Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 010151/001.

Names and composition

"DILANTIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PHENYTOIN SODIUM.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010151/001 DILANTIN PHENYTOIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
084349/001 DILANTIN PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 30MG EXTENDED
084349/002 DILANTIN PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG EXTENDED
084427/001 DILANTIN PHENYTOIN TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 50MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010151/001 DILANTIN PHENYTOIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
040298/001 EXTENDED PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG EXTENDED
040298/002 PHENYTEK PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 200MG EXTENDED
040298/003 PHENYTEK PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG EXTENDED
040435/001 EXTENDED PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG EXTENDED
040573/001 PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
040621/001 EXTENDED PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG EXTENDED
040684/001 EXTENDED PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG EXTENDED
040731/001 EXTENDED PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 200MG EXTENDED
040731/002 EXTENDED PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG EXTENDED
040732/001 EXTENDED PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG EXTENDED
040759/001 EXTENDED PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 30MG EXTENDED
040765/001 EXTENDED PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG EXTENDED
040781/001 PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
080259/001 PROMPT PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG PROMPT
080857/001 DIPHENYLAN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 30MG PROMPT
080857/002 DIPHENYLAN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG PROMPT
080905/001 PROMPT PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG PROMPT
084307/001 PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
084349/001 DILANTIN PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 30MG EXTENDED
084349/002 DILANTIN PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG EXTENDED
085434/001 PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
085435/001 PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG PROMPT
085894/001 PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG PROMPT
088519/001 PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
088520/001 PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
088521/001 PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
088711/001 PHENYTEX PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG EXTENDED
089003/001 PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
089441/001 EXTENDED PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG EXTENDED
089501/001 PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
089521/001 PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
089744/001 PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
089779/001 PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
089900/001 PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
204309/001 PHENYTOIN SODIUM PHENYTOIN SODIUM CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG EXTENDED

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Answered questions

Tell me about Dilantin... and tell me how long it stays in the body and when given through IV ?
I'm just concerned, cuz bf keeps groaning in his sleep and that's how he sounds sometimes when it starts. I j ust want to make sure that the medicine given to him will work. Asked by Soo Seacrest 1 year ago.

Dilantin is used to control epilepsy. Epilepsy is a condition where you have repeated seizures (fits). There are many different types of seizures, ranging from mild to severe. Dilantin belongs to a group of medicines called anticonvulsants. These drugs are thought to work by controlling brain chemicals which send signals to nerves so that seizures do not happen. Dilantin is also used to help prevent seizures occurring during or after brain surgery. Dilantin may also be used to treat a rapid or irregular heart beat. Dilantin may be used alone, or in combination with other medicines, to treat your condition. Your doctor may have prescribed Dilantin for another reason. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Dilantin has been prescribed. There is no evidence that Dilantin is addictive. Dilantin is used to control epilepsy. Epilepsy is a condition where you have repeated seizures (fits). There are many different types of seizures, ranging from mild to severe. Dilantin belongs to a group of medicines called anticonvulsants. These drugs are thought to work by controlling brain chemicals which send signals to nerves so that seizures do not happen. Dilantin is also used to help prevent seizures occurring during or after brain surgery. Dilantin may also be used to treat a rapid or irregular heart beat. Dilantin may be used alone, or in combination with other medicines, to treat your condition. Your doctor may have prescribed Dilantin for another reason. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Dilantin has been prescribed for you. There is no evidence that Dilantin is addictive. The cause of the seizure will determine the liklihood of another seizure. Seizures can be caused by toxemia, encephalitis, meningitis, various drugs or chemicals and head trauma. Dilantin stays within the body for several days and withdrawal from the long term use can provoke seizures. However if he is to be maintained on Dilantin, he must be careful as there are numerous drug-interactions i.e. disulfuram, a medicine used to treat alcoholism other medicines used to treat fits and convulsions, such as vigabatrin, sodium valproate, valproic acid, carbamazepine, ethosuximide, phenobarbital and lamotrigine anticoagulants, medicines used to prevent blood clots some pain relievers, such as salicylates benzodiazepines, medicines used as sedatives or to treat mental disorders such as anxiety and schizophrenia some medicines used to treat mental disorders, such as clozapine, phenothiazines, fluoxetine and paroxetine corticosteroids such as cortisone and prednisolone cyclosporin, a medicine used to prevent organ transplant rejection and to treat severe rheumatoid arthritis and some severe skin conditions some medicines used to treat cancer medicines used to treat heart problems, such as quinidine, amiodarone, nifedipine, verapamil and diltiazem. some antibiotics and antifungal medicines used to treat infections, such as erythromycin, tetracyclines, ciprofloxacin, sulfonamides, fluconazole, ketoconazole and miconazole isoniazid, a medicine used to prevent and treat tuberculosis (TB) frusemide, a diuretic (fluid tablet), which is used to reduce water retention and high blood pressure some medicines used to treat stomach or duodenal ulcers, such as omeprazole and sucralfate general anaesthetics and muscle relaxants, medicines used during an operation methadone, a medicine used to control severe pain and to treat heroin addiction methylphenidate, a medicine used to treat Attention Deficit Disorder St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), an ingredient used in herbal medicines to treat anxiety and depression tolbutamide, glibenclamide and chlorpropamide, medicines used to treat diabetes some vitamins such as folic acid and Vitamin D theophylline, a medicine used to treat asthma sleeping tablets, sedatives and tranquillisers, medicines used to treat mood disorders oestrogens, hormones used in oral contraceptives and in hormone replacement therapy. Usually once the diagnosis is made as to the cause and appropriate therapy is begun, seizures decrease in frequency and patients may do well for long periods of time without seizure. Answered by Noelle Durgan 1 year ago.

I have been a gran-mal seizure patient taking Dilantin for 18 years. The active ingredient in this medication is Phenytoin. Once it has been force-fed through IV into your arm, you cannot go off the drug unless your doctor chooses to change the medication. And if your doctor does change the medication, you will most likely be started on a low dose and gradually increased with the new medication while lowering the phenytoin. If you attempt to go cold turkey off this medication, you could possibly have a severe seizure and wind up in the hospital. There are chances in taking every antiseizural drug. You could possibly have a seizure at any time even if you are therapeutic, however, being therapeutic does lower your chances. Answered by Micheal Streiff 1 year ago.

Dilantin is an anti-convulsent. It calms a part of your brain that is over-excited due to over-stimulation.It is always possible to have a seizure during the first 24 hours taking it until the body gets enough of it to be stabilized. Answered by Kent Royster 1 year ago.

I knew there was a reason I was avoiding this- I have been needing to keep emotions in check and this just let out a flood of tears so now I am going to let my own feelings be. You did a great job, on the poem, raising the daughter. I am proud of you for both. Answered by Diane Nussey 1 year ago.


Dilantin Drug Overdose?
I have a serious question and no, I am not asking because I'm overdosing or whatever, it's a friend's problem. Say someone takes about...45 or so pills of dilantin and nothing happens, does that mean nothing will? Or does it take time to work? What will happen if you maybe take another 15/20 pills of... Asked by Jesica Poorman 1 year ago.

I have a serious question and no, I am not asking because I'm overdosing or whatever, it's a friend's problem. Say someone takes about...45 or so pills of dilantin and nothing happens, does that mean nothing will? Or does it take time to work? What will happen if you maybe take another 15/20 pills of some other medicine, like cozaar or maybe even advil? Information is appreciated. Answered by Janel Woodbridge 1 year ago.

DILANTIN - is an antiepileptic drug, prescribed to control grand mal seizures (a type of seizure in which the individual experiences a sudden loss of consciousness immediately followed by generalized convulsions) and temporal lobe seizures (a type of seizure caused by disease in the cortex of the temporal [side] lobe of the brain affecting smell, taste, sight, hearing, memory, and movement). Dilantin may also be used to prevent and treat seizures occurring during and after neurosurgery (surgery of the brain and spinal cord). If you have been taking Dilantin regularly, do not stop abruptly. This may precipitate prolonged or repeated epileptic seizures without any recovery of consciousness between attacks--a condition called status epilepticus that can be fatal if not treated promptly. An OVERDOSE of Dilantin can be FATAL. If you suspect an overdose, seek medical attention immediately. Symptoms of Dilantin overdose may include: Coma, difficulty in pronouncing words correctly, involuntary eye movement, lack of muscle coordination, low blood pressure, nausea, sluggishness, slurred speech, tremors, vomiting. Always take medical opinion and then take DILANTIN. This is very important- Answered by Mertie Tolleson 1 year ago.

Dilantin overdose would be a really bad way to go. Answered by Ilene Twohig 1 year ago.

Delayed absorption is possible. Eight or ten might cause only dizziness, but 45 can cause cardiac thythm disturbances. I'd recommend a trip to (and possibly an overnight stay in) your friend's local emergency department. Answered by Adam Coones 1 year ago.

you can die if you take 45 of any kind of drug most drugs get broken down in the liver and if you take too many at one time your liver could shut down Answered by Tawny Wyont 1 year ago.


I have a question about dilantin.?
i have no liver problems OK Asked by Claribel Lafay 1 year ago.

Dilantin or (diphenylhydantoin) as you mention is prescribed to stop/control tonic-clonic grand mal and complex partial (temporal lobe) seizures. Sometimes it is given for trigeminal neuralgia as well which doesn't seem to be your problem. Common side effects are ataxia (altered gait), slurred speech, dizziness, insomnia, nervousness, twitching, headache(common), mental confusion, decreased coordination, periarteritis nodosa, nystagmus, diplopia, blurred vision, gingival hyperplasia, nausea, vomiting, constipation, hepatitis, hyperglycemia, osteomalacia, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, agranulocytosis, pancytopenia, scarlatiniform or morbilliform rash, bullous or purpuric dermatitis, exfoliative dermatitis, Steven-Johnson syndrome, lupus erythematousus, toxic epidermal necrolysis, photosensitivity reactions from the sun, and hirsutism. Are your blood levels, CBC and calcium level being checked occasionally? Are your liver function tests being done? Are you being checked for megaloblastic anemia, folic acid or B12 levels? Take with food! It's a very old drug and I suspect you are well controlled considering your dose. There probably are better drugs on the market but this one is cheap and effective especially if you are well-controlled. Keep a journal of any symptoms you have and take them to your doctor so he/she can order appropriate lab work. If you have any skin manifestations ask your prescriber about Stevens-Johnson syndrome. These are not all inclusive side effects or lab findings but some of the more normal ones. Don't ever just take yourself off the medication without the prescribers authorization. Don't get scared by "all" the side effects in the literature, for liability they tend to be over zealous in reporting everything, but obviously you need this drug and taking it out weighs any of the negatives. Questions should be routinely asked by your prescriber/pharmacist/lab personnel and shared with you. You are captain of your ship, take responsibility to know what labs, symptoms, side effects you should know about. Always ask when in doubt, but only your prescriber knows your whole clinical picture. There are side effects with other drugs so ask about that also. Good luck, should you get pregnant please inform your prescriber! Answered by Magan Caligari 1 year ago.

the effect is to hopefully prevent or reduce the frequency of seizures. see webmd.com Answered by Neida Agresta 1 year ago.

LIVER PROBLEMS....YOU SHOULD HAVE A LIVER PANEL BLOOD DRAW AT LEAST EVERY 6 MONTHS..... Answered by Evelyne Isa 1 year ago.

go to this link....read.... Answered by Imelda Boyton 1 year ago.


Natural Suppliments and Dilantin?
First of all, I take Dilantin (100mg three times a day) and am having some horrid panic issues... I feel panicky all day everyday and the medicine the doctor gave me scares me (buspar, the side effects freak me out) so I went to WalMart and bought two things. 1. Natrol 5-HTP and Valerian root. My questions are,... Asked by Florance Speelman 1 year ago.

First of all, I take Dilantin (100mg three times a day) and am having some horrid panic issues... I feel panicky all day everyday and the medicine the doctor gave me scares me (buspar, the side effects freak me out) so I went to WalMart and bought two things. 1. Natrol 5-HTP and Valerian root. My questions are, do those two things have any side effects? Has anyone been hurt by taking it? And, will either one of those interact badly with Dilantin? Oh, and has anyone used them for panic disorder? I called the doctor and he said he didn't know and that anything sold over-the-counter isnt very strong... Answered by Cristie Lambertson 1 year ago.

Ok, here's the thing. Using holistic medicine can be very effective and can help you with panic disorders, but there are many things you need to know. I would recommend visiting with a holistic doctor who can tell you what to take, how much, what brand and where to find it. Failing that, I have found Dr. Linda Page's books on holistic nutrition to be very helpful. Dr Andrew Weil is also very learned on the subject of integrative medicine as well. There are also changes to your diet and excercise that can be very helpful for mental function that you should probably know about. I know that very few western doctors that I have ever visited had a clue about nutrition or holistic medicine so you have to find help away from your doctor. Also, any holistic treatment you decide to pursue will take longer to be effective than the "magic bullet" medication of western medicine. I hope you find all you need to make yourself well. Answered by Chantell Hoenig 1 year ago.


Dilantin during pregnancy...?
Dilantin during pregnancy...?My mother has epilepsy and she takes dilantin for it. She has been taking dilantin probably for about 30 years now. I am 24 years old. I was talking to her the other day and something about having a bad memory got brought up. And she said she has always heard that taking Dilantin can... Asked by Reatha Younglas 1 year ago.

Dilantin during pregnancy...? My mother has epilepsy and she takes dilantin for it. She has been taking dilantin probably for about 30 years now. I am 24 years old. I was talking to her the other day and something about having a bad memory got brought up. And she said she has always heard that taking Dilantin can cause memory loss or memory problems. My memory is horrible, I can not remember so many of the things I have done in my life. I see pictures and I know its me but I just can not remember doing those things or being there. My friends and other family will talk about when they were a little kid all the things they can remember and I just can't. I'm not saying I can't remember anything but I would say I don't remember 80% of what other people say they can remember. When someone will say do you remember when we... Sometimes I can remember and sometimes I can't (I'm talking about just a couple of years ago not even when I was a little child) Anyway my question is if my mother took Dilantin during pregnancy (which she has told me she did-the drs told her the pros would out weigh the cons) could that be the reason my memory is sooo bad? Answered by Benjamin Mausbach 1 year ago.

Here is what the FDA says about Dilantin use during pregnancy, and its side effects for the baby: Pregnancy and Dilantin The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lists phenytoin in Pregnancy Category D. This indicates that there is clear evidence of risk to the human fetus, but the benefits may outweigh the risk for pregnant women who have a serious condition that cannot be treated effectively with a safer drug. The babies of women taking Dilantin have a greater than usual number of major birth defects like cleft lip, cleft palate, and heart malformations. Defects like these occur in 2-3% of all pregnancies but affect 4-7% of the babies of women taking only phenytoin. (This rate is similar to that for women taking other seizure medicines.) There is also an increased chance of minor birth defects such as short fingers and widely spaced eyes. When these babies are re-examined after several years, however, these minor defects are often undetectable or very subtle. Women taking phenytoin used to be warned about a disorder called "fetal hydantoin syndrome," but this concept is no longer accepted. Phenytoin does not clearly differ from other seizure medicines in the type of defects that may occur. The risk of defects is higher for women who take more than one AED and for women with a family history of birth defects. Advise women who are capable of becoming pregnant to take 400 mcg (0.4 mg) of folic acid (folate) daily to help prevent neural tube defects. Women at high risk, such as those with a history of a neural tube defect in a previous pregnancy, should take 4000 mcg (4 mg) daily, beginning before they become pregnant. About 20% to 35% of women have seizures more often during pregnancy because of changes in hormones or changes in how phenytoin is handled by the body. Check the blood levels of phenytoin regularly during pregnancy so that the dosage can be adjusted as needed. No studies have been performed to demonstrate the effect of specific AEDs during labor and delivery. Possible causes of seizures include: failure or inability to take medication sleep deprivation hyperventilation stress pain. Some babies born to mothers taking phenytoin have had inadequate blood clotting within the first 24 hours after birth. It is recommended that the mother be given about 10 mg of vitamin K per day during the last month of pregnancy to prevent this problem. The vitamin K given to babies when they are born may be too late to prevent this disorder. Breast-feeding by mothers taking phenytoin should be safe for healthy, full-term newborns, although a small amount of the medication will appear in the milk. Since 90% of phenytoin is bound to plasma proteins in the mother's blood, the level in breast milk is about 10% of the level in the mother's blood. Answered by Rick Ferland 1 year ago.

i have had to take drugs for the time of both pregnancies. I surely have intense stress and OCD. i didn't wish the drugs at the same time as pregnant, yet my first being pregnant I were given so undesirable that the advantages outweighed the hazards. i'm on Clonazepam, Seroquel, and Luvox. With my 2d toddler, I talked to my well being care service earlier conceiving and he or she placed me on those meds that were the most possibility-free for the time of a being pregnant (as all of us comprehend no longer some thing is considered possibility-free yet that's what I had to do) and this toddler is doing tremendous, and my first grew to grow to be out in basic terms positive too. in case you fairly want them, then bypass with what your well being care service says. sturdy success. Answered by Emilia Meisenburg 1 year ago.


Any doctors or nurses around? Can taking two glaucoma medications cause a dilantin level in the blood to rise?
My gf's level was taken two weeks ago and it rose to 17 from being at or around normal for a long time. The only change she has made to her meds is that two eyedrops were added for glaucoma. One is called "cosopt', the other is "Alphagan'. Other than that, we have no clue why it rose. Asked by Jonas Grumer 1 year ago.

A normal dilantin level is 10-20 so 17 is still in the normal range. until her level reaches 30 she is not toxic. I have looked up the medications she is taking and there is nothing stating a contraindication or a indication for increasing dilantin levels. Is she drinking enough water and is she going pee ok? If so, then it is apparently clearing her body just fine. Make sure, since she is on prolonged therapy with dilantin, that she has an adequate intake, not excessive, of foods high in vitamin D and that she has some exposure to sunlight....wear a hat and sunglasses. And as I'm sure she knows, the flu vaccine may increase her seizure activity so if she gets a flu shot her dosage may need to be adjusted for a time. The only thing I know that for certain will increase dilantin levels is drinking alcohol so if she had a few drinks close to when her blood level was drawn that may have temporarily increased it....but like I said, its still well within the normal level. Hope this helps, my best to you! Answered by Cherilyn Christen 1 year ago.


Does anyone no if i can take cough medicine with dilantin?
Asked by Charlie Kopis 1 year ago.

Although Dilantin interacts with almost every medication under the sun, if the active ingredient in your cough medicine is dextromethorphan then you are okay. All other active ingredients that may be in your cough medicine are also okay, but I would take caution with acetaminophen (tylenol). The levels of it's toxic metabolite may be increased by the dilantin and cause some issues, but this is a very minor interaction and likely not to be a problem. If there is acetaminophen in it you should try to stay under 3000 mg of acetaminophen a day or avoid it altogether. Answered by Tristan Laskoskie 1 year ago.

Dilantin Syrup Answered by Isaiah Simpton 1 year ago.

That would all depend on the active ingredients of the cough mixture. Without you posting exactly what cough mixture you intend to take, no one can check for drug interactions. Your best bet would be to call a pharmacist though and ask them. They are trained professionals and will be able to advise on drug interactions, and suggest a safe medication to take. Answered by Li Matthys 1 year ago.

HEY I TOTALLY UNDERSTAND. I HAVE AN AVERAGE OF 15 MIGRAINES A MONTH ALSO. I ASLO TAKE IMITREX WHICH IS VERY EXPENSIVE.. AND I HAVE BEEN TAKING THIS FOR ABOUT 17 YEARS...I AM SORRY I DON'T HAVE THE ANSWER FOR YOU. BUT KEEP THIS IN MIND.. ALWAYS STAY AWAYS FORM STRONG PURFUMES, CIG SMOKE, AND WEAR SUNGLASSES. I FIND MY HEADACHES ARE MORE FREQUENT IN SUMMER. YOU CAN ALSO TRY DRAMAMINE (USED COMMOMLY FOR MOTION SICKNESS) A NURSE TOLD ME THIS AND IT HELPS. YYOU KNOW HOW YOU FEEL DIZZY WHEN YOU GET A HEADACHE...HOPE THIS HELPS. CHECK ON LINE PREVENTION OF MIGRAINES... GIVES YOU SOME FOODS WHICH CAN TRIGGER A MIGRAINE. Answered by Carlena Mikolajczyk 1 year ago.

It reacts with aspirin tylenol and antihistamine. If the cough medicine doesn't contain these ingrediemts then it is ok. Answered by Lilia Persten 1 year ago.


What are side effects of Dilantin ?
Asked by Sherryl Pinzone 1 year ago.

Constipation; dizziness; headache; mild nervousness; nausea; trouble sleeping; vomiting. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Dilantin Infatabs Chewable Tablets: Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); bone pain; butterfly-shaped rash on the face; clumsiness or unsteadiness; confusion; dark urine; delirium; high blood sugar (flushing; fruit-like breath odor; increased thirst, hunger, or urination; rapid breathing); new or worsening mental or mood changes (eg, anxiety, behavior changes, depression, irritability, panic attacks, restlessness, suicidal thoughts or attempts); new or worsening seizures; numbness or tingling of the hands or feet; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; signs of infection (eg, chills, fever, sore throat); slurred speech; stomach pain; swollen lymph nodes; swollen or tender gums; tremor; unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual eye movements; unusual muscle movements; yellowing of the skin or eyes. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Dilantin Kapseals Extended-Release Capsules: Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); bone pain; butterfly-shaped rash on the face; clumsiness or unsteadiness; confusion; dark urine; delirium; high blood sugar (flushing; fruit-like breath odor; increased thirst, hunger, or urination; rapid breathing); new or worsening mental or mood changes (eg, anxiety, behavior changes, depression, irritability, panic attacks, restlessness, suicidal thoughts or attempts); new or worsening seizures; numbness or tingling of the hands or feet; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; signs of infection (eg, chills, fever, sore throat); slurred speech; stomach pain; swollen lymph nodes; swollen or tender gums; tremor; unusual bruising or bleeding; unusual eye movements; unusual muscle movements; yellowing of the skin or eyes. Answered by Ossie Rumford 1 year ago.

I very good question to verify through WebMD.com. I'm sure that they might vary from individual to individual. I do know that Dilantin levels are generally checked monthly for maintainance. Answered by Paulina Luelf 1 year ago.


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