewhat harsh and only for short term use. Years ago when I was taking birth control pills I also had frequent UTIs. Got some relief by a surgeon enlarging the opening of my bladder. The problem didn't completely stop until I stopped taking the pill. Answered by Amelia Cornetta 1 year ago.

Curing a UTI straight answers: A lot of water and cranberry pills. Cranberry Juice just fills you up and has a lot of sugar in some. For the pain: A heating pad on bladder area helps a lot and also decreases the need to pee. I use ThermalOn pads (the ones you use for back or shoulder pain) its good when you don't want to be home in bed. Preventing: Make sure you drink water everyday. Answered by Adelia Marsh 1 year ago.

Utis. Sounds like you're doing it all right. Cranbury juice..drinking it several times a day is known to help. Also if you are sexually active...CLEANLINESS.. Both you and your partner..both before and after.. Lastly..when on toilet..always wipe front to back..Alot of docs agree that poor toilet habits..can cause frequency of UTi's... Wear cotton underwear or any underwear that has cotton crotch area.. These all seem to assist.. Good luck, Nurse Andrea RN . Answered by Florencia Beckstrand 1 year ago.

Increase your vit C and take an herbal immune system booster like echinacea with goldenseal or astragalus when you feel a UTI coming on. Rest. Definitely keep up the cranberry intake. Echinacea and astragalus cannot be taken for more than a week or else they become ineffective for your system. Answered by Lupe Lepre 1 year ago.

ba zheng san, a chinese formula blend. 3 grams three times a day for avg size person. d-mannose is also worth a try. Evidentally the sugar does not easily absorb, passes through the body and binds to the bacteria on the bladder walls causing you to uriinate them out. What ever you choose drink a lot of water to flush and take probiotics in between Answered by Tamar Werries 1 year ago.

The two natural antibiotics colloidal silver and garlic oil will both help for prevention if you take them every day. Answered by America Broy 1 year ago.


How can i get rid of my hyperhidrosis?
hey i would make the appt. myself but i wouldnt be able to drive there by myself or anything. plus i think i should tell my parents before scheduling any time of appt. Asked by Sydney Lawary 1 year ago.

i told my mom that i have get sweaty hands already and i was like i need to go to the dermatologist and shes like no we need to see the doctor first. well she never made the appt. and ive been suffering with sweaty hands and feet for years now and its ruining my life, i want to tell my parents but i am so embarrassed i cant bring myself to tell them AGAIN and then have them do nothing about it. oh and they have totally forgot about it, like they have no idea im struggling with this. I need help. any good ways of telling them about it? also what are the best treatments? iontopherisis? Answered by Lily Eastep 1 year ago.

Hey A.K. :) How can you get rid of your hyperhydrosis? Well, first of all, why don't you make the appointment yourself instead of relying on your mom? Just do it...if they're not going to help you, you have to help yourself. Anyways, as far as "best treatments" are concerned, you should really seek advice from a doctor. But here are some options: Medications * Aluminium chloride (hexahydrate) solution: While aluminium chloride is used in regular antiperspirants, hyperhidrosis sufferers need a much higher concentration to effectively treat the symptoms of the condition. A 15% aluminium chloride solution or higher usually takes about a week of nightly use to stop the sweating, with one or two nightly applications per week to maintain the results. An aluminium chloride solution can be very effective; some people, however, cannot tolerate the irritation that it can cause but these constitute a minority of all patients. Also, the solution is usually not effective for palmar (hand) and plantar (foot) hyperhidrosis - for which iontophoresis (see below) may yield better results in some circumstances. For the severe cases of palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis there is a low level of success using conservative measures such as Aluminium chloride antiperspirants. * Botulinum toxin type A (including Botox ®): Injections of the botulinum toxin are used to disable the sweat glands.[1] The effects can last from 4-9 months depending on the site of injections. With proper anesthesia the hand and foot injections are almost painless. The procedure when used for underarm sweating has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and now some insurance companies pay partially for the treatments.[citation needed] * Oral medication: There are several oral drugs available to treat the condition with varying degrees of success.[citation needed] o A class of anticholinergic drugs are available that have shown to reduce hyperhidrosis. Ditropan ® (generic name: oxybutynin) is one that has been the most promising.[2] For some people, however, the drowsiness and dry-mouth associated with the drug cannot be tolerated. A time release version of the drug is also available, called Ditropan XL ®, with purportedly reduced effectiveness. Robinul ® (generic name: glycopyrrolate) is another drug used on an off-label basis. The drug seems to be almost as effective as oxybutynin, with similar side-effects such as a dry mouth or dry throat often leading to pain in these areas. Other less effective anticholinergic agents that have been tried include propantheline bromide (Probanthine ®) and benztropine (Cogentin ®). o A different class of drugs known as beta-blockers has also been tried, but does not seem to be nearly as effective. o Since the disorder is often caused by or exacerbated by high-anxiety, antidepressant drugs can help alleviate symptoms. Surgical procedures * Surgery (Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy or ETS): Select sympathetic nerves or nerve ganglia in the chest are either cut or burned (completely destroying their ability to transmit impulses), or clamped (theoretically allowing for the reversal of the procedure). The procedure often causes anhidrosis from the mid-chest upwards, a disturbing condition. Major drawbacks to the procedure include thermo regulatory dysfunction (Goldstien, 2005), lowered fear and alertness[3] and the overwhelming incidence of compensatory hyperhidrosis. Some people find this sweating to be tolerable while others find the compensatory hyperhidrosis to be worse than the initial condition. It has also been established that there is a low (less than 1%) chance of Horner's syndrome. Other risks common to minimally-invasive chest surgery, though rare, do exist. Patients have also been shown to experience a cardiac sympathetic denervation, which results in a 10% lowered heartbeat during both rest and exercise. ETS was thought to be helpful in treating facial blushing and facial sweating. According to Dr. Reisfeld, the only indication for ETS at present is severe palmar hyperhidrosis (too much hand sweating). Statistics have shown that when treated for facial blushing and/or excessive facial sweating, the failure rate of ETS for those two clinical presentations is higher and patients are more prone to side effects. * Surgery (Sweat gland suction): A new technique adapted and modified from liposuction. On an out-patient basis with only local anesthesia, the sweat glands are permanently removed in a gentle, non-aggressive manner. The sweat glands and armpits are first softened and anesthetized with a special solution. After a short period, the sweat glands can then be removed in a manner similar to liposuction. Only small incisions above and under the armpits are required to remove the sweat glands through quick suction. The entire minimally invasive operation takes between 60 and 90 minutes. Patients can go home directly after the procedure. Some can even return to work after leaving the practice, although taking the rest of the day off is recommended. Over 95% of patients report considerably less discomfort and permanent dryness. * Iontophoresis: This method was originally described in the 1950s, and its exact mode of action remains elusive to date. The affected area is placed in a device that has two pails of water with a conductor in each one. The hand or foot acts like a conductor between the positively- and negatively-charged pails. As the low current passes through the area, the minerals in the water clog the sweat glands, limiting the amount of sweat released. Common brands of tap water iontophoresis devices are the Drionic®, Idrostar and MD-1A (RA Fischer). Some people have seen great results while others see no effect. However, since the device can be painful to some (it is important to note that pain is usually limited to small wounds and that over time the body adjusts to the procedure) and a great deal of time is required, no cessation of sweating in some people may be the result of not using the device as required. The device is usually used for the hands and feet, but there has been a device created for the axillae (armpit) area and for the stump region of amputees. Answered by Treva Cardona 1 year ago.

Drink 3 cups of sage tea every day. A cup in the morning, one in the afternoon and one before you go to sleep. In a week, your sweating will decrease by 50-70%. If you want to make it really dry then soak your hand in the tea (when it cools down) for 20 minutes. I plant and drink my own sage but you can buy it in stores and online, shop around because prices vary. Also lose your body fat by working out and eating healthier like becoming pescetarian, this way you can keep your heart rate in check when you're outside. You can never cure hyperhidrosis but with good habits and constantly monitoring your progress you'll be able to reduce it to a more comfortable level. Good luck. Answered by Soo Neale 1 year ago.

Try iontophoresis. It worked for my and has completely changed my life. I no longer have to worry about sweaty hands at all. I know talking to your parents about it can be difficult and embarrassing but you will feel so much better if you let them know about it so they can help you. Let them know how much it's making you suffer. I don't think it is that they don't care about your problem but rather that they don't understand what it's like to have this issue. No one without sweaty hands can know what kind of a burden this issue can be, so you have to help them understand. Iontophoresis is expensive, but it is a one time deal as far as buying the machine and you don't need a doctor to order one. Please at least give it a shot. I did and it was the best decision I have ever made. Answered by Youlanda Rognstad 1 year ago.

Frustrating for you, I'm sure. But why not give your mom a second (or 10th, heh heh) chance? I am a busy mom and I am also incredibly forgetful. The kindest thing you could do would be to write a note, asking mumsy to make you an appt. for your sweaty hands, and tape it to her bathroom mirror, where she'll see it every day. Make sure the note is a nice one. Tell her that after she makes the appt. you'll rub her shoulders, or something you know she likes. Then, every time you notice your hands are wet, casually go up to your mom and sort of rub her arm. (It'll only work if she's wearing short sleeves, lol) As the days pass, it should do the trick. I had a problem with really bad "night sweats" awhile back, and my doc prescribed Hytrin, 1 mg. per day. Hytrin is for high blood pressure or something like that, so your doc may or may not be willing to give it to you; besides, it might not work for what you have. As far as treatment for your hands: I saw a special on Discovery Health that addressed your condition: if a person's job requires long periods at a keyboard or something in which it simply doesn't work to be dripping wet, there is a laser procedure, very expensive and time-consuming, that can be done, but they won't do anything for your feet, as far as I know. It is a pain, though, and I wish you the best in getting to the bottom of it all. :) Answered by Merissa Burlson 1 year ago.

Just try reminding your mom about this and don't be embarrassed. If you go to the doctor and you're not calm, he or she might diagnose you with an anxiety disorder. Answered by Jake Kiening 1 year ago.

Try telling your mom again. Or, you can try holding her hand so she could feel how sweaty your hand really is. There's really nothing to be ashamed about it. All my family members know about mine, and we laugh about it. Don't think they understand how much i hate it though. Answered by Mendy Appelgate 1 year ago.


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