Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019034/003.

Names and composition

"DILAUDID" is the commercial name of a drug composed of HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019034/003 DILAUDID HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
019034/004 DILAUDID HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per ML
019034/005 DILAUDID HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4MG per ML
019891/001 DILAUDID HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
019892/001 DILAUDID HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
019892/002 DILAUDID HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
019892/003 DILAUDID HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019034/001 DILAUDID-HP HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
019034/002 DILAUDID-HP HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 250MG per VIAL
019034/003 DILAUDID HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
019034/004 DILAUDID HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per ML
019034/005 DILAUDID HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4MG per ML
019891/001 DILAUDID HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
019892/001 DILAUDID HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
019892/002 DILAUDID HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
019892/003 DILAUDID HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
021044/001 PALLADONE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 12MG
021044/002 PALLADONE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 16MG
021044/003 PALLADONE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 24MG
021044/004 PALLADONE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 32MG
021217/001 EXALGO HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 8MG
021217/002 EXALGO HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 12MG
021217/003 EXALGO HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 16MG
021217/004 EXALGO HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 32MG
074317/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
074597/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
074597/003 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
074598/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
074653/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
076444/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
076723/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
076855/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
076855/002 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
076855/003 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
077311/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
077311/002 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
077311/003 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
077471/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 8MG
077471/002 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
077471/003 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
078228/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
078261/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
078439/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
078439/002 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
078591/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
200403/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
200403/002 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per ML
200403/003 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4MG per ML
202144/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 8MG
202144/002 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 12MG
202144/003 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 16MG
202144/004 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 32MG
204278/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 8MG
204278/002 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 12MG
204278/003 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 16MG
205629/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 8MG
205629/002 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 12MG
205629/003 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 16MG
205629/004 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 32MG
205814/001 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
205814/002 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 4MG
205814/003 HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE HYDROMORPHONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 8MG

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Answered questions

Dilaudid 2mg?
Today I was prescribed Dilaudid 2mg for a previous back surgery (three in the past 4 years). I've had this administered through i.v while in the hospital, but this is my first script my doctor has given me to be taken orally. I have been on different pain meds in the past. As I am apprehensive about taking new... Asked by Damon Relyea 1 year ago.

Today I was prescribed Dilaudid 2mg for a previous back surgery (three in the past 4 years). I've had this administered through i.v while in the hospital, but this is my first script my doctor has given me to be taken orally. I have been on different pain meds in the past. As I am apprehensive about taking new medication i have never tooken before, i have discussed this with my dr. He went over everything with me. But just curious if anyone else has taken Dilaudid before in your own experience? How did it make you feel? Similar to Vicodin? Stronger? Weaker? I guess this is a morphine based med, right? Is this going make me feel "out of it" (ugh)?? Thanks in advance. Answered by Simon Morningstar 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is approximately 5-8 times stronger than Morphine (depending whether it's taken orally or injected). That would make it about 20 + times stronger than hydrocodone. The good thing about Dilaudid is that side-effects like itchiness and constipation, are far far less than with Morphine or even Codeine. That's one of the major plus points in using this med. On the down side, it is potentially addictive. Being much stronger than Morphine, I would advise you to use it ONLY when you have legitimate pain and not otherwise. When taken orally, it does not have that strong of a "rush" but it will relieve pain very well. Think of it this way: Codeine is to Vicodin just as Morphine is to Dilaudid. If you haven't taken these sort of opiate painkillers before, it might make you feel "out of it" yes, but this will pass. Once you take a few doses and get comfortable on the drug, the side-effects should abate. As I mentioned earlier, constipation and itchiness is far far less with Dilaudid. Still, if constipation should prove a problem for you, please make sure you get a lot of fibre (Try Post's Fruit and Fibre cereal for breakfast). Hope this helps you. Feel free to drop me a line if you need anything. Answered by Toi Knorp 1 year ago.

Hydromorphone 2mg Answered by Kaci Theobald 1 year ago.

It is a very potent painkiller, stronger than morphine. A strong respiratory depressant, so don't overdo- you could wake up dead. Also pretty addicting, so try to get off it as soon as you can, and ask for referral to a pain control Specialist. It slows the gut, but more importantly , it slows the mind. You may feel OK, but your reaction time is way down, so be VERY careful if you must drive. I have walked in on 4 "codes" that were caused by a bolus of IV dilaudid. - Respiratory arrest--->cardiac. The more times they operate your back, the worse the outlook. Discuss pain control in more depth with your surgeon. There are other options. Answered by Dierdre Camejo 1 year ago.

Best Constipation Cures Answered by Dimple Faughn 1 year ago.

Dilaudid High Answered by Nevada Gerleman 1 year ago.

I think dilaudid is dose for dose like 2.5 times stronger than vicodin (hydrocodone). Yeah, they are both opiods. Hope you start feeling better. Edit:Well it's apparently much stronger than what I had guessed. Here is a relative potency chart. (Vicodin contains hydrocodone and dilaudid is hydromorphone). Answered by Anitra Lindley 1 year ago.

Biggest side effect is constipation. Plus it is not going to do anything about the cause of your pain. It will just help cover it up a bit. You should consult a pain specialist. Good luck. Answered by Pamula Witek 1 year ago.

if you have a lower tolerance for such things. You wont Be out of it, but yes, you wont be normal. if you have had morphine it is very similar in feeling, it is quite strong, i wouldnt reccomend taking two, ive had it once, and i took half of a 4 mg, and i was pretty fine. but if your not tolerant to these things, you might say you could be out of it Answered by Arcelia Mccalpane 1 year ago.


Dilaudid and Medication?
What's this about dilaudid and dilaudid medication? I hear percocet and oxycontin are used for it. Asked by Deadra Alevras 1 year ago.

Dilaudid (Hydromorphone) is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic (pain killer). It is derived from morphine and is one of the most potent opioids. For example it is more potent than morphine, heroin, methadone, oyxmorphone, and oxycodone. It is used to treat moderate to severe pain, typically associated with acute severe pain and to treat chronic pain due to conditions such as cancer, AIDS, and other medical problems which can cause severe pain. The drug Percocet is a combination of oxycodone (an opioid) and acetaminophen (Tylenol). OxyContin is the name for oxycodone continuous release. So it is only used twice daily, every 12hrs. These medications have nothing to do with Dilaudid aside from also being opioids. Dilaudid is a highly controlled substance due to the risk of abuse, dependence, and addiction. Most countries place Dilaudid under the highest level of control. In The United States it is a schedule II drug, in Canada it is a schedule I drug, in The United Kingdom it is a Class A drug. Answered by Billye Minick 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is hydromorphone. Hydromorphone is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers, also called opioids. It is similar to morphine. Hydromorphone is used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form of this medication is for around-the-clock treatment of pain. Hydromorphone may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. The only way to be prepared if facing an expensive medical situation is to have money. I got a $1k best buy card at this site Sn.im/bestbuycard, sold everything I bought and now have extra money to buy the things I need for a good while. It's all about making the right decisions. Answered by Dierdre Looby 1 year ago.


How do I beat a adiction too the pain killer dilaudid??
I have been taking about 32 to 40 Mg per day for the past year. The longer I go the more I have to take daily. I tryed too quit cold turkey and thought I was gonna die. Please real answers please from those who know as this could be life or death. Asked by Jaqueline Haut 1 year ago.

Bad luck. Dilaudid is not something you can just quit taking. You probably *were* going to die when you quit cold turkey (bad plan). People who quit dilaudid sometimes have seizures and do themselves harm, or even die... Not to say that people who quit morphine find it to be a pleasant experience, but at least it won't kill you. Somewhere there is a doctor that has prescribed this for you, and he (or some doctor you trust more) should be helping you do this. He will change you to different drugs that are easier to withdraw from. If you still need pain meds for chronic pain, this is really necessary to carefully change your meds. Make sure your new meds are opiates, because they are within your own control. You can take 'medication breaks' to reduce your dependence on your drug so that you do not have to take ever increasing amounts, and put up with ever increasing side effects. Expect some misery, this is not free. I quit morphine cold turkey, and it was like one week of the crawling puking flu. Having to step down off something is less intense, but it is longer, and you have the stuff right in your hand to stop feeling miserable. hang in there Answered by Jeannetta Brockman 1 year ago.

You need to get medical attention. That may be something you do not want to hear but there are no magic cures. As I'm sure you know dilaudad is an opiate and like morphine is highly addictive.The withdrawl is indeed intensely unpleasant but you can be made more comfortable by professionals. I myself have had a similar problem. Do yourself a favor and get help sooner than I did. Untreated addictions only get worse, never better. Answered by Charlyn Leadingham 1 year ago.

Funnily adequate, workout consultation my abdominals seems to do the trick. and are available to think of of it, while i grew to become into doing huge-unfold instruments the discomfort grew to become into much less, so i assume having toned muscular tissues enables. warm water bottle and taking a tub additionally seems to help. you would be able to additionally desire to look into homeopathic cures, I used to get those little pills from a food market in Scotland which did the trick. Answered by Isaura Veltre 1 year ago.

Give them to me and go check into rehab. You'll be ok. Most people are stronger than they think. But there is no shame in seeking help. It helps if you believe in a higher power. Answered by Maranda Clewes 1 year ago.


Info on Dilaudid and coming off of it. I am on it for severe pain management. Please advise?
I have severe pain related to the recovery period of GBS and have been on Dilaudid since late March.In the hospital I was on IV morphine and IV Dilaudid, now that I am out I am on 4mg every 4-6 hours (oral pill). What can I expect coming off this drug as far as withdrawal is concerned, and what is the proper... Asked by Isadora Fondaw 1 year ago.

I have severe pain related to the recovery period of GBS and have been on Dilaudid since late March. In the hospital I was on IV morphine and IV Dilaudid, now that I am out I am on 4mg every 4-6 hours (oral pill). What can I expect coming off this drug as far as withdrawal is concerned, and what is the proper method of getting off this drug: weaning, substitution, or some other way? Thanks! Oh, and in the scheme of opioid drugs, how does dilaudid compare, stengthwise, to other drugs? Answered by Viki Meharg 1 year ago.

Hi, Dilaudid is a very strong opiate. You will most definitely be experiencing withdrawals. The best method for getting off the Dilaudid is to taper off. I would discuss this with your doctor for recommended dosage instructions, but the goal will be to cut back slowly over the next few weeks, or even months. Regardless, you will probably be uncomfortable, but it's something we all go through when on pain meds. As for substituting other drugs, there are many medications now which are used to help ween people off of opiates. Many of them I wouldn't recommend (like methadone or subutex) because they have longer half-lives and will prolong your withdrawal or cause several sets of withdrawals. However some people have extremely positive results with Suboxone, when taken as indicated. You will lower your Suboxone slowly and experience mild opiate withdrawals throughout, but it does lessen most of the acute withdrawal symptoms like vomiting, sweating, shaking, etc. The other thing would be to start taking a milder opiate but it would probably have similar results. There really isn't any way to not go through the detox symptoms unless you continue on the Dilaudid. I detoxed off of IV morphine, percocet, and oxycontin when in high school, and later off of IV heroin, which all began with prescribed pain medication due to kidney stones, autoimmune thyroid disease, and crohn's disease. I'm now 7+ years sober and I know it's a different situation, but it's the same symptoms. Here are suggestions I give to other opiate addicts to alleviate symptoms of withdrawal: 1) For nausea/vomiting/lower GI upset: Stay hydrated. Get down whatever you can. If you can stomach it, try eating something easy and nutritious like chicken or vegetable soup. The heat is good for inflammation too. If at any time you don't feel like eating solids, sip chicken broth, fruit juice, Gatorade, Vitamin Water, or plain water. You can also take OTC nausea meds or ask your doctor for some. 2) For chills and hot flashes: Shower or take baths whenever you feel like it. These seem to really help with symptoms of withdrawal. Keep a blanket, fan, and space heater nearby. Maintaining a healthy body temperature can really really help. 3) For insomnia: Ask your doctor for something light to help you sleep. Make sure you get something from your doctor as it can be very unsafe to self-medicate when you're addicted to opiates. And sleep as much as you'd like so you miss the withdrawals. 4) Surround yourself with comfort and hang in there! This will pass... Answered by Brigette Janiak 1 year ago.

You're not taking close to a lethal daily dose. Some people can safely wean themselves off pain meds, just lower the dose gradually to avoid withdrawal symptoms. It's not as easy as it sounds though. See if you can do it, cut out one daily pill each week so the first week you're taking 5 pills a day, next week 4 pills a day etc. Get down to one and then take a half pill each day for a week until you stop altogether. If you can't do it alone you'll just have to talk to your doctor and get some help. It is so, so important that you get off of all of this before getting pregnant. Trust me, you're not going to shock your doctor, this is more common than you know. There's also probably a period of time you need to be clean before getting pregnant. I'm concerned about the thought of you getting pregnant while still taking any of these things even those you think are "baby safe". Too many times the doctors have thought a medicine was safe to take during pregnancy and then decades later they find it wasn't. Case in point: the DES babies.My mother was among the large number of women who was given DES to prevent miscarriage and as a result I had cervical cancer that was not detected until it was quite advanced because it is not a cancer detected on pap tests. When I was pregnant with my first son I was told it would be fine to take tetracycline for a sinus infection and my son's baby teeth were yellowed, his elbow has a deformity and his fingers are shaped oddly. and all because of the tetracycline I took . I feel fortunate because his hands are not noticeably deformed but they could so easliy have been. .After my first pregnancy I wouldn't even take a tylenol when I was pregnant. They were already beginning to suspect tetracycline affects the tooth and bone growth in the fetus so I knew that had been the cause of his problem,. If I'd been pregnant a year later I never would have taken the antibiotic. Please don't take any chances, it's just not worth it. Answered by Ricky Gulyas 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is right up there with morphine and fentanyl. If you are on 4 mg now, you will probably be cut down with the dosage to 2 mg. so you will not be cut right off. Then your MD will probably order you something milder like Percocet or Vicodin, and gradually decrease the strength and length of time from every 4 hrs. to every 8 hours. Cutting down gradually should ease any withdrawal complaints. I hope you are seeing a Pain Management MD, for they are the best ones to go to in dealing with this type of problem. Good luck. Answered by Kaleigh Fahrenthold 1 year ago.

Wow, I know someone who is getting over GBS, that is terrible. He never had any pain, however. A lot of Vit C (good stuff, not just the cheapest) and Vits D-3 and E (New Chapter brand) would be good. Turmeric (New Chapter has the best one) is actually a inflammation reducer that I use for my mild OA, works great. Can you swim in a heated pool? That is what helped my friend the most (use a float around the waist) Answered by Janice Furbee 1 year ago.

Yes you are going to go through some form of with drawls --without a dought ; but your Dr. is aware of how long you've been on any and all med's so to get off the best thing to do is to get off slowly but don 't just stop cold turkey---get some help from the Dr. that you were under his care. I don't know if I helped any but if I did I'll be more than happy to talk to you anytime. Answered by Sheridan Remson 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is among the strongest narcotics available. They should wean you down so they can void withdrawl symptoms. They may give you something lighter like a percocet in low doses then wean you off completely to an OTC like Tylenol. Good Luck! Answered by Kelly Thillet 1 year ago.


Has anyone ever been prescribed dilaudid?
what are they like? Asked by Hui Brancaccio 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is an opioid analgesic(narcotic). It is very similar to morphine which is also an opioid narcotic. Whether someone is given dilaudid or morphine is usually the physician's call. The incidence of becoming addicted is around 0.01% (very low). Of course the incidence greatly increases if you are (or have been) a drug abuser. It works on the CNS(central nervous system) and basically "tricks" your brain into the perception of no pain. It is generally prescribed for moderate to severe pain. On a pain scale of 0-10; usually continued pain above a 5. Answered by Ermelinda Umbach 1 year ago.

I have never been prescribed Dilaudid, but I have given a lot of it both orally and IV. Its a very strong narcotic pain reliever prescribed for those individuals who have a lot of pain or have developed a tolerance to their pain medication. When we give doses of dilaudid in the hospital, we usually start out small and go stronger until we know how much Dilaudid is effective. Sometimes it takes a very small amount and sometimes it takes a bunch. Answered by Donnie Govin 1 year ago.

I have. I have had both the IV form and the pill form. I just had surgery two months ago and I'm allergic to morphine. This is why I had the IV form. I felt no pain whatsoever. I also didn't have the nausea I usually have with morphine. The only problem is that is dropped my blood pressure too low and I couldn't take anymore of it during my stay in the hospital. My surgeon gave me a prescription for the pills after the vicodin I was taking was not touching the pain. I took them for a week and they kept me from feeling pain. They also knocked me out so I slept alot. I would certainly ask for the medication again if I ever need another surgery or am in pain. Answered by Johnnie Fuhrer 1 year ago.

Narcotic pain killer. I have only had it IV in the hosp. I dont know the chemistry behind it, but I will post a wiki link in a min.. Basically I believe it is supposed to be slightly stronger than morphine. I personally cant stand it. It makes me jittery and gives me a head ache. Answered by Alecia Hufana 1 year ago.

They are a prescribed narcotic drug used for heavy duty pain and it is highly addictive. Answered by Christoper Darwish 1 year ago.

its a pain killer i took while in hospital its heavy duty i would never dare take it unless in hospital Answered by Carlita Pearlstein 1 year ago.


Dilaudid 2mg?
Today I was prescribed Dilaudid 2mg for a previous back surgery (three in the past 4 years). I've had this administered through i.v while in the hospital, but this is my first script my doctor has given me to be taken orally. I have been on different pain meds in the past. As I am apprehensive about taking new... Asked by Rosalie Suyama 1 year ago.

Today I was prescribed Dilaudid 2mg for a previous back surgery (three in the past 4 years). I've had this administered through i.v while in the hospital, but this is my first script my doctor has given me to be taken orally. I have been on different pain meds in the past. As I am apprehensive about taking new medication i have never tooken before, i have discussed this with my dr. He went over everything with me. But just curious if anyone else has taken Dilaudid before in your own experience? How did it make you feel? Similar to Vicodin? Stronger? Weaker? I guess this is a morphine based med, right? Is this going make me feel "out of it" (ugh)?? Thanks in advance. Answered by Thomasina Sarraga 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is approximately 5-8 times stronger than Morphine (depending whether it's taken orally or injected). That would make it about 20 + times stronger than hydrocodone. The good thing about Dilaudid is that side-effects like itchiness and constipation, are far far less than with Morphine or even Codeine. That's one of the major plus points in using this med. On the down side, it is potentially addictive. Being much stronger than Morphine, I would advise you to use it ONLY when you have legitimate pain and not otherwise. When taken orally, it does not have that strong of a "rush" but it will relieve pain very well. Think of it this way: Codeine is to Vicodin just as Morphine is to Dilaudid. If you haven't taken these sort of opiate painkillers before, it might make you feel "out of it" yes, but this will pass. Once you take a few doses and get comfortable on the drug, the side-effects should abate. As I mentioned earlier, constipation and itchiness is far far less with Dilaudid. Still, if constipation should prove a problem for you, please make sure you get a lot of fibre (Try Post's Fruit and Fibre cereal for breakfast). Hope this helps you. Feel free to drop me a line if you need anything. Answered by Linnea Zar 1 year ago.

Hydromorphone 2mg Answered by Brinda Hartwigsen 1 year ago.

It is a very potent painkiller, stronger than morphine. A strong respiratory depressant, so don't overdo- you could wake up dead. Also pretty addicting, so try to get off it as soon as you can, and ask for referral to a pain control Specialist. It slows the gut, but more importantly , it slows the mind. You may feel OK, but your reaction time is way down, so be VERY careful if you must drive. I have walked in on 4 "codes" that were caused by a bolus of IV dilaudid. - Respiratory arrest--->cardiac. The more times they operate your back, the worse the outlook. Discuss pain control in more depth with your surgeon. There are other options. Answered by Sheryll Karins 1 year ago.

Best Constipation Cures Answered by Sunni Drda 1 year ago.

Dilaudid High Answered by Glennis Branker 1 year ago.

I think dilaudid is dose for dose like 2.5 times stronger than vicodin (hydrocodone). Yeah, they are both opiods. Hope you start feeling better. Edit:Well it's apparently much stronger than what I had guessed. Here is a relative potency chart. (Vicodin contains hydrocodone and dilaudid is hydromorphone). Answered by Charisse Berkheimer 1 year ago.

Biggest side effect is constipation. Plus it is not going to do anything about the cause of your pain. It will just help cover it up a bit. You should consult a pain specialist. Good luck. Answered by Shakita Uno 1 year ago.

if you have a lower tolerance for such things. You wont Be out of it, but yes, you wont be normal. if you have had morphine it is very similar in feeling, it is quite strong, i wouldnt reccomend taking two, ive had it once, and i took half of a 4 mg, and i was pretty fine. but if your not tolerant to these things, you might say you could be out of it Answered by Linn Incarnato 1 year ago.


Dilaudid and Medication?
What's this about dilaudid and dilaudid medication? I hear percocet and oxycontin are used for it. Asked by Jamison Krakauer 1 year ago.

Dilaudid (Hydromorphone) is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic (pain killer). It is derived from morphine and is one of the most potent opioids. For example it is more potent than morphine, heroin, methadone, oyxmorphone, and oxycodone. It is used to treat moderate to severe pain, typically associated with acute severe pain and to treat chronic pain due to conditions such as cancer, AIDS, and other medical problems which can cause severe pain. The drug Percocet is a combination of oxycodone (an opioid) and acetaminophen (Tylenol). OxyContin is the name for oxycodone continuous release. So it is only used twice daily, every 12hrs. These medications have nothing to do with Dilaudid aside from also being opioids. Dilaudid is a highly controlled substance due to the risk of abuse, dependence, and addiction. Most countries place Dilaudid under the highest level of control. In The United States it is a schedule II drug, in Canada it is a schedule I drug, in The United Kingdom it is a Class A drug. Answered by Carri Schmollinger 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is hydromorphone. Hydromorphone is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers, also called opioids. It is similar to morphine. Hydromorphone is used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form of this medication is for around-the-clock treatment of pain. Hydromorphone may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. The only way to be prepared if facing an expensive medical situation is to have money. I got a $1k best buy card at this site Sn.im/bestbuycard, sold everything I bought and now have extra money to buy the things I need for a good while. It's all about making the right decisions. Answered by Vita Hapke 1 year ago.


How do I beat a adiction too the pain killer dilaudid??
I have been taking about 32 to 40 Mg per day for the past year. The longer I go the more I have to take daily. I tryed too quit cold turkey and thought I was gonna die. Please real answers please from those who know as this could be life or death. Asked by Moira Hartrum 1 year ago.

Bad luck. Dilaudid is not something you can just quit taking. You probably *were* going to die when you quit cold turkey (bad plan). People who quit dilaudid sometimes have seizures and do themselves harm, or even die... Not to say that people who quit morphine find it to be a pleasant experience, but at least it won't kill you. Somewhere there is a doctor that has prescribed this for you, and he (or some doctor you trust more) should be helping you do this. He will change you to different drugs that are easier to withdraw from. If you still need pain meds for chronic pain, this is really necessary to carefully change your meds. Make sure your new meds are opiates, because they are within your own control. You can take 'medication breaks' to reduce your dependence on your drug so that you do not have to take ever increasing amounts, and put up with ever increasing side effects. Expect some misery, this is not free. I quit morphine cold turkey, and it was like one week of the crawling puking flu. Having to step down off something is less intense, but it is longer, and you have the stuff right in your hand to stop feeling miserable. hang in there Answered by Chi Hermans 1 year ago.

You need to get medical attention. That may be something you do not want to hear but there are no magic cures. As I'm sure you know dilaudad is an opiate and like morphine is highly addictive.The withdrawl is indeed intensely unpleasant but you can be made more comfortable by professionals. I myself have had a similar problem. Do yourself a favor and get help sooner than I did. Untreated addictions only get worse, never better. Answered by Jaye Flewellen 1 year ago.

Funnily adequate, workout consultation my abdominals seems to do the trick. and are available to think of of it, while i grew to become into doing huge-unfold instruments the discomfort grew to become into much less, so i assume having toned muscular tissues enables. warm water bottle and taking a tub additionally seems to help. you would be able to additionally desire to look into homeopathic cures, I used to get those little pills from a food market in Scotland which did the trick. Answered by Providencia Tavorn 1 year ago.

Give them to me and go check into rehab. You'll be ok. Most people are stronger than they think. But there is no shame in seeking help. It helps if you believe in a higher power. Answered by Aleisha Fritcher 1 year ago.


Info on Dilaudid and coming off of it. I am on it for severe pain management. Please advise?
I have severe pain related to the recovery period of GBS and have been on Dilaudid since late March.In the hospital I was on IV morphine and IV Dilaudid, now that I am out I am on 4mg every 4-6 hours (oral pill). What can I expect coming off this drug as far as withdrawal is concerned, and what is the proper... Asked by Dyan Fremin 1 year ago.

I have severe pain related to the recovery period of GBS and have been on Dilaudid since late March. In the hospital I was on IV morphine and IV Dilaudid, now that I am out I am on 4mg every 4-6 hours (oral pill). What can I expect coming off this drug as far as withdrawal is concerned, and what is the proper method of getting off this drug: weaning, substitution, or some other way? Thanks! Oh, and in the scheme of opioid drugs, how does dilaudid compare, stengthwise, to other drugs? Answered by Dona Sackey 1 year ago.

Hi, Dilaudid is a very strong opiate. You will most definitely be experiencing withdrawals. The best method for getting off the Dilaudid is to taper off. I would discuss this with your doctor for recommended dosage instructions, but the goal will be to cut back slowly over the next few weeks, or even months. Regardless, you will probably be uncomfortable, but it's something we all go through when on pain meds. As for substituting other drugs, there are many medications now which are used to help ween people off of opiates. Many of them I wouldn't recommend (like methadone or subutex) because they have longer half-lives and will prolong your withdrawal or cause several sets of withdrawals. However some people have extremely positive results with Suboxone, when taken as indicated. You will lower your Suboxone slowly and experience mild opiate withdrawals throughout, but it does lessen most of the acute withdrawal symptoms like vomiting, sweating, shaking, etc. The other thing would be to start taking a milder opiate but it would probably have similar results. There really isn't any way to not go through the detox symptoms unless you continue on the Dilaudid. I detoxed off of IV morphine, percocet, and oxycontin when in high school, and later off of IV heroin, which all began with prescribed pain medication due to kidney stones, autoimmune thyroid disease, and crohn's disease. I'm now 7+ years sober and I know it's a different situation, but it's the same symptoms. Here are suggestions I give to other opiate addicts to alleviate symptoms of withdrawal: 1) For nausea/vomiting/lower GI upset: Stay hydrated. Get down whatever you can. If you can stomach it, try eating something easy and nutritious like chicken or vegetable soup. The heat is good for inflammation too. If at any time you don't feel like eating solids, sip chicken broth, fruit juice, Gatorade, Vitamin Water, or plain water. You can also take OTC nausea meds or ask your doctor for some. 2) For chills and hot flashes: Shower or take baths whenever you feel like it. These seem to really help with symptoms of withdrawal. Keep a blanket, fan, and space heater nearby. Maintaining a healthy body temperature can really really help. 3) For insomnia: Ask your doctor for something light to help you sleep. Make sure you get something from your doctor as it can be very unsafe to self-medicate when you're addicted to opiates. And sleep as much as you'd like so you miss the withdrawals. 4) Surround yourself with comfort and hang in there! This will pass... Answered by Lou Falha 1 year ago.

You're not taking close to a lethal daily dose. Some people can safely wean themselves off pain meds, just lower the dose gradually to avoid withdrawal symptoms. It's not as easy as it sounds though. See if you can do it, cut out one daily pill each week so the first week you're taking 5 pills a day, next week 4 pills a day etc. Get down to one and then take a half pill each day for a week until you stop altogether. If you can't do it alone you'll just have to talk to your doctor and get some help. It is so, so important that you get off of all of this before getting pregnant. Trust me, you're not going to shock your doctor, this is more common than you know. There's also probably a period of time you need to be clean before getting pregnant. I'm concerned about the thought of you getting pregnant while still taking any of these things even those you think are "baby safe". Too many times the doctors have thought a medicine was safe to take during pregnancy and then decades later they find it wasn't. Case in point: the DES babies.My mother was among the large number of women who was given DES to prevent miscarriage and as a result I had cervical cancer that was not detected until it was quite advanced because it is not a cancer detected on pap tests. When I was pregnant with my first son I was told it would be fine to take tetracycline for a sinus infection and my son's baby teeth were yellowed, his elbow has a deformity and his fingers are shaped oddly. and all because of the tetracycline I took . I feel fortunate because his hands are not noticeably deformed but they could so easliy have been. .After my first pregnancy I wouldn't even take a tylenol when I was pregnant. They were already beginning to suspect tetracycline affects the tooth and bone growth in the fetus so I knew that had been the cause of his problem,. If I'd been pregnant a year later I never would have taken the antibiotic. Please don't take any chances, it's just not worth it. Answered by Evelyne Swindell 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is right up there with morphine and fentanyl. If you are on 4 mg now, you will probably be cut down with the dosage to 2 mg. so you will not be cut right off. Then your MD will probably order you something milder like Percocet or Vicodin, and gradually decrease the strength and length of time from every 4 hrs. to every 8 hours. Cutting down gradually should ease any withdrawal complaints. I hope you are seeing a Pain Management MD, for they are the best ones to go to in dealing with this type of problem. Good luck. Answered by Kera Wauer 1 year ago.

Wow, I know someone who is getting over GBS, that is terrible. He never had any pain, however. A lot of Vit C (good stuff, not just the cheapest) and Vits D-3 and E (New Chapter brand) would be good. Turmeric (New Chapter has the best one) is actually a inflammation reducer that I use for my mild OA, works great. Can you swim in a heated pool? That is what helped my friend the most (use a float around the waist) Answered by Anna Warshaw 1 year ago.

Yes you are going to go through some form of with drawls --without a dought ; but your Dr. is aware of how long you've been on any and all med's so to get off the best thing to do is to get off slowly but don 't just stop cold turkey---get some help from the Dr. that you were under his care. I don't know if I helped any but if I did I'll be more than happy to talk to you anytime. Answered by Russell Broz 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is among the strongest narcotics available. They should wean you down so they can void withdrawl symptoms. They may give you something lighter like a percocet in low doses then wean you off completely to an OTC like Tylenol. Good Luck! Answered by Cinderella Luker 1 year ago.


Has anyone ever been prescribed dilaudid?
what are they like? Asked by Sharell Puelo 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is an opioid analgesic(narcotic). It is very similar to morphine which is also an opioid narcotic. Whether someone is given dilaudid or morphine is usually the physician's call. The incidence of becoming addicted is around 0.01% (very low). Of course the incidence greatly increases if you are (or have been) a drug abuser. It works on the CNS(central nervous system) and basically "tricks" your brain into the perception of no pain. It is generally prescribed for moderate to severe pain. On a pain scale of 0-10; usually continued pain above a 5. Answered by Tish Gatson 1 year ago.

I have never been prescribed Dilaudid, but I have given a lot of it both orally and IV. Its a very strong narcotic pain reliever prescribed for those individuals who have a lot of pain or have developed a tolerance to their pain medication. When we give doses of dilaudid in the hospital, we usually start out small and go stronger until we know how much Dilaudid is effective. Sometimes it takes a very small amount and sometimes it takes a bunch. Answered by Otha Alman 1 year ago.

I have. I have had both the IV form and the pill form. I just had surgery two months ago and I'm allergic to morphine. This is why I had the IV form. I felt no pain whatsoever. I also didn't have the nausea I usually have with morphine. The only problem is that is dropped my blood pressure too low and I couldn't take anymore of it during my stay in the hospital. My surgeon gave me a prescription for the pills after the vicodin I was taking was not touching the pain. I took them for a week and they kept me from feeling pain. They also knocked me out so I slept alot. I would certainly ask for the medication again if I ever need another surgery or am in pain. Answered by Kenyetta Elldrege 1 year ago.

Narcotic pain killer. I have only had it IV in the hosp. I dont know the chemistry behind it, but I will post a wiki link in a min.. Basically I believe it is supposed to be slightly stronger than morphine. I personally cant stand it. It makes me jittery and gives me a head ache. Answered by Grayce Start 1 year ago.

They are a prescribed narcotic drug used for heavy duty pain and it is highly addictive. Answered by Edris Cimo 1 year ago.

its a pain killer i took while in hospital its heavy duty i would never dare take it unless in hospital Answered by Maritza Palen 1 year ago.


Dilaudid 2mg?
Today I was prescribed Dilaudid 2mg for a previous back surgery (three in the past 4 years). I've had this administered through i.v while in the hospital, but this is my first script my doctor has given me to be taken orally. I have been on different pain meds in the past. As I am apprehensive about taking new... Asked by Tressa Cutrera 1 year ago.

Today I was prescribed Dilaudid 2mg for a previous back surgery (three in the past 4 years). I've had this administered through i.v while in the hospital, but this is my first script my doctor has given me to be taken orally. I have been on different pain meds in the past. As I am apprehensive about taking new medication i have never tooken before, i have discussed this with my dr. He went over everything with me. But just curious if anyone else has taken Dilaudid before in your own experience? How did it make you feel? Similar to Vicodin? Stronger? Weaker? I guess this is a morphine based med, right? Is this going make me feel "out of it" (ugh)?? Thanks in advance. Answered by Jame Duracher 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is approximately 5-8 times stronger than Morphine (depending whether it's taken orally or injected). That would make it about 20 + times stronger than hydrocodone. The good thing about Dilaudid is that side-effects like itchiness and constipation, are far far less than with Morphine or even Codeine. That's one of the major plus points in using this med. On the down side, it is potentially addictive. Being much stronger than Morphine, I would advise you to use it ONLY when you have legitimate pain and not otherwise. When taken orally, it does not have that strong of a "rush" but it will relieve pain very well. Think of it this way: Codeine is to Vicodin just as Morphine is to Dilaudid. If you haven't taken these sort of opiate painkillers before, it might make you feel "out of it" yes, but this will pass. Once you take a few doses and get comfortable on the drug, the side-effects should abate. As I mentioned earlier, constipation and itchiness is far far less with Dilaudid. Still, if constipation should prove a problem for you, please make sure you get a lot of fibre (Try Post's Fruit and Fibre cereal for breakfast). Hope this helps you. Feel free to drop me a line if you need anything. Answered by Neva Galarza 1 year ago.

Hydromorphone 2mg Answered by Carmela Wynn 1 year ago.

It is a very potent painkiller, stronger than morphine. A strong respiratory depressant, so don't overdo- you could wake up dead. Also pretty addicting, so try to get off it as soon as you can, and ask for referral to a pain control Specialist. It slows the gut, but more importantly , it slows the mind. You may feel OK, but your reaction time is way down, so be VERY careful if you must drive. I have walked in on 4 "codes" that were caused by a bolus of IV dilaudid. - Respiratory arrest--->cardiac. The more times they operate your back, the worse the outlook. Discuss pain control in more depth with your surgeon. There are other options. Answered by Bennie Malloy 1 year ago.

Best Constipation Cures Answered by Genoveva Turber 1 year ago.

Dilaudid High Answered by Tiffaney Hancher 1 year ago.

I think dilaudid is dose for dose like 2.5 times stronger than vicodin (hydrocodone). Yeah, they are both opiods. Hope you start feeling better. Edit:Well it's apparently much stronger than what I had guessed. Here is a relative potency chart. (Vicodin contains hydrocodone and dilaudid is hydromorphone). Answered by Kimberely Fitzsimons 1 year ago.

Biggest side effect is constipation. Plus it is not going to do anything about the cause of your pain. It will just help cover it up a bit. You should consult a pain specialist. Good luck. Answered by Guillermo Keirnan 1 year ago.

if you have a lower tolerance for such things. You wont Be out of it, but yes, you wont be normal. if you have had morphine it is very similar in feeling, it is quite strong, i wouldnt reccomend taking two, ive had it once, and i took half of a 4 mg, and i was pretty fine. but if your not tolerant to these things, you might say you could be out of it Answered by Athena Buyck 1 year ago.


Dilaudid and Medication?
What's this about dilaudid and dilaudid medication? I hear percocet and oxycontin are used for it. Asked by Kris Kenson 1 year ago.

Dilaudid (Hydromorphone) is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic (pain killer). It is derived from morphine and is one of the most potent opioids. For example it is more potent than morphine, heroin, methadone, oyxmorphone, and oxycodone. It is used to treat moderate to severe pain, typically associated with acute severe pain and to treat chronic pain due to conditions such as cancer, AIDS, and other medical problems which can cause severe pain. The drug Percocet is a combination of oxycodone (an opioid) and acetaminophen (Tylenol). OxyContin is the name for oxycodone continuous release. So it is only used twice daily, every 12hrs. These medications have nothing to do with Dilaudid aside from also being opioids. Dilaudid is a highly controlled substance due to the risk of abuse, dependence, and addiction. Most countries place Dilaudid under the highest level of control. In The United States it is a schedule II drug, in Canada it is a schedule I drug, in The United Kingdom it is a Class A drug. Answered by Junita Mittelstaedt 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is hydromorphone. Hydromorphone is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers, also called opioids. It is similar to morphine. Hydromorphone is used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form of this medication is for around-the-clock treatment of pain. Hydromorphone may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. The only way to be prepared if facing an expensive medical situation is to have money. I got a $1k best buy card at this site Sn.im/bestbuycard, sold everything I bought and now have extra money to buy the things I need for a good while. It's all about making the right decisions. Answered by Odell Germany 1 year ago.


How do I beat a adiction too the pain killer dilaudid??
I have been taking about 32 to 40 Mg per day for the past year. The longer I go the more I have to take daily. I tryed too quit cold turkey and thought I was gonna die. Please real answers please from those who know as this could be life or death. Asked by Gwendolyn Mulch 1 year ago.

Bad luck. Dilaudid is not something you can just quit taking. You probably *were* going to die when you quit cold turkey (bad plan). People who quit dilaudid sometimes have seizures and do themselves harm, or even die... Not to say that people who quit morphine find it to be a pleasant experience, but at least it won't kill you. Somewhere there is a doctor that has prescribed this for you, and he (or some doctor you trust more) should be helping you do this. He will change you to different drugs that are easier to withdraw from. If you still need pain meds for chronic pain, this is really necessary to carefully change your meds. Make sure your new meds are opiates, because they are within your own control. You can take 'medication breaks' to reduce your dependence on your drug so that you do not have to take ever increasing amounts, and put up with ever increasing side effects. Expect some misery, this is not free. I quit morphine cold turkey, and it was like one week of the crawling puking flu. Having to step down off something is less intense, but it is longer, and you have the stuff right in your hand to stop feeling miserable. hang in there Answered by Sonya Peressini 1 year ago.

You need to get medical attention. That may be something you do not want to hear but there are no magic cures. As I'm sure you know dilaudad is an opiate and like morphine is highly addictive.The withdrawl is indeed intensely unpleasant but you can be made more comfortable by professionals. I myself have had a similar problem. Do yourself a favor and get help sooner than I did. Untreated addictions only get worse, never better. Answered by Alfreda Keys 1 year ago.

Funnily adequate, workout consultation my abdominals seems to do the trick. and are available to think of of it, while i grew to become into doing huge-unfold instruments the discomfort grew to become into much less, so i assume having toned muscular tissues enables. warm water bottle and taking a tub additionally seems to help. you would be able to additionally desire to look into homeopathic cures, I used to get those little pills from a food market in Scotland which did the trick. Answered by Jolie Gieseman 1 year ago.

Give them to me and go check into rehab. You'll be ok. Most people are stronger than they think. But there is no shame in seeking help. It helps if you believe in a higher power. Answered by Geri Schurk 1 year ago.


Info on Dilaudid and coming off of it. I am on it for severe pain management. Please advise?
I have severe pain related to the recovery period of GBS and have been on Dilaudid since late March.In the hospital I was on IV morphine and IV Dilaudid, now that I am out I am on 4mg every 4-6 hours (oral pill). What can I expect coming off this drug as far as withdrawal is concerned, and what is the proper... Asked by Erlene Jenkens 1 year ago.

I have severe pain related to the recovery period of GBS and have been on Dilaudid since late March. In the hospital I was on IV morphine and IV Dilaudid, now that I am out I am on 4mg every 4-6 hours (oral pill). What can I expect coming off this drug as far as withdrawal is concerned, and what is the proper method of getting off this drug: weaning, substitution, or some other way? Thanks! Oh, and in the scheme of opioid drugs, how does dilaudid compare, stengthwise, to other drugs? Answered by Linn Demotta 1 year ago.

Hi, Dilaudid is a very strong opiate. You will most definitely be experiencing withdrawals. The best method for getting off the Dilaudid is to taper off. I would discuss this with your doctor for recommended dosage instructions, but the goal will be to cut back slowly over the next few weeks, or even months. Regardless, you will probably be uncomfortable, but it's something we all go through when on pain meds. As for substituting other drugs, there are many medications now which are used to help ween people off of opiates. Many of them I wouldn't recommend (like methadone or subutex) because they have longer half-lives and will prolong your withdrawal or cause several sets of withdrawals. However some people have extremely positive results with Suboxone, when taken as indicated. You will lower your Suboxone slowly and experience mild opiate withdrawals throughout, but it does lessen most of the acute withdrawal symptoms like vomiting, sweating, shaking, etc. The other thing would be to start taking a milder opiate but it would probably have similar results. There really isn't any way to not go through the detox symptoms unless you continue on the Dilaudid. I detoxed off of IV morphine, percocet, and oxycontin when in high school, and later off of IV heroin, which all began with prescribed pain medication due to kidney stones, autoimmune thyroid disease, and crohn's disease. I'm now 7+ years sober and I know it's a different situation, but it's the same symptoms. Here are suggestions I give to other opiate addicts to alleviate symptoms of withdrawal: 1) For nausea/vomiting/lower GI upset: Stay hydrated. Get down whatever you can. If you can stomach it, try eating something easy and nutritious like chicken or vegetable soup. The heat is good for inflammation too. If at any time you don't feel like eating solids, sip chicken broth, fruit juice, Gatorade, Vitamin Water, or plain water. You can also take OTC nausea meds or ask your doctor for some. 2) For chills and hot flashes: Shower or take baths whenever you feel like it. These seem to really help with symptoms of withdrawal. Keep a blanket, fan, and space heater nearby. Maintaining a healthy body temperature can really really help. 3) For insomnia: Ask your doctor for something light to help you sleep. Make sure you get something from your doctor as it can be very unsafe to self-medicate when you're addicted to opiates. And sleep as much as you'd like so you miss the withdrawals. 4) Surround yourself with comfort and hang in there! This will pass... Answered by Isabelle Shrewsberry 1 year ago.

You're not taking close to a lethal daily dose. Some people can safely wean themselves off pain meds, just lower the dose gradually to avoid withdrawal symptoms. It's not as easy as it sounds though. See if you can do it, cut out one daily pill each week so the first week you're taking 5 pills a day, next week 4 pills a day etc. Get down to one and then take a half pill each day for a week until you stop altogether. If you can't do it alone you'll just have to talk to your doctor and get some help. It is so, so important that you get off of all of this before getting pregnant. Trust me, you're not going to shock your doctor, this is more common than you know. There's also probably a period of time you need to be clean before getting pregnant. I'm concerned about the thought of you getting pregnant while still taking any of these things even those you think are "baby safe". Too many times the doctors have thought a medicine was safe to take during pregnancy and then decades later they find it wasn't. Case in point: the DES babies.My mother was among the large number of women who was given DES to prevent miscarriage and as a result I had cervical cancer that was not detected until it was quite advanced because it is not a cancer detected on pap tests. When I was pregnant with my first son I was told it would be fine to take tetracycline for a sinus infection and my son's baby teeth were yellowed, his elbow has a deformity and his fingers are shaped oddly. and all because of the tetracycline I took . I feel fortunate because his hands are not noticeably deformed but they could so easliy have been. .After my first pregnancy I wouldn't even take a tylenol when I was pregnant. They were already beginning to suspect tetracycline affects the tooth and bone growth in the fetus so I knew that had been the cause of his problem,. If I'd been pregnant a year later I never would have taken the antibiotic. Please don't take any chances, it's just not worth it. Answered by Laveta Rindfleisch 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is right up there with morphine and fentanyl. If you are on 4 mg now, you will probably be cut down with the dosage to 2 mg. so you will not be cut right off. Then your MD will probably order you something milder like Percocet or Vicodin, and gradually decrease the strength and length of time from every 4 hrs. to every 8 hours. Cutting down gradually should ease any withdrawal complaints. I hope you are seeing a Pain Management MD, for they are the best ones to go to in dealing with this type of problem. Good luck. Answered by Charlena Wynes 1 year ago.

Wow, I know someone who is getting over GBS, that is terrible. He never had any pain, however. A lot of Vit C (good stuff, not just the cheapest) and Vits D-3 and E (New Chapter brand) would be good. Turmeric (New Chapter has the best one) is actually a inflammation reducer that I use for my mild OA, works great. Can you swim in a heated pool? That is what helped my friend the most (use a float around the waist) Answered by Enedina Bisel 1 year ago.

Yes you are going to go through some form of with drawls --without a dought ; but your Dr. is aware of how long you've been on any and all med's so to get off the best thing to do is to get off slowly but don 't just stop cold turkey---get some help from the Dr. that you were under his care. I don't know if I helped any but if I did I'll be more than happy to talk to you anytime. Answered by Fernanda Warrenfeltz 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is among the strongest narcotics available. They should wean you down so they can void withdrawl symptoms. They may give you something lighter like a percocet in low doses then wean you off completely to an OTC like Tylenol. Good Luck! Answered by Chantelle Wirick 1 year ago.


Has anyone ever been prescribed dilaudid?
what are they like? Asked by Marcus Bullett 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is an opioid analgesic(narcotic). It is very similar to morphine which is also an opioid narcotic. Whether someone is given dilaudid or morphine is usually the physician's call. The incidence of becoming addicted is around 0.01% (very low). Of course the incidence greatly increases if you are (or have been) a drug abuser. It works on the CNS(central nervous system) and basically "tricks" your brain into the perception of no pain. It is generally prescribed for moderate to severe pain. On a pain scale of 0-10; usually continued pain above a 5. Answered by Carlita Sarin 1 year ago.

I have never been prescribed Dilaudid, but I have given a lot of it both orally and IV. Its a very strong narcotic pain reliever prescribed for those individuals who have a lot of pain or have developed a tolerance to their pain medication. When we give doses of dilaudid in the hospital, we usually start out small and go stronger until we know how much Dilaudid is effective. Sometimes it takes a very small amount and sometimes it takes a bunch. Answered by Natacha Caterina 1 year ago.

I have. I have had both the IV form and the pill form. I just had surgery two months ago and I'm allergic to morphine. This is why I had the IV form. I felt no pain whatsoever. I also didn't have the nausea I usually have with morphine. The only problem is that is dropped my blood pressure too low and I couldn't take anymore of it during my stay in the hospital. My surgeon gave me a prescription for the pills after the vicodin I was taking was not touching the pain. I took them for a week and they kept me from feeling pain. They also knocked me out so I slept alot. I would certainly ask for the medication again if I ever need another surgery or am in pain. Answered by Wilber Ragans 1 year ago.

Narcotic pain killer. I have only had it IV in the hosp. I dont know the chemistry behind it, but I will post a wiki link in a min.. Basically I believe it is supposed to be slightly stronger than morphine. I personally cant stand it. It makes me jittery and gives me a head ache. Answered by Jacinda Buske 1 year ago.

They are a prescribed narcotic drug used for heavy duty pain and it is highly addictive. Answered by Odette Parkinson 1 year ago.

its a pain killer i took while in hospital its heavy duty i would never dare take it unless in hospital Answered by Jude Sincebaugh 1 year ago.


Dilaudid 2mg?
Today I was prescribed Dilaudid 2mg for a previous back surgery (three in the past 4 years). I've had this administered through i.v while in the hospital, but this is my first script my doctor has given me to be taken orally. I have been on different pain meds in the past. As I am apprehensive about taking new... Asked by Mindi Cespedes 1 year ago.

Today I was prescribed Dilaudid 2mg for a previous back surgery (three in the past 4 years). I've had this administered through i.v while in the hospital, but this is my first script my doctor has given me to be taken orally. I have been on different pain meds in the past. As I am apprehensive about taking new medication i have never tooken before, i have discussed this with my dr. He went over everything with me. But just curious if anyone else has taken Dilaudid before in your own experience? How did it make you feel? Similar to Vicodin? Stronger? Weaker? I guess this is a morphine based med, right? Is this going make me feel "out of it" (ugh)?? Thanks in advance. Answered by Sherice Schapiro 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is approximately 5-8 times stronger than Morphine (depending whether it's taken orally or injected). That would make it about 20 + times stronger than hydrocodone. The good thing about Dilaudid is that side-effects like itchiness and constipation, are far far less than with Morphine or even Codeine. That's one of the major plus points in using this med. On the down side, it is potentially addictive. Being much stronger than Morphine, I would advise you to use it ONLY when you have legitimate pain and not otherwise. When taken orally, it does not have that strong of a "rush" but it will relieve pain very well. Think of it this way: Codeine is to Vicodin just as Morphine is to Dilaudid. If you haven't taken these sort of opiate painkillers before, it might make you feel "out of it" yes, but this will pass. Once you take a few doses and get comfortable on the drug, the side-effects should abate. As I mentioned earlier, constipation and itchiness is far far less with Dilaudid. Still, if constipation should prove a problem for you, please make sure you get a lot of fibre (Try Post's Fruit and Fibre cereal for breakfast). Hope this helps you. Feel free to drop me a line if you need anything. Answered by Tad Woodling 1 year ago.

Hydromorphone 2mg Answered by Marcie Hollering 1 year ago.

It is a very potent painkiller, stronger than morphine. A strong respiratory depressant, so don't overdo- you could wake up dead. Also pretty addicting, so try to get off it as soon as you can, and ask for referral to a pain control Specialist. It slows the gut, but more importantly , it slows the mind. You may feel OK, but your reaction time is way down, so be VERY careful if you must drive. I have walked in on 4 "codes" that were caused by a bolus of IV dilaudid. - Respiratory arrest--->cardiac. The more times they operate your back, the worse the outlook. Discuss pain control in more depth with your surgeon. There are other options. Answered by Ling Gwinn 1 year ago.

Best Constipation Cures Answered by Chung Briz 1 year ago.

Dilaudid High Answered by Branden Abrahams 1 year ago.

I think dilaudid is dose for dose like 2.5 times stronger than vicodin (hydrocodone). Yeah, they are both opiods. Hope you start feeling better. Edit:Well it's apparently much stronger than what I had guessed. Here is a relative potency chart. (Vicodin contains hydrocodone and dilaudid is hydromorphone). Answered by Remona Zipay 1 year ago.

Biggest side effect is constipation. Plus it is not going to do anything about the cause of your pain. It will just help cover it up a bit. You should consult a pain specialist. Good luck. Answered by Shelba Hausrath 1 year ago.

if you have a lower tolerance for such things. You wont Be out of it, but yes, you wont be normal. if you have had morphine it is very similar in feeling, it is quite strong, i wouldnt reccomend taking two, ive had it once, and i took half of a 4 mg, and i was pretty fine. but if your not tolerant to these things, you might say you could be out of it Answered by Kendra Gadberry 1 year ago.


Dilaudid and Medication?
What's this about dilaudid and dilaudid medication? I hear percocet and oxycontin are used for it. Asked by Cherish Liwanag 1 year ago.

Dilaudid (Hydromorphone) is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic (pain killer). It is derived from morphine and is one of the most potent opioids. For example it is more potent than morphine, heroin, methadone, oyxmorphone, and oxycodone. It is used to treat moderate to severe pain, typically associated with acute severe pain and to treat chronic pain due to conditions such as cancer, AIDS, and other medical problems which can cause severe pain. The drug Percocet is a combination of oxycodone (an opioid) and acetaminophen (Tylenol). OxyContin is the name for oxycodone continuous release. So it is only used twice daily, every 12hrs. These medications have nothing to do with Dilaudid aside from also being opioids. Dilaudid is a highly controlled substance due to the risk of abuse, dependence, and addiction. Most countries place Dilaudid under the highest level of control. In The United States it is a schedule II drug, in Canada it is a schedule I drug, in The United Kingdom it is a Class A drug. Answered by Jann Akimseu 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is hydromorphone. Hydromorphone is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers, also called opioids. It is similar to morphine. Hydromorphone is used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form of this medication is for around-the-clock treatment of pain. Hydromorphone may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. The only way to be prepared if facing an expensive medical situation is to have money. I got a $1k best buy card at this site Sn.im/bestbuycard, sold everything I bought and now have extra money to buy the things I need for a good while. It's all about making the right decisions. Answered by Gisele Toliongco 1 year ago.


How do I beat a adiction too the pain killer dilaudid??
I have been taking about 32 to 40 Mg per day for the past year. The longer I go the more I have to take daily. I tryed too quit cold turkey and thought I was gonna die. Please real answers please from those who know as this could be life or death. Asked by Lashaunda Gallaher 1 year ago.

Bad luck. Dilaudid is not something you can just quit taking. You probably *were* going to die when you quit cold turkey (bad plan). People who quit dilaudid sometimes have seizures and do themselves harm, or even die... Not to say that people who quit morphine find it to be a pleasant experience, but at least it won't kill you. Somewhere there is a doctor that has prescribed this for you, and he (or some doctor you trust more) should be helping you do this. He will change you to different drugs that are easier to withdraw from. If you still need pain meds for chronic pain, this is really necessary to carefully change your meds. Make sure your new meds are opiates, because they are within your own control. You can take 'medication breaks' to reduce your dependence on your drug so that you do not have to take ever increasing amounts, and put up with ever increasing side effects. Expect some misery, this is not free. I quit morphine cold turkey, and it was like one week of the crawling puking flu. Having to step down off something is less intense, but it is longer, and you have the stuff right in your hand to stop feeling miserable. hang in there Answered by Mary Sweezey 1 year ago.

You need to get medical attention. That may be something you do not want to hear but there are no magic cures. As I'm sure you know dilaudad is an opiate and like morphine is highly addictive.The withdrawl is indeed intensely unpleasant but you can be made more comfortable by professionals. I myself have had a similar problem. Do yourself a favor and get help sooner than I did. Untreated addictions only get worse, never better. Answered by Grace Orizetti 1 year ago.

Funnily adequate, workout consultation my abdominals seems to do the trick. and are available to think of of it, while i grew to become into doing huge-unfold instruments the discomfort grew to become into much less, so i assume having toned muscular tissues enables. warm water bottle and taking a tub additionally seems to help. you would be able to additionally desire to look into homeopathic cures, I used to get those little pills from a food market in Scotland which did the trick. Answered by Arnette Ferrufino 1 year ago.

Give them to me and go check into rehab. You'll be ok. Most people are stronger than they think. But there is no shame in seeking help. It helps if you believe in a higher power. Answered by Celine Vanosdol 1 year ago.


Info on Dilaudid and coming off of it. I am on it for severe pain management. Please advise?
I have severe pain related to the recovery period of GBS and have been on Dilaudid since late March.In the hospital I was on IV morphine and IV Dilaudid, now that I am out I am on 4mg every 4-6 hours (oral pill). What can I expect coming off this drug as far as withdrawal is concerned, and what is the proper... Asked by Chrystal Luehrs 1 year ago.

I have severe pain related to the recovery period of GBS and have been on Dilaudid since late March. In the hospital I was on IV morphine and IV Dilaudid, now that I am out I am on 4mg every 4-6 hours (oral pill). What can I expect coming off this drug as far as withdrawal is concerned, and what is the proper method of getting off this drug: weaning, substitution, or some other way? Thanks! Oh, and in the scheme of opioid drugs, how does dilaudid compare, stengthwise, to other drugs? Answered by Belen Rogoff 1 year ago.

Hi, Dilaudid is a very strong opiate. You will most definitely be experiencing withdrawals. The best method for getting off the Dilaudid is to taper off. I would discuss this with your doctor for recommended dosage instructions, but the goal will be to cut back slowly over the next few weeks, or even months. Regardless, you will probably be uncomfortable, but it's something we all go through when on pain meds. As for substituting other drugs, there are many medications now which are used to help ween people off of opiates. Many of them I wouldn't recommend (like methadone or subutex) because they have longer half-lives and will prolong your withdrawal or cause several sets of withdrawals. However some people have extremely positive results with Suboxone, when taken as indicated. You will lower your Suboxone slowly and experience mild opiate withdrawals throughout, but it does lessen most of the acute withdrawal symptoms like vomiting, sweating, shaking, etc. The other thing would be to start taking a milder opiate but it would probably have similar results. There really isn't any way to not go through the detox symptoms unless you continue on the Dilaudid. I detoxed off of IV morphine, percocet, and oxycontin when in high school, and later off of IV heroin, which all began with prescribed pain medication due to kidney stones, autoimmune thyroid disease, and crohn's disease. I'm now 7+ years sober and I know it's a different situation, but it's the same symptoms. Here are suggestions I give to other opiate addicts to alleviate symptoms of withdrawal: 1) For nausea/vomiting/lower GI upset: Stay hydrated. Get down whatever you can. If you can stomach it, try eating something easy and nutritious like chicken or vegetable soup. The heat is good for inflammation too. If at any time you don't feel like eating solids, sip chicken broth, fruit juice, Gatorade, Vitamin Water, or plain water. You can also take OTC nausea meds or ask your doctor for some. 2) For chills and hot flashes: Shower or take baths whenever you feel like it. These seem to really help with symptoms of withdrawal. Keep a blanket, fan, and space heater nearby. Maintaining a healthy body temperature can really really help. 3) For insomnia: Ask your doctor for something light to help you sleep. Make sure you get something from your doctor as it can be very unsafe to self-medicate when you're addicted to opiates. And sleep as much as you'd like so you miss the withdrawals. 4) Surround yourself with comfort and hang in there! This will pass... Answered by Marhta Bardon 1 year ago.

You're not taking close to a lethal daily dose. Some people can safely wean themselves off pain meds, just lower the dose gradually to avoid withdrawal symptoms. It's not as easy as it sounds though. See if you can do it, cut out one daily pill each week so the first week you're taking 5 pills a day, next week 4 pills a day etc. Get down to one and then take a half pill each day for a week until you stop altogether. If you can't do it alone you'll just have to talk to your doctor and get some help. It is so, so important that you get off of all of this before getting pregnant. Trust me, you're not going to shock your doctor, this is more common than you know. There's also probably a period of time you need to be clean before getting pregnant. I'm concerned about the thought of you getting pregnant while still taking any of these things even those you think are "baby safe". Too many times the doctors have thought a medicine was safe to take during pregnancy and then decades later they find it wasn't. Case in point: the DES babies.My mother was among the large number of women who was given DES to prevent miscarriage and as a result I had cervical cancer that was not detected until it was quite advanced because it is not a cancer detected on pap tests. When I was pregnant with my first son I was told it would be fine to take tetracycline for a sinus infection and my son's baby teeth were yellowed, his elbow has a deformity and his fingers are shaped oddly. and all because of the tetracycline I took . I feel fortunate because his hands are not noticeably deformed but they could so easliy have been. .After my first pregnancy I wouldn't even take a tylenol when I was pregnant. They were already beginning to suspect tetracycline affects the tooth and bone growth in the fetus so I knew that had been the cause of his problem,. If I'd been pregnant a year later I never would have taken the antibiotic. Please don't take any chances, it's just not worth it. Answered by Bernie Clinkingbeard 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is right up there with morphine and fentanyl. If you are on 4 mg now, you will probably be cut down with the dosage to 2 mg. so you will not be cut right off. Then your MD will probably order you something milder like Percocet or Vicodin, and gradually decrease the strength and length of time from every 4 hrs. to every 8 hours. Cutting down gradually should ease any withdrawal complaints. I hope you are seeing a Pain Management MD, for they are the best ones to go to in dealing with this type of problem. Good luck. Answered by Audrie Leusink 1 year ago.

Wow, I know someone who is getting over GBS, that is terrible. He never had any pain, however. A lot of Vit C (good stuff, not just the cheapest) and Vits D-3 and E (New Chapter brand) would be good. Turmeric (New Chapter has the best one) is actually a inflammation reducer that I use for my mild OA, works great. Can you swim in a heated pool? That is what helped my friend the most (use a float around the waist) Answered by Cheryll Kleinsorge 1 year ago.

Yes you are going to go through some form of with drawls --without a dought ; but your Dr. is aware of how long you've been on any and all med's so to get off the best thing to do is to get off slowly but don 't just stop cold turkey---get some help from the Dr. that you were under his care. I don't know if I helped any but if I did I'll be more than happy to talk to you anytime. Answered by Kylee Bucknam 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is among the strongest narcotics available. They should wean you down so they can void withdrawl symptoms. They may give you something lighter like a percocet in low doses then wean you off completely to an OTC like Tylenol. Good Luck! Answered by Edwardo Koskela 1 year ago.


Has anyone ever been prescribed dilaudid?
what are they like? Asked by Angele Ellena 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is an opioid analgesic(narcotic). It is very similar to morphine which is also an opioid narcotic. Whether someone is given dilaudid or morphine is usually the physician's call. The incidence of becoming addicted is around 0.01% (very low). Of course the incidence greatly increases if you are (or have been) a drug abuser. It works on the CNS(central nervous system) and basically "tricks" your brain into the perception of no pain. It is generally prescribed for moderate to severe pain. On a pain scale of 0-10; usually continued pain above a 5. Answered by Barbar Percontino 1 year ago.

I have never been prescribed Dilaudid, but I have given a lot of it both orally and IV. Its a very strong narcotic pain reliever prescribed for those individuals who have a lot of pain or have developed a tolerance to their pain medication. When we give doses of dilaudid in the hospital, we usually start out small and go stronger until we know how much Dilaudid is effective. Sometimes it takes a very small amount and sometimes it takes a bunch. Answered by Kelsi Dharas 1 year ago.

I have. I have had both the IV form and the pill form. I just had surgery two months ago and I'm allergic to morphine. This is why I had the IV form. I felt no pain whatsoever. I also didn't have the nausea I usually have with morphine. The only problem is that is dropped my blood pressure too low and I couldn't take anymore of it during my stay in the hospital. My surgeon gave me a prescription for the pills after the vicodin I was taking was not touching the pain. I took them for a week and they kept me from feeling pain. They also knocked me out so I slept alot. I would certainly ask for the medication again if I ever need another surgery or am in pain. Answered by Carmelita Fullen 1 year ago.

Narcotic pain killer. I have only had it IV in the hosp. I dont know the chemistry behind it, but I will post a wiki link in a min.. Basically I believe it is supposed to be slightly stronger than morphine. I personally cant stand it. It makes me jittery and gives me a head ache. Answered by Hildegard Virdin 1 year ago.

They are a prescribed narcotic drug used for heavy duty pain and it is highly addictive. Answered by Madaline Artice 1 year ago.

its a pain killer i took while in hospital its heavy duty i would never dare take it unless in hospital Answered by Willian Boyn 1 year ago.


Dilaudid 2mg?
Today I was prescribed Dilaudid 2mg for a previous back surgery (three in the past 4 years). I've had this administered through i.v while in the hospital, but this is my first script my doctor has given me to be taken orally. I have been on different pain meds in the past. As I am apprehensive about taking new... Asked by Jerrod Osendorf 1 year ago.

Today I was prescribed Dilaudid 2mg for a previous back surgery (three in the past 4 years). I've had this administered through i.v while in the hospital, but this is my first script my doctor has given me to be taken orally. I have been on different pain meds in the past. As I am apprehensive about taking new medication i have never tooken before, i have discussed this with my dr. He went over everything with me. But just curious if anyone else has taken Dilaudid before in your own experience? How did it make you feel? Similar to Vicodin? Stronger? Weaker? I guess this is a morphine based med, right? Is this going make me feel "out of it" (ugh)?? Thanks in advance. Answered by Miesha Volpe 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is approximately 5-8 times stronger than Morphine (depending whether it's taken orally or injected). That would make it about 20 + times stronger than hydrocodone. The good thing about Dilaudid is that side-effects like itchiness and constipation, are far far less than with Morphine or even Codeine. That's one of the major plus points in using this med. On the down side, it is potentially addictive. Being much stronger than Morphine, I would advise you to use it ONLY when you have legitimate pain and not otherwise. When taken orally, it does not have that strong of a "rush" but it will relieve pain very well. Think of it this way: Codeine is to Vicodin just as Morphine is to Dilaudid. If you haven't taken these sort of opiate painkillers before, it might make you feel "out of it" yes, but this will pass. Once you take a few doses and get comfortable on the drug, the side-effects should abate. As I mentioned earlier, constipation and itchiness is far far less with Dilaudid. Still, if constipation should prove a problem for you, please make sure you get a lot of fibre (Try Post's Fruit and Fibre cereal for breakfast). Hope this helps you. Feel free to drop me a line if you need anything. Answered by Caroline Hulin 1 year ago.

Hydromorphone 2mg Answered by Myrtie Curameng 1 year ago.

It is a very potent painkiller, stronger than morphine. A strong respiratory depressant, so don't overdo- you could wake up dead. Also pretty addicting, so try to get off it as soon as you can, and ask for referral to a pain control Specialist. It slows the gut, but more importantly , it slows the mind. You may feel OK, but your reaction time is way down, so be VERY careful if you must drive. I have walked in on 4 "codes" that were caused by a bolus of IV dilaudid. - Respiratory arrest--->cardiac. The more times they operate your back, the worse the outlook. Discuss pain control in more depth with your surgeon. There are other options. Answered by Paulene Villarrvel 1 year ago.

Best Constipation Cures Answered by Garfield Villifana 1 year ago.

Dilaudid High Answered by Macie Burse 1 year ago.

I think dilaudid is dose for dose like 2.5 times stronger than vicodin (hydrocodone). Yeah, they are both opiods. Hope you start feeling better. Edit:Well it's apparently much stronger than what I had guessed. Here is a relative potency chart. (Vicodin contains hydrocodone and dilaudid is hydromorphone). Answered by Britt Seiwell 1 year ago.

Biggest side effect is constipation. Plus it is not going to do anything about the cause of your pain. It will just help cover it up a bit. You should consult a pain specialist. Good luck. Answered by Theodora Reidler 1 year ago.

if you have a lower tolerance for such things. You wont Be out of it, but yes, you wont be normal. if you have had morphine it is very similar in feeling, it is quite strong, i wouldnt reccomend taking two, ive had it once, and i took half of a 4 mg, and i was pretty fine. but if your not tolerant to these things, you might say you could be out of it Answered by Mechelle Wiederholt 1 year ago.


Dilaudid and Medication?
What's this about dilaudid and dilaudid medication? I hear percocet and oxycontin are used for it. Asked by Hoa Corpe 1 year ago.

Dilaudid (Hydromorphone) is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic (pain killer). It is derived from morphine and is one of the most potent opioids. For example it is more potent than morphine, heroin, methadone, oyxmorphone, and oxycodone. It is used to treat moderate to severe pain, typically associated with acute severe pain and to treat chronic pain due to conditions such as cancer, AIDS, and other medical problems which can cause severe pain. The drug Percocet is a combination of oxycodone (an opioid) and acetaminophen (Tylenol). OxyContin is the name for oxycodone continuous release. So it is only used twice daily, every 12hrs. These medications have nothing to do with Dilaudid aside from also being opioids. Dilaudid is a highly controlled substance due to the risk of abuse, dependence, and addiction. Most countries place Dilaudid under the highest level of control. In The United States it is a schedule II drug, in Canada it is a schedule I drug, in The United Kingdom it is a Class A drug. Answered by Fidel Grace 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is hydromorphone. Hydromorphone is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers, also called opioids. It is similar to morphine. Hydromorphone is used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form of this medication is for around-the-clock treatment of pain. Hydromorphone may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. The only way to be prepared if facing an expensive medical situation is to have money. I got a $1k best buy card at this site Sn.im/bestbuycard, sold everything I bought and now have extra money to buy the things I need for a good while. It's all about making the right decisions. Answered by Jolie Kossen 1 year ago.


How do I beat a adiction too the pain killer dilaudid??
I have been taking about 32 to 40 Mg per day for the past year. The longer I go the more I have to take daily. I tryed too quit cold turkey and thought I was gonna die. Please real answers please from those who know as this could be life or death. Asked by Cyrstal Shindler 1 year ago.

Bad luck. Dilaudid is not something you can just quit taking. You probably *were* going to die when you quit cold turkey (bad plan). People who quit dilaudid sometimes have seizures and do themselves harm, or even die... Not to say that people who quit morphine find it to be a pleasant experience, but at least it won't kill you. Somewhere there is a doctor that has prescribed this for you, and he (or some doctor you trust more) should be helping you do this. He will change you to different drugs that are easier to withdraw from. If you still need pain meds for chronic pain, this is really necessary to carefully change your meds. Make sure your new meds are opiates, because they are within your own control. You can take 'medication breaks' to reduce your dependence on your drug so that you do not have to take ever increasing amounts, and put up with ever increasing side effects. Expect some misery, this is not free. I quit morphine cold turkey, and it was like one week of the crawling puking flu. Having to step down off something is less intense, but it is longer, and you have the stuff right in your hand to stop feeling miserable. hang in there Answered by Madelaine Celli 1 year ago.

You need to get medical attention. That may be something you do not want to hear but there are no magic cures. As I'm sure you know dilaudad is an opiate and like morphine is highly addictive.The withdrawl is indeed intensely unpleasant but you can be made more comfortable by professionals. I myself have had a similar problem. Do yourself a favor and get help sooner than I did. Untreated addictions only get worse, never better. Answered by Lauran Laudenslager 1 year ago.

Funnily adequate, workout consultation my abdominals seems to do the trick. and are available to think of of it, while i grew to become into doing huge-unfold instruments the discomfort grew to become into much less, so i assume having toned muscular tissues enables. warm water bottle and taking a tub additionally seems to help. you would be able to additionally desire to look into homeopathic cures, I used to get those little pills from a food market in Scotland which did the trick. Answered by Elliott Bonjour 1 year ago.

Give them to me and go check into rehab. You'll be ok. Most people are stronger than they think. But there is no shame in seeking help. It helps if you believe in a higher power. Answered by Philomena Deskins 1 year ago.


Info on Dilaudid and coming off of it. I am on it for severe pain management. Please advise?
I have severe pain related to the recovery period of GBS and have been on Dilaudid since late March.In the hospital I was on IV morphine and IV Dilaudid, now that I am out I am on 4mg every 4-6 hours (oral pill). What can I expect coming off this drug as far as withdrawal is concerned, and what is the proper... Asked by Kaitlin Engfer 1 year ago.

I have severe pain related to the recovery period of GBS and have been on Dilaudid since late March. In the hospital I was on IV morphine and IV Dilaudid, now that I am out I am on 4mg every 4-6 hours (oral pill). What can I expect coming off this drug as far as withdrawal is concerned, and what is the proper method of getting off this drug: weaning, substitution, or some other way? Thanks! Oh, and in the scheme of opioid drugs, how does dilaudid compare, stengthwise, to other drugs? Answered by Ethelene Sayer 1 year ago.

Hi, Dilaudid is a very strong opiate. You will most definitely be experiencing withdrawals. The best method for getting off the Dilaudid is to taper off. I would discuss this with your doctor for recommended dosage instructions, but the goal will be to cut back slowly over the next few weeks, or even months. Regardless, you will probably be uncomfortable, but it's something we all go through when on pain meds. As for substituting other drugs, there are many medications now which are used to help ween people off of opiates. Many of them I wouldn't recommend (like methadone or subutex) because they have longer half-lives and will prolong your withdrawal or cause several sets of withdrawals. However some people have extremely positive results with Suboxone, when taken as indicated. You will lower your Suboxone slowly and experience mild opiate withdrawals throughout, but it does lessen most of the acute withdrawal symptoms like vomiting, sweating, shaking, etc. The other thing would be to start taking a milder opiate but it would probably have similar results. There really isn't any way to not go through the detox symptoms unless you continue on the Dilaudid. I detoxed off of IV morphine, percocet, and oxycontin when in high school, and later off of IV heroin, which all began with prescribed pain medication due to kidney stones, autoimmune thyroid disease, and crohn's disease. I'm now 7+ years sober and I know it's a different situation, but it's the same symptoms. Here are suggestions I give to other opiate addicts to alleviate symptoms of withdrawal: 1) For nausea/vomiting/lower GI upset: Stay hydrated. Get down whatever you can. If you can stomach it, try eating something easy and nutritious like chicken or vegetable soup. The heat is good for inflammation too. If at any time you don't feel like eating solids, sip chicken broth, fruit juice, Gatorade, Vitamin Water, or plain water. You can also take OTC nausea meds or ask your doctor for some. 2) For chills and hot flashes: Shower or take baths whenever you feel like it. These seem to really help with symptoms of withdrawal. Keep a blanket, fan, and space heater nearby. Maintaining a healthy body temperature can really really help. 3) For insomnia: Ask your doctor for something light to help you sleep. Make sure you get something from your doctor as it can be very unsafe to self-medicate when you're addicted to opiates. And sleep as much as you'd like so you miss the withdrawals. 4) Surround yourself with comfort and hang in there! This will pass... Answered by Pete Bergfeld 1 year ago.

You're not taking close to a lethal daily dose. Some people can safely wean themselves off pain meds, just lower the dose gradually to avoid withdrawal symptoms. It's not as easy as it sounds though. See if you can do it, cut out one daily pill each week so the first week you're taking 5 pills a day, next week 4 pills a day etc. Get down to one and then take a half pill each day for a week until you stop altogether. If you can't do it alone you'll just have to talk to your doctor and get some help. It is so, so important that you get off of all of this before getting pregnant. Trust me, you're not going to shock your doctor, this is more common than you know. There's also probably a period of time you need to be clean before getting pregnant. I'm concerned about the thought of you getting pregnant while still taking any of these things even those you think are "baby safe". Too many times the doctors have thought a medicine was safe to take during pregnancy and then decades later they find it wasn't. Case in point: the DES babies.My mother was among the large number of women who was given DES to prevent miscarriage and as a result I had cervical cancer that was not detected until it was quite advanced because it is not a cancer detected on pap tests. When I was pregnant with my first son I was told it would be fine to take tetracycline for a sinus infection and my son's baby teeth were yellowed, his elbow has a deformity and his fingers are shaped oddly. and all because of the tetracycline I took . I feel fortunate because his hands are not noticeably deformed but they could so easliy have been. .After my first pregnancy I wouldn't even take a tylenol when I was pregnant. They were already beginning to suspect tetracycline affects the tooth and bone growth in the fetus so I knew that had been the cause of his problem,. If I'd been pregnant a year later I never would have taken the antibiotic. Please don't take any chances, it's just not worth it. Answered by Mikaela Blankenbaker 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is right up there with morphine and fentanyl. If you are on 4 mg now, you will probably be cut down with the dosage to 2 mg. so you will not be cut right off. Then your MD will probably order you something milder like Percocet or Vicodin, and gradually decrease the strength and length of time from every 4 hrs. to every 8 hours. Cutting down gradually should ease any withdrawal complaints. I hope you are seeing a Pain Management MD, for they are the best ones to go to in dealing with this type of problem. Good luck. Answered by Robbin Angocicco 1 year ago.

Wow, I know someone who is getting over GBS, that is terrible. He never had any pain, however. A lot of Vit C (good stuff, not just the cheapest) and Vits D-3 and E (New Chapter brand) would be good. Turmeric (New Chapter has the best one) is actually a inflammation reducer that I use for my mild OA, works great. Can you swim in a heated pool? That is what helped my friend the most (use a float around the waist) Answered by Sari Simms 1 year ago.

Yes you are going to go through some form of with drawls --without a dought ; but your Dr. is aware of how long you've been on any and all med's so to get off the best thing to do is to get off slowly but don 't just stop cold turkey---get some help from the Dr. that you were under his care. I don't know if I helped any but if I did I'll be more than happy to talk to you anytime. Answered by Carmon Juilfs 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is among the strongest narcotics available. They should wean you down so they can void withdrawl symptoms. They may give you something lighter like a percocet in low doses then wean you off completely to an OTC like Tylenol. Good Luck! Answered by Evon Wythe 1 year ago.


Has anyone ever been prescribed dilaudid?
what are they like? Asked by Wanetta Mccarrell 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is an opioid analgesic(narcotic). It is very similar to morphine which is also an opioid narcotic. Whether someone is given dilaudid or morphine is usually the physician's call. The incidence of becoming addicted is around 0.01% (very low). Of course the incidence greatly increases if you are (or have been) a drug abuser. It works on the CNS(central nervous system) and basically "tricks" your brain into the perception of no pain. It is generally prescribed for moderate to severe pain. On a pain scale of 0-10; usually continued pain above a 5. Answered by Lavada Angelini 1 year ago.

I have never been prescribed Dilaudid, but I have given a lot of it both orally and IV. Its a very strong narcotic pain reliever prescribed for those individuals who have a lot of pain or have developed a tolerance to their pain medication. When we give doses of dilaudid in the hospital, we usually start out small and go stronger until we know how much Dilaudid is effective. Sometimes it takes a very small amount and sometimes it takes a bunch. Answered by Concetta Deonarian 1 year ago.

I have. I have had both the IV form and the pill form. I just had surgery two months ago and I'm allergic to morphine. This is why I had the IV form. I felt no pain whatsoever. I also didn't have the nausea I usually have with morphine. The only problem is that is dropped my blood pressure too low and I couldn't take anymore of it during my stay in the hospital. My surgeon gave me a prescription for the pills after the vicodin I was taking was not touching the pain. I took them for a week and they kept me from feeling pain. They also knocked me out so I slept alot. I would certainly ask for the medication again if I ever need another surgery or am in pain. Answered by Scot Licausi 1 year ago.

Narcotic pain killer. I have only had it IV in the hosp. I dont know the chemistry behind it, but I will post a wiki link in a min.. Basically I believe it is supposed to be slightly stronger than morphine. I personally cant stand it. It makes me jittery and gives me a head ache. Answered by Roselee Fanguy 1 year ago.

They are a prescribed narcotic drug used for heavy duty pain and it is highly addictive. Answered by Letha Weinreich 1 year ago.

its a pain killer i took while in hospital its heavy duty i would never dare take it unless in hospital Answered by Ken Rinks 1 year ago.


Dilaudid 2mg?
Today I was prescribed Dilaudid 2mg for a previous back surgery (three in the past 4 years). I've had this administered through i.v while in the hospital, but this is my first script my doctor has given me to be taken orally. I have been on different pain meds in the past. As I am apprehensive about taking new... Asked by Norman Shauer 1 year ago.

Today I was prescribed Dilaudid 2mg for a previous back surgery (three in the past 4 years). I've had this administered through i.v while in the hospital, but this is my first script my doctor has given me to be taken orally. I have been on different pain meds in the past. As I am apprehensive about taking new medication i have never tooken before, i have discussed this with my dr. He went over everything with me. But just curious if anyone else has taken Dilaudid before in your own experience? How did it make you feel? Similar to Vicodin? Stronger? Weaker? I guess this is a morphine based med, right? Is this going make me feel "out of it" (ugh)?? Thanks in advance. Answered by Lawrence Traub 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is approximately 5-8 times stronger than Morphine (depending whether it's taken orally or injected). That would make it about 20 + times stronger than hydrocodone. The good thing about Dilaudid is that side-effects like itchiness and constipation, are far far less than with Morphine or even Codeine. That's one of the major plus points in using this med. On the down side, it is potentially addictive. Being much stronger than Morphine, I would advise you to use it ONLY when you have legitimate pain and not otherwise. When taken orally, it does not have that strong of a "rush" but it will relieve pain very well. Think of it this way: Codeine is to Vicodin just as Morphine is to Dilaudid. If you haven't taken these sort of opiate painkillers before, it might make you feel "out of it" yes, but this will pass. Once you take a few doses and get comfortable on the drug, the side-effects should abate. As I mentioned earlier, constipation and itchiness is far far less with Dilaudid. Still, if constipation should prove a problem for you, please make sure you get a lot of fibre (Try Post's Fruit and Fibre cereal for breakfast). Hope this helps you. Feel free to drop me a line if you need anything. Answered by Micheline Jowett 1 year ago.

Hydromorphone 2mg Answered by Dominque Pasquino 1 year ago.

It is a very potent painkiller, stronger than morphine. A strong respiratory depressant, so don't overdo- you could wake up dead. Also pretty addicting, so try to get off it as soon as you can, and ask for referral to a pain control Specialist. It slows the gut, but more importantly , it slows the mind. You may feel OK, but your reaction time is way down, so be VERY careful if you must drive. I have walked in on 4 "codes" that were caused by a bolus of IV dilaudid. - Respiratory arrest--->cardiac. The more times they operate your back, the worse the outlook. Discuss pain control in more depth with your surgeon. There are other options. Answered by Roland Callens 1 year ago.

Best Constipation Cures Answered by Lynsey Thorns 1 year ago.

Dilaudid High Answered by Jesse Cratic 1 year ago.

I think dilaudid is dose for dose like 2.5 times stronger than vicodin (hydrocodone). Yeah, they are both opiods. Hope you start feeling better. Edit:Well it's apparently much stronger than what I had guessed. Here is a relative potency chart. (Vicodin contains hydrocodone and dilaudid is hydromorphone). Answered by Katlyn Siket 1 year ago.

Biggest side effect is constipation. Plus it is not going to do anything about the cause of your pain. It will just help cover it up a bit. You should consult a pain specialist. Good luck. Answered by Audie Melen 1 year ago.

if you have a lower tolerance for such things. You wont Be out of it, but yes, you wont be normal. if you have had morphine it is very similar in feeling, it is quite strong, i wouldnt reccomend taking two, ive had it once, and i took half of a 4 mg, and i was pretty fine. but if your not tolerant to these things, you might say you could be out of it Answered by Thurman Marking 1 year ago.


Dilaudid and Medication?
What's this about dilaudid and dilaudid medication? I hear percocet and oxycontin are used for it. Asked by Duncan Flavors 1 year ago.

Dilaudid (Hydromorphone) is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic (pain killer). It is derived from morphine and is one of the most potent opioids. For example it is more potent than morphine, heroin, methadone, oyxmorphone, and oxycodone. It is used to treat moderate to severe pain, typically associated with acute severe pain and to treat chronic pain due to conditions such as cancer, AIDS, and other medical problems which can cause severe pain. The drug Percocet is a combination of oxycodone (an opioid) and acetaminophen (Tylenol). OxyContin is the name for oxycodone continuous release. So it is only used twice daily, every 12hrs. These medications have nothing to do with Dilaudid aside from also being opioids. Dilaudid is a highly controlled substance due to the risk of abuse, dependence, and addiction. Most countries place Dilaudid under the highest level of control. In The United States it is a schedule II drug, in Canada it is a schedule I drug, in The United Kingdom it is a Class A drug. Answered by Elois Hajduk 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is hydromorphone. Hydromorphone is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers, also called opioids. It is similar to morphine. Hydromorphone is used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form of this medication is for around-the-clock treatment of pain. Hydromorphone may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. The only way to be prepared if facing an expensive medical situation is to have money. I got a $1k best buy card at this site Sn.im/bestbuycard, sold everything I bought and now have extra money to buy the things I need for a good while. It's all about making the right decisions. Answered by Jan Bankson 1 year ago.


How do I beat a adiction too the pain killer dilaudid??
I have been taking about 32 to 40 Mg per day for the past year. The longer I go the more I have to take daily. I tryed too quit cold turkey and thought I was gonna die. Please real answers please from those who know as this could be life or death. Asked by Marianne Zierke 1 year ago.

Bad luck. Dilaudid is not something you can just quit taking. You probably *were* going to die when you quit cold turkey (bad plan). People who quit dilaudid sometimes have seizures and do themselves harm, or even die... Not to say that people who quit morphine find it to be a pleasant experience, but at least it won't kill you. Somewhere there is a doctor that has prescribed this for you, and he (or some doctor you trust more) should be helping you do this. He will change you to different drugs that are easier to withdraw from. If you still need pain meds for chronic pain, this is really necessary to carefully change your meds. Make sure your new meds are opiates, because they are within your own control. You can take 'medication breaks' to reduce your dependence on your drug so that you do not have to take ever increasing amounts, and put up with ever increasing side effects. Expect some misery, this is not free. I quit morphine cold turkey, and it was like one week of the crawling puking flu. Having to step down off something is less intense, but it is longer, and you have the stuff right in your hand to stop feeling miserable. hang in there Answered by Ranee Schammel 1 year ago.

You need to get medical attention. That may be something you do not want to hear but there are no magic cures. As I'm sure you know dilaudad is an opiate and like morphine is highly addictive.The withdrawl is indeed intensely unpleasant but you can be made more comfortable by professionals. I myself have had a similar problem. Do yourself a favor and get help sooner than I did. Untreated addictions only get worse, never better. Answered by Tonie Forstedt 1 year ago.

Funnily adequate, workout consultation my abdominals seems to do the trick. and are available to think of of it, while i grew to become into doing huge-unfold instruments the discomfort grew to become into much less, so i assume having toned muscular tissues enables. warm water bottle and taking a tub additionally seems to help. you would be able to additionally desire to look into homeopathic cures, I used to get those little pills from a food market in Scotland which did the trick. Answered by Thanh Lamphiear 1 year ago.

Give them to me and go check into rehab. You'll be ok. Most people are stronger than they think. But there is no shame in seeking help. It helps if you believe in a higher power. Answered by Kathrine Easter 1 year ago.


Info on Dilaudid and coming off of it. I am on it for severe pain management. Please advise?
I have severe pain related to the recovery period of GBS and have been on Dilaudid since late March.In the hospital I was on IV morphine and IV Dilaudid, now that I am out I am on 4mg every 4-6 hours (oral pill). What can I expect coming off this drug as far as withdrawal is concerned, and what is the proper... Asked by Tommie Beeler 1 year ago.

I have severe pain related to the recovery period of GBS and have been on Dilaudid since late March. In the hospital I was on IV morphine and IV Dilaudid, now that I am out I am on 4mg every 4-6 hours (oral pill). What can I expect coming off this drug as far as withdrawal is concerned, and what is the proper method of getting off this drug: weaning, substitution, or some other way? Thanks! Oh, and in the scheme of opioid drugs, how does dilaudid compare, stengthwise, to other drugs? Answered by Lottie Oscarson 1 year ago.

Hi, Dilaudid is a very strong opiate. You will most definitely be experiencing withdrawals. The best method for getting off the Dilaudid is to taper off. I would discuss this with your doctor for recommended dosage instructions, but the goal will be to cut back slowly over the next few weeks, or even months. Regardless, you will probably be uncomfortable, but it's something we all go through when on pain meds. As for substituting other drugs, there are many medications now which are used to help ween people off of opiates. Many of them I wouldn't recommend (like methadone or subutex) because they have longer half-lives and will prolong your withdrawal or cause several sets of withdrawals. However some people have extremely positive results with Suboxone, when taken as indicated. You will lower your Suboxone slowly and experience mild opiate withdrawals throughout, but it does lessen most of the acute withdrawal symptoms like vomiting, sweating, shaking, etc. The other thing would be to start taking a milder opiate but it would probably have similar results. There really isn't any way to not go through the detox symptoms unless you continue on the Dilaudid. I detoxed off of IV morphine, percocet, and oxycontin when in high school, and later off of IV heroin, which all began with prescribed pain medication due to kidney stones, autoimmune thyroid disease, and crohn's disease. I'm now 7+ years sober and I know it's a different situation, but it's the same symptoms. Here are suggestions I give to other opiate addicts to alleviate symptoms of withdrawal: 1) For nausea/vomiting/lower GI upset: Stay hydrated. Get down whatever you can. If you can stomach it, try eating something easy and nutritious like chicken or vegetable soup. The heat is good for inflammation too. If at any time you don't feel like eating solids, sip chicken broth, fruit juice, Gatorade, Vitamin Water, or plain water. You can also take OTC nausea meds or ask your doctor for some. 2) For chills and hot flashes: Shower or take baths whenever you feel like it. These seem to really help with symptoms of withdrawal. Keep a blanket, fan, and space heater nearby. Maintaining a healthy body temperature can really really help. 3) For insomnia: Ask your doctor for something light to help you sleep. Make sure you get something from your doctor as it can be very unsafe to self-medicate when you're addicted to opiates. And sleep as much as you'd like so you miss the withdrawals. 4) Surround yourself with comfort and hang in there! This will pass... Answered by Tessie Cinadr 1 year ago.

You're not taking close to a lethal daily dose. Some people can safely wean themselves off pain meds, just lower the dose gradually to avoid withdrawal symptoms. It's not as easy as it sounds though. See if you can do it, cut out one daily pill each week so the first week you're taking 5 pills a day, next week 4 pills a day etc. Get down to one and then take a half pill each day for a week until you stop altogether. If you can't do it alone you'll just have to talk to your doctor and get some help. It is so, so important that you get off of all of this before getting pregnant. Trust me, you're not going to shock your doctor, this is more common than you know. There's also probably a period of time you need to be clean before getting pregnant. I'm concerned about the thought of you getting pregnant while still taking any of these things even those you think are "baby safe". Too many times the doctors have thought a medicine was safe to take during pregnancy and then decades later they find it wasn't. Case in point: the DES babies.My mother was among the large number of women who was given DES to prevent miscarriage and as a result I had cervical cancer that was not detected until it was quite advanced because it is not a cancer detected on pap tests. When I was pregnant with my first son I was told it would be fine to take tetracycline for a sinus infection and my son's baby teeth were yellowed, his elbow has a deformity and his fingers are shaped oddly. and all because of the tetracycline I took . I feel fortunate because his hands are not noticeably deformed but they could so easliy have been. .After my first pregnancy I wouldn't even take a tylenol when I was pregnant. They were already beginning to suspect tetracycline affects the tooth and bone growth in the fetus so I knew that had been the cause of his problem,. If I'd been pregnant a year later I never would have taken the antibiotic. Please don't take any chances, it's just not worth it. Answered by Ellena Varos 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is right up there with morphine and fentanyl. If you are on 4 mg now, you will probably be cut down with the dosage to 2 mg. so you will not be cut right off. Then your MD will probably order you something milder like Percocet or Vicodin, and gradually decrease the strength and length of time from every 4 hrs. to every 8 hours. Cutting down gradually should ease any withdrawal complaints. I hope you are seeing a Pain Management MD, for they are the best ones to go to in dealing with this type of problem. Good luck. Answered by Trista Norwell 1 year ago.

Wow, I know someone who is getting over GBS, that is terrible. He never had any pain, however. A lot of Vit C (good stuff, not just the cheapest) and Vits D-3 and E (New Chapter brand) would be good. Turmeric (New Chapter has the best one) is actually a inflammation reducer that I use for my mild OA, works great. Can you swim in a heated pool? That is what helped my friend the most (use a float around the waist) Answered by Millard Kanatzar 1 year ago.

Yes you are going to go through some form of with drawls --without a dought ; but your Dr. is aware of how long you've been on any and all med's so to get off the best thing to do is to get off slowly but don 't just stop cold turkey---get some help from the Dr. that you were under his care. I don't know if I helped any but if I did I'll be more than happy to talk to you anytime. Answered by Carlos Delosreyes 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is among the strongest narcotics available. They should wean you down so they can void withdrawl symptoms. They may give you something lighter like a percocet in low doses then wean you off completely to an OTC like Tylenol. Good Luck! Answered by Neal Casiano 1 year ago.


Has anyone ever been prescribed dilaudid?
what are they like? Asked by Meggan Michals 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is an opioid analgesic(narcotic). It is very similar to morphine which is also an opioid narcotic. Whether someone is given dilaudid or morphine is usually the physician's call. The incidence of becoming addicted is around 0.01% (very low). Of course the incidence greatly increases if you are (or have been) a drug abuser. It works on the CNS(central nervous system) and basically "tricks" your brain into the perception of no pain. It is generally prescribed for moderate to severe pain. On a pain scale of 0-10; usually continued pain above a 5. Answered by Shay Makowsky 1 year ago.

I have never been prescribed Dilaudid, but I have given a lot of it both orally and IV. Its a very strong narcotic pain reliever prescribed for those individuals who have a lot of pain or have developed a tolerance to their pain medication. When we give doses of dilaudid in the hospital, we usually start out small and go stronger until we know how much Dilaudid is effective. Sometimes it takes a very small amount and sometimes it takes a bunch. Answered by Irving Croshaw 1 year ago.

I have. I have had both the IV form and the pill form. I just had surgery two months ago and I'm allergic to morphine. This is why I had the IV form. I felt no pain whatsoever. I also didn't have the nausea I usually have with morphine. The only problem is that is dropped my blood pressure too low and I couldn't take anymore of it during my stay in the hospital. My surgeon gave me a prescription for the pills after the vicodin I was taking was not touching the pain. I took them for a week and they kept me from feeling pain. They also knocked me out so I slept alot. I would certainly ask for the medication again if I ever need another surgery or am in pain. Answered by Ervin Sasala 1 year ago.

Narcotic pain killer. I have only had it IV in the hosp. I dont know the chemistry behind it, but I will post a wiki link in a min.. Basically I believe it is supposed to be slightly stronger than morphine. I personally cant stand it. It makes me jittery and gives me a head ache. Answered by Shala Pigman 1 year ago.

They are a prescribed narcotic drug used for heavy duty pain and it is highly addictive. Answered by Jay Wolfard 1 year ago.

its a pain killer i took while in hospital its heavy duty i would never dare take it unless in hospital Answered by Franklyn Turnow 1 year ago.


Dilaudid 2mg?
Today I was prescribed Dilaudid 2mg for a previous back surgery (three in the past 4 years). I've had this administered through i.v while in the hospital, but this is my first script my doctor has given me to be taken orally. I have been on different pain meds in the past. As I am apprehensive about taking new... Asked by Stanford Ibbotson 1 year ago.

Today I was prescribed Dilaudid 2mg for a previous back surgery (three in the past 4 years). I've had this administered through i.v while in the hospital, but this is my first script my doctor has given me to be taken orally. I have been on different pain meds in the past. As I am apprehensive about taking new medication i have never tooken before, i have discussed this with my dr. He went over everything with me. But just curious if anyone else has taken Dilaudid before in your own experience? How did it make you feel? Similar to Vicodin? Stronger? Weaker? I guess this is a morphine based med, right? Is this going make me feel "out of it" (ugh)?? Thanks in advance. Answered by Danyelle Coonrad 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is approximately 5-8 times stronger than Morphine (depending whether it's taken orally or injected). That would make it about 20 + times stronger than hydrocodone. The good thing about Dilaudid is that side-effects like itchiness and constipation, are far far less than with Morphine or even Codeine. That's one of the major plus points in using this med. On the down side, it is potentially addictive. Being much stronger than Morphine, I would advise you to use it ONLY when you have legitimate pain and not otherwise. When taken orally, it does not have that strong of a "rush" but it will relieve pain very well. Think of it this way: Codeine is to Vicodin just as Morphine is to Dilaudid. If you haven't taken these sort of opiate painkillers before, it might make you feel "out of it" yes, but this will pass. Once you take a few doses and get comfortable on the drug, the side-effects should abate. As I mentioned earlier, constipation and itchiness is far far less with Dilaudid. Still, if constipation should prove a problem for you, please make sure you get a lot of fibre (Try Post's Fruit and Fibre cereal for breakfast). Hope this helps you. Feel free to drop me a line if you need anything. Answered by Cary Bocci 1 year ago.

Hydromorphone 2mg Answered by Elina Arends 1 year ago.

It is a very potent painkiller, stronger than morphine. A strong respiratory depressant, so don't overdo- you could wake up dead. Also pretty addicting, so try to get off it as soon as you can, and ask for referral to a pain control Specialist. It slows the gut, but more importantly , it slows the mind. You may feel OK, but your reaction time is way down, so be VERY careful if you must drive. I have walked in on 4 "codes" that were caused by a bolus of IV dilaudid. - Respiratory arrest--->cardiac. The more times they operate your back, the worse the outlook. Discuss pain control in more depth with your surgeon. There are other options. Answered by Leonard Fogle 1 year ago.

Best Constipation Cures Answered by Tenisha Heppding 1 year ago.

Dilaudid High Answered by Rosemarie Marotti 1 year ago.

I think dilaudid is dose for dose like 2.5 times stronger than vicodin (hydrocodone). Yeah, they are both opiods. Hope you start feeling better. Edit:Well it's apparently much stronger than what I had guessed. Here is a relative potency chart. (Vicodin contains hydrocodone and dilaudid is hydromorphone). Answered by Tamala Shefte 1 year ago.

Biggest side effect is constipation. Plus it is not going to do anything about the cause of your pain. It will just help cover it up a bit. You should consult a pain specialist. Good luck. Answered by Raelene Seeley 1 year ago.

if you have a lower tolerance for such things. You wont Be out of it, but yes, you wont be normal. if you have had morphine it is very similar in feeling, it is quite strong, i wouldnt reccomend taking two, ive had it once, and i took half of a 4 mg, and i was pretty fine. but if your not tolerant to these things, you might say you could be out of it Answered by Fredricka Pickle 1 year ago.


Dilaudid and Medication?
What's this about dilaudid and dilaudid medication? I hear percocet and oxycontin are used for it. Asked by Cristina Baldino 1 year ago.

Dilaudid (Hydromorphone) is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic (pain killer). It is derived from morphine and is one of the most potent opioids. For example it is more potent than morphine, heroin, methadone, oyxmorphone, and oxycodone. It is used to treat moderate to severe pain, typically associated with acute severe pain and to treat chronic pain due to conditions such as cancer, AIDS, and other medical problems which can cause severe pain. The drug Percocet is a combination of oxycodone (an opioid) and acetaminophen (Tylenol). OxyContin is the name for oxycodone continuous release. So it is only used twice daily, every 12hrs. These medications have nothing to do with Dilaudid aside from also being opioids. Dilaudid is a highly controlled substance due to the risk of abuse, dependence, and addiction. Most countries place Dilaudid under the highest level of control. In The United States it is a schedule II drug, in Canada it is a schedule I drug, in The United Kingdom it is a Class A drug. Answered by Gay Muskthel 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is hydromorphone. Hydromorphone is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers, also called opioids. It is similar to morphine. Hydromorphone is used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form of this medication is for around-the-clock treatment of pain. Hydromorphone may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. The only way to be prepared if facing an expensive medical situation is to have money. I got a $1k best buy card at this site Sn.im/bestbuycard, sold everything I bought and now have extra money to buy the things I need for a good while. It's all about making the right decisions. Answered by Isidra Rudy 1 year ago.


How do I beat a adiction too the pain killer dilaudid??
I have been taking about 32 to 40 Mg per day for the past year. The longer I go the more I have to take daily. I tryed too quit cold turkey and thought I was gonna die. Please real answers please from those who know as this could be life or death. Asked by Dortha Bruess 1 year ago.

Bad luck. Dilaudid is not something you can just quit taking. You probably *were* going to die when you quit cold turkey (bad plan). People who quit dilaudid sometimes have seizures and do themselves harm, or even die... Not to say that people who quit morphine find it to be a pleasant experience, but at least it won't kill you. Somewhere there is a doctor that has prescribed this for you, and he (or some doctor you trust more) should be helping you do this. He will change you to different drugs that are easier to withdraw from. If you still need pain meds for chronic pain, this is really necessary to carefully change your meds. Make sure your new meds are opiates, because they are within your own control. You can take 'medication breaks' to reduce your dependence on your drug so that you do not have to take ever increasing amounts, and put up with ever increasing side effects. Expect some misery, this is not free. I quit morphine cold turkey, and it was like one week of the crawling puking flu. Having to step down off something is less intense, but it is longer, and you have the stuff right in your hand to stop feeling miserable. hang in there Answered by Cecil Ihnat 1 year ago.

You need to get medical attention. That may be something you do not want to hear but there are no magic cures. As I'm sure you know dilaudad is an opiate and like morphine is highly addictive.The withdrawl is indeed intensely unpleasant but you can be made more comfortable by professionals. I myself have had a similar problem. Do yourself a favor and get help sooner than I did. Untreated addictions only get worse, never better. Answered by Karissa Plascencia 1 year ago.

Funnily adequate, workout consultation my abdominals seems to do the trick. and are available to think of of it, while i grew to become into doing huge-unfold instruments the discomfort grew to become into much less, so i assume having toned muscular tissues enables. warm water bottle and taking a tub additionally seems to help. you would be able to additionally desire to look into homeopathic cures, I used to get those little pills from a food market in Scotland which did the trick. Answered by Marina Glueck 1 year ago.

Give them to me and go check into rehab. You'll be ok. Most people are stronger than they think. But there is no shame in seeking help. It helps if you believe in a higher power. Answered by Lucille Bitter 1 year ago.


Info on Dilaudid and coming off of it. I am on it for severe pain management. Please advise?
I have severe pain related to the recovery period of GBS and have been on Dilaudid since late March.In the hospital I was on IV morphine and IV Dilaudid, now that I am out I am on 4mg every 4-6 hours (oral pill). What can I expect coming off this drug as far as withdrawal is concerned, and what is the proper... Asked by Stephan Euell 1 year ago.

I have severe pain related to the recovery period of GBS and have been on Dilaudid since late March. In the hospital I was on IV morphine and IV Dilaudid, now that I am out I am on 4mg every 4-6 hours (oral pill). What can I expect coming off this drug as far as withdrawal is concerned, and what is the proper method of getting off this drug: weaning, substitution, or some other way? Thanks! Oh, and in the scheme of opioid drugs, how does dilaudid compare, stengthwise, to other drugs? Answered by Fred Wasielewski 1 year ago.

Hi, Dilaudid is a very strong opiate. You will most definitely be experiencing withdrawals. The best method for getting off the Dilaudid is to taper off. I would discuss this with your doctor for recommended dosage instructions, but the goal will be to cut back slowly over the next few weeks, or even months. Regardless, you will probably be uncomfortable, but it's something we all go through when on pain meds. As for substituting other drugs, there are many medications now which are used to help ween people off of opiates. Many of them I wouldn't recommend (like methadone or subutex) because they have longer half-lives and will prolong your withdrawal or cause several sets of withdrawals. However some people have extremely positive results with Suboxone, when taken as indicated. You will lower your Suboxone slowly and experience mild opiate withdrawals throughout, but it does lessen most of the acute withdrawal symptoms like vomiting, sweating, shaking, etc. The other thing would be to start taking a milder opiate but it would probably have similar results. There really isn't any way to not go through the detox symptoms unless you continue on the Dilaudid. I detoxed off of IV morphine, percocet, and oxycontin when in high school, and later off of IV heroin, which all began with prescribed pain medication due to kidney stones, autoimmune thyroid disease, and crohn's disease. I'm now 7+ years sober and I know it's a different situation, but it's the same symptoms. Here are suggestions I give to other opiate addicts to alleviate symptoms of withdrawal: 1) For nausea/vomiting/lower GI upset: Stay hydrated. Get down whatever you can. If you can stomach it, try eating something easy and nutritious like chicken or vegetable soup. The heat is good for inflammation too. If at any time you don't feel like eating solids, sip chicken broth, fruit juice, Gatorade, Vitamin Water, or plain water. You can also take OTC nausea meds or ask your doctor for some. 2) For chills and hot flashes: Shower or take baths whenever you feel like it. These seem to really help with symptoms of withdrawal. Keep a blanket, fan, and space heater nearby. Maintaining a healthy body temperature can really really help. 3) For insomnia: Ask your doctor for something light to help you sleep. Make sure you get something from your doctor as it can be very unsafe to self-medicate when you're addicted to opiates. And sleep as much as you'd like so you miss the withdrawals. 4) Surround yourself with comfort and hang in there! This will pass... Answered by Amira Saik 1 year ago.

You're not taking close to a lethal daily dose. Some people can safely wean themselves off pain meds, just lower the dose gradually to avoid withdrawal symptoms. It's not as easy as it sounds though. See if you can do it, cut out one daily pill each week so the first week you're taking 5 pills a day, next week 4 pills a day etc. Get down to one and then take a half pill each day for a week until you stop altogether. If you can't do it alone you'll just have to talk to your doctor and get some help. It is so, so important that you get off of all of this before getting pregnant. Trust me, you're not going to shock your doctor, this is more common than you know. There's also probably a period of time you need to be clean before getting pregnant. I'm concerned about the thought of you getting pregnant while still taking any of these things even those you think are "baby safe". Too many times the doctors have thought a medicine was safe to take during pregnancy and then decades later they find it wasn't. Case in point: the DES babies.My mother was among the large number of women who was given DES to prevent miscarriage and as a result I had cervical cancer that was not detected until it was quite advanced because it is not a cancer detected on pap tests. When I was pregnant with my first son I was told it would be fine to take tetracycline for a sinus infection and my son's baby teeth were yellowed, his elbow has a deformity and his fingers are shaped oddly. and all because of the tetracycline I took . I feel fortunate because his hands are not noticeably deformed but they could so easliy have been. .After my first pregnancy I wouldn't even take a tylenol when I was pregnant. They were already beginning to suspect tetracycline affects the tooth and bone growth in the fetus so I knew that had been the cause of his problem,. If I'd been pregnant a year later I never would have taken the antibiotic. Please don't take any chances, it's just not worth it. Answered by Kenneth Omar 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is right up there with morphine and fentanyl. If you are on 4 mg now, you will probably be cut down with the dosage to 2 mg. so you will not be cut right off. Then your MD will probably order you something milder like Percocet or Vicodin, and gradually decrease the strength and length of time from every 4 hrs. to every 8 hours. Cutting down gradually should ease any withdrawal complaints. I hope you are seeing a Pain Management MD, for they are the best ones to go to in dealing with this type of problem. Good luck. Answered by Aleta Nell 1 year ago.

Wow, I know someone who is getting over GBS, that is terrible. He never had any pain, however. A lot of Vit C (good stuff, not just the cheapest) and Vits D-3 and E (New Chapter brand) would be good. Turmeric (New Chapter has the best one) is actually a inflammation reducer that I use for my mild OA, works great. Can you swim in a heated pool? That is what helped my friend the most (use a float around the waist) Answered by Carter Acre 1 year ago.

Yes you are going to go through some form of with drawls --without a dought ; but your Dr. is aware of how long you've been on any and all med's so to get off the best thing to do is to get off slowly but don 't just stop cold turkey---get some help from the Dr. that you were under his care. I don't know if I helped any but if I did I'll be more than happy to talk to you anytime. Answered by Rafaela Castle 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is among the strongest narcotics available. They should wean you down so they can void withdrawl symptoms. They may give you something lighter like a percocet in low doses then wean you off completely to an OTC like Tylenol. Good Luck! Answered by Nguyet Myklebust 1 year ago.


Has anyone ever been prescribed dilaudid?
what are they like? Asked by Jesusita Cerullo 1 year ago.

Dilaudid is an opioid analgesic(narcotic). It is very similar to morphine which is also an opioid narcotic. Whether someone is given dilaudid or morphine is usually the physician's call. The incidence of becoming addicted is around 0.01% (very low). Of course the incidence greatly increases if you are (or have been) a drug abuser. It works on the CNS(central nervous system) and basically "tricks" your brain into the perception of no pain. It is generally prescribed for moderate to severe pain. On a pain scale of 0-10; usually continued pain above a 5. Answered by Alla Suderman 1 year ago.

I have never been prescribed Dilaudid, but I have given a lot of it both orally and IV. Its a very strong narcotic pain reliever prescribed for those individuals who have a lot of pain or have developed a tolerance to their pain medication. When we give doses of dilaudid in the hospital, we usually start out small and go stronger until we know how much Dilaudid is effective. Sometimes it takes a very small amount and sometimes it takes a bunch. Answered by Kari Busbin 1 year ago.

I have. I have had both the IV form and the pill form. I just had surgery two months ago and I'm allergic to morphine. This is why I had the IV form. I felt no pain whatsoever. I also didn't have the nausea I usually have with morphine. The only problem is that is dropped my blood pressure too low and I couldn't take anymore of it during my stay in the hospital. My surgeon gave me a prescription for the pills after the vicodin I was taking was not touching the pain. I took them for a week and they kept me from feeling pain. They also knocked me out so I slept alot. I would certainly ask for the medication again if I ever need another surgery or am in pain. Answered by Carol Kesselman 1 year ago.

Narcotic pain killer. I have only had it IV in the hosp. I dont know the chemistry behind it, but I will post a wiki link in a min.. Basically I believe it is supposed to be slightly stronger than morphine. I personally cant stand it. It makes me jittery and gives me a head ache. Answered by Evelina Labbie 1 year ago.

They are a prescribed narcotic drug used for heavy duty pain and it is highly addictive. Answered by Janella Ziyad 1 year ago.

its a pain killer i took while in hospital its heavy duty i would never dare take it unless in hospital Answered by Maryrose Alva 1 year ago.


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