Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018741/001.

Names and composition

"DIPROLENE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018741/001 DIPROLENE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE OINTMENT, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
019408/001 DIPROLENE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
019408/002 DIPROLENE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE GEL, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
019716/001 DIPROLENE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE LOTION, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017536/001 DIPROSONE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
017691/001 DIPROSONE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
017781/001 DIPROSONE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017829/001 DIPROSONE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE DISC/TOPICAL EQ 0.1% BASE
018741/001 DIPROLENE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE OINTMENT, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
019136/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
019137/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
019138/001 ALPHATREX BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
019140/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
019141/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
019143/001 ALPHATREX BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
019408/001 DIPROLENE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
019408/002 DIPROLENE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE GEL, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
019555/001 DIPROLENE AF BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
019716/001 DIPROLENE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE LOTION, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
070273/001 ALPHATREX BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
070274/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
070275/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
070281/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
070885/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
071012/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
071085/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
071143/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
071467/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
071476/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
071477/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
071882/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
072276/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
072526/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
072536/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
072538/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
073552/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
074271/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
074272/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE LOTION/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
074304/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE OINTMENT, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
074579/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
075276/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE GEL, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
075373/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE OINTMENT, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
076215/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
076508/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE GEL, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
076543/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
076592/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
076603/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
076753/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE OINTMENT, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
077111/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE LOTION, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
077477/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE LOTION, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
078930/001 BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE CREAM, AUGMENTED/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE
208079/001 SERNIVO BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE SPRAY/TOPICAL EQ 0.05% BASE per SPRAY

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Is clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream pretty much the same as diprolene cream?
Asked by Curt Dreps 2 years ago.

The first cream is a combination of an antifungal agent and the same cortisone product as what's in the diprolene cream. So, in that sense, the cortisone product part of it is the same. Answered by Ryan Meanor 2 years ago.


I was just prescribed betamethasone (for Diprolene) for my hair loss.?
Has anyone else been prescribed this and how long does it take to show results? I am a 24 y/o female with thick, long hair. The dermatologist said it is temporary hair thinning in the crown of my head due to low iron and mainly stress. (I'm a senior in college, finals coming up, worrying about grad school, etc... Asked by Bethany Vasudevan 2 years ago.

Has anyone else been prescribed this and how long does it take to show results? I am a 24 y/o female with thick, long hair. The dermatologist said it is temporary hair thinning in the crown of my head due to low iron and mainly stress. (I'm a senior in college, finals coming up, worrying about grad school, etc ...) The hair thinning is stressfull as well. Any info on this medicine would be appreciated. Thanks! Answered by Dino Salos 2 years ago.


What would you like to ask?my dog ate some diprolene cream what should my concerns be?
Asked by Lenard Ellwanger 2 years ago.

Check the ingredients on the label. You can also call the animal poison control center at 888 426-4435. There will be a $65.00 charge placed against your credit card. This is not the place to come for advice. You'll get incorrect info from 12 years old who aren't even old enough to be on this site, and who can't even spell correctly. Here's a good example: Their dog "ate or DRANKS a whol bottle of TYLONAL and they suggested giving HYDRONGYNE perioxide. That would be Tylenol and HYDROGEN. Answered by Yasmin Shimon 2 years ago.

"There would probably be more risk with the tube than the contents. Single very large doses of cortisone (betamethasone) are well tolerated by dogs. She has probably received only a clinical dose. She may show a common cortisone side effect of an increased thirst over the next 24-48 hours. Don't be concerned about that. Sometimes a little panting too. The carrier ingredients in the ointment (glycols, etc) can sometimes cause some diarrhea or vomiting. I would have expected the vomioting by now. the daiarrhea can occur a bit later. Nothing at all to worry about. Small fragments of the plastic tube shoukld pass ok. Regards, PeterDr Pete" Answered by Kattie Quastad 2 years ago.


Is there an over the counter alternative to the prescription medication betamethasone dipropionate?
Asked by Shantell Kragh 2 years ago.

Diprolene (betamethasone dipropionate) is a highly potent steroid cream used for severe rashes, eczema, etc. The only available OTC alternative steroid is Hydrocortisone 1%--but this is very weak compared to Diprolene, about 1/100th the potency. Answered by Pamela Malinski 2 years ago.

Betamethasone Over The Counter Answered by Kattie Vandersloot 2 years ago.

Betamethasone Cream Over The Counter Answered by Mike Richemond 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Is there an over the counter alternative to the prescription medication betamethasone dipropionate? Answered by Ashley Vind 2 years ago.

I don't have health insurance and last time I did it didn't cover anything. I need an over the counter solution now after 2 years the situation has returned. Answered by Pansy Catinella 2 years ago.

Check with your doctor, or in some states your pharmacist can help (in other states, the pharmacist is not allowed to help you decide - he/she simply needs to fill the prescription as written). If cost is the issue, check out on online drug finder such as the one below. Answered by Rudolf Henrichsen 2 years ago.


Can anyone tell me 5 medications related to the integumentary system?
Asked by Tammi Weymouth 2 years ago.

Lamisil, Triamcinolone, Kwell, Diprolene, any antibiotic cream Answered by Amberly Klimes 2 years ago.


What prescriptions do doctors give for eczema?
Asked by Billie Speiden 2 years ago.

Try Diprolene first. It's a topical corticosteriod. Ointment works better than cream. Answered by Page Lightford 2 years ago.

I am an atopic dermatitis patient with over 40 years of experience;these are what I have used: 1.Prescription strength hydrocortisone cream,aka corticosteroid. 2.Prednisone,shot or pills. Not recommended because the steroid lasts for as long as you use it and the rash comes back after a few days.Then you are left with the side effects(blood does not clot well). 3.Lidex ointment.A little stronger then hydrocortisone. 4.ProtopicBIG MISTAKE.It burned;I hated it and went back to hydrocortisone.Lucky for me since Protopic and it's cousin Elidel are under investigation for CAUSING AN INCREASED RISK OF SKIN CANCER.No one should use these medicines until the testing has been completed and the medicines are absolutely cleared of uping skin cancer risk. You should also take an antihistamine pill;over-the-counter or prescription. My dermatologist used to make up a special moisturizing formula of hydrocortisone.It's now available in non-prescription Cortaid with moisturizers.Over the years I have found that Cortaid or the one-percent prescription hydrocortisone cream are the best bets.My worst flareup lasted for four years straight and I was on prescription meds the whole time.Some rashes just take a long time to burn out;I found out that good grooming...using Cetaphil cleansers and moisturizer,the moisturizers frequently during the day,with the hydrocortisone just two to three times a day,were enough to deal with the rash...not stressing about it and knowing that you are taking good care of your sensitive skin is really important when dealing with bothersome eczema. Answered by Peggie Erickson 2 years ago.

Itch Relief Antihistamine medication may reduce the itch during a flare up of ezcema, and the reduced scratching in turn reduces damage & irritation to the skin (the Itch cycle). Capsaicin applied to the skin acts as a counter irritant (see Gate control theory of nerve signal transmission). Other agents that act on nerve transmissions, like menthol, also have been found to mitigate the body's itch signals, providing some relief. Whilst research has suggested Naloxone hydrochloride and dibucaine suppress the itch cycle in atopic-dermatitis model mice. Corticosteroids Dermatitis is often treated by doctors with prescribed Glucocorticoid (a corticosteroid steroid) ointments or creams. For mild-moderate eczema a weak steroid may be used (e.g. Hydrocortisone or Desonide), whilst more severe cases require a higher-potency steroid (e.g. Clobetasol propionate). They are highly effective in most cases, but must be used sparingly to avoid possible side effects, the most significant of which is that their prolonged use can cause the skin to thin and become fragile (atrophy). High strength steroids used over large areas may be significantly absorbed into the body causing bone demineralisation (osteoporosis). Finally by their immunosuppression action they can, if used alone, exacerbate some skin infections (fungal or viral). If using on the face, only a low strength steroid should be used and care must be taken to avoid the eyes. Hence a steroid of an appropriate strength to promptly settle an episode of eczema should be sparingly applied. Once the desired response has been achieved, it should be discontinued and not used for long-term prevention. Immunomodulators Topical immunomodulators like pimecrolimus (Elidel® and Douglan®) and tacrolimus (Protopic®) were developed after corticosteroid treatments, effectively suppressing the immune system in the affected area, and appear to yield better results in some populations. The US Food and Drug Administration has issued a public health advisory about the possible risk of lymph node or skin cancer from use of these products, but many professional medical organizations disagree with the FDA's findings: * The postulation is that the immune system may help remove some pre-cancerous abnormal cells which is prevented by these drugs. However, any chronic inflammatory condition such as eczema, by the very nature of increased metabolism and cell replication, has a tiny associated risk of cancer (see Bowen's disease). * Current practice by UK dermatologists [1] is not to consider this a significant real concern and they are increasingly recommending the use of these new drugs. The dramatic improvement on the condition can significantly improve the quality of life of sufferers (and families kept awake by the distress of affected children). The major debate, in the UK, has been about the cost of such newer treatments and, given only finite NHS resources, when they are most appropriate to use.[2] Antibiotics The disruption to the skin's normal barrier protection through dry and cracked skin allows easy entry for bacteria and fungi. Scratching by the patient both introduces infection and spreads it from one area to another. Any skin infection further irritates the skin and a rapid detoriation in the condition may ensue; the appropriate antibiotic should be given. Answered by Keena Rowbotham 2 years ago.

well, I've had it for about 2 years, but it typically depends on how bad your eczema is. If it's really bad then they will prescribe an ointment that you apply to the area as needed, but you also have to make sure that you are taking proper care of your skin. You have to be careful to avoid humidity and make sure that take care of your skin even if you don't have a "breakout" Answered by Particia Kapps 2 years ago.

Usually cortisone cream. By the way eczema can be an allergic reaction try going to an allergist. Answered by Lizzie Leftwich 2 years ago.

remember that some sterioids can't be used continuously as they make the skin thinner. You may need to take a break from them after using it for a week or two. Answered by May Eggler 2 years ago.

try Dermatop. its a prescription cream that works really well. Answered by Kizzy Bertel 2 years ago.

Elidel and Protopic Answered by Chang Trucks 2 years ago.

triamcinolone 0.1% cream. i have it and that's what they gave me. but you shouldn't use it on your face. Answered by Nelly Vrooman 2 years ago.


Poisin ivi?
how do you get rid of it fast. Asked by Jimmie Singler 2 years ago.

The best remedy I have found is called Diprolene. It used to be by prescription only, but it might be over the counter by now. It kills it in about 3 days. (I am assuming you are talking about a skin reaction to it.) Answered by Curtis Mclain 2 years ago.

they have new products over the counter, that are 2 step processes, i think the first step washes the oils away so it doesn't spread and the second step is for itching, if you have poison ivy really bad see your doctor, they have prescriptions available Answered by Lenny Golding 2 years ago.

good luck just got it a week ago clearing a house lot Answered by Kam Soderholm 2 years ago.

poor vinegar or bleach over the rash and it will dry up faster Answered by Forest Mcghin 2 years ago.

predisone dose pak. Answered by Theo Clavelle 2 years ago.


Is there a homeopathic option instead of the drug my doctor prescribed?
My son's (12 months old) doctor prescribed betamethasone dipropionate and the pharmacist made it sound like this would be dangerous for my Little, lowering levels of cortosone if used over a long period of time and I'm supposed to give it to him twice a day for 3 weeks. It's supposed to help loosen the... Asked by Adrienne Lowenthal 2 years ago.

My son's (12 months old) doctor prescribed betamethasone dipropionate and the pharmacist made it sound like this would be dangerous for my Little, lowering levels of cortosone if used over a long period of time and I'm supposed to give it to him twice a day for 3 weeks. It's supposed to help loosen the skin that has grown reattached to his penis from his circumcision. (Or they'd have to tear it again and I don't want him to go through that again.) Does anyone know of another safer option? I've put in a call to my doctor and am just waiting to hear back but wondering if anyone else has any knowledge they can share with me. Answered by Carli Grabau 2 years ago.

Connor is wrong about using the medication. Your son's doctor is prescribing the perfect medication and is going by the book. It sounds like your son has or is developing phimosis. Using Diprolene (betamethasone dipropionate topical) is a cheap and HIGHLY effective conservative treatment. In guidelines betamethasone is literally the specific treatment of choice. A study conducted in Paris France at l'Hôpital Necker - Enfants Malades (then published in The British Journal of Urology International) found that 85% of young boys responded to using topical corticosteroids for a period of 4-8 weeks and there were no side effects of note in any of the children. Very few treatments of any type can boost such high efficacy and almost zero side effects. And the alternative is surgery and that will cost more, it will be very hard on you and very unpleasant for him, and there are a lot more complications that could happen. I don't know what your pharmacist said but that is a very safe medication. Even if you need to use it longer it is safe and your son's doctor has examined him and in his clinical judgement he clearly feels using the medication is safe. Yes corticosteroids can lower levels of cortisol because corticosteroids cause adrenal suppression. Basically corticosteroid medication takes the place of naturally occurring cortisol. To regulate the amount of corticosteroids (natural and synthetic) the body will stop synthesizing natural corticosteroids. HOWEVER your son will be using a topical cream and three weeks in NOT a long time. If he were taking an ORAL medication like prednisone after about 7 days adrenal suppression would begin to occur and he would need to gradually tapper off over a couple of days. In some RARE cases with topical medication swelling can occur once the medication is discontinued (rebound inflammation) so his doctor may ask you to reduce how often you apply it for a few days after his treatment to avoid any problems (but it is not likely to be needed). In any case side effects of any type are unlikely and it is a smart idea to try this method. People take topical and oral corticosteroids all the time and almost all do fine. Even if physical dependency to corticosteroids occur it is not a problem as long as it is reduced slowly. Also physical dependency is not addiction just incase that is unclear. And speaking as someone who had the same problem as your son, I did have to have the surgery (phimosis can become very painful) at about age 14y and it is not a very pleasant experience. I only wish my doctor had mentioned topical medication when I was younger. Your son with thank you, even if it does not work at least you tried. And for the record homeopathy has been conclusively disproved. The World Health Organization (WHO), The Parliament of The United Kingdom, The British National Health Service, The American Medical Association, Office fédéral de la santé publique (Swiss government), and many more governments and agencies have definitively stated that homeopathy has no medical value aside from a possibly placebo effect. It is safe, it just won't help. Answered by Cristina Lado 2 years ago.

Homeopathy has been shown to be completly Ineffictive. Topical steroids are only a problem in the long term, for 3/52 should be quite safe Answered by Pamala Debiase 2 years ago.

Certainly, if you wish to use something that doesn't actually have any effect. Mind you, doing nothing or something homeopathic, which amounts to much the same thing, isn't likely to be safer for your son. Still, it's your choice and his problem. Answered by Ping Franz 2 years ago.

A cream isn't going to detach skin, and the safest option would have been to leave the child alone to begin with. Seeing as he's already in the situation the best thing to do would be to take him to a specialist. The skin will need to be detached mannually, the skin should be retracted at every diaper change untill the child is three years old. -Connor Answered by Ophelia Lamour 2 years ago.

You are talking about your son's penis. You should listen to the doctor. Answered by Diamond Bedee 2 years ago.


Is clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream pretty much the same as diprolene cream?
Asked by Francisca Katke 2 years ago.

The first cream is a combination of an antifungal agent and the same cortisone product as what's in the diprolene cream. So, in that sense, the cortisone product part of it is the same. Answered by Merlene Mccomber 2 years ago.


I was just prescribed betamethasone (for Diprolene) for my hair loss.?
Has anyone else been prescribed this and how long does it take to show results? I am a 24 y/o female with thick, long hair. The dermatologist said it is temporary hair thinning in the crown of my head due to low iron and mainly stress. (I'm a senior in college, finals coming up, worrying about grad school, etc... Asked by Shira Wheeley 2 years ago.

Has anyone else been prescribed this and how long does it take to show results? I am a 24 y/o female with thick, long hair. The dermatologist said it is temporary hair thinning in the crown of my head due to low iron and mainly stress. (I'm a senior in college, finals coming up, worrying about grad school, etc ...) The hair thinning is stressfull as well. Any info on this medicine would be appreciated. Thanks! Answered by Melvina Penoyer 2 years ago.


What would you like to ask?my dog ate some diprolene cream what should my concerns be?
Asked by Andra Anastas 2 years ago.

Check the ingredients on the label. You can also call the animal poison control center at 888 426-4435. There will be a $65.00 charge placed against your credit card. This is not the place to come for advice. You'll get incorrect info from 12 years old who aren't even old enough to be on this site, and who can't even spell correctly. Here's a good example: Their dog "ate or DRANKS a whol bottle of TYLONAL and they suggested giving HYDRONGYNE perioxide. That would be Tylenol and HYDROGEN. Answered by Monica Delisi 2 years ago.

"There would probably be more risk with the tube than the contents. Single very large doses of cortisone (betamethasone) are well tolerated by dogs. She has probably received only a clinical dose. She may show a common cortisone side effect of an increased thirst over the next 24-48 hours. Don't be concerned about that. Sometimes a little panting too. The carrier ingredients in the ointment (glycols, etc) can sometimes cause some diarrhea or vomiting. I would have expected the vomioting by now. the daiarrhea can occur a bit later. Nothing at all to worry about. Small fragments of the plastic tube shoukld pass ok. Regards, PeterDr Pete" Answered by Anissa Dolak 2 years ago.


Is there an over the counter alternative to the prescription medication betamethasone dipropionate?
Asked by Sage Mclarney 2 years ago.

Diprolene (betamethasone dipropionate) is a highly potent steroid cream used for severe rashes, eczema, etc. The only available OTC alternative steroid is Hydrocortisone 1%--but this is very weak compared to Diprolene, about 1/100th the potency. Answered by Jene Mcgraph 2 years ago.

Betamethasone Over The Counter Answered by Eugena Vicknair 2 years ago.

Betamethasone Cream Over The Counter Answered by Beatriz Moench 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Is there an over the counter alternative to the prescription medication betamethasone dipropionate? Answered by Edra Villanvera 2 years ago.

I don't have health insurance and last time I did it didn't cover anything. I need an over the counter solution now after 2 years the situation has returned. Answered by Marjory Bastress 2 years ago.

Check with your doctor, or in some states your pharmacist can help (in other states, the pharmacist is not allowed to help you decide - he/she simply needs to fill the prescription as written). If cost is the issue, check out on online drug finder such as the one below. Answered by Alesha Radecki 2 years ago.


Can anyone tell me 5 medications related to the integumentary system?
Asked by Leann Giandelone 2 years ago.

Lamisil, Triamcinolone, Kwell, Diprolene, any antibiotic cream Answered by Ariane Fellin 2 years ago.


What prescriptions do doctors give for eczema?
Asked by Keisha Mabe 2 years ago.

Try Diprolene first. It's a topical corticosteriod. Ointment works better than cream. Answered by Tamera Halderman 2 years ago.

I am an atopic dermatitis patient with over 40 years of experience;these are what I have used: 1.Prescription strength hydrocortisone cream,aka corticosteroid. 2.Prednisone,shot or pills. Not recommended because the steroid lasts for as long as you use it and the rash comes back after a few days.Then you are left with the side effects(blood does not clot well). 3.Lidex ointment.A little stronger then hydrocortisone. 4.ProtopicBIG MISTAKE.It burned;I hated it and went back to hydrocortisone.Lucky for me since Protopic and it's cousin Elidel are under investigation for CAUSING AN INCREASED RISK OF SKIN CANCER.No one should use these medicines until the testing has been completed and the medicines are absolutely cleared of uping skin cancer risk. You should also take an antihistamine pill;over-the-counter or prescription. My dermatologist used to make up a special moisturizing formula of hydrocortisone.It's now available in non-prescription Cortaid with moisturizers.Over the years I have found that Cortaid or the one-percent prescription hydrocortisone cream are the best bets.My worst flareup lasted for four years straight and I was on prescription meds the whole time.Some rashes just take a long time to burn out;I found out that good grooming...using Cetaphil cleansers and moisturizer,the moisturizers frequently during the day,with the hydrocortisone just two to three times a day,were enough to deal with the rash...not stressing about it and knowing that you are taking good care of your sensitive skin is really important when dealing with bothersome eczema. Answered by Francisco Scot 2 years ago.

Itch Relief Antihistamine medication may reduce the itch during a flare up of ezcema, and the reduced scratching in turn reduces damage & irritation to the skin (the Itch cycle). Capsaicin applied to the skin acts as a counter irritant (see Gate control theory of nerve signal transmission). Other agents that act on nerve transmissions, like menthol, also have been found to mitigate the body's itch signals, providing some relief. Whilst research has suggested Naloxone hydrochloride and dibucaine suppress the itch cycle in atopic-dermatitis model mice. Corticosteroids Dermatitis is often treated by doctors with prescribed Glucocorticoid (a corticosteroid steroid) ointments or creams. For mild-moderate eczema a weak steroid may be used (e.g. Hydrocortisone or Desonide), whilst more severe cases require a higher-potency steroid (e.g. Clobetasol propionate). They are highly effective in most cases, but must be used sparingly to avoid possible side effects, the most significant of which is that their prolonged use can cause the skin to thin and become fragile (atrophy). High strength steroids used over large areas may be significantly absorbed into the body causing bone demineralisation (osteoporosis). Finally by their immunosuppression action they can, if used alone, exacerbate some skin infections (fungal or viral). If using on the face, only a low strength steroid should be used and care must be taken to avoid the eyes. Hence a steroid of an appropriate strength to promptly settle an episode of eczema should be sparingly applied. Once the desired response has been achieved, it should be discontinued and not used for long-term prevention. Immunomodulators Topical immunomodulators like pimecrolimus (Elidel® and Douglan®) and tacrolimus (Protopic®) were developed after corticosteroid treatments, effectively suppressing the immune system in the affected area, and appear to yield better results in some populations. The US Food and Drug Administration has issued a public health advisory about the possible risk of lymph node or skin cancer from use of these products, but many professional medical organizations disagree with the FDA's findings: * The postulation is that the immune system may help remove some pre-cancerous abnormal cells which is prevented by these drugs. However, any chronic inflammatory condition such as eczema, by the very nature of increased metabolism and cell replication, has a tiny associated risk of cancer (see Bowen's disease). * Current practice by UK dermatologists [1] is not to consider this a significant real concern and they are increasingly recommending the use of these new drugs. The dramatic improvement on the condition can significantly improve the quality of life of sufferers (and families kept awake by the distress of affected children). The major debate, in the UK, has been about the cost of such newer treatments and, given only finite NHS resources, when they are most appropriate to use.[2] Antibiotics The disruption to the skin's normal barrier protection through dry and cracked skin allows easy entry for bacteria and fungi. Scratching by the patient both introduces infection and spreads it from one area to another. Any skin infection further irritates the skin and a rapid detoriation in the condition may ensue; the appropriate antibiotic should be given. Answered by Tory Brazzi 2 years ago.

well, I've had it for about 2 years, but it typically depends on how bad your eczema is. If it's really bad then they will prescribe an ointment that you apply to the area as needed, but you also have to make sure that you are taking proper care of your skin. You have to be careful to avoid humidity and make sure that take care of your skin even if you don't have a "breakout" Answered by Warren Crate 2 years ago.

Usually cortisone cream. By the way eczema can be an allergic reaction try going to an allergist. Answered by Lorette Kelter 2 years ago.

remember that some sterioids can't be used continuously as they make the skin thinner. You may need to take a break from them after using it for a week or two. Answered by Marylin Bosson 2 years ago.

try Dermatop. its a prescription cream that works really well. Answered by Felicia Broun 2 years ago.

Elidel and Protopic Answered by Mechelle Vassall 2 years ago.

triamcinolone 0.1% cream. i have it and that's what they gave me. but you shouldn't use it on your face. Answered by Wilbur Zambo 2 years ago.


Poisin ivi?
how do you get rid of it fast. Asked by Jona Typhair 2 years ago.

The best remedy I have found is called Diprolene. It used to be by prescription only, but it might be over the counter by now. It kills it in about 3 days. (I am assuming you are talking about a skin reaction to it.) Answered by Dulcie Kai 2 years ago.

they have new products over the counter, that are 2 step processes, i think the first step washes the oils away so it doesn't spread and the second step is for itching, if you have poison ivy really bad see your doctor, they have prescriptions available Answered by Amos Ryon 2 years ago.

good luck just got it a week ago clearing a house lot Answered by Inocencia Plues 2 years ago.

poor vinegar or bleach over the rash and it will dry up faster Answered by Monte Parcells 2 years ago.

predisone dose pak. Answered by Lynelle Encinas 2 years ago.


Is there a homeopathic option instead of the drug my doctor prescribed?
My son's (12 months old) doctor prescribed betamethasone dipropionate and the pharmacist made it sound like this would be dangerous for my Little, lowering levels of cortosone if used over a long period of time and I'm supposed to give it to him twice a day for 3 weeks. It's supposed to help loosen the... Asked by Ngoc Berdy 2 years ago.

My son's (12 months old) doctor prescribed betamethasone dipropionate and the pharmacist made it sound like this would be dangerous for my Little, lowering levels of cortosone if used over a long period of time and I'm supposed to give it to him twice a day for 3 weeks. It's supposed to help loosen the skin that has grown reattached to his penis from his circumcision. (Or they'd have to tear it again and I don't want him to go through that again.) Does anyone know of another safer option? I've put in a call to my doctor and am just waiting to hear back but wondering if anyone else has any knowledge they can share with me. Answered by Gustavo Domebo 2 years ago.

Connor is wrong about using the medication. Your son's doctor is prescribing the perfect medication and is going by the book. It sounds like your son has or is developing phimosis. Using Diprolene (betamethasone dipropionate topical) is a cheap and HIGHLY effective conservative treatment. In guidelines betamethasone is literally the specific treatment of choice. A study conducted in Paris France at l'Hôpital Necker - Enfants Malades (then published in The British Journal of Urology International) found that 85% of young boys responded to using topical corticosteroids for a period of 4-8 weeks and there were no side effects of note in any of the children. Very few treatments of any type can boost such high efficacy and almost zero side effects. And the alternative is surgery and that will cost more, it will be very hard on you and very unpleasant for him, and there are a lot more complications that could happen. I don't know what your pharmacist said but that is a very safe medication. Even if you need to use it longer it is safe and your son's doctor has examined him and in his clinical judgement he clearly feels using the medication is safe. Yes corticosteroids can lower levels of cortisol because corticosteroids cause adrenal suppression. Basically corticosteroid medication takes the place of naturally occurring cortisol. To regulate the amount of corticosteroids (natural and synthetic) the body will stop synthesizing natural corticosteroids. HOWEVER your son will be using a topical cream and three weeks in NOT a long time. If he were taking an ORAL medication like prednisone after about 7 days adrenal suppression would begin to occur and he would need to gradually tapper off over a couple of days. In some RARE cases with topical medication swelling can occur once the medication is discontinued (rebound inflammation) so his doctor may ask you to reduce how often you apply it for a few days after his treatment to avoid any problems (but it is not likely to be needed). In any case side effects of any type are unlikely and it is a smart idea to try this method. People take topical and oral corticosteroids all the time and almost all do fine. Even if physical dependency to corticosteroids occur it is not a problem as long as it is reduced slowly. Also physical dependency is not addiction just incase that is unclear. And speaking as someone who had the same problem as your son, I did have to have the surgery (phimosis can become very painful) at about age 14y and it is not a very pleasant experience. I only wish my doctor had mentioned topical medication when I was younger. Your son with thank you, even if it does not work at least you tried. And for the record homeopathy has been conclusively disproved. The World Health Organization (WHO), The Parliament of The United Kingdom, The British National Health Service, The American Medical Association, Office fédéral de la santé publique (Swiss government), and many more governments and agencies have definitively stated that homeopathy has no medical value aside from a possibly placebo effect. It is safe, it just won't help. Answered by Yvette Toan 2 years ago.

Homeopathy has been shown to be completly Ineffictive. Topical steroids are only a problem in the long term, for 3/52 should be quite safe Answered by Darby Swansen 2 years ago.

Certainly, if you wish to use something that doesn't actually have any effect. Mind you, doing nothing or something homeopathic, which amounts to much the same thing, isn't likely to be safer for your son. Still, it's your choice and his problem. Answered by Napoleon Hartness 2 years ago.

A cream isn't going to detach skin, and the safest option would have been to leave the child alone to begin with. Seeing as he's already in the situation the best thing to do would be to take him to a specialist. The skin will need to be detached mannually, the skin should be retracted at every diaper change untill the child is three years old. -Connor Answered by Landon Nasalroad 2 years ago.

You are talking about your son's penis. You should listen to the doctor. Answered by Noel Pajak 2 years ago.


Is clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream pretty much the same as diprolene cream?
Asked by Kathaleen Hiskey 2 years ago.

The first cream is a combination of an antifungal agent and the same cortisone product as what's in the diprolene cream. So, in that sense, the cortisone product part of it is the same. Answered by Macy Crossan 2 years ago.


I was just prescribed betamethasone (for Diprolene) for my hair loss.?
Has anyone else been prescribed this and how long does it take to show results? I am a 24 y/o female with thick, long hair. The dermatologist said it is temporary hair thinning in the crown of my head due to low iron and mainly stress. (I'm a senior in college, finals coming up, worrying about grad school, etc... Asked by Margherita Hadcock 2 years ago.

Has anyone else been prescribed this and how long does it take to show results? I am a 24 y/o female with thick, long hair. The dermatologist said it is temporary hair thinning in the crown of my head due to low iron and mainly stress. (I'm a senior in college, finals coming up, worrying about grad school, etc ...) The hair thinning is stressfull as well. Any info on this medicine would be appreciated. Thanks! Answered by Reena Nette 2 years ago.


What would you like to ask?my dog ate some diprolene cream what should my concerns be?
Asked by Lou Youse 2 years ago.

Check the ingredients on the label. You can also call the animal poison control center at 888 426-4435. There will be a $65.00 charge placed against your credit card. This is not the place to come for advice. You'll get incorrect info from 12 years old who aren't even old enough to be on this site, and who can't even spell correctly. Here's a good example: Their dog "ate or DRANKS a whol bottle of TYLONAL and they suggested giving HYDRONGYNE perioxide. That would be Tylenol and HYDROGEN. Answered by Dung Bishoff 2 years ago.

"There would probably be more risk with the tube than the contents. Single very large doses of cortisone (betamethasone) are well tolerated by dogs. She has probably received only a clinical dose. She may show a common cortisone side effect of an increased thirst over the next 24-48 hours. Don't be concerned about that. Sometimes a little panting too. The carrier ingredients in the ointment (glycols, etc) can sometimes cause some diarrhea or vomiting. I would have expected the vomioting by now. the daiarrhea can occur a bit later. Nothing at all to worry about. Small fragments of the plastic tube shoukld pass ok. Regards, PeterDr Pete" Answered by Lorenzo Thanpaeng 2 years ago.


Is there an over the counter alternative to the prescription medication betamethasone dipropionate?
Asked by Rachal Guebert 2 years ago.

Diprolene (betamethasone dipropionate) is a highly potent steroid cream used for severe rashes, eczema, etc. The only available OTC alternative steroid is Hydrocortisone 1%--but this is very weak compared to Diprolene, about 1/100th the potency. Answered by Sherril Shugars 2 years ago.

Betamethasone Over The Counter Answered by Anjelica Kubicki 2 years ago.

Betamethasone Cream Over The Counter Answered by Joye Bottrell 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Is there an over the counter alternative to the prescription medication betamethasone dipropionate? Answered by Risa Mcmillian 2 years ago.

I don't have health insurance and last time I did it didn't cover anything. I need an over the counter solution now after 2 years the situation has returned. Answered by Yahaira Wailes 2 years ago.

Check with your doctor, or in some states your pharmacist can help (in other states, the pharmacist is not allowed to help you decide - he/she simply needs to fill the prescription as written). If cost is the issue, check out on online drug finder such as the one below. Answered by Leila Radde 2 years ago.


Can anyone tell me 5 medications related to the integumentary system?
Asked by Lloyd Dave 2 years ago.

Lamisil, Triamcinolone, Kwell, Diprolene, any antibiotic cream Answered by Marilynn Moneypenny 2 years ago.


What prescriptions do doctors give for eczema?
Asked by Epifania Labella 2 years ago.

Try Diprolene first. It's a topical corticosteriod. Ointment works better than cream. Answered by Emelina Schuber 2 years ago.

I am an atopic dermatitis patient with over 40 years of experience;these are what I have used: 1.Prescription strength hydrocortisone cream,aka corticosteroid. 2.Prednisone,shot or pills. Not recommended because the steroid lasts for as long as you use it and the rash comes back after a few days.Then you are left with the side effects(blood does not clot well). 3.Lidex ointment.A little stronger then hydrocortisone. 4.ProtopicBIG MISTAKE.It burned;I hated it and went back to hydrocortisone.Lucky for me since Protopic and it's cousin Elidel are under investigation for CAUSING AN INCREASED RISK OF SKIN CANCER.No one should use these medicines until the testing has been completed and the medicines are absolutely cleared of uping skin cancer risk. You should also take an antihistamine pill;over-the-counter or prescription. My dermatologist used to make up a special moisturizing formula of hydrocortisone.It's now available in non-prescription Cortaid with moisturizers.Over the years I have found that Cortaid or the one-percent prescription hydrocortisone cream are the best bets.My worst flareup lasted for four years straight and I was on prescription meds the whole time.Some rashes just take a long time to burn out;I found out that good grooming...using Cetaphil cleansers and moisturizer,the moisturizers frequently during the day,with the hydrocortisone just two to three times a day,were enough to deal with the rash...not stressing about it and knowing that you are taking good care of your sensitive skin is really important when dealing with bothersome eczema. Answered by Hai Olazabal 2 years ago.

Itch Relief Antihistamine medication may reduce the itch during a flare up of ezcema, and the reduced scratching in turn reduces damage & irritation to the skin (the Itch cycle). Capsaicin applied to the skin acts as a counter irritant (see Gate control theory of nerve signal transmission). Other agents that act on nerve transmissions, like menthol, also have been found to mitigate the body's itch signals, providing some relief. Whilst research has suggested Naloxone hydrochloride and dibucaine suppress the itch cycle in atopic-dermatitis model mice. Corticosteroids Dermatitis is often treated by doctors with prescribed Glucocorticoid (a corticosteroid steroid) ointments or creams. For mild-moderate eczema a weak steroid may be used (e.g. Hydrocortisone or Desonide), whilst more severe cases require a higher-potency steroid (e.g. Clobetasol propionate). They are highly effective in most cases, but must be used sparingly to avoid possible side effects, the most significant of which is that their prolonged use can cause the skin to thin and become fragile (atrophy). High strength steroids used over large areas may be significantly absorbed into the body causing bone demineralisation (osteoporosis). Finally by their immunosuppression action they can, if used alone, exacerbate some skin infections (fungal or viral). If using on the face, only a low strength steroid should be used and care must be taken to avoid the eyes. Hence a steroid of an appropriate strength to promptly settle an episode of eczema should be sparingly applied. Once the desired response has been achieved, it should be discontinued and not used for long-term prevention. Immunomodulators Topical immunomodulators like pimecrolimus (Elidel® and Douglan®) and tacrolimus (Protopic®) were developed after corticosteroid treatments, effectively suppressing the immune system in the affected area, and appear to yield better results in some populations. The US Food and Drug Administration has issued a public health advisory about the possible risk of lymph node or skin cancer from use of these products, but many professional medical organizations disagree with the FDA's findings: * The postulation is that the immune system may help remove some pre-cancerous abnormal cells which is prevented by these drugs. However, any chronic inflammatory condition such as eczema, by the very nature of increased metabolism and cell replication, has a tiny associated risk of cancer (see Bowen's disease). * Current practice by UK dermatologists [1] is not to consider this a significant real concern and they are increasingly recommending the use of these new drugs. The dramatic improvement on the condition can significantly improve the quality of life of sufferers (and families kept awake by the distress of affected children). The major debate, in the UK, has been about the cost of such newer treatments and, given only finite NHS resources, when they are most appropriate to use.[2] Antibiotics The disruption to the skin's normal barrier protection through dry and cracked skin allows easy entry for bacteria and fungi. Scratching by the patient both introduces infection and spreads it from one area to another. Any skin infection further irritates the skin and a rapid detoriation in the condition may ensue; the appropriate antibiotic should be given. Answered by Elia Podbielski 2 years ago.

well, I've had it for about 2 years, but it typically depends on how bad your eczema is. If it's really bad then they will prescribe an ointment that you apply to the area as needed, but you also have to make sure that you are taking proper care of your skin. You have to be careful to avoid humidity and make sure that take care of your skin even if you don't have a "breakout" Answered by Hilario Colian 2 years ago.

Usually cortisone cream. By the way eczema can be an allergic reaction try going to an allergist. Answered by Mervin Wenzell 2 years ago.

remember that some sterioids can't be used continuously as they make the skin thinner. You may need to take a break from them after using it for a week or two. Answered by Harmony Vyhnal 2 years ago.

try Dermatop. its a prescription cream that works really well. Answered by Clair Lastinger 2 years ago.

Elidel and Protopic Answered by Mac Espada 2 years ago.

triamcinolone 0.1% cream. i have it and that's what they gave me. but you shouldn't use it on your face. Answered by Jake Tremmel 2 years ago.


Poisin ivi?
how do you get rid of it fast. Asked by Isobel Stabler 2 years ago.

The best remedy I have found is called Diprolene. It used to be by prescription only, but it might be over the counter by now. It kills it in about 3 days. (I am assuming you are talking about a skin reaction to it.) Answered by Asuncion Sapara 2 years ago.

they have new products over the counter, that are 2 step processes, i think the first step washes the oils away so it doesn't spread and the second step is for itching, if you have poison ivy really bad see your doctor, they have prescriptions available Answered by Sean Catrambone 2 years ago.

good luck just got it a week ago clearing a house lot Answered by Jamaal Inabnit 2 years ago.

poor vinegar or bleach over the rash and it will dry up faster Answered by Karie Seegar 2 years ago.

predisone dose pak. Answered by Marth Kovich 2 years ago.


Is there a homeopathic option instead of the drug my doctor prescribed?
My son's (12 months old) doctor prescribed betamethasone dipropionate and the pharmacist made it sound like this would be dangerous for my Little, lowering levels of cortosone if used over a long period of time and I'm supposed to give it to him twice a day for 3 weeks. It's supposed to help loosen the... Asked by Rafael Ocker 2 years ago.

My son's (12 months old) doctor prescribed betamethasone dipropionate and the pharmacist made it sound like this would be dangerous for my Little, lowering levels of cortosone if used over a long period of time and I'm supposed to give it to him twice a day for 3 weeks. It's supposed to help loosen the skin that has grown reattached to his penis from his circumcision. (Or they'd have to tear it again and I don't want him to go through that again.) Does anyone know of another safer option? I've put in a call to my doctor and am just waiting to hear back but wondering if anyone else has any knowledge they can share with me. Answered by Brendan Anecelle 2 years ago.

Connor is wrong about using the medication. Your son's doctor is prescribing the perfect medication and is going by the book. It sounds like your son has or is developing phimosis. Using Diprolene (betamethasone dipropionate topical) is a cheap and HIGHLY effective conservative treatment. In guidelines betamethasone is literally the specific treatment of choice. A study conducted in Paris France at l'Hôpital Necker - Enfants Malades (then published in The British Journal of Urology International) found that 85% of young boys responded to using topical corticosteroids for a period of 4-8 weeks and there were no side effects of note in any of the children. Very few treatments of any type can boost such high efficacy and almost zero side effects. And the alternative is surgery and that will cost more, it will be very hard on you and very unpleasant for him, and there are a lot more complications that could happen. I don't know what your pharmacist said but that is a very safe medication. Even if you need to use it longer it is safe and your son's doctor has examined him and in his clinical judgement he clearly feels using the medication is safe. Yes corticosteroids can lower levels of cortisol because corticosteroids cause adrenal suppression. Basically corticosteroid medication takes the place of naturally occurring cortisol. To regulate the amount of corticosteroids (natural and synthetic) the body will stop synthesizing natural corticosteroids. HOWEVER your son will be using a topical cream and three weeks in NOT a long time. If he were taking an ORAL medication like prednisone after about 7 days adrenal suppression would begin to occur and he would need to gradually tapper off over a couple of days. In some RARE cases with topical medication swelling can occur once the medication is discontinued (rebound inflammation) so his doctor may ask you to reduce how often you apply it for a few days after his treatment to avoid any problems (but it is not likely to be needed). In any case side effects of any type are unlikely and it is a smart idea to try this method. People take topical and oral corticosteroids all the time and almost all do fine. Even if physical dependency to corticosteroids occur it is not a problem as long as it is reduced slowly. Also physical dependency is not addiction just incase that is unclear. And speaking as someone who had the same problem as your son, I did have to have the surgery (phimosis can become very painful) at about age 14y and it is not a very pleasant experience. I only wish my doctor had mentioned topical medication when I was younger. Your son with thank you, even if it does not work at least you tried. And for the record homeopathy has been conclusively disproved. The World Health Organization (WHO), The Parliament of The United Kingdom, The British National Health Service, The American Medical Association, Office fédéral de la santé publique (Swiss government), and many more governments and agencies have definitively stated that homeopathy has no medical value aside from a possibly placebo effect. It is safe, it just won't help. Answered by Lala Mynnerlyn 2 years ago.

Homeopathy has been shown to be completly Ineffictive. Topical steroids are only a problem in the long term, for 3/52 should be quite safe Answered by Fannie Balson 2 years ago.

Certainly, if you wish to use something that doesn't actually have any effect. Mind you, doing nothing or something homeopathic, which amounts to much the same thing, isn't likely to be safer for your son. Still, it's your choice and his problem. Answered by Neida Goley 2 years ago.

A cream isn't going to detach skin, and the safest option would have been to leave the child alone to begin with. Seeing as he's already in the situation the best thing to do would be to take him to a specialist. The skin will need to be detached mannually, the skin should be retracted at every diaper change untill the child is three years old. -Connor Answered by Ezra Hooper 2 years ago.

You are talking about your son's penis. You should listen to the doctor. Answered by Neda Dossous 2 years ago.


Is clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream pretty much the same as diprolene cream?
Asked by Terry Reier 2 years ago.

The first cream is a combination of an antifungal agent and the same cortisone product as what's in the diprolene cream. So, in that sense, the cortisone product part of it is the same. Answered by Danilo Brinda 2 years ago.


I was just prescribed betamethasone (for Diprolene) for my hair loss.?
Has anyone else been prescribed this and how long does it take to show results? I am a 24 y/o female with thick, long hair. The dermatologist said it is temporary hair thinning in the crown of my head due to low iron and mainly stress. (I'm a senior in college, finals coming up, worrying about grad school, etc... Asked by Jarvis Carlo 2 years ago.

Has anyone else been prescribed this and how long does it take to show results? I am a 24 y/o female with thick, long hair. The dermatologist said it is temporary hair thinning in the crown of my head due to low iron and mainly stress. (I'm a senior in college, finals coming up, worrying about grad school, etc ...) The hair thinning is stressfull as well. Any info on this medicine would be appreciated. Thanks! Answered by Jaye Dickhaut 2 years ago.


What would you like to ask?my dog ate some diprolene cream what should my concerns be?
Asked by Arthur Leigers 2 years ago.

Check the ingredients on the label. You can also call the animal poison control center at 888 426-4435. There will be a $65.00 charge placed against your credit card. This is not the place to come for advice. You'll get incorrect info from 12 years old who aren't even old enough to be on this site, and who can't even spell correctly. Here's a good example: Their dog "ate or DRANKS a whol bottle of TYLONAL and they suggested giving HYDRONGYNE perioxide. That would be Tylenol and HYDROGEN. Answered by Dirk Wilbers 2 years ago.

"There would probably be more risk with the tube than the contents. Single very large doses of cortisone (betamethasone) are well tolerated by dogs. She has probably received only a clinical dose. She may show a common cortisone side effect of an increased thirst over the next 24-48 hours. Don't be concerned about that. Sometimes a little panting too. The carrier ingredients in the ointment (glycols, etc) can sometimes cause some diarrhea or vomiting. I would have expected the vomioting by now. the daiarrhea can occur a bit later. Nothing at all to worry about. Small fragments of the plastic tube shoukld pass ok. Regards, PeterDr Pete" Answered by Leisa Kavaney 2 years ago.


Is there an over the counter alternative to the prescription medication betamethasone dipropionate?
Asked by Dannie Hermens 2 years ago.

Diprolene (betamethasone dipropionate) is a highly potent steroid cream used for severe rashes, eczema, etc. The only available OTC alternative steroid is Hydrocortisone 1%--but this is very weak compared to Diprolene, about 1/100th the potency. Answered by Joe Emlay 2 years ago.

Betamethasone Over The Counter Answered by Shenita Daponte 2 years ago.

Betamethasone Cream Over The Counter Answered by Kiesha Honse 2 years ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Is there an over the counter alternative to the prescription medication betamethasone dipropionate? Answered by Monty Gazzara 2 years ago.

I don't have health insurance and last time I did it didn't cover anything. I need an over the counter solution now after 2 years the situation has returned. Answered by Germaine Lowthorp 2 years ago.

Check with your doctor, or in some states your pharmacist can help (in other states, the pharmacist is not allowed to help you decide - he/she simply needs to fill the prescription as written). If cost is the issue, check out on online drug finder such as the one below. Answered by Cyndy Whitsett 2 years ago.


Can anyone tell me 5 medications related to the integumentary system?
Asked by Jefferey Cuffe 2 years ago.

Lamisil, Triamcinolone, Kwell, Diprolene, any antibiotic cream Answered by Kristian Nasalroad 2 years ago.


What prescriptions do doctors give for eczema?
Asked by Morton Krassow 2 years ago.

Try Diprolene first. It's a topical corticosteriod. Ointment works better than cream. Answered by Sammy Ehrgott 2 years ago.

I am an atopic dermatitis patient with over 40 years of experience;these are what I have used: 1.Prescription strength hydrocortisone cream,aka corticosteroid. 2.Prednisone,shot or pills. Not recommended because the steroid lasts for as long as you use it and the rash comes back after a few days.Then you are left with the side effects(blood does not clot well). 3.Lidex ointment.A little stronger then hydrocortisone. 4.ProtopicBIG MISTAKE.It burned;I hated it and went back to hydrocortisone.Lucky for me since Protopic and it's cousin Elidel are under investigation for CAUSING AN INCREASED RISK OF SKIN CANCER.No one should use these medicines until the testing has been completed and the medicines are absolutely cleared of uping skin cancer risk. You should also take an antihistamine pill;over-the-counter or prescription. My dermatologist used to make up a special moisturizing formula of hydrocortisone.It's now available in non-prescription Cortaid with moisturizers.Over the years I have found that Cortaid or the one-percent prescription hydrocortisone cream are the best bets.My worst flareup lasted for four years straight and I was on prescription meds the whole time.Some rashes just take a long time to burn out;I found out that good grooming...using Cetaphil cleansers and moisturizer,the moisturizers frequently during the day,with the hydrocortisone just two to three times a day,were enough to deal with the rash...not stressing about it and knowing that you are taking good care of your sensitive skin is really important when dealing with bothersome eczema. Answered by Taisha Poto 2 years ago.

Itch Relief Antihistamine medication may reduce the itch during a flare up of ezcema, and the reduced scratching in turn reduces damage & irritation to the skin (the Itch cycle). Capsaicin applied to the skin acts as a counter irritant (see Gate control theory of nerve signal transmission). Other agents that act on nerve transmissions, like menthol, also have been found to mitigate the body's itch signals, providing some relief. Whilst research has suggested Naloxone hydrochloride and dibucaine suppress the itch cycle in atopic-dermatitis model mice. Corticosteroids Dermatitis is often treated by doctors with prescribed Glucocorticoid (a corticosteroid steroid) ointments or creams. For mild-moderate eczema a weak steroid may be used (e.g. Hydrocortisone or Desonide), whilst more severe cases require a higher-potency steroid (e.g. Clobetasol propionate). They are highly effective in most cases, but must be used sparingly to avoid possible side effects, the most significant of which is that their prolonged use can cause the skin to thin and become fragile (atrophy). High strength steroids used over large areas may be significantly absorbed into the body causing bone demineralisation (osteoporosis). Finally by their immunosuppression action they can, if used alone, exacerbate some skin infections (fungal or viral). If using on the face, only a low strength steroid should be used and care must be taken to avoid the eyes. Hence a steroid of an appropriate strength to promptly settle an episode of eczema should be sparingly applied. Once the desired response has been achieved, it should be discontinued and not used for long-term prevention. Immunomodulators Topical immunomodulators like pimecrolimus (Elidel® and Douglan®) and tacrolimus (Protopic®) were developed after corticosteroid treatments, effectively suppressing the immune system in the affected area, and appear to yield better results in some populations. The US Food and Drug Administration has issued a public health advisory about the possible risk of lymph node or skin cancer from use of these products, but many professional medical organizations disagree with the FDA's findings: * The postulation is that the immune system may help remove some pre-cancerous abnormal cells which is prevented by these drugs. However, any chronic inflammatory condition such as eczema, by the very nature of increased metabolism and cell replication, has a tiny associated risk of cancer (see Bowen's disease). * Current practice by UK dermatologists [1] is not to consider this a significant real concern and they are increasingly recommending the use of these new drugs. The dramatic improvement on the condition can significantly improve the quality of life of sufferers (and families kept awake by the distress of affected children). The major debate, in the UK, has been about the cost of such newer treatments and, given only finite NHS resources, when they are most appropriate to use.[2] Antibiotics The disruption to the skin's normal barrier protection through dry and cracked skin allows easy entry for bacteria and fungi. Scratching by the patient both introduces infection and spreads it from one area to another. Any skin infection further irritates the skin and a rapid detoriation in the condition may ensue; the appropriate antibiotic should be given. Answered by Fransisca Marten 2 years ago.

well, I've had it for about 2 years, but it typically depends on how bad your eczema is. If it's really bad then they will prescribe an ointment that you apply to the area as needed, but you also have to make sure that you are taking proper care of your skin. You have to be careful to avoid humidity and make sure that take care of your skin even if you don't have a "breakout" Answered by Melida Bingert 2 years ago.

Usually cortisone cream. By the way eczema can be an allergic reaction try going to an allergist. Answered by Buddy Salassi 2 years ago.

remember that some sterioids can't be used continuously as they make the skin thinner. You may need to take a break from them after using it for a week or two. Answered by Ernestina Bure 2 years ago.

try Dermatop. its a prescription cream that works really well. Answered by Jamila Gauwain 2 years ago.

Elidel and Protopic Answered by Princess Lips 2 years ago.

triamcinolone 0.1% cream. i have it and that's what they gave me. but you shouldn't use it on your face. Answered by Domenica Barkman 2 years ago.


Poisin ivi?
how do you get rid of it fast. Asked by Juliette Mirabito 2 years ago.

The best remedy I have found is called Diprolene. It used to be by prescription only, but it might be over the counter by now. It kills it in about 3 days. (I am assuming you are talking about a skin reaction to it.) Answered by Lucille Friddle 2 years ago.

they have new products over the counter, that are 2 step processes, i think the first step washes the oils away so it doesn't spread and the second step is for itching, if you have poison ivy really bad see your doctor, they have prescriptions available Answered by Alejandra Dachelet 2 years ago.

good luck just got it a week ago clearing a house lot Answered by Monika Lipner 2 years ago.

poor vinegar or bleach over the rash and it will dry up faster Answered by Linda Curtis 2 years ago.

predisone dose pak. Answered by Shizuko Gabossi 2 years ago.


Is there a homeopathic option instead of the drug my doctor prescribed?
My son's (12 months old) doctor prescribed betamethasone dipropionate and the pharmacist made it sound like this would be dangerous for my Little, lowering levels of cortosone if used over a long period of time and I'm supposed to give it to him twice a day for 3 weeks. It's supposed to help loosen the... Asked by Loris Baklund 2 years ago.

My son's (12 months old) doctor prescribed betamethasone dipropionate and the pharmacist made it sound like this would be dangerous for my Little, lowering levels of cortosone if used over a long period of time and I'm supposed to give it to him twice a day for 3 weeks. It's supposed to help loosen the skin that has grown reattached to his penis from his circumcision. (Or they'd have to tear it again and I don't want him to go through that again.) Does anyone know of another safer option? I've put in a call to my doctor and am just waiting to hear back but wondering if anyone else has any knowledge they can share with me. Answered by Malorie Ardelean 2 years ago.

Connor is wrong about using the medication. Your son's doctor is prescribing the perfect medication and is going by the book. It sounds like your son has or is developing phimosis. Using Diprolene (betamethasone dipropionate topical) is a cheap and HIGHLY effective conservative treatment. In guidelines betamethasone is literally the specific treatment of choice. A study conducted in Paris France at l'Hôpital Necker - Enfants Malades (then published in The British Journal of Urology International) found that 85% of young boys responded to using topical corticosteroids for a period of 4-8 weeks and there were no side effects of note in any of the children. Very few treatments of any type can boost such high efficacy and almost zero side effects. And the alternative is surgery and that will cost more, it will be very hard on you and very unpleasant for him, and there are a lot more complications that could happen. I don't know what your pharmacist said but that is a very safe medication. Even if you need to use it longer it is safe and your son's doctor has examined him and in his clinical judgement he clearly feels using the medication is safe. Yes corticosteroids can lower levels of cortisol because corticosteroids cause adrenal suppression. Basically corticosteroid medication takes the place of naturally occurring cortisol. To regulate the amount of corticosteroids (natural and synthetic) the body will stop synthesizing natural corticosteroids. HOWEVER your son will be using a topical cream and three weeks in NOT a long time. If he were taking an ORAL medication like prednisone after about 7 days adrenal suppression would begin to occur and he would need to gradually tapper off over a couple of days. In some RARE cases with topical medication swelling can occur once the medication is discontinued (rebound inflammation) so his doctor may ask you to reduce how often you apply it for a few days after his treatment to avoid any problems (but it is not likely to be needed). In any case side effects of any type are unlikely and it is a smart idea to try this method. People take topical and oral corticosteroids all the time and almost all do fine. Even if physical dependency to corticosteroids occur it is not a problem as long as it is reduced slowly. Also physical dependency is not addiction just incase that is unclear. And speaking as someone who had the same problem as your son, I did have to have the surgery (phimosis can become very painful) at about age 14y and it is not a very pleasant experience. I only wish my doctor had mentioned topical medication when I was younger. Your son with thank you, even if it does not work at least you tried. And for the record homeopathy has been conclusively disproved. The World Health Organization (WHO), The Parliament of The United Kingdom, The British National Health Service, The American Medical Association, Office fédéral de la santé publique (Swiss government), and many more governments and agencies have definitively stated that homeopathy has no medical value aside from a possibly placebo effect. It is safe, it just won't help. Answered by Oliva Scarola 2 years ago.

Homeopathy has been shown to be completly Ineffictive. Topical steroids are only a problem in the long term, for 3/52 should be quite safe Answered by Devorah Ashing 2 years ago.

Certainly, if you wish to use something that doesn't actually have any effect. Mind you, doing nothing or something homeopathic, which amounts to much the same thing, isn't likely to be safer for your son. Still, it's your choice and his problem. Answered by Helene Ransdell 2 years ago.

A cream isn't going to detach skin, and the safest option would have been to leave the child alone to begin with. Seeing as he's already in the situation the best thing to do would be to take him to a specialist. The skin will need to be detached mannually, the skin should be retracted at every diaper change untill the child is three years old. -Connor Answered by Nancy Giffee 2 years ago.

You are talking about your son's penis. You should listen to the doctor. Answered by Enda Gragg 2 years ago.


Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - All rights reserved