Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020939/001.

Names and composition

"DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020939/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
020939/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
020939/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
020939/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
020939/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
020939/006 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
072838/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
072838/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
072838/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
072838/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074051/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074051/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074051/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074051/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074067/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074067/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074067/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074067/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074079/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
074079/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
074079/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074084/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074084/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074093/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074093/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074093/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074093/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074168/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074168/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074168/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074168/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074185/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074185/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074185/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074185/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074617/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
074845/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
074845/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
074845/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074852/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074852/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074852/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074894/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
074910/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
074910/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
074910/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074941/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
074943/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074943/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074943/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074984/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074984/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074984/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074984/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
075004/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075086/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075106/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075116/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075116/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075116/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
075116/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
075124/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
075124/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075124/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075375/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075749/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075853/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per VIAL
076563/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
076563/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
076563/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
076563/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
076563/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076563/006 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
077686/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
077686/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
077686/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
077686/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
077686/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
077686/006 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
078538/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
090421/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
090421/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
090421/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
090421/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
090421/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
090492/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
090492/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
090492/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
090492/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
090492/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
091022/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
091022/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
091022/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
091022/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
091022/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
091022/006 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
202463/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
202651/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
202651/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 50MG per 10ML
202651/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 125MG per 25ML
203023/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
203023/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
203023/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
203023/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
203023/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018602/001 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
018602/002 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
018602/003 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
018602/004 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
019471/001 CARDIZEM SR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019471/002 CARDIZEM SR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019471/003 CARDIZEM SR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019471/004 CARDIZEM SR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020027/001 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020027/003 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020062/001 CARDIZEM CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
020062/002 CARDIZEM CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
020062/003 CARDIZEM CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
020062/004 CARDIZEM CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
020062/005 CARDIZEM CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
020092/001 DILACOR XR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020092/002 DILACOR XR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020092/003 DILACOR XR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020401/001 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
020401/002 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
020401/003 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
020401/004 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
020401/005 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
020401/006 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
020792/001 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per VIAL
020939/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
020939/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
020939/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
020939/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
020939/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
020939/006 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
021392/001 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
021392/002 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
021392/003 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
021392/004 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
021392/005 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
021392/006 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
072838/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
072838/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
072838/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
072838/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074051/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074051/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074051/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074051/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074067/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074067/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074067/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074067/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074079/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
074079/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
074079/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074084/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074084/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074093/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074093/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074093/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074093/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074168/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074168/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074168/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074168/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074185/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074185/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074185/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074185/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074617/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
074752/001 CARTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074752/002 CARTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074752/003 CARTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074752/004 CARTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
074845/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
074845/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
074845/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074852/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074852/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074852/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074894/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
074910/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
074910/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
074910/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074941/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
074943/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074943/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074943/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074984/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074984/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074984/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074984/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
075004/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075086/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075106/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075116/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075116/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075116/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
075116/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
075124/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
075124/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075124/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075375/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075401/001 TAZTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075401/002 TAZTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075401/003 TAZTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
075401/004 TAZTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
075401/005 TAZTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
075749/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075853/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per VIAL
076151/001 DILT-CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
076151/002 DILT-CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
076151/003 DILT-CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
076151/004 DILT-CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076395/001 DILTZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
076395/002 DILTZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
076395/003 DILTZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
076395/004 DILTZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076395/005 DILTZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
076563/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
076563/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
076563/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
076563/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
076563/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076563/006 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
077686/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
077686/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
077686/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
077686/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
077686/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
077686/006 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
078538/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
090421/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
090421/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
090421/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
090421/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
090421/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
090492/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
090492/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
090492/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
090492/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
090492/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
091022/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
091022/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
091022/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
091022/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
091022/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
091022/006 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
202463/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
202651/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
202651/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 50MG per 10ML
202651/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 125MG per 25ML
203023/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
203023/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
203023/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
203023/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
203023/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG

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Answered questions

How to make Diltiazem Hydrochloride for injection stability?
we make Diltiazem Hydrochloride to dry powder for injection , but it degaretion after one month. it have another substance. how to make it stability? Diltiazem Hydrochloride must be preserved in tight,light-resistant and cool containers. Asked by Noelia Mezo 1 year ago.

Why are you asking this? If you are working for a legitimate company making diltiazem, the chemists would know what to do. If you're working for a less than legitimate company..... Answered by Rudy Lutrick 1 year ago.


What is Diliazem (inwood)?
Asked by Albertine Formella 1 year ago.

Diltiazem hydrochloride is a slow channel voltage dependent calcium entry blocker. There are 3 classes of calcium entry blockers. Diltiazem is the only member of the benzothiazepine family. Although initially used to treat hypertension it is rarely used for that purpose any longer. A series of studies by Robin Roberts, M.D. carried out in Houston in the 1980s demonstrated that individuals on diltiazem for hypertension who suffered a myocardial infarction (heart attack) associated with a low left ventricular ejection fraction (heart failure) had a significantly increased mortality. The only calcium entry blocker that is appropriately utilized today for hypertension is the dihydropyridine amlodipine besylate. Diltiazem is also used for rate control - to slow the heart rate - in individuals with rapid heart rhythm abnormalities such as sometimes seen with atrial fibrillation. Diltiazem is also used for migraine headache prophylaxis as one respondent has suggested. The idea of calcium entry blockers arose from animal research which made note of 2 things. Calcified plaques in arteries tended to cause worse outcomes in the event of a myocardial infarction. In addition with myocardial infarction it is influx of calcium with an osmotic gradient with water following calcium into myocytes (heart muscle cells) resulting is distention that is a major factor in cell death. The idea was that perhaps calcium entry blockers might prevent calcification of arterial plaques and that they might prevent influx of calcium into myocytes when a person suffered a myocardial infarction. It was quickly apparent that these drugs did neither of the above. If I may be of further assistance please let me know. I wish you the very best of health and in all things may God bless. P.S.: I most sincerely do not like to make unkind comments but if there are physicians out there who still prescribe diltiazem for hypertension you should be ashamed of yourself. Answered by Jerrica Malizia 1 year ago.

Like every neighborhood Washington Heights and Inwood have their good and bad areas. Part of the Heights and Inwood tend to be very congested though, a lot of traffic, people, businesses, but that also adds a distinct flavor to the neighborhood. Inwood IS part of Manhattan. It's at the northern most end of Manhattan, past 200th Street. Both areas tend to have a high concentration of Latinos, mainly Dominican immigrants who look to ease their transition into the "American" way of life by starting out in an area where they are most comfortable and feel there is a support system for them. Not unlike most other immigrant groups that come to the United States. Answered by Theola Dwire 1 year ago.

Diltiazem is a drug used to relieve the symptoms of Hypertension (High Blood pressure) and also to prevent Migranes. It is also used to reduce cravings of cocaine :) Answered by Timika Parrow 1 year ago.

a calcium channel blocker just like verapamil Answered by Scottie Artinian 1 year ago.


What happens when a doctor prescribes cardizem to a 62 yr old man with normal blood pressure?
Had heart attack caused by cardizem Asked by Margene Hansford 1 year ago.

Brand name: Cardizem Pronounced: CAR-di-zem Generic name: Diltiazem hydrochloride Other brand names: Cardizem CD, Cardizem SR, Dilacor XR, Tiazac Why is this drug prescribed? Cardizem and Cardizem CD (a controlled release form of diltiazem) are used in the treatment of angina pectoris (chest pain usually caused by lack of oxygen to the heart due to clogged arteries) and chronic stable angina (caused by exertion). Cardizem CD is also used to treat high blood pressure. Another controlled release form, Cardizem SR, is used only in the treatment of high blood pressure. Cardizem, a calcium channel blocker, dilates blood vessels and slows the heart to reduce blood pressure and the pain of angina. Doctors sometimes prescribe Cardizem for loss of circulation in the fingers and toes (Raynaud's phenomenon), for involuntary movements (tardive dyskinesia), and to prevent heart attack. Tiazac and Dilacor XR are used in the treatment of high blood pressure and chronic stable angina. They may be taken alone or combined with other blood pressure medications. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Cardizem. •More common side effects may include: Abnormally slow heartbeat (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), dizziness, fluid retention, flushing (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), headache, nausea, rash, weakness •Less common or rare side effects may include: Abnormal dreams, allergic reaction, altered way of walking, amnesia, anemia, angina (severe chest pain), blood disorders, congestive heart failure, constipation, cough, depression, diarrhea, difficulty sleeping, drowsiness, dry mouth, excessive urination at night, eye irritation, fainting, flu symptoms, hair loss, hallucinations, heart attack, high blood sugar, hives, impotence, increased output of pale urine, indigestion, infection, irregular heartbeat, itching, joint pain, labored breathing, loss of appetite, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, muscle cramps, nasal congestion or inflammation, nervousness, nosebleed, pain, personality change, pounding heartbeat, rapid heartbeat, reddish or purplish spots on skin, ringing in ears, sexual difficulties, skin inflammation/flaking or peeling, sensitivity to light, sleepiness, sore throat, taste alteration, thirst, tingling or pins and needles, tremor, vision changes, vomiting, welts, weight increase Answered by Jefferson Fury 1 year ago.

The American Heart Association set new guidelines for normal B/P ranges and 120/90 is too high. They want to see an average pressure of 117/68. So, your B/P of 120/90 is too high and 100/50 is okay. Please remember that B/P fluctuates throughout the day and night and throughout your lifetime. B/Ps are typically lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon/early evening. And the average B/P for a healthy 5-year-old is very different from that of a healthy 15-year-old and a healthy 75-year-old. B/P is affected by stress. Stress comes in many forms. Even Illness, strong emotions and obesity are forms of stress on the body. Pretty much everything is a form of stress. And stress can, at times, be a good thing. So "stress" is a general, catch-all word. Yes, of course you experience stress whether or not you know it when you see it. An isolated reading of 120/90 may not be significant. High or low blood pressure is generally determined by what the values are consistently. Spot checks won't establish a baseline unless done in a specific way. Check your B/P with the same equipment on 3 different days and at 3 different times of day (Morning, mid day and night). You'll get a much better idea of what your baseline B/P is and how it rates according to the AHA. Answered by Thora Maas 1 year ago.

High blood pressure is not the only reason Cardizem can be prescribed. It does have other uses. Who told you Cardizem caused the heart attack? I have never heard of that. Answered by Celia Mandiola 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation.?
I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation and am taking Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and Warfarin..If I undergo "Cardio version is a medical procedure by which an abnormally fast heart rate (tachycardia) or cardiac arrhythmia is converted to a normal rhythm, using electricity", will I be able... Asked by Maureen Hasen 1 year ago.

I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation and am taking Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and Warfarin.. If I undergo "Cardio version is a medical procedure by which an abnormally fast heart rate (tachycardia) or cardiac arrhythmia is converted to a normal rhythm, using electricity", will I be able to come off Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and/or Warfarin? Or am I on either or both for the rest of my life? Thank you. Answered by Agustina Borra 1 year ago.

Hi Flossie , yes your heart meds will end ,probably not immediately but fairly soon after your procedure. I had my A.F. , arrhythmia /palpitations cured with a Cardiac Ablation up in London's Brompton hospital about 5 weeks ago. Good luck. Answered by Elna Loughridge 1 year ago.

A cardioversion is usually a temporary fix and most often the AF will return. If you stay in a normal rhythm for a few months your doctor may wean you off of the diltiazem. Doctors are usually more hesitant to take people off of warfarin because at any time you could you go back into AF and possibly have a stroke. Depending on your age and other risk factors for stroke your doctor may also consider replacing the warfarin with other anticoagulant drugs that are easier to take and a little safer, like aspirin and/or plavix. Answered by Hilario Kemple 1 year ago.


Where to go when given bad medicines by a pharmacy?
Twice now I have received a prescribed “180 MG of Diltiazem ER” which was substituted for “180 MG of Cartizem CD” (this was fine) … but each time the 180 quantity of meds have been given in the wrong-much larger capsules, carrying the identification make of 676 676 … in searching for this identification mark .. the... Asked by Eugenio Oehmke 1 year ago.

If you are receiving them in person (not something you get online) them it seems the obvious place to go is back to the pharmacy. If you order them online, then you need to contact that company. Answered by Leonida Decenzo 1 year ago.

Ask the police. Answered by Olga Desisto 1 year ago.


Can anybody help me out with info on mixing heaps of medications?
I'm wanting to know what the side effects/dangers of taking too many medications are?My Granddad suffers from a lot of illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, emphysema, high blood pressure and fibromyalgia just to name a few and takes HEAPS of different medications. GTN spray for chest pain, augmentin as... Asked by Francoise Duhon 1 year ago.

I'm wanting to know what the side effects/dangers of taking too many medications are? My Granddad suffers from a lot of illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, emphysema, high blood pressure and fibromyalgia just to name a few and takes HEAPS of different medications. GTN spray for chest pain, augmentin as an antibiotic, amitropyline for pain relief from fibromyalgia, aspirin, diltiazem hydrochloride for blood pressure, isosorbide mononitrate for chest pain, spironolactone for heart failure and removing excess fluid, escitalopram for mood and anxiety, atorvastatin for lowering cholesterol, fluticasone propionate and salmeterol for breathlessness, cilazapril for blood pressure, frusemide for excess fluid removal, prednisone for helping with breathing, clopidogrel for prevent heart attacks, pantoprazole for reducing stomach acid and huge amounts of insulin for his diabetes. He is constantly having falls from being so dizzy, always has chest pain, is always sleeping, always out of breath etc etc. Is it dangerous to be on this amount of medication? Answered by Nery Niedermeier 1 year ago.

Please sit down with the Pharmacist and ask if there are any drug interactions going on. If he has several doctors, and they are not aware of what the other are prescribing, then yes, it can be quite dangerous. This is why is it so important to use one Pharmacy with a Pharmacist you can talk with and trust. If there is interactions, you need to let the doctors know what is going on. Answered by Kyung Apolito 1 year ago.

His doctor needs to go over his pill list and see if some of these can be stopped.(or changed) My experience with the elderly is that the doctor changes their pills and the patient does not understand that pill A should be stopped and pill B replaces it. The doctor needs to be aware of the dizziness and sleepiness, etc. When I took my Mother to the doctor, she often told the doctor everything was "fine" because she had the mistaken idea that he would scold her if she complained. Or she "didn't want to bother him". He sounds miserable and if the doctor can help....that is what he is paid for. (If his doctor is not cooperative...you may need a new doc..just saying ) Answered by Loria Pedulla 1 year ago.


Help with Pharm questions?
Medication order: Cardizem (diltiazem) 100 mg in 100 mL D5W at 0.25 mg/kg over 2 minutes, then begin a continuous infusion of 10 mg/hour.Patient Weight: 165 lbHow many mL/hr will the patient receive as the continuous infusion?The medication order is to administer dobutamine hydrochloride (Dobutrex) at... Asked by Lashawnda Goehringer 1 year ago.

Medication order: Cardizem (diltiazem) 100 mg in 100 mL D5W at 0.25 mg/kg over 2 minutes, then begin a continuous infusion of 10 mg/hour. Patient Weight: 165 lb How many mL/hr will the patient receive as the continuous infusion? The medication order is to administer dobutamine hydrochloride (Dobutrex) at 5.2 mcg/kg/min. The patient weighs 150 lb. Prepare the IV solution by adding Dobutrex 250 mg to 200 mL of D5W. Calculate the flow rate in microdrops (60 drops per mL). Answered by Bobbi Woollard 1 year ago.

17 Drops/Minute. Answered by Christen Fesmire 1 year ago.


Sweating problem. MAJOR!?
I;ve got this major problem with sweating. I sweat very easily. Like the simpilest task and i;ll start sweating like a freight train. Like running the sweeper. I sweat every where. Armpits, whole head, arms, butt, feet, etc. and it really sucks cause when i'm with friends or in gym class its embarrassing cause... Asked by Myrl Pochintesta 1 year ago.

I;ve got this major problem with sweating. I sweat very easily. Like the simpilest task and i;ll start sweating like a freight train. Like running the sweeper. I sweat every where. Armpits, whole head, arms, butt, feet, etc. and it really sucks cause when i'm with friends or in gym class its embarrassing cause i have to where baggy clothes, my hair up, and we can;t shower. i never get to dress in what i want. and it really sucks. Is there any way i can stop this? Answered by Jolene Arbon 1 year ago.

Excess sweating is known as hyperhidrosis. There are several treatments available, as you have all over sweating problems unfortunately topical treatments, prescription anti-perspirants and botox injections (belive it or not botox is licensed (and regularly used) for the treatment of under-arm perspiration) won't help you, you need a medication. these medications can be affective: Glycopyrrolate (Robinul) Propantheline (Pro-Banthine) Oxybutynin Hydrochloride (Ditropan) Indomethacine (indocid) Diltiazem (cardizem) Clonidine (Catapres) Propranolol (Inderal) Oxprenolol (Trasicor) these herbs can be affective if you are not comfortable with medications: Burdock Astragalus Belladonna Oh and AVOID caffine drinks, spicy foods and alcohol! Answered by Trang Silvestro 1 year ago.

yeah you probably do have hyperhydrosis..( excessive sweating).i heard about it on mystery diagnosis. If you speak to a doctor about it he can give you some solutions....or medication...for the mean time a good thing to do would be to use secret clinical strength and in places you sweat put baby powder to help wick away some of the moisture and get a travel size baby powder bottle to carry in your purse or bookbag for school...hope this helps. speak to your doctor and good luck.....also if you're open minded a surprising thing to help stop sweating is botox...some celebs even have it injected in their underaarms before a red carpet so they don't sweat and mess up expensive gowns, i've seen it injected into a 40 year old mans pits who sweated excessively and it helped him stop sweating so much also...but talk to your doc b4 taking this next step to see if he has an alternative. Answered by Reva Felli 1 year ago.

Some people just have overactive sweat glands. I do too, it's not a big deal, just shower after you exercise, and put on a lot of deodorant. That way even if you do sweat it won't smell. Sweat isn't a big deal, just relax and don't even think about it. :) Answered by Nona Zilliox 1 year ago.

i sweat excessively and all i do is wear white clothing.. i also highly recommend to not use antipersperant. Answered by Daniela Liebl 1 year ago.

my friend had a similar problem and she went to the doctor and gave her some medication Answered by Cassey Brofft 1 year ago.

idk i seriously have the same problem i use antiperspirent, but it does not work at all (i use dove clinical waterproof antiperspirent) i'm sweatin all under my armpits. idc if my hands get sweaty cus a lot of people have sweaty palms . tell me if you find a trick. Answered by Jill Kagey 1 year ago.

you need to relax and take it easy thats what i think Answered by Vincent Lucchini 1 year ago.


How to make Diltiazem Hydrochloride for injection stability?
we make Diltiazem Hydrochloride to dry powder for injection , but it degaretion after one month. it have another substance. how to make it stability? Diltiazem Hydrochloride must be preserved in tight,light-resistant and cool containers. Asked by Otha Bond 1 year ago.

Why are you asking this? If you are working for a legitimate company making diltiazem, the chemists would know what to do. If you're working for a less than legitimate company..... Answered by Shantelle Hondros 1 year ago.


What is Diliazem (inwood)?
Asked by Trudi Brogan 1 year ago.

Diltiazem hydrochloride is a slow channel voltage dependent calcium entry blocker. There are 3 classes of calcium entry blockers. Diltiazem is the only member of the benzothiazepine family. Although initially used to treat hypertension it is rarely used for that purpose any longer. A series of studies by Robin Roberts, M.D. carried out in Houston in the 1980s demonstrated that individuals on diltiazem for hypertension who suffered a myocardial infarction (heart attack) associated with a low left ventricular ejection fraction (heart failure) had a significantly increased mortality. The only calcium entry blocker that is appropriately utilized today for hypertension is the dihydropyridine amlodipine besylate. Diltiazem is also used for rate control - to slow the heart rate - in individuals with rapid heart rhythm abnormalities such as sometimes seen with atrial fibrillation. Diltiazem is also used for migraine headache prophylaxis as one respondent has suggested. The idea of calcium entry blockers arose from animal research which made note of 2 things. Calcified plaques in arteries tended to cause worse outcomes in the event of a myocardial infarction. In addition with myocardial infarction it is influx of calcium with an osmotic gradient with water following calcium into myocytes (heart muscle cells) resulting is distention that is a major factor in cell death. The idea was that perhaps calcium entry blockers might prevent calcification of arterial plaques and that they might prevent influx of calcium into myocytes when a person suffered a myocardial infarction. It was quickly apparent that these drugs did neither of the above. If I may be of further assistance please let me know. I wish you the very best of health and in all things may God bless. P.S.: I most sincerely do not like to make unkind comments but if there are physicians out there who still prescribe diltiazem for hypertension you should be ashamed of yourself. Answered by Jane Congdon 1 year ago.

Like every neighborhood Washington Heights and Inwood have their good and bad areas. Part of the Heights and Inwood tend to be very congested though, a lot of traffic, people, businesses, but that also adds a distinct flavor to the neighborhood. Inwood IS part of Manhattan. It's at the northern most end of Manhattan, past 200th Street. Both areas tend to have a high concentration of Latinos, mainly Dominican immigrants who look to ease their transition into the "American" way of life by starting out in an area where they are most comfortable and feel there is a support system for them. Not unlike most other immigrant groups that come to the United States. Answered by Kristopher Melia 1 year ago.

Diltiazem is a drug used to relieve the symptoms of Hypertension (High Blood pressure) and also to prevent Migranes. It is also used to reduce cravings of cocaine :) Answered by Tosha Grigalonis 1 year ago.

a calcium channel blocker just like verapamil Answered by Rutha Troesch 1 year ago.


What happens when a doctor prescribes cardizem to a 62 yr old man with normal blood pressure?
Had heart attack caused by cardizem Asked by Ricardo Scarsdale 1 year ago.

Brand name: Cardizem Pronounced: CAR-di-zem Generic name: Diltiazem hydrochloride Other brand names: Cardizem CD, Cardizem SR, Dilacor XR, Tiazac Why is this drug prescribed? Cardizem and Cardizem CD (a controlled release form of diltiazem) are used in the treatment of angina pectoris (chest pain usually caused by lack of oxygen to the heart due to clogged arteries) and chronic stable angina (caused by exertion). Cardizem CD is also used to treat high blood pressure. Another controlled release form, Cardizem SR, is used only in the treatment of high blood pressure. Cardizem, a calcium channel blocker, dilates blood vessels and slows the heart to reduce blood pressure and the pain of angina. Doctors sometimes prescribe Cardizem for loss of circulation in the fingers and toes (Raynaud's phenomenon), for involuntary movements (tardive dyskinesia), and to prevent heart attack. Tiazac and Dilacor XR are used in the treatment of high blood pressure and chronic stable angina. They may be taken alone or combined with other blood pressure medications. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Cardizem. •More common side effects may include: Abnormally slow heartbeat (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), dizziness, fluid retention, flushing (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), headache, nausea, rash, weakness •Less common or rare side effects may include: Abnormal dreams, allergic reaction, altered way of walking, amnesia, anemia, angina (severe chest pain), blood disorders, congestive heart failure, constipation, cough, depression, diarrhea, difficulty sleeping, drowsiness, dry mouth, excessive urination at night, eye irritation, fainting, flu symptoms, hair loss, hallucinations, heart attack, high blood sugar, hives, impotence, increased output of pale urine, indigestion, infection, irregular heartbeat, itching, joint pain, labored breathing, loss of appetite, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, muscle cramps, nasal congestion or inflammation, nervousness, nosebleed, pain, personality change, pounding heartbeat, rapid heartbeat, reddish or purplish spots on skin, ringing in ears, sexual difficulties, skin inflammation/flaking or peeling, sensitivity to light, sleepiness, sore throat, taste alteration, thirst, tingling or pins and needles, tremor, vision changes, vomiting, welts, weight increase Answered by Tayna Sobczynski 1 year ago.

The American Heart Association set new guidelines for normal B/P ranges and 120/90 is too high. They want to see an average pressure of 117/68. So, your B/P of 120/90 is too high and 100/50 is okay. Please remember that B/P fluctuates throughout the day and night and throughout your lifetime. B/Ps are typically lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon/early evening. And the average B/P for a healthy 5-year-old is very different from that of a healthy 15-year-old and a healthy 75-year-old. B/P is affected by stress. Stress comes in many forms. Even Illness, strong emotions and obesity are forms of stress on the body. Pretty much everything is a form of stress. And stress can, at times, be a good thing. So "stress" is a general, catch-all word. Yes, of course you experience stress whether or not you know it when you see it. An isolated reading of 120/90 may not be significant. High or low blood pressure is generally determined by what the values are consistently. Spot checks won't establish a baseline unless done in a specific way. Check your B/P with the same equipment on 3 different days and at 3 different times of day (Morning, mid day and night). You'll get a much better idea of what your baseline B/P is and how it rates according to the AHA. Answered by Digna Santomauro 1 year ago.

High blood pressure is not the only reason Cardizem can be prescribed. It does have other uses. Who told you Cardizem caused the heart attack? I have never heard of that. Answered by Gertrud Voeltner 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation.?
I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation and am taking Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and Warfarin..If I undergo "Cardio version is a medical procedure by which an abnormally fast heart rate (tachycardia) or cardiac arrhythmia is converted to a normal rhythm, using electricity", will I be able... Asked by Lyndsey Hiss 1 year ago.

I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation and am taking Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and Warfarin.. If I undergo "Cardio version is a medical procedure by which an abnormally fast heart rate (tachycardia) or cardiac arrhythmia is converted to a normal rhythm, using electricity", will I be able to come off Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and/or Warfarin? Or am I on either or both for the rest of my life? Thank you. Answered by Leif Linko 1 year ago.

Hi Flossie , yes your heart meds will end ,probably not immediately but fairly soon after your procedure. I had my A.F. , arrhythmia /palpitations cured with a Cardiac Ablation up in London's Brompton hospital about 5 weeks ago. Good luck. Answered by Ammie Vollmar 1 year ago.

A cardioversion is usually a temporary fix and most often the AF will return. If you stay in a normal rhythm for a few months your doctor may wean you off of the diltiazem. Doctors are usually more hesitant to take people off of warfarin because at any time you could you go back into AF and possibly have a stroke. Depending on your age and other risk factors for stroke your doctor may also consider replacing the warfarin with other anticoagulant drugs that are easier to take and a little safer, like aspirin and/or plavix. Answered by Keira Kleyman 1 year ago.


Where to go when given bad medicines by a pharmacy?
Twice now I have received a prescribed “180 MG of Diltiazem ER” which was substituted for “180 MG of Cartizem CD” (this was fine) … but each time the 180 quantity of meds have been given in the wrong-much larger capsules, carrying the identification make of 676 676 … in searching for this identification mark .. the... Asked by Jenell Bekhit 1 year ago.

If you are receiving them in person (not something you get online) them it seems the obvious place to go is back to the pharmacy. If you order them online, then you need to contact that company. Answered by Deloris Demart 1 year ago.

Ask the police. Answered by Mamie Chech 1 year ago.


Can anybody help me out with info on mixing heaps of medications?
I'm wanting to know what the side effects/dangers of taking too many medications are?My Granddad suffers from a lot of illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, emphysema, high blood pressure and fibromyalgia just to name a few and takes HEAPS of different medications. GTN spray for chest pain, augmentin as... Asked by Scottie Hallemeyer 1 year ago.

I'm wanting to know what the side effects/dangers of taking too many medications are? My Granddad suffers from a lot of illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, emphysema, high blood pressure and fibromyalgia just to name a few and takes HEAPS of different medications. GTN spray for chest pain, augmentin as an antibiotic, amitropyline for pain relief from fibromyalgia, aspirin, diltiazem hydrochloride for blood pressure, isosorbide mononitrate for chest pain, spironolactone for heart failure and removing excess fluid, escitalopram for mood and anxiety, atorvastatin for lowering cholesterol, fluticasone propionate and salmeterol for breathlessness, cilazapril for blood pressure, frusemide for excess fluid removal, prednisone for helping with breathing, clopidogrel for prevent heart attacks, pantoprazole for reducing stomach acid and huge amounts of insulin for his diabetes. He is constantly having falls from being so dizzy, always has chest pain, is always sleeping, always out of breath etc etc. Is it dangerous to be on this amount of medication? Answered by Morris Aseng 1 year ago.

Please sit down with the Pharmacist and ask if there are any drug interactions going on. If he has several doctors, and they are not aware of what the other are prescribing, then yes, it can be quite dangerous. This is why is it so important to use one Pharmacy with a Pharmacist you can talk with and trust. If there is interactions, you need to let the doctors know what is going on. Answered by Delpha Lockridge 1 year ago.

His doctor needs to go over his pill list and see if some of these can be stopped.(or changed) My experience with the elderly is that the doctor changes their pills and the patient does not understand that pill A should be stopped and pill B replaces it. The doctor needs to be aware of the dizziness and sleepiness, etc. When I took my Mother to the doctor, she often told the doctor everything was "fine" because she had the mistaken idea that he would scold her if she complained. Or she "didn't want to bother him". He sounds miserable and if the doctor can help....that is what he is paid for. (If his doctor is not cooperative...you may need a new doc..just saying ) Answered by Gisela Caputo 1 year ago.


Help with Pharm questions?
Medication order: Cardizem (diltiazem) 100 mg in 100 mL D5W at 0.25 mg/kg over 2 minutes, then begin a continuous infusion of 10 mg/hour.Patient Weight: 165 lbHow many mL/hr will the patient receive as the continuous infusion?The medication order is to administer dobutamine hydrochloride (Dobutrex) at... Asked by Aracelis Montero 1 year ago.

Medication order: Cardizem (diltiazem) 100 mg in 100 mL D5W at 0.25 mg/kg over 2 minutes, then begin a continuous infusion of 10 mg/hour. Patient Weight: 165 lb How many mL/hr will the patient receive as the continuous infusion? The medication order is to administer dobutamine hydrochloride (Dobutrex) at 5.2 mcg/kg/min. The patient weighs 150 lb. Prepare the IV solution by adding Dobutrex 250 mg to 200 mL of D5W. Calculate the flow rate in microdrops (60 drops per mL). Answered by Deangelo Yoshizumi 1 year ago.

17 Drops/Minute. Answered by Nicky Imm 1 year ago.


Sweating problem. MAJOR!?
I;ve got this major problem with sweating. I sweat very easily. Like the simpilest task and i;ll start sweating like a freight train. Like running the sweeper. I sweat every where. Armpits, whole head, arms, butt, feet, etc. and it really sucks cause when i'm with friends or in gym class its embarrassing cause... Asked by Moira Frett 1 year ago.

I;ve got this major problem with sweating. I sweat very easily. Like the simpilest task and i;ll start sweating like a freight train. Like running the sweeper. I sweat every where. Armpits, whole head, arms, butt, feet, etc. and it really sucks cause when i'm with friends or in gym class its embarrassing cause i have to where baggy clothes, my hair up, and we can;t shower. i never get to dress in what i want. and it really sucks. Is there any way i can stop this? Answered by Claribel Snock 1 year ago.

Excess sweating is known as hyperhidrosis. There are several treatments available, as you have all over sweating problems unfortunately topical treatments, prescription anti-perspirants and botox injections (belive it or not botox is licensed (and regularly used) for the treatment of under-arm perspiration) won't help you, you need a medication. these medications can be affective: Glycopyrrolate (Robinul) Propantheline (Pro-Banthine) Oxybutynin Hydrochloride (Ditropan) Indomethacine (indocid) Diltiazem (cardizem) Clonidine (Catapres) Propranolol (Inderal) Oxprenolol (Trasicor) these herbs can be affective if you are not comfortable with medications: Burdock Astragalus Belladonna Oh and AVOID caffine drinks, spicy foods and alcohol! Answered by Denny Truxon 1 year ago.

yeah you probably do have hyperhydrosis..( excessive sweating).i heard about it on mystery diagnosis. If you speak to a doctor about it he can give you some solutions....or medication...for the mean time a good thing to do would be to use secret clinical strength and in places you sweat put baby powder to help wick away some of the moisture and get a travel size baby powder bottle to carry in your purse or bookbag for school...hope this helps. speak to your doctor and good luck.....also if you're open minded a surprising thing to help stop sweating is botox...some celebs even have it injected in their underaarms before a red carpet so they don't sweat and mess up expensive gowns, i've seen it injected into a 40 year old mans pits who sweated excessively and it helped him stop sweating so much also...but talk to your doc b4 taking this next step to see if he has an alternative. Answered by Beata Edey 1 year ago.

Some people just have overactive sweat glands. I do too, it's not a big deal, just shower after you exercise, and put on a lot of deodorant. That way even if you do sweat it won't smell. Sweat isn't a big deal, just relax and don't even think about it. :) Answered by Joetta Warnock 1 year ago.

i sweat excessively and all i do is wear white clothing.. i also highly recommend to not use antipersperant. Answered by Ray Cosselman 1 year ago.

my friend had a similar problem and she went to the doctor and gave her some medication Answered by Leeanne Losey 1 year ago.

idk i seriously have the same problem i use antiperspirent, but it does not work at all (i use dove clinical waterproof antiperspirent) i'm sweatin all under my armpits. idc if my hands get sweaty cus a lot of people have sweaty palms . tell me if you find a trick. Answered by Otis Hallaway 1 year ago.

you need to relax and take it easy thats what i think Answered by Catharine Mcinerny 1 year ago.


How to make Diltiazem Hydrochloride for injection stability?
we make Diltiazem Hydrochloride to dry powder for injection , but it degaretion after one month. it have another substance. how to make it stability? Diltiazem Hydrochloride must be preserved in tight,light-resistant and cool containers. Asked by Deloris Lockmiller 1 year ago.

Why are you asking this? If you are working for a legitimate company making diltiazem, the chemists would know what to do. If you're working for a less than legitimate company..... Answered by Everett Guitian 1 year ago.


What is Diliazem (inwood)?
Asked by Jacqualine Mulich 1 year ago.

Diltiazem hydrochloride is a slow channel voltage dependent calcium entry blocker. There are 3 classes of calcium entry blockers. Diltiazem is the only member of the benzothiazepine family. Although initially used to treat hypertension it is rarely used for that purpose any longer. A series of studies by Robin Roberts, M.D. carried out in Houston in the 1980s demonstrated that individuals on diltiazem for hypertension who suffered a myocardial infarction (heart attack) associated with a low left ventricular ejection fraction (heart failure) had a significantly increased mortality. The only calcium entry blocker that is appropriately utilized today for hypertension is the dihydropyridine amlodipine besylate. Diltiazem is also used for rate control - to slow the heart rate - in individuals with rapid heart rhythm abnormalities such as sometimes seen with atrial fibrillation. Diltiazem is also used for migraine headache prophylaxis as one respondent has suggested. The idea of calcium entry blockers arose from animal research which made note of 2 things. Calcified plaques in arteries tended to cause worse outcomes in the event of a myocardial infarction. In addition with myocardial infarction it is influx of calcium with an osmotic gradient with water following calcium into myocytes (heart muscle cells) resulting is distention that is a major factor in cell death. The idea was that perhaps calcium entry blockers might prevent calcification of arterial plaques and that they might prevent influx of calcium into myocytes when a person suffered a myocardial infarction. It was quickly apparent that these drugs did neither of the above. If I may be of further assistance please let me know. I wish you the very best of health and in all things may God bless. P.S.: I most sincerely do not like to make unkind comments but if there are physicians out there who still prescribe diltiazem for hypertension you should be ashamed of yourself. Answered by Ronald Rozon 1 year ago.

Like every neighborhood Washington Heights and Inwood have their good and bad areas. Part of the Heights and Inwood tend to be very congested though, a lot of traffic, people, businesses, but that also adds a distinct flavor to the neighborhood. Inwood IS part of Manhattan. It's at the northern most end of Manhattan, past 200th Street. Both areas tend to have a high concentration of Latinos, mainly Dominican immigrants who look to ease their transition into the "American" way of life by starting out in an area where they are most comfortable and feel there is a support system for them. Not unlike most other immigrant groups that come to the United States. Answered by Rosemary Spartichino 1 year ago.

Diltiazem is a drug used to relieve the symptoms of Hypertension (High Blood pressure) and also to prevent Migranes. It is also used to reduce cravings of cocaine :) Answered by Roxann Fortino 1 year ago.

a calcium channel blocker just like verapamil Answered by Sharen Bernstein 1 year ago.


What happens when a doctor prescribes cardizem to a 62 yr old man with normal blood pressure?
Had heart attack caused by cardizem Asked by Nicky Lease 1 year ago.

Brand name: Cardizem Pronounced: CAR-di-zem Generic name: Diltiazem hydrochloride Other brand names: Cardizem CD, Cardizem SR, Dilacor XR, Tiazac Why is this drug prescribed? Cardizem and Cardizem CD (a controlled release form of diltiazem) are used in the treatment of angina pectoris (chest pain usually caused by lack of oxygen to the heart due to clogged arteries) and chronic stable angina (caused by exertion). Cardizem CD is also used to treat high blood pressure. Another controlled release form, Cardizem SR, is used only in the treatment of high blood pressure. Cardizem, a calcium channel blocker, dilates blood vessels and slows the heart to reduce blood pressure and the pain of angina. Doctors sometimes prescribe Cardizem for loss of circulation in the fingers and toes (Raynaud's phenomenon), for involuntary movements (tardive dyskinesia), and to prevent heart attack. Tiazac and Dilacor XR are used in the treatment of high blood pressure and chronic stable angina. They may be taken alone or combined with other blood pressure medications. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Cardizem. •More common side effects may include: Abnormally slow heartbeat (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), dizziness, fluid retention, flushing (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), headache, nausea, rash, weakness •Less common or rare side effects may include: Abnormal dreams, allergic reaction, altered way of walking, amnesia, anemia, angina (severe chest pain), blood disorders, congestive heart failure, constipation, cough, depression, diarrhea, difficulty sleeping, drowsiness, dry mouth, excessive urination at night, eye irritation, fainting, flu symptoms, hair loss, hallucinations, heart attack, high blood sugar, hives, impotence, increased output of pale urine, indigestion, infection, irregular heartbeat, itching, joint pain, labored breathing, loss of appetite, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, muscle cramps, nasal congestion or inflammation, nervousness, nosebleed, pain, personality change, pounding heartbeat, rapid heartbeat, reddish or purplish spots on skin, ringing in ears, sexual difficulties, skin inflammation/flaking or peeling, sensitivity to light, sleepiness, sore throat, taste alteration, thirst, tingling or pins and needles, tremor, vision changes, vomiting, welts, weight increase Answered by Brook Hald 1 year ago.

The American Heart Association set new guidelines for normal B/P ranges and 120/90 is too high. They want to see an average pressure of 117/68. So, your B/P of 120/90 is too high and 100/50 is okay. Please remember that B/P fluctuates throughout the day and night and throughout your lifetime. B/Ps are typically lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon/early evening. And the average B/P for a healthy 5-year-old is very different from that of a healthy 15-year-old and a healthy 75-year-old. B/P is affected by stress. Stress comes in many forms. Even Illness, strong emotions and obesity are forms of stress on the body. Pretty much everything is a form of stress. And stress can, at times, be a good thing. So "stress" is a general, catch-all word. Yes, of course you experience stress whether or not you know it when you see it. An isolated reading of 120/90 may not be significant. High or low blood pressure is generally determined by what the values are consistently. Spot checks won't establish a baseline unless done in a specific way. Check your B/P with the same equipment on 3 different days and at 3 different times of day (Morning, mid day and night). You'll get a much better idea of what your baseline B/P is and how it rates according to the AHA. Answered by Coleen Latten 1 year ago.

High blood pressure is not the only reason Cardizem can be prescribed. It does have other uses. Who told you Cardizem caused the heart attack? I have never heard of that. Answered by Dia Dammeyer 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation.?
I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation and am taking Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and Warfarin..If I undergo "Cardio version is a medical procedure by which an abnormally fast heart rate (tachycardia) or cardiac arrhythmia is converted to a normal rhythm, using electricity", will I be able... Asked by Monserrate Chaples 1 year ago.

I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation and am taking Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and Warfarin.. If I undergo "Cardio version is a medical procedure by which an abnormally fast heart rate (tachycardia) or cardiac arrhythmia is converted to a normal rhythm, using electricity", will I be able to come off Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and/or Warfarin? Or am I on either or both for the rest of my life? Thank you. Answered by Russel Reinowski 1 year ago.

Hi Flossie , yes your heart meds will end ,probably not immediately but fairly soon after your procedure. I had my A.F. , arrhythmia /palpitations cured with a Cardiac Ablation up in London's Brompton hospital about 5 weeks ago. Good luck. Answered by Patti Lough 1 year ago.

A cardioversion is usually a temporary fix and most often the AF will return. If you stay in a normal rhythm for a few months your doctor may wean you off of the diltiazem. Doctors are usually more hesitant to take people off of warfarin because at any time you could you go back into AF and possibly have a stroke. Depending on your age and other risk factors for stroke your doctor may also consider replacing the warfarin with other anticoagulant drugs that are easier to take and a little safer, like aspirin and/or plavix. Answered by Louisa Gothe 1 year ago.


Where to go when given bad medicines by a pharmacy?
Twice now I have received a prescribed “180 MG of Diltiazem ER” which was substituted for “180 MG of Cartizem CD” (this was fine) … but each time the 180 quantity of meds have been given in the wrong-much larger capsules, carrying the identification make of 676 676 … in searching for this identification mark .. the... Asked by Polly Lettinga 1 year ago.

If you are receiving them in person (not something you get online) them it seems the obvious place to go is back to the pharmacy. If you order them online, then you need to contact that company. Answered by Pearlie Zolocsik 1 year ago.

Ask the police. Answered by Yasuko Honas 1 year ago.


Can anybody help me out with info on mixing heaps of medications?
I'm wanting to know what the side effects/dangers of taking too many medications are?My Granddad suffers from a lot of illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, emphysema, high blood pressure and fibromyalgia just to name a few and takes HEAPS of different medications. GTN spray for chest pain, augmentin as... Asked by Vivan Emerton 1 year ago.

I'm wanting to know what the side effects/dangers of taking too many medications are? My Granddad suffers from a lot of illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, emphysema, high blood pressure and fibromyalgia just to name a few and takes HEAPS of different medications. GTN spray for chest pain, augmentin as an antibiotic, amitropyline for pain relief from fibromyalgia, aspirin, diltiazem hydrochloride for blood pressure, isosorbide mononitrate for chest pain, spironolactone for heart failure and removing excess fluid, escitalopram for mood and anxiety, atorvastatin for lowering cholesterol, fluticasone propionate and salmeterol for breathlessness, cilazapril for blood pressure, frusemide for excess fluid removal, prednisone for helping with breathing, clopidogrel for prevent heart attacks, pantoprazole for reducing stomach acid and huge amounts of insulin for his diabetes. He is constantly having falls from being so dizzy, always has chest pain, is always sleeping, always out of breath etc etc. Is it dangerous to be on this amount of medication? Answered by Ulysses Deschino 1 year ago.

Please sit down with the Pharmacist and ask if there are any drug interactions going on. If he has several doctors, and they are not aware of what the other are prescribing, then yes, it can be quite dangerous. This is why is it so important to use one Pharmacy with a Pharmacist you can talk with and trust. If there is interactions, you need to let the doctors know what is going on. Answered by Many Shenk 1 year ago.

His doctor needs to go over his pill list and see if some of these can be stopped.(or changed) My experience with the elderly is that the doctor changes their pills and the patient does not understand that pill A should be stopped and pill B replaces it. The doctor needs to be aware of the dizziness and sleepiness, etc. When I took my Mother to the doctor, she often told the doctor everything was "fine" because she had the mistaken idea that he would scold her if she complained. Or she "didn't want to bother him". He sounds miserable and if the doctor can help....that is what he is paid for. (If his doctor is not cooperative...you may need a new doc..just saying ) Answered by Cesar Leedy 1 year ago.


Help with Pharm questions?
Medication order: Cardizem (diltiazem) 100 mg in 100 mL D5W at 0.25 mg/kg over 2 minutes, then begin a continuous infusion of 10 mg/hour.Patient Weight: 165 lbHow many mL/hr will the patient receive as the continuous infusion?The medication order is to administer dobutamine hydrochloride (Dobutrex) at... Asked by Dorian Towsley 1 year ago.

Medication order: Cardizem (diltiazem) 100 mg in 100 mL D5W at 0.25 mg/kg over 2 minutes, then begin a continuous infusion of 10 mg/hour. Patient Weight: 165 lb How many mL/hr will the patient receive as the continuous infusion? The medication order is to administer dobutamine hydrochloride (Dobutrex) at 5.2 mcg/kg/min. The patient weighs 150 lb. Prepare the IV solution by adding Dobutrex 250 mg to 200 mL of D5W. Calculate the flow rate in microdrops (60 drops per mL). Answered by Shenna Durrance 1 year ago.

17 Drops/Minute. Answered by Harry Alampi 1 year ago.


Sweating problem. MAJOR!?
I;ve got this major problem with sweating. I sweat very easily. Like the simpilest task and i;ll start sweating like a freight train. Like running the sweeper. I sweat every where. Armpits, whole head, arms, butt, feet, etc. and it really sucks cause when i'm with friends or in gym class its embarrassing cause... Asked by Don Broomhead 1 year ago.

I;ve got this major problem with sweating. I sweat very easily. Like the simpilest task and i;ll start sweating like a freight train. Like running the sweeper. I sweat every where. Armpits, whole head, arms, butt, feet, etc. and it really sucks cause when i'm with friends or in gym class its embarrassing cause i have to where baggy clothes, my hair up, and we can;t shower. i never get to dress in what i want. and it really sucks. Is there any way i can stop this? Answered by Marilee Linnen 1 year ago.

Excess sweating is known as hyperhidrosis. There are several treatments available, as you have all over sweating problems unfortunately topical treatments, prescription anti-perspirants and botox injections (belive it or not botox is licensed (and regularly used) for the treatment of under-arm perspiration) won't help you, you need a medication. these medications can be affective: Glycopyrrolate (Robinul) Propantheline (Pro-Banthine) Oxybutynin Hydrochloride (Ditropan) Indomethacine (indocid) Diltiazem (cardizem) Clonidine (Catapres) Propranolol (Inderal) Oxprenolol (Trasicor) these herbs can be affective if you are not comfortable with medications: Burdock Astragalus Belladonna Oh and AVOID caffine drinks, spicy foods and alcohol! Answered by Delila Colon 1 year ago.

yeah you probably do have hyperhydrosis..( excessive sweating).i heard about it on mystery diagnosis. If you speak to a doctor about it he can give you some solutions....or medication...for the mean time a good thing to do would be to use secret clinical strength and in places you sweat put baby powder to help wick away some of the moisture and get a travel size baby powder bottle to carry in your purse or bookbag for school...hope this helps. speak to your doctor and good luck.....also if you're open minded a surprising thing to help stop sweating is botox...some celebs even have it injected in their underaarms before a red carpet so they don't sweat and mess up expensive gowns, i've seen it injected into a 40 year old mans pits who sweated excessively and it helped him stop sweating so much also...but talk to your doc b4 taking this next step to see if he has an alternative. Answered by Fletcher Daste 1 year ago.

Some people just have overactive sweat glands. I do too, it's not a big deal, just shower after you exercise, and put on a lot of deodorant. That way even if you do sweat it won't smell. Sweat isn't a big deal, just relax and don't even think about it. :) Answered by Chauncey Cave 1 year ago.

i sweat excessively and all i do is wear white clothing.. i also highly recommend to not use antipersperant. Answered by Laci Saelee 1 year ago.

my friend had a similar problem and she went to the doctor and gave her some medication Answered by Digna Tyre 1 year ago.

idk i seriously have the same problem i use antiperspirent, but it does not work at all (i use dove clinical waterproof antiperspirent) i'm sweatin all under my armpits. idc if my hands get sweaty cus a lot of people have sweaty palms . tell me if you find a trick. Answered by Brigitte Tarvis 1 year ago.

you need to relax and take it easy thats what i think Answered by Wesley Restrepo 1 year ago.


How to make Diltiazem Hydrochloride for injection stability?
we make Diltiazem Hydrochloride to dry powder for injection , but it degaretion after one month. it have another substance. how to make it stability? Diltiazem Hydrochloride must be preserved in tight,light-resistant and cool containers. Asked by Lakisha Adside 1 year ago.

Why are you asking this? If you are working for a legitimate company making diltiazem, the chemists would know what to do. If you're working for a less than legitimate company..... Answered by Andre Halcott 1 year ago.


What is Diliazem (inwood)?
Asked by Zita Koria 1 year ago.

Diltiazem hydrochloride is a slow channel voltage dependent calcium entry blocker. There are 3 classes of calcium entry blockers. Diltiazem is the only member of the benzothiazepine family. Although initially used to treat hypertension it is rarely used for that purpose any longer. A series of studies by Robin Roberts, M.D. carried out in Houston in the 1980s demonstrated that individuals on diltiazem for hypertension who suffered a myocardial infarction (heart attack) associated with a low left ventricular ejection fraction (heart failure) had a significantly increased mortality. The only calcium entry blocker that is appropriately utilized today for hypertension is the dihydropyridine amlodipine besylate. Diltiazem is also used for rate control - to slow the heart rate - in individuals with rapid heart rhythm abnormalities such as sometimes seen with atrial fibrillation. Diltiazem is also used for migraine headache prophylaxis as one respondent has suggested. The idea of calcium entry blockers arose from animal research which made note of 2 things. Calcified plaques in arteries tended to cause worse outcomes in the event of a myocardial infarction. In addition with myocardial infarction it is influx of calcium with an osmotic gradient with water following calcium into myocytes (heart muscle cells) resulting is distention that is a major factor in cell death. The idea was that perhaps calcium entry blockers might prevent calcification of arterial plaques and that they might prevent influx of calcium into myocytes when a person suffered a myocardial infarction. It was quickly apparent that these drugs did neither of the above. If I may be of further assistance please let me know. I wish you the very best of health and in all things may God bless. P.S.: I most sincerely do not like to make unkind comments but if there are physicians out there who still prescribe diltiazem for hypertension you should be ashamed of yourself. Answered by Vilma Diotte 1 year ago.

Like every neighborhood Washington Heights and Inwood have their good and bad areas. Part of the Heights and Inwood tend to be very congested though, a lot of traffic, people, businesses, but that also adds a distinct flavor to the neighborhood. Inwood IS part of Manhattan. It's at the northern most end of Manhattan, past 200th Street. Both areas tend to have a high concentration of Latinos, mainly Dominican immigrants who look to ease their transition into the "American" way of life by starting out in an area where they are most comfortable and feel there is a support system for them. Not unlike most other immigrant groups that come to the United States. Answered by Antonette Mainiero 1 year ago.

Diltiazem is a drug used to relieve the symptoms of Hypertension (High Blood pressure) and also to prevent Migranes. It is also used to reduce cravings of cocaine :) Answered by Magan Porro 1 year ago.

a calcium channel blocker just like verapamil Answered by Irina Dolven 1 year ago.


What happens when a doctor prescribes cardizem to a 62 yr old man with normal blood pressure?
Had heart attack caused by cardizem Asked by Orpha Speedy 1 year ago.

Brand name: Cardizem Pronounced: CAR-di-zem Generic name: Diltiazem hydrochloride Other brand names: Cardizem CD, Cardizem SR, Dilacor XR, Tiazac Why is this drug prescribed? Cardizem and Cardizem CD (a controlled release form of diltiazem) are used in the treatment of angina pectoris (chest pain usually caused by lack of oxygen to the heart due to clogged arteries) and chronic stable angina (caused by exertion). Cardizem CD is also used to treat high blood pressure. Another controlled release form, Cardizem SR, is used only in the treatment of high blood pressure. Cardizem, a calcium channel blocker, dilates blood vessels and slows the heart to reduce blood pressure and the pain of angina. Doctors sometimes prescribe Cardizem for loss of circulation in the fingers and toes (Raynaud's phenomenon), for involuntary movements (tardive dyskinesia), and to prevent heart attack. Tiazac and Dilacor XR are used in the treatment of high blood pressure and chronic stable angina. They may be taken alone or combined with other blood pressure medications. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Cardizem. •More common side effects may include: Abnormally slow heartbeat (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), dizziness, fluid retention, flushing (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), headache, nausea, rash, weakness •Less common or rare side effects may include: Abnormal dreams, allergic reaction, altered way of walking, amnesia, anemia, angina (severe chest pain), blood disorders, congestive heart failure, constipation, cough, depression, diarrhea, difficulty sleeping, drowsiness, dry mouth, excessive urination at night, eye irritation, fainting, flu symptoms, hair loss, hallucinations, heart attack, high blood sugar, hives, impotence, increased output of pale urine, indigestion, infection, irregular heartbeat, itching, joint pain, labored breathing, loss of appetite, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, muscle cramps, nasal congestion or inflammation, nervousness, nosebleed, pain, personality change, pounding heartbeat, rapid heartbeat, reddish or purplish spots on skin, ringing in ears, sexual difficulties, skin inflammation/flaking or peeling, sensitivity to light, sleepiness, sore throat, taste alteration, thirst, tingling or pins and needles, tremor, vision changes, vomiting, welts, weight increase Answered by Brigida Mckaughan 1 year ago.

The American Heart Association set new guidelines for normal B/P ranges and 120/90 is too high. They want to see an average pressure of 117/68. So, your B/P of 120/90 is too high and 100/50 is okay. Please remember that B/P fluctuates throughout the day and night and throughout your lifetime. B/Ps are typically lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon/early evening. And the average B/P for a healthy 5-year-old is very different from that of a healthy 15-year-old and a healthy 75-year-old. B/P is affected by stress. Stress comes in many forms. Even Illness, strong emotions and obesity are forms of stress on the body. Pretty much everything is a form of stress. And stress can, at times, be a good thing. So "stress" is a general, catch-all word. Yes, of course you experience stress whether or not you know it when you see it. An isolated reading of 120/90 may not be significant. High or low blood pressure is generally determined by what the values are consistently. Spot checks won't establish a baseline unless done in a specific way. Check your B/P with the same equipment on 3 different days and at 3 different times of day (Morning, mid day and night). You'll get a much better idea of what your baseline B/P is and how it rates according to the AHA. Answered by Kareen Mantella 1 year ago.

High blood pressure is not the only reason Cardizem can be prescribed. It does have other uses. Who told you Cardizem caused the heart attack? I have never heard of that. Answered by Brent Sellin 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation.?
I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation and am taking Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and Warfarin..If I undergo "Cardio version is a medical procedure by which an abnormally fast heart rate (tachycardia) or cardiac arrhythmia is converted to a normal rhythm, using electricity", will I be able... Asked by Alexander Agliam 1 year ago.

I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation and am taking Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and Warfarin.. If I undergo "Cardio version is a medical procedure by which an abnormally fast heart rate (tachycardia) or cardiac arrhythmia is converted to a normal rhythm, using electricity", will I be able to come off Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and/or Warfarin? Or am I on either or both for the rest of my life? Thank you. Answered by Elidia Hartse 1 year ago.

Hi Flossie , yes your heart meds will end ,probably not immediately but fairly soon after your procedure. I had my A.F. , arrhythmia /palpitations cured with a Cardiac Ablation up in London's Brompton hospital about 5 weeks ago. Good luck. Answered by Gene Goldenstein 1 year ago.

A cardioversion is usually a temporary fix and most often the AF will return. If you stay in a normal rhythm for a few months your doctor may wean you off of the diltiazem. Doctors are usually more hesitant to take people off of warfarin because at any time you could you go back into AF and possibly have a stroke. Depending on your age and other risk factors for stroke your doctor may also consider replacing the warfarin with other anticoagulant drugs that are easier to take and a little safer, like aspirin and/or plavix. Answered by Linwood Hermanns 1 year ago.


Where to go when given bad medicines by a pharmacy?
Twice now I have received a prescribed “180 MG of Diltiazem ER” which was substituted for “180 MG of Cartizem CD” (this was fine) … but each time the 180 quantity of meds have been given in the wrong-much larger capsules, carrying the identification make of 676 676 … in searching for this identification mark .. the... Asked by Donn Lebouef 1 year ago.

If you are receiving them in person (not something you get online) them it seems the obvious place to go is back to the pharmacy. If you order them online, then you need to contact that company. Answered by Lynette Hollabaugh 1 year ago.

Ask the police. Answered by Wallace Hofe 1 year ago.


Can anybody help me out with info on mixing heaps of medications?
I'm wanting to know what the side effects/dangers of taking too many medications are?My Granddad suffers from a lot of illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, emphysema, high blood pressure and fibromyalgia just to name a few and takes HEAPS of different medications. GTN spray for chest pain, augmentin as... Asked by Rita Orellana 1 year ago.

I'm wanting to know what the side effects/dangers of taking too many medications are? My Granddad suffers from a lot of illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, emphysema, high blood pressure and fibromyalgia just to name a few and takes HEAPS of different medications. GTN spray for chest pain, augmentin as an antibiotic, amitropyline for pain relief from fibromyalgia, aspirin, diltiazem hydrochloride for blood pressure, isosorbide mononitrate for chest pain, spironolactone for heart failure and removing excess fluid, escitalopram for mood and anxiety, atorvastatin for lowering cholesterol, fluticasone propionate and salmeterol for breathlessness, cilazapril for blood pressure, frusemide for excess fluid removal, prednisone for helping with breathing, clopidogrel for prevent heart attacks, pantoprazole for reducing stomach acid and huge amounts of insulin for his diabetes. He is constantly having falls from being so dizzy, always has chest pain, is always sleeping, always out of breath etc etc. Is it dangerous to be on this amount of medication? Answered by Bryce Kenouo 1 year ago.

Please sit down with the Pharmacist and ask if there are any drug interactions going on. If he has several doctors, and they are not aware of what the other are prescribing, then yes, it can be quite dangerous. This is why is it so important to use one Pharmacy with a Pharmacist you can talk with and trust. If there is interactions, you need to let the doctors know what is going on. Answered by Olympia Aucoin 1 year ago.

His doctor needs to go over his pill list and see if some of these can be stopped.(or changed) My experience with the elderly is that the doctor changes their pills and the patient does not understand that pill A should be stopped and pill B replaces it. The doctor needs to be aware of the dizziness and sleepiness, etc. When I took my Mother to the doctor, she often told the doctor everything was "fine" because she had the mistaken idea that he would scold her if she complained. Or she "didn't want to bother him". He sounds miserable and if the doctor can help....that is what he is paid for. (If his doctor is not cooperative...you may need a new doc..just saying ) Answered by Tenisha Batala 1 year ago.


Help with Pharm questions?
Medication order: Cardizem (diltiazem) 100 mg in 100 mL D5W at 0.25 mg/kg over 2 minutes, then begin a continuous infusion of 10 mg/hour.Patient Weight: 165 lbHow many mL/hr will the patient receive as the continuous infusion?The medication order is to administer dobutamine hydrochloride (Dobutrex) at... Asked by Micaela Fleschner 1 year ago.

Medication order: Cardizem (diltiazem) 100 mg in 100 mL D5W at 0.25 mg/kg over 2 minutes, then begin a continuous infusion of 10 mg/hour. Patient Weight: 165 lb How many mL/hr will the patient receive as the continuous infusion? The medication order is to administer dobutamine hydrochloride (Dobutrex) at 5.2 mcg/kg/min. The patient weighs 150 lb. Prepare the IV solution by adding Dobutrex 250 mg to 200 mL of D5W. Calculate the flow rate in microdrops (60 drops per mL). Answered by Ted Mynhier 1 year ago.

17 Drops/Minute. Answered by Keely Szczesny 1 year ago.


Sweating problem. MAJOR!?
I;ve got this major problem with sweating. I sweat very easily. Like the simpilest task and i;ll start sweating like a freight train. Like running the sweeper. I sweat every where. Armpits, whole head, arms, butt, feet, etc. and it really sucks cause when i'm with friends or in gym class its embarrassing cause... Asked by Jacquelynn Mugleston 1 year ago.

I;ve got this major problem with sweating. I sweat very easily. Like the simpilest task and i;ll start sweating like a freight train. Like running the sweeper. I sweat every where. Armpits, whole head, arms, butt, feet, etc. and it really sucks cause when i'm with friends or in gym class its embarrassing cause i have to where baggy clothes, my hair up, and we can;t shower. i never get to dress in what i want. and it really sucks. Is there any way i can stop this? Answered by Jama Modique 1 year ago.

Excess sweating is known as hyperhidrosis. There are several treatments available, as you have all over sweating problems unfortunately topical treatments, prescription anti-perspirants and botox injections (belive it or not botox is licensed (and regularly used) for the treatment of under-arm perspiration) won't help you, you need a medication. these medications can be affective: Glycopyrrolate (Robinul) Propantheline (Pro-Banthine) Oxybutynin Hydrochloride (Ditropan) Indomethacine (indocid) Diltiazem (cardizem) Clonidine (Catapres) Propranolol (Inderal) Oxprenolol (Trasicor) these herbs can be affective if you are not comfortable with medications: Burdock Astragalus Belladonna Oh and AVOID caffine drinks, spicy foods and alcohol! Answered by Vernell Wallravin 1 year ago.

yeah you probably do have hyperhydrosis..( excessive sweating).i heard about it on mystery diagnosis. If you speak to a doctor about it he can give you some solutions....or medication...for the mean time a good thing to do would be to use secret clinical strength and in places you sweat put baby powder to help wick away some of the moisture and get a travel size baby powder bottle to carry in your purse or bookbag for school...hope this helps. speak to your doctor and good luck.....also if you're open minded a surprising thing to help stop sweating is botox...some celebs even have it injected in their underaarms before a red carpet so they don't sweat and mess up expensive gowns, i've seen it injected into a 40 year old mans pits who sweated excessively and it helped him stop sweating so much also...but talk to your doc b4 taking this next step to see if he has an alternative. Answered by Georgia Paramore 1 year ago.

Some people just have overactive sweat glands. I do too, it's not a big deal, just shower after you exercise, and put on a lot of deodorant. That way even if you do sweat it won't smell. Sweat isn't a big deal, just relax and don't even think about it. :) Answered by Britany Schaumberg 1 year ago.

i sweat excessively and all i do is wear white clothing.. i also highly recommend to not use antipersperant. Answered by Darin Lieuallen 1 year ago.

my friend had a similar problem and she went to the doctor and gave her some medication Answered by Nadine Jarzynka 1 year ago.

idk i seriously have the same problem i use antiperspirent, but it does not work at all (i use dove clinical waterproof antiperspirent) i'm sweatin all under my armpits. idc if my hands get sweaty cus a lot of people have sweaty palms . tell me if you find a trick. Answered by Damon Dersch 1 year ago.

you need to relax and take it easy thats what i think Answered by Brendon Busque 1 year ago.


How to make Diltiazem Hydrochloride for injection stability?
we make Diltiazem Hydrochloride to dry powder for injection , but it degaretion after one month. it have another substance. how to make it stability? Diltiazem Hydrochloride must be preserved in tight,light-resistant and cool containers. Asked by Amee Protas 1 year ago.

Why are you asking this? If you are working for a legitimate company making diltiazem, the chemists would know what to do. If you're working for a less than legitimate company..... Answered by Delinda Frederique 1 year ago.


What is Diliazem (inwood)?
Asked by Cristal Baldivia 1 year ago.

Diltiazem hydrochloride is a slow channel voltage dependent calcium entry blocker. There are 3 classes of calcium entry blockers. Diltiazem is the only member of the benzothiazepine family. Although initially used to treat hypertension it is rarely used for that purpose any longer. A series of studies by Robin Roberts, M.D. carried out in Houston in the 1980s demonstrated that individuals on diltiazem for hypertension who suffered a myocardial infarction (heart attack) associated with a low left ventricular ejection fraction (heart failure) had a significantly increased mortality. The only calcium entry blocker that is appropriately utilized today for hypertension is the dihydropyridine amlodipine besylate. Diltiazem is also used for rate control - to slow the heart rate - in individuals with rapid heart rhythm abnormalities such as sometimes seen with atrial fibrillation. Diltiazem is also used for migraine headache prophylaxis as one respondent has suggested. The idea of calcium entry blockers arose from animal research which made note of 2 things. Calcified plaques in arteries tended to cause worse outcomes in the event of a myocardial infarction. In addition with myocardial infarction it is influx of calcium with an osmotic gradient with water following calcium into myocytes (heart muscle cells) resulting is distention that is a major factor in cell death. The idea was that perhaps calcium entry blockers might prevent calcification of arterial plaques and that they might prevent influx of calcium into myocytes when a person suffered a myocardial infarction. It was quickly apparent that these drugs did neither of the above. If I may be of further assistance please let me know. I wish you the very best of health and in all things may God bless. P.S.: I most sincerely do not like to make unkind comments but if there are physicians out there who still prescribe diltiazem for hypertension you should be ashamed of yourself. Answered by Truman Panter 1 year ago.

Like every neighborhood Washington Heights and Inwood have their good and bad areas. Part of the Heights and Inwood tend to be very congested though, a lot of traffic, people, businesses, but that also adds a distinct flavor to the neighborhood. Inwood IS part of Manhattan. It's at the northern most end of Manhattan, past 200th Street. Both areas tend to have a high concentration of Latinos, mainly Dominican immigrants who look to ease their transition into the "American" way of life by starting out in an area where they are most comfortable and feel there is a support system for them. Not unlike most other immigrant groups that come to the United States. Answered by Milagros Anagnost 1 year ago.

Diltiazem is a drug used to relieve the symptoms of Hypertension (High Blood pressure) and also to prevent Migranes. It is also used to reduce cravings of cocaine :) Answered by Lashonda Butzlaff 1 year ago.

a calcium channel blocker just like verapamil Answered by Shawanna Goldinger 1 year ago.


What happens when a doctor prescribes cardizem to a 62 yr old man with normal blood pressure?
Had heart attack caused by cardizem Asked by Tawna Yengo 1 year ago.

Brand name: Cardizem Pronounced: CAR-di-zem Generic name: Diltiazem hydrochloride Other brand names: Cardizem CD, Cardizem SR, Dilacor XR, Tiazac Why is this drug prescribed? Cardizem and Cardizem CD (a controlled release form of diltiazem) are used in the treatment of angina pectoris (chest pain usually caused by lack of oxygen to the heart due to clogged arteries) and chronic stable angina (caused by exertion). Cardizem CD is also used to treat high blood pressure. Another controlled release form, Cardizem SR, is used only in the treatment of high blood pressure. Cardizem, a calcium channel blocker, dilates blood vessels and slows the heart to reduce blood pressure and the pain of angina. Doctors sometimes prescribe Cardizem for loss of circulation in the fingers and toes (Raynaud's phenomenon), for involuntary movements (tardive dyskinesia), and to prevent heart attack. Tiazac and Dilacor XR are used in the treatment of high blood pressure and chronic stable angina. They may be taken alone or combined with other blood pressure medications. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Cardizem. •More common side effects may include: Abnormally slow heartbeat (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), dizziness, fluid retention, flushing (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), headache, nausea, rash, weakness •Less common or rare side effects may include: Abnormal dreams, allergic reaction, altered way of walking, amnesia, anemia, angina (severe chest pain), blood disorders, congestive heart failure, constipation, cough, depression, diarrhea, difficulty sleeping, drowsiness, dry mouth, excessive urination at night, eye irritation, fainting, flu symptoms, hair loss, hallucinations, heart attack, high blood sugar, hives, impotence, increased output of pale urine, indigestion, infection, irregular heartbeat, itching, joint pain, labored breathing, loss of appetite, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, muscle cramps, nasal congestion or inflammation, nervousness, nosebleed, pain, personality change, pounding heartbeat, rapid heartbeat, reddish or purplish spots on skin, ringing in ears, sexual difficulties, skin inflammation/flaking or peeling, sensitivity to light, sleepiness, sore throat, taste alteration, thirst, tingling or pins and needles, tremor, vision changes, vomiting, welts, weight increase Answered by Lorina Dubree 1 year ago.

The American Heart Association set new guidelines for normal B/P ranges and 120/90 is too high. They want to see an average pressure of 117/68. So, your B/P of 120/90 is too high and 100/50 is okay. Please remember that B/P fluctuates throughout the day and night and throughout your lifetime. B/Ps are typically lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon/early evening. And the average B/P for a healthy 5-year-old is very different from that of a healthy 15-year-old and a healthy 75-year-old. B/P is affected by stress. Stress comes in many forms. Even Illness, strong emotions and obesity are forms of stress on the body. Pretty much everything is a form of stress. And stress can, at times, be a good thing. So "stress" is a general, catch-all word. Yes, of course you experience stress whether or not you know it when you see it. An isolated reading of 120/90 may not be significant. High or low blood pressure is generally determined by what the values are consistently. Spot checks won't establish a baseline unless done in a specific way. Check your B/P with the same equipment on 3 different days and at 3 different times of day (Morning, mid day and night). You'll get a much better idea of what your baseline B/P is and how it rates according to the AHA. Answered by Marry Greminger 1 year ago.

High blood pressure is not the only reason Cardizem can be prescribed. It does have other uses. Who told you Cardizem caused the heart attack? I have never heard of that. Answered by Garland Rosewall 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation.?
I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation and am taking Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and Warfarin..If I undergo "Cardio version is a medical procedure by which an abnormally fast heart rate (tachycardia) or cardiac arrhythmia is converted to a normal rhythm, using electricity", will I be able... Asked by Philip Cozad 1 year ago.

I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation and am taking Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and Warfarin.. If I undergo "Cardio version is a medical procedure by which an abnormally fast heart rate (tachycardia) or cardiac arrhythmia is converted to a normal rhythm, using electricity", will I be able to come off Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and/or Warfarin? Or am I on either or both for the rest of my life? Thank you. Answered by Rachell Angelilli 1 year ago.

Hi Flossie , yes your heart meds will end ,probably not immediately but fairly soon after your procedure. I had my A.F. , arrhythmia /palpitations cured with a Cardiac Ablation up in London's Brompton hospital about 5 weeks ago. Good luck. Answered by Devin Werremeyer 1 year ago.

A cardioversion is usually a temporary fix and most often the AF will return. If you stay in a normal rhythm for a few months your doctor may wean you off of the diltiazem. Doctors are usually more hesitant to take people off of warfarin because at any time you could you go back into AF and possibly have a stroke. Depending on your age and other risk factors for stroke your doctor may also consider replacing the warfarin with other anticoagulant drugs that are easier to take and a little safer, like aspirin and/or plavix. Answered by Maura Niverson 1 year ago.


Where to go when given bad medicines by a pharmacy?
Twice now I have received a prescribed “180 MG of Diltiazem ER” which was substituted for “180 MG of Cartizem CD” (this was fine) … but each time the 180 quantity of meds have been given in the wrong-much larger capsules, carrying the identification make of 676 676 … in searching for this identification mark .. the... Asked by Susan Shockency 1 year ago.

If you are receiving them in person (not something you get online) them it seems the obvious place to go is back to the pharmacy. If you order them online, then you need to contact that company. Answered by Marina Auten 1 year ago.

Ask the police. Answered by Annamaria Dill 1 year ago.


Can anybody help me out with info on mixing heaps of medications?
I'm wanting to know what the side effects/dangers of taking too many medications are?My Granddad suffers from a lot of illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, emphysema, high blood pressure and fibromyalgia just to name a few and takes HEAPS of different medications. GTN spray for chest pain, augmentin as... Asked by Lavona Rudi 1 year ago.

I'm wanting to know what the side effects/dangers of taking too many medications are? My Granddad suffers from a lot of illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, emphysema, high blood pressure and fibromyalgia just to name a few and takes HEAPS of different medications. GTN spray for chest pain, augmentin as an antibiotic, amitropyline for pain relief from fibromyalgia, aspirin, diltiazem hydrochloride for blood pressure, isosorbide mononitrate for chest pain, spironolactone for heart failure and removing excess fluid, escitalopram for mood and anxiety, atorvastatin for lowering cholesterol, fluticasone propionate and salmeterol for breathlessness, cilazapril for blood pressure, frusemide for excess fluid removal, prednisone for helping with breathing, clopidogrel for prevent heart attacks, pantoprazole for reducing stomach acid and huge amounts of insulin for his diabetes. He is constantly having falls from being so dizzy, always has chest pain, is always sleeping, always out of breath etc etc. Is it dangerous to be on this amount of medication? Answered by Steven Poupard 1 year ago.

Please sit down with the Pharmacist and ask if there are any drug interactions going on. If he has several doctors, and they are not aware of what the other are prescribing, then yes, it can be quite dangerous. This is why is it so important to use one Pharmacy with a Pharmacist you can talk with and trust. If there is interactions, you need to let the doctors know what is going on. Answered by Hollie Hanbury 1 year ago.

His doctor needs to go over his pill list and see if some of these can be stopped.(or changed) My experience with the elderly is that the doctor changes their pills and the patient does not understand that pill A should be stopped and pill B replaces it. The doctor needs to be aware of the dizziness and sleepiness, etc. When I took my Mother to the doctor, she often told the doctor everything was "fine" because she had the mistaken idea that he would scold her if she complained. Or she "didn't want to bother him". He sounds miserable and if the doctor can help....that is what he is paid for. (If his doctor is not cooperative...you may need a new doc..just saying ) Answered by Tasia Burows 1 year ago.


Help with Pharm questions?
Medication order: Cardizem (diltiazem) 100 mg in 100 mL D5W at 0.25 mg/kg over 2 minutes, then begin a continuous infusion of 10 mg/hour.Patient Weight: 165 lbHow many mL/hr will the patient receive as the continuous infusion?The medication order is to administer dobutamine hydrochloride (Dobutrex) at... Asked by Sha Norbeck 1 year ago.

Medication order: Cardizem (diltiazem) 100 mg in 100 mL D5W at 0.25 mg/kg over 2 minutes, then begin a continuous infusion of 10 mg/hour. Patient Weight: 165 lb How many mL/hr will the patient receive as the continuous infusion? The medication order is to administer dobutamine hydrochloride (Dobutrex) at 5.2 mcg/kg/min. The patient weighs 150 lb. Prepare the IV solution by adding Dobutrex 250 mg to 200 mL of D5W. Calculate the flow rate in microdrops (60 drops per mL). Answered by Larae Sharp 1 year ago.

17 Drops/Minute. Answered by Leonarda Pivec 1 year ago.


Sweating problem. MAJOR!?
I;ve got this major problem with sweating. I sweat very easily. Like the simpilest task and i;ll start sweating like a freight train. Like running the sweeper. I sweat every where. Armpits, whole head, arms, butt, feet, etc. and it really sucks cause when i'm with friends or in gym class its embarrassing cause... Asked by Refugio Menkin 1 year ago.

I;ve got this major problem with sweating. I sweat very easily. Like the simpilest task and i;ll start sweating like a freight train. Like running the sweeper. I sweat every where. Armpits, whole head, arms, butt, feet, etc. and it really sucks cause when i'm with friends or in gym class its embarrassing cause i have to where baggy clothes, my hair up, and we can;t shower. i never get to dress in what i want. and it really sucks. Is there any way i can stop this? Answered by Johnnie Sanpson 1 year ago.

Excess sweating is known as hyperhidrosis. There are several treatments available, as you have all over sweating problems unfortunately topical treatments, prescription anti-perspirants and botox injections (belive it or not botox is licensed (and regularly used) for the treatment of under-arm perspiration) won't help you, you need a medication. these medications can be affective: Glycopyrrolate (Robinul) Propantheline (Pro-Banthine) Oxybutynin Hydrochloride (Ditropan) Indomethacine (indocid) Diltiazem (cardizem) Clonidine (Catapres) Propranolol (Inderal) Oxprenolol (Trasicor) these herbs can be affective if you are not comfortable with medications: Burdock Astragalus Belladonna Oh and AVOID caffine drinks, spicy foods and alcohol! Answered by Shaneka Quiroz 1 year ago.

yeah you probably do have hyperhydrosis..( excessive sweating).i heard about it on mystery diagnosis. If you speak to a doctor about it he can give you some solutions....or medication...for the mean time a good thing to do would be to use secret clinical strength and in places you sweat put baby powder to help wick away some of the moisture and get a travel size baby powder bottle to carry in your purse or bookbag for school...hope this helps. speak to your doctor and good luck.....also if you're open minded a surprising thing to help stop sweating is botox...some celebs even have it injected in their underaarms before a red carpet so they don't sweat and mess up expensive gowns, i've seen it injected into a 40 year old mans pits who sweated excessively and it helped him stop sweating so much also...but talk to your doc b4 taking this next step to see if he has an alternative. Answered by Dannette Sandell 1 year ago.

Some people just have overactive sweat glands. I do too, it's not a big deal, just shower after you exercise, and put on a lot of deodorant. That way even if you do sweat it won't smell. Sweat isn't a big deal, just relax and don't even think about it. :) Answered by Lourdes Ordeneaux 1 year ago.

i sweat excessively and all i do is wear white clothing.. i also highly recommend to not use antipersperant. Answered by Tyson Banfield 1 year ago.

my friend had a similar problem and she went to the doctor and gave her some medication Answered by Tristan Wai 1 year ago.

idk i seriously have the same problem i use antiperspirent, but it does not work at all (i use dove clinical waterproof antiperspirent) i'm sweatin all under my armpits. idc if my hands get sweaty cus a lot of people have sweaty palms . tell me if you find a trick. Answered by Cameron Lanciotti 1 year ago.

you need to relax and take it easy thats what i think Answered by Freeman Aufiero 1 year ago.


How to make Diltiazem Hydrochloride for injection stability?
we make Diltiazem Hydrochloride to dry powder for injection , but it degaretion after one month. it have another substance. how to make it stability? Diltiazem Hydrochloride must be preserved in tight,light-resistant and cool containers. Asked by Raisa Tengwall 1 year ago.

Why are you asking this? If you are working for a legitimate company making diltiazem, the chemists would know what to do. If you're working for a less than legitimate company..... Answered by Andera Jeanbaptiste 1 year ago.


What is Diliazem (inwood)?
Asked by Ka Hudlin 1 year ago.

Diltiazem hydrochloride is a slow channel voltage dependent calcium entry blocker. There are 3 classes of calcium entry blockers. Diltiazem is the only member of the benzothiazepine family. Although initially used to treat hypertension it is rarely used for that purpose any longer. A series of studies by Robin Roberts, M.D. carried out in Houston in the 1980s demonstrated that individuals on diltiazem for hypertension who suffered a myocardial infarction (heart attack) associated with a low left ventricular ejection fraction (heart failure) had a significantly increased mortality. The only calcium entry blocker that is appropriately utilized today for hypertension is the dihydropyridine amlodipine besylate. Diltiazem is also used for rate control - to slow the heart rate - in individuals with rapid heart rhythm abnormalities such as sometimes seen with atrial fibrillation. Diltiazem is also used for migraine headache prophylaxis as one respondent has suggested. The idea of calcium entry blockers arose from animal research which made note of 2 things. Calcified plaques in arteries tended to cause worse outcomes in the event of a myocardial infarction. In addition with myocardial infarction it is influx of calcium with an osmotic gradient with water following calcium into myocytes (heart muscle cells) resulting is distention that is a major factor in cell death. The idea was that perhaps calcium entry blockers might prevent calcification of arterial plaques and that they might prevent influx of calcium into myocytes when a person suffered a myocardial infarction. It was quickly apparent that these drugs did neither of the above. If I may be of further assistance please let me know. I wish you the very best of health and in all things may God bless. P.S.: I most sincerely do not like to make unkind comments but if there are physicians out there who still prescribe diltiazem for hypertension you should be ashamed of yourself. Answered by Ernie Ramseyer 1 year ago.

Like every neighborhood Washington Heights and Inwood have their good and bad areas. Part of the Heights and Inwood tend to be very congested though, a lot of traffic, people, businesses, but that also adds a distinct flavor to the neighborhood. Inwood IS part of Manhattan. It's at the northern most end of Manhattan, past 200th Street. Both areas tend to have a high concentration of Latinos, mainly Dominican immigrants who look to ease their transition into the "American" way of life by starting out in an area where they are most comfortable and feel there is a support system for them. Not unlike most other immigrant groups that come to the United States. Answered by Laticia Venanzi 1 year ago.

Diltiazem is a drug used to relieve the symptoms of Hypertension (High Blood pressure) and also to prevent Migranes. It is also used to reduce cravings of cocaine :) Answered by Douglass Locatelli 1 year ago.

a calcium channel blocker just like verapamil Answered by Miguelina Konopski 1 year ago.


What happens when a doctor prescribes cardizem to a 62 yr old man with normal blood pressure?
Had heart attack caused by cardizem Asked by Rebecka Paya 1 year ago.

Brand name: Cardizem Pronounced: CAR-di-zem Generic name: Diltiazem hydrochloride Other brand names: Cardizem CD, Cardizem SR, Dilacor XR, Tiazac Why is this drug prescribed? Cardizem and Cardizem CD (a controlled release form of diltiazem) are used in the treatment of angina pectoris (chest pain usually caused by lack of oxygen to the heart due to clogged arteries) and chronic stable angina (caused by exertion). Cardizem CD is also used to treat high blood pressure. Another controlled release form, Cardizem SR, is used only in the treatment of high blood pressure. Cardizem, a calcium channel blocker, dilates blood vessels and slows the heart to reduce blood pressure and the pain of angina. Doctors sometimes prescribe Cardizem for loss of circulation in the fingers and toes (Raynaud's phenomenon), for involuntary movements (tardive dyskinesia), and to prevent heart attack. Tiazac and Dilacor XR are used in the treatment of high blood pressure and chronic stable angina. They may be taken alone or combined with other blood pressure medications. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Cardizem. •More common side effects may include: Abnormally slow heartbeat (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), dizziness, fluid retention, flushing (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), headache, nausea, rash, weakness •Less common or rare side effects may include: Abnormal dreams, allergic reaction, altered way of walking, amnesia, anemia, angina (severe chest pain), blood disorders, congestive heart failure, constipation, cough, depression, diarrhea, difficulty sleeping, drowsiness, dry mouth, excessive urination at night, eye irritation, fainting, flu symptoms, hair loss, hallucinations, heart attack, high blood sugar, hives, impotence, increased output of pale urine, indigestion, infection, irregular heartbeat, itching, joint pain, labored breathing, loss of appetite, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, muscle cramps, nasal congestion or inflammation, nervousness, nosebleed, pain, personality change, pounding heartbeat, rapid heartbeat, reddish or purplish spots on skin, ringing in ears, sexual difficulties, skin inflammation/flaking or peeling, sensitivity to light, sleepiness, sore throat, taste alteration, thirst, tingling or pins and needles, tremor, vision changes, vomiting, welts, weight increase Answered by Inga Lones 1 year ago.

The American Heart Association set new guidelines for normal B/P ranges and 120/90 is too high. They want to see an average pressure of 117/68. So, your B/P of 120/90 is too high and 100/50 is okay. Please remember that B/P fluctuates throughout the day and night and throughout your lifetime. B/Ps are typically lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon/early evening. And the average B/P for a healthy 5-year-old is very different from that of a healthy 15-year-old and a healthy 75-year-old. B/P is affected by stress. Stress comes in many forms. Even Illness, strong emotions and obesity are forms of stress on the body. Pretty much everything is a form of stress. And stress can, at times, be a good thing. So "stress" is a general, catch-all word. Yes, of course you experience stress whether or not you know it when you see it. An isolated reading of 120/90 may not be significant. High or low blood pressure is generally determined by what the values are consistently. Spot checks won't establish a baseline unless done in a specific way. Check your B/P with the same equipment on 3 different days and at 3 different times of day (Morning, mid day and night). You'll get a much better idea of what your baseline B/P is and how it rates according to the AHA. Answered by Bea Stricklin 1 year ago.

High blood pressure is not the only reason Cardizem can be prescribed. It does have other uses. Who told you Cardizem caused the heart attack? I have never heard of that. Answered by Lindy Niedbalec 1 year ago.


I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation.?
I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation and am taking Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and Warfarin..If I undergo "Cardio version is a medical procedure by which an abnormally fast heart rate (tachycardia) or cardiac arrhythmia is converted to a normal rhythm, using electricity", will I be able... Asked by Neta Lynn 1 year ago.

I have been diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation and am taking Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and Warfarin.. If I undergo "Cardio version is a medical procedure by which an abnormally fast heart rate (tachycardia) or cardiac arrhythmia is converted to a normal rhythm, using electricity", will I be able to come off Adizem (Diltiazem Hydrochloride?) and/or Warfarin? Or am I on either or both for the rest of my life? Thank you. Answered by Malik Kaschmitter 1 year ago.

Hi Flossie , yes your heart meds will end ,probably not immediately but fairly soon after your procedure. I had my A.F. , arrhythmia /palpitations cured with a Cardiac Ablation up in London's Brompton hospital about 5 weeks ago. Good luck. Answered by Dixie Rieve 1 year ago.

A cardioversion is usually a temporary fix and most often the AF will return. If you stay in a normal rhythm for a few months your doctor may wean you off of the diltiazem. Doctors are usually more hesitant to take people off of warfarin because at any time you could you go back into AF and possibly have a stroke. Depending on your age and other risk factors for stroke your doctor may also consider replacing the warfarin with other anticoagulant drugs that are easier to take and a little safer, like aspirin and/or plavix. Answered by Lorilee Filsinger 1 year ago.


Where to go when given bad medicines by a pharmacy?
Twice now I have received a prescribed “180 MG of Diltiazem ER” which was substituted for “180 MG of Cartizem CD” (this was fine) … but each time the 180 quantity of meds have been given in the wrong-much larger capsules, carrying the identification make of 676 676 … in searching for this identification mark .. the... Asked by Brinda Bowerize 1 year ago.

If you are receiving them in person (not something you get online) them it seems the obvious place to go is back to the pharmacy. If you order them online, then you need to contact that company. Answered by Keisha Dieffenbacher 1 year ago.

Ask the police. Answered by Fred Pobre 1 year ago.


Can anybody help me out with info on mixing heaps of medications?
I'm wanting to know what the side effects/dangers of taking too many medications are?My Granddad suffers from a lot of illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, emphysema, high blood pressure and fibromyalgia just to name a few and takes HEAPS of different medications. GTN spray for chest pain, augmentin as... Asked by Jeremy Dammrich 1 year ago.

I'm wanting to know what the side effects/dangers of taking too many medications are? My Granddad suffers from a lot of illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, emphysema, high blood pressure and fibromyalgia just to name a few and takes HEAPS of different medications. GTN spray for chest pain, augmentin as an antibiotic, amitropyline for pain relief from fibromyalgia, aspirin, diltiazem hydrochloride for blood pressure, isosorbide mononitrate for chest pain, spironolactone for heart failure and removing excess fluid, escitalopram for mood and anxiety, atorvastatin for lowering cholesterol, fluticasone propionate and salmeterol for breathlessness, cilazapril for blood pressure, frusemide for excess fluid removal, prednisone for helping with breathing, clopidogrel for prevent heart attacks, pantoprazole for reducing stomach acid and huge amounts of insulin for his diabetes. He is constantly having falls from being so dizzy, always has chest pain, is always sleeping, always out of breath etc etc. Is it dangerous to be on this amount of medication? Answered by Claire Hieronymus 1 year ago.

Please sit down with the Pharmacist and ask if there are any drug interactions going on. If he has several doctors, and they are not aware of what the other are prescribing, then yes, it can be quite dangerous. This is why is it so important to use one Pharmacy with a Pharmacist you can talk with and trust. If there is interactions, you need to let the doctors know what is going on. Answered by Carlo Yballe 1 year ago.

His doctor needs to go over his pill list and see if some of these can be stopped.(or changed) My experience with the elderly is that the doctor changes their pills and the patient does not understand that pill A should be stopped and pill B replaces it. The doctor needs to be aware of the dizziness and sleepiness, etc. When I took my Mother to the doctor, she often told the doctor everything was "fine" because she had the mistaken idea that he would scold her if she complained. Or she "didn't want to bother him". He sounds miserable and if the doctor can help....that is what he is paid for. (If his doctor is not cooperative...you may need a new doc..just saying ) Answered by Alethea Pitarresi 1 year ago.


Help with Pharm questions?
Medication order: Cardizem (diltiazem) 100 mg in 100 mL D5W at 0.25 mg/kg over 2 minutes, then begin a continuous infusion of 10 mg/hour.Patient Weight: 165 lbHow many mL/hr will the patient receive as the continuous infusion?The medication order is to administer dobutamine hydrochloride (Dobutrex) at... Asked by Kate Arboleda 1 year ago.

Medication order: Cardizem (diltiazem) 100 mg in 100 mL D5W at 0.25 mg/kg over 2 minutes, then begin a continuous infusion of 10 mg/hour. Patient Weight: 165 lb How many mL/hr will the patient receive as the continuous infusion? The medication order is to administer dobutamine hydrochloride (Dobutrex) at 5.2 mcg/kg/min. The patient weighs 150 lb. Prepare the IV solution by adding Dobutrex 250 mg to 200 mL of D5W. Calculate the flow rate in microdrops (60 drops per mL). Answered by Gail Locatelli 1 year ago.

17 Drops/Minute. Answered by Marlo Nettik 1 year ago.


Sweating problem. MAJOR!?
I;ve got this major problem with sweating. I sweat very easily. Like the simpilest task and i;ll start sweating like a freight train. Like running the sweeper. I sweat every where. Armpits, whole head, arms, butt, feet, etc. and it really sucks cause when i'm with friends or in gym class its embarrassing cause... Asked by Cedric Agers 1 year ago.

I;ve got this major problem with sweating. I sweat very easily. Like the simpilest task and i;ll start sweating like a freight train. Like running the sweeper. I sweat every where. Armpits, whole head, arms, butt, feet, etc. and it really sucks cause when i'm with friends or in gym class its embarrassing cause i have to where baggy clothes, my hair up, and we can;t shower. i never get to dress in what i want. and it really sucks. Is there any way i can stop this? Answered by Daisy Quenneville 1 year ago.

Excess sweating is known as hyperhidrosis. There are several treatments available, as you have all over sweating problems unfortunately topical treatments, prescription anti-perspirants and botox injections (belive it or not botox is licensed (and regularly used) for the treatment of under-arm perspiration) won't help you, you need a medication. these medications can be affective: Glycopyrrolate (Robinul) Propantheline (Pro-Banthine) Oxybutynin Hydrochloride (Ditropan) Indomethacine (indocid) Diltiazem (cardizem) Clonidine (Catapres) Propranolol (Inderal) Oxprenolol (Trasicor) these herbs can be affective if you are not comfortable with medications: Burdock Astragalus Belladonna Oh and AVOID caffine drinks, spicy foods and alcohol! Answered by Lazaro Gere 1 year ago.

yeah you probably do have hyperhydrosis..( excessive sweating).i heard about it on mystery diagnosis. If you speak to a doctor about it he can give you some solutions....or medication...for the mean time a good thing to do would be to use secret clinical strength and in places you sweat put baby powder to help wick away some of the moisture and get a travel size baby powder bottle to carry in your purse or bookbag for school...hope this helps. speak to your doctor and good luck.....also if you're open minded a surprising thing to help stop sweating is botox...some celebs even have it injected in their underaarms before a red carpet so they don't sweat and mess up expensive gowns, i've seen it injected into a 40 year old mans pits who sweated excessively and it helped him stop sweating so much also...but talk to your doc b4 taking this next step to see if he has an alternative. Answered by Lonnie Ervay 1 year ago.

Some people just have overactive sweat glands. I do too, it's not a big deal, just shower after you exercise, and put on a lot of deodorant. That way even if you do sweat it won't smell. Sweat isn't a big deal, just relax and don't even think about it. :) Answered by Ashely Julander 1 year ago.

i sweat excessively and all i do is wear white clothing.. i also highly recommend to not use antipersperant. Answered by Emory Marten 1 year ago.

my friend had a similar problem and she went to the doctor and gave her some medication Answered by Rosita Mcguire 1 year ago.

idk i seriously have the same problem i use antiperspirent, but it does not work at all (i use dove clinical waterproof antiperspirent) i'm sweatin all under my armpits. idc if my hands get sweaty cus a lot of people have sweaty palms . tell me if you find a trick. Answered by Silvana Appleyard 1 year ago.

you need to relax and take it easy thats what i think Answered by Charmaine Gunzalez 1 year ago.


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