DIPENTUM Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019715/001.

Names and composition

"DIPENTUM" is the commercial name of a drug composed of OLSALAZINE SODIUM.

Answered questions

Has Dipentum been discontinued? I have been prescribed it and the pharmacy says it is no longer available.?
Asked by Cornell Espree 3 months ago.

I can't find any reference to it's discontinuation....might be that your pharmacy can't get it for one reason or another. You might try calling other pharmacies, the generic name for it is Olsalazine. Answered by Monty Taitt 3 months ago.


Is it normal for Ulcerative Colitis drugs to cause pain?
To answer the first question below, yes, we are pretty sure it's Ulcerative Colitis. I had two different doctors give me two colonoscopies five years apart from each other and they both said it looks like UC. Plus, I once also took Remicade (which is used to treat Crohn's) and that didn't work for... Asked by Gwendolyn Catalanatto 3 months ago.

I've taken Asacol, Dipentum, Lialda and Colazal and all these drugs make me have bad stomach cramps, really bad smelling gas, and an urgency to run to the bathroom every few hours. When I am taken off these drugs, I feel fine. However, my doctor says that I need to stay on them. Are these drug interactions normal? Answered by Verna Pedrosa 3 months ago.

To answer the first question below, yes, we are pretty sure it's Ulcerative Colitis. I had two different doctors give me two colonoscopies five years apart from each other and they both said it looks like UC. Plus, I once also took Remicade (which is used to treat Crohn's) and that didn't work for me either. Answered by Genoveva Hecker 3 months ago.

Is the diagnosis of Ulcerative Colitis definite? My Dr originally thought I had Ulcerative Colitis, but it turned out to be Crohn's Disease, and when I was on the drugs for Ulcerative Colitis, I had those same symptoms. (turns out alot of people with CD have awful smelling gas as a result of the disease). It is sometimes difficult for the diagnosis, because CD and UC are so similar. Just some food for thought... Answered by Gwenn Heffron 3 months ago.


Ulcerative Colitis question?
When I am off all medication, I feel great. My body rejects just about all meds such as asacol, dipentum and lialda. However, my doctor tells me that I should keep taking meds otherwise, I will likely develop colon cancer. I had a colonoscopy three months ago and found that I have moderate ulcerative colitis. ... Asked by Vickey Whitledge 3 months ago.

When I am off all medication, I feel great. My body rejects just about all meds such as asacol, dipentum and lialda. However, my doctor tells me that I should keep taking meds otherwise, I will likely develop colon cancer. I had a colonoscopy three months ago and found that I have moderate ulcerative colitis. Should I keep taking the medication that makes me feel bad? Answered by Earlene Ports 3 months ago.

My mum had ulcerativie colitis. She was allergic to all the medications and could not take them, and the condition ended up severe. She had her large intestine removed and a ileostomy bag for a year, then had an operation to create a 'pouch' and rejoin everything up. She now has a lot of problems with a tightening of her small intestine and food getting stuck, which results in severe pain and vomiting and sometimes hospital admittance. There are a lot of things she can't eat and most of her food has to be mashed up so that she can digest it. I think if she could have taken the medication rather than have gone through what she has, she would've done. Considering that colon cancer could not only result in the removal of your colon, like what happened with my mum, but your death, then you should take the medication. Talk to your Doctor again, they may be able to help with the problems you have with it. Answered by Rosamond Marrable 3 months ago.

I had severe UC during college and I also had issues with medications. I found that I felt like crap if I took meds but then against the wishes of my doctor I took myself off all meds. I was even worse off without them though. Of course I eventually opted to get the surgery to remove my large intestine as well. I had the bag for three months while the newly created J-pouch was healing. I am now two years post surgery and my life is much better now. I was a lucky one that after surgery I can still eat what I want and only go to the restroom 4-6 times a day. But while I was on my meds the year before surgery I was going around 10 times a day so still an improvement. Check with your doctor about new meds and explain that the old ones are causing you excessive pain. I hope that yours stays moderate and you never have need for surgery. Good luck with everything! Answered by Cordelia Qua 3 months ago.

Maybe you should consider implications or considerations on each medication. Such as should I take this one on an empty stomach or with food. These factors could make a difference on how your body responds to them. If you don't want the disease process to become severe and possibly develop into cancer, I would do what your doctor recommends. Answered by Josie Esmont 3 months ago.


What are some alternatives to Prednisone for Crohn's Disease?
After having abdominal pain for some time and recent blood in my stool I had a colonoscopy and endoscopy yesterday. The doctor believes I have Crohn's disease and has prescribed Prednisone. After reading about this drug I do not want to take it, what are some alternative treatments I can ask about? Asked by Kyong Juras 3 months ago.

I am so sorry about your diagosis. The side effects of long term prednisone use are serious. You doctor is going to keep you on prednisone for a short period of time. There are several other treatment options available for crohn's disease, which have minimum side effects. Hopefully you will be in remission in short period of time. Next time you visit you doctor discuss the following options with him/her. Treatment Options: Anti-Inflammation Drugs. Most people are first treated with drugs containing mesalamine, a substance that helps control inflammation. Sulfasalazine is the most commonly used of these drugs. Patients who do not benefit from it or who cannot tolerate it may be put on other mesalamine-containing drugs, generally known as 5-ASA agents, such as Asacol, Dipentum, or Pentasa. Possible side effects of mesalamine-containing drugs include nausea, vomiting, heartburn, diarrhea, and headache. Cortisone or Steroids. Cortisone drugs and steroids—called corticosteriods—provide very effective results. Prednisone is a common generic name of one of the drugs in this group of medications. In the beginning, when the disease it at its worst, prednisone is usually prescribed in a large dose. The dosage is then lowered once symptoms have been controlled. These drugs can cause serious side effects, including greater susceptibility to infection. Immune System Suppressors. Drugs that suppress the immune system are also used to treat Crohn’s disease. Most commonly prescribed are 6-mercaptopurine or a related drug, azathioprine. Immunosuppressive agents work by blocking the immune reaction that contributes to inflammation. These drugs may cause side effects like nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea and may lower a person’s resistance to infection. When patients are treated with a combination of corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs, the dose of corticosteroids may eventually be lowered. Some studies suggest that immunosuppressive drugs may enhance the effectiveness of corticosteroids. Infliximab (Remicade). This drug is the first of a group of medications that blocks the body’s inflammation response. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the drug for the treatment of moderate to severe Crohn’s disease that does not respond to standard therapies (mesalamine substances, corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents) and for the treatment of open, draining fistulas. Infliximab, the first treatment approved specifically for Crohn’s disease is a TNF substance. Additional research will need to be done in order to fully understand the range of treatments Remicade may offer to help people with Crohn’s disease. Antibiotics. Antibiotics are used to treat bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine caused by stricture, fistulas, or prior surgery. For this common problem, the doctor may prescribe one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, sulfonamide, cephalosporin, tetracycline, or metronidazole. Anti-Diarrheal and Fluid Replacements. Diarrhea and crampy abdominal pain are often relieved when the inflammation subsides, but additional medication may also be necessary. Several antidiarrheal agents could be used, including diphenoxylate, loperamide, and codeine. Patients who are dehydrated because of diarrhea will be treated with fluids and electrolytes. Nutrition Supplementation The doctor may recommend nutritional supplements, especially for children whose growth has been slowed. Special high-calorie liquid formulas are sometimes used for this purpose. A small number of patients may need to be fed intravenously for a brief time through a small tube inserted into the vein of the arm. This procedure can help patients who need extra nutrition temporarily, those whose intestines need to rest, or those whose intestines cannot absorb enough nutrition from food. There are no known foods that cause Crohn’s disease. However, when people are suffering a flare in disease, foods such as bulky grains, hot spices, alcohol, and milk products may increase diarrhea and cramping. Answered by Carter Cheevers 3 months ago.

Alternatives To Prednisone Answered by Arica Bronn 3 months ago.

Prednisone Alternatives Answered by Johanna Ketron 3 months ago.

hi reese, i am a female crohn's pt. for 28 yrs. Most GIs are not using prednisone any more seeing as it causes serious side effects if one is on them for more than 1 yr. Entocort is the replacement for it b/c it doesn't have any of the side effects like steroids. I've been on it for over 8 yrs. and have had no side effects whatsoever. Ask your GI if you can take it or other newer treatments: Remicade, Humira, 6MP, or Imuran. For more information, check out the crohn's and colitis foundation's site. They have updated stuff on newer treatments, their side effects, how it works, diet, surgery, coping skills, as well as a live chat & hotline that is run by healthcare experts. There is also an open forum where you can post questions to others in the same situation. You have that right as a pt. to ask about other treatments. You can even get a 2nd opinion if your GI doesn't want to use the newer medications. Definitely look into CCFA's site and hotline. Talk to a healthcare expert before making a choice in your care. Feel free to email me w/questions. My heart goes out to you. I understand where you are coming from and I know it stinks. Best of luck and wishing you a life long remission. :) Answered by Darin Sicheneder 3 months ago.

Honestly...Prednisone if you're in a flare is GREAT...yes, the side effects are not all the nice...first rule of thumb when taking Prednisone...LIMIT YOUR SALT intake...this is because Prednsione alone make you retain water...adding more salt in your diet while on it will make you retain more water which in result...you'll gain more weight...Honestly, the only other drug you can do would be Entocort..it has the same approach as Prednsione and also in the same family as Prednisone...which has lesser side effects...Plus, it's 9mg a day of Entocort vs 20-30mg of Prednisone...really, just watch your salt intake and you will get hungry and will stay hungry...run...walk...try not to eat...Prednisone, work great..I had a nasty flare where I was admitted to a hospital and they started me on IV Prednisone...within 3 days I was feeling sooo much better and was discharged from the hospital...truth be told, if you do have Crohn's...you're not alone and you'll hear the word Prednisone a lot...hope this helps... Answered by Athena Cribari 3 months ago.

Oral Hydrocortisone? Although it's quite similar in terms of side effects to Prednisone. Perhaps a NSAID? I would think they would be far less effective than Prednisone though for Crohn's disease. Answered by Elizabet Kaya 3 months ago.

alternatives prednisone crohndisease Answered by Henry Ealey 3 months ago.


Is any of these medications a type of viagra?
i have cigna insurance.my insurance might cover part or all of the cost for viagra pills.under miscellanious,in the cigna website,it has these names listed,is any of these other medications a type of viagra(other than viagra)is it the ones with(pa) on the side of the... Asked by Tammie Lejenne 3 months ago.

i have cigna insurance.my insurance might cover part or all of the cost for viagra pills.under miscellanious,in the cigna website,it has these names listed,is any of these other medications a type of viagra(other than viagra)is it the ones with(pa) on the side of the name? MISCELLANEOUS: allopurinol amylase/lipase/protease azathioprine balsalazide cabergoline (QL) calcitriol desmopressin folic acid leucovorin methotrexate mycophenolate naltrexone (QL) tizanidine zaleplon Ambien CR Asacol Asacol HD Canasa Cellcept Colazal Dipentum Epipen (QL) Epipen Jr. (QL) Fosrenol Lialda Megace ES Pentasa Prefera-OB Pulmozyme (PA) Renvela Revatio (PA) Spiriva Synarel (PA, QL) Thalomid Trexall Tussionex Viagra (PA) Zemplar Adrenaclick Ambien Apriso Arava (PA) Coartem (QL) Edluar (ST) Lariam (PA, QL) Malarone (PA) Nimotop Nuvigil Orap Phoslo Priftin Provigil Sonata Sucraid Answered by Andre Touby 3 months ago.

No. Viagra is the only one. I'm not sure what the PA means, but it is probably the only ED oral medication covered. You know there are several oral ED treatments and my guess is that Viagra is the preferred one, meaning it will have the lowest co-pay and if the Dr. writes for another med, they will substitute Viagra for it. Call the insurance co to make sure. They will typically only allow 6-8 tablets a month. Answered by Elvina Strelecki 3 months ago.

There are possible choices to this drug however they do not have the identical dramatic outcome. Your pal demands to don't forget why there's a drawback with ED. The drug is not a treatment, it is a banded. When the blood waft is blocked or bogged down it'll final result the role of the frame to get an erection. Advise your pal to don't forget the reason of the drawback first. This would possibly contain a difference in nutrition, cleaning and dietary supplements. Also your pal is also taking an excessive amount of of the drug. Answered by Jammie Abitong 3 months ago.

None of the rest of them are (other than Viagra). These are probably the medications that are on the formulary (allowed list) for your insurance. Answered by Ruthie Behne 3 months ago.


I'm on the verge of having a flare up with Ulcerative Colitis and I was wondering what can I do to prevent it?
Ulcerative Colitis Asked by Claretha Wohlenhaus 3 months ago.

See your doctor and make sure you are taking your Asacol/Pentasa/Dipentum or whatever else you should be taking to prevent a flare-up. A severe flare-up might need a course of steroids. Truth is you need medication for a flare-up of UC, and you need to start treatment as early as possible. Dont sit on it. See your doctor. Answered by Gretchen Raimo 3 months ago.

First of all, Asacol is not a medication you can just ask for and expect to prevent your flare-up. Asacol is a medication you take to maintain your colitis. There is also no garuntee you can go down the number of tablets you can take after a few years or so. It does however have no side effects and is one of the best to take. I have been on it for a few years now and it help me maintain my colitis - it has greatly helped me have less flare-ups but it is not a quick fix. Depending on the severity of your colitis you may or may not be on medication - but most people are. From MY exeperience, severe flare-ups are treated with prednisone. I would be told to go on it for about a week or a little more starting with a certain amount of tablets and tapering down. I would do this while still keeping up with my asacol. Predisone, because it is steroid, IS a quick fix. It DOES have side effects as well. Since colitis is something you live with forever, some people chose to self manage their illness. This should only be done after talking it over with your doctor. For example, I was given a prescription for prednisone and kept it for bad flar ups. Because I knew my doctor would prescribe it if i went to see him, i would just do exactly what he would tell me to do in the past - a few days, starting with a few tablets an tapering down. I DO NOT reccomend doing this without doctors advisement... but it is an option. You question seems to sound like you KNOW you are going to have a flare-up. Could this be because you did something you were not suppose to do (eat something or not take meds?). If that is the case... do not do the thing you aren't supposed to (duh, right?). Well, if you don;t know what you did to trigger it... and you are getting frequent flare-ups - keep a diary of what you eat, drink and do each day. You can review it yourself or take it into your doctor. Healthier and non-medicated ways of avoiding a flare-up can include avoiding stress (if you find yourself very stressed often try taking a yoga class or talking to a counsellor - this REALLY helps). Also, be very careful what you are eating. Stay away from fried foods, nuts, seeds, dairy, raw vegetables etc and lettuce. From personal experience when I KNOW I have a flare-up I tone my diet way down and keep it bland. I usually eat plain cooked chicken, bread etc. This will prevent you from eating anything that either triggered the flare-up or make it worse. Your body is going to be different from everyone else. Just because you have ulcerative colitis doesn't mean you are like everyone else with colitis - in fact, what works for me may not work for you. I have had it for over 5 years and finally know how to control mine but every so often i find myself caught off guard. Be very careful. If you are not on medication you probably should be. There are very mild and safe medications that you take everyday to AID in the prevention of flare-ups. Find a specialist if you dont have one - don't settle until you find one you like and feel respects you. hope this helps Answered by Dara Schomas 3 months ago.

Ask your doctor for asacol tablets ---2 three times a day---works wonders ---after about a year you can cut back to 2 twice a day ---there is no cure but this stuff is good and if taken properly there is a good chance of no flare ups for years and years --good tip --use baby wipes instead of paper. Answered by Dan Bicket 3 months ago.

Follow your doctors orders! Answered by Tawny Keedah 3 months ago.


Bleeding from Ulcerative Colitis?
I've been taking 1 pill of Colazal 750mg for over a week now and have bled everytime I go to the bathroom. I also have stomach cramps throughout the day and really bad smelling gas. Should I stop taking the Colazal? My doctor has put me on Asacol, Lialda and Dipentum in the past and they all cause similar... Asked by Mariana Pushaw 3 months ago.

I've been taking 1 pill of Colazal 750mg for over a week now and have bled everytime I go to the bathroom. I also have stomach cramps throughout the day and really bad smelling gas. Should I stop taking the Colazal? My doctor has put me on Asacol, Lialda and Dipentum in the past and they all cause similar problems as the Colazal. However, my doctor insists that I continue the Colazal for a couple more weeks. Should I take matters into my own hands and stop the Colazal? I'm concerned that I am losing too much blood. Answered by Cherri Altmark 3 months ago.

Tell your Dr that you would like a CBC (complete blood count) done, it will let him know if you are anemic. If you are not satisfied with what your Dr is doing or agree with his treatment plan, get a second opinion. You may also want to see if you can find a holistic/natural practioner who can help with complementary therapy that may help reduce the side effects of your medication and suggest dietary changes that will help build/keep blood count up within normal limits. Answered by Jame Freelove 3 months ago.


Can you die from Chron's disease, does the medication kill you eventually?.?
Asked by Derek Fetterly 3 months ago.

The most common complication is blockage of the intestine. Blockage occurs because the disease tends to thicken the intestinal wall with swelling and scar tissue, narrowing the passage. Crohn’s disease may also cause sores, or ulcers, that tunnel through the affected area into surrounding tissues, such as the bladder, vagina, or skin. The areas around the anus and rectum are often involved. The tunnels, called fistulas, are a common complication and often become infected. Sometimes fistulas can be treated with medicine, but in some cases they may require surgery. In addition to fistulas, small tears called fissures may develop in the lining of the mucus membrane of the anus. Nutritional complications are common in Crohn’s disease. Deficiencies of proteins, calories, and vitamins are well documented. These deficiencies may be caused by inadequate dietary intake, intestinal loss of protein, or poor absorption, also referred to as malabsorption. Other complications associated with Crohn’s disease include arthritis, skin problems, inflammation in the eyes or mouth, kidney stones, gallstones, or other diseases of the liver and biliary system. Some of these problems resolve during treatment for disease in the digestive system, but some must be treated separately. Anti-Inflammation Drugs. Most people are first treated with drugs containing mesalamine, a substance that helps control inflammation. Sulfasalazine is the most commonly used of these drugs. Patients who do not benefit from it or who cannot tolerate it may be put on other mesalamine-containing drugs, generally known as 5-ASA agents, such as Asacol, Dipentum, or Pentasa. Possible side effects of mesalamine-containing drugs include nausea, vomiting, heartburn, diarrhea, and headache. Cortisone or Steroids. Cortisone drugs and steroids—called corticosteriods—provide very effective results. Prednisone is a common generic name of one of the drugs in this group of medications. In the beginning, when the disease it at its worst, prednisone is usually prescribed in a large dose. The dosage is then lowered once symptoms have been controlled. These drugs can cause serious side effects, including greater susceptibility to infection. Immune System Suppressors. Drugs that suppress the immune system are also used to treat Crohn’s disease. Most commonly prescribed are 6-mercaptopurine or a related drug, azathioprine. Immunosuppressive agents work by blocking the immune reaction that contributes to inflammation. These drugs may cause side effects like nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea and may lower a person’s resistance to infection. When patients are treated with a combination of corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs, the dose of corticosteroids may eventually be lowered. Some studies suggest that immunosuppressive drugs may enhance the effectiveness of corticosteroids. Infliximab (Remicade). This drug is the first of a group of medications that blocks the body’s inflammation response. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the drug for the treatment of moderate to severe Crohn’s disease that does not respond to standard therapies (mesalamine substances, corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents) and for the treatment of open, draining fistulas. Infliximab, the first treatment approved specifically for Crohn’s disease is a TNF substance. Additional research will need to be done in order to fully understand the range of treatments Remicade may offer to help people with Crohn’s disease. Antibiotics. Antibiotics are used to treat bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine caused by stricture, fistulas, or prior surgery. For this common problem, the doctor may prescribe one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, sulfonamide, cephalosporin, tetracycline, or metronidazole. Anti-Diarrheal and Fluid Replacements. Diarrhea and crampy abdominal pain are often relieved when the inflammation subsides, but additional medication may also be necessary. Several antidiarrheal agents could be used, including diphenoxylate, loperamide, and codeine. Patients who are dehydrated because of diarrhea will be treated with fluids and electrolytes. I think you have a better chance of dying from NOT taking the tretments then from taking them. Good Luck to you and Feel better! Answered by Alana Lostetter 3 months ago.

uncontrolled Crohns can kill from bowel perforation or dehydration the meds are tough but better than the disease. Answered by Kelly Jesus 3 months ago.

Yes you can die from it, no, the meds don't kill you. Even if they do, if it allows you to live longer than if you didn't take it, wouldn't it be better than dying sooner? Answered by Jimmy Schuchart 3 months ago.

Chron's disease is a very slow cancer of the bowels. I know a gal who has had it over 20 years she works and takes care of her family. She just needs to be careful what she eats or it makes her violently ill. Your doctor will give you instructions on what you can and cannot eat as long as you stick to the diet you can live for many many years. She recently found out her husband has it too.. its a genetic thing. They caught him earlier than her diagnosis so he takes his meds and doing fine. Answered by Dawn Agonoy 3 months ago.

i know prednisone almost killed my grandfather. thatsused for chrons if im correct? Answered by Clarence Defonce 3 months ago.

Calm down and have some knowledge... Crohn's disease is marked by chronic inflammation of the colon. Crohn's disease will wax and wane in severity. Many patients develop diarrhea as well as abdominal pain and weight loss. Bloody diarrhea is less common in Crohn's disease when compared to ulcerative colitis. The treatment for Crohn's disease is very similar to that of ulcerative colitis. Patients thus may be treated with sulfasalazine, Mesalamine preparations and Glucocorticoids as well as 6-mercaptopurine. Some antibiotics such as Ciprofloxacin and Metronidazole can be effective for specific complications associated with Crohn's disease. Particularly, Metronidazole has been useful in treating patients who have fistulous disease. Ciprofloxacin has also been utilized in some patients who have "micro perforations". It is of essence that adequate nutrition be maintained in Crohn's disease. Thus patients may require B12 therapy as well as supplementation of calcium, magnesium, iron, vitamin D, vitamins and folic acid. On occasion, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) may be required for patients who have severe disease. (TPN is a method for providing nutrition to patients through the veins. This is especially useful in some patients with inflammatory bowel disease, malabsortive disorders and severe malnutrition.) Usually these patients have been hospitalized and have been refractory to high dose IV steroid therapy. Under these circumstances, total parenteral nutrition may provide improved bowel control and induce remission. In some cases, total parenteral nutrition may be administered at home under the close supervision of a physician. Complications associated with Crohn's disease include: Abscesses Fistula formation Obstruction Anal disease Non-healing ulcer disease, etc. Answered by Lindsey Brotzman 3 months ago.


Can Lyme Disease be misdiagnosed as Ulcerative Colitis?
I was diagnosed with Colitis five years ago. Every Colitis medication that has been given to me has not worked for me (Asacol, Colazal, Dipentum, Lialda and Remicade) and makes me sick even in very small doses. My mom says she heard a story of someone who thought they had Crohns, but later found out that it was... Asked by Augustine Lavene 3 months ago.

I was diagnosed with Colitis five years ago. Every Colitis medication that has been given to me has not worked for me (Asacol, Colazal, Dipentum, Lialda and Remicade) and makes me sick even in very small doses. My mom says she heard a story of someone who thought they had Crohns, but later found out that it was Lyme Disease. Apparently they couldn't take the meds for Crohns either. Is it practical to think that I might have Lyme rather than Colitis? Answered by Freddie Kanevsky 3 months ago.

It's a stretch to imagine that your colitis symptoms are due strictly to a Lyme infection....esp one that's been actively present for 5 years. Another issue seems to be at work here, seeing as none of those meds helped. What's "causing" the symptoms in your case might not be the classic ones. A doc specializing in diet-induced or digestive disorders, maybe even a naturopath familiar w/ colitis, might be worth visiting. Answered by Freida Stickrath 3 months ago.

Monitor your blood glucose levels. If you have diabetes, monitoring your blood glucose levels will help keep your blood glucose under control and may help improve your neuropathy. Answered by Damian Lagrow 3 months ago.


I have Coletus very bad ,for the last 8 yrs.found no help?
My Dr is Dr Evans in CorpusChristi, no help.I'm on Asacol 400 mg 3 pills 4 times a day. Prdnisone 20 mg. I have a hard time eating; Beverly Mutina Asked by Loise Sperger 3 months ago.

Hi Bev. I also have this disease, 30 years with it now. Asacol didn't work for me, even though it was the one my insurance company wanted me to take. I ended up with Dipentum, which worked well for me. Prednisone is a hard drug to take for a long time. It can do wonders with inflammation but is hard on other organs. Have you altered your diet much? Did you get any relief with diet changes? Sounds like it's time for a second opinion, maybe even consider the surgery. Hope you're feeling better soon! Answered by Abram Albertine 3 months ago.

hi prissy, I am a female Crohn's pt. dxed at the age of 12. Have had it for 28 yrs. now. It is similar to Ulcerative Colitis and also known as IBD (inflammatory bowel disease). Have you checked out the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America's website? They have tons of information ranging from the latest treatments, diet, women's issues, surgery, to locating a local CCFA support chapter near you where you can meet others like yourself and swap information on which GIs are the best where you live, which hospitals are great at treating IBD, which ones to avoid, they have educational seminars where MDs, dieticians, drug reps, etc. come in to speak to pts. and family members, etc. They also have a live chat & a hotline that is run by healthcare experts who are well versed in IBD during the week plus they have a forum where pts. and family members can post questions to others who have CD or UC. Definitely look into it and also finding a local support group near you. I've joined one near me and I know which GIs are the best in the area, which places are great for testing, which surgeons are the best and which ones to avoid. Also, try getting a referral from your primary MD as to which hospital near you has a dietician you can meet with to discuss diet tips for folks with IBD. They work w/pts. all the time who have special dietary needs so definitely look into it. My heart goes out to you. I wish you the best of luck. Answered by Ji Khiev 3 months ago.

Keep bugging your doctor. He/she should find something that works. If nothing else, there are surgical options that could be appropriate. In the meantime, make sure you eat plenty of fiber and drink plenty of water. BTW, you do mean "colitis," right? Answered by Maisha Papan 3 months ago.


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ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019715/001 DIPENTUM OLSALAZINE SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019715/001 DIPENTUM OLSALAZINE SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG

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