Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020092/001.

Names and composition

"DILACOR XR" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020092/001 DILACOR XR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020092/002 DILACOR XR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020092/003 DILACOR XR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018602/001 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
018602/002 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
018602/003 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
018602/004 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
019471/001 CARDIZEM SR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019471/002 CARDIZEM SR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019471/003 CARDIZEM SR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019471/004 CARDIZEM SR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020027/001 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020027/003 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020062/001 CARDIZEM CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
020062/002 CARDIZEM CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
020062/003 CARDIZEM CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
020062/004 CARDIZEM CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
020062/005 CARDIZEM CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
020092/001 DILACOR XR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020092/002 DILACOR XR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020092/003 DILACOR XR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020401/001 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
020401/002 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
020401/003 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
020401/004 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
020401/005 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
020401/006 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
020792/001 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per VIAL
020939/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
020939/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
020939/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
020939/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
020939/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
020939/006 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
021392/001 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
021392/002 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
021392/003 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
021392/004 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
021392/005 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
021392/006 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
072838/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
072838/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
072838/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
072838/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074051/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074051/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074051/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074051/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074067/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074067/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074067/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074067/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074079/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
074079/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
074079/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074084/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074084/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074093/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074093/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074093/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074093/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074168/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074168/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074168/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074168/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074185/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074185/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074185/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074185/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074617/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
074752/001 CARTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074752/002 CARTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074752/003 CARTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074752/004 CARTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
074845/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
074845/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
074845/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074852/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074852/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074852/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074894/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
074910/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
074910/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
074910/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074941/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
074943/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074943/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074943/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074984/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074984/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074984/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074984/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
075004/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075086/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075106/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075116/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075116/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075116/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
075116/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
075124/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
075124/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075124/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075375/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075401/001 TAZTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075401/002 TAZTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075401/003 TAZTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
075401/004 TAZTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
075401/005 TAZTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
075749/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075853/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per VIAL
076151/001 DILT-CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
076151/002 DILT-CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
076151/003 DILT-CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
076151/004 DILT-CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076395/001 DILTZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
076395/002 DILTZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
076395/003 DILTZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
076395/004 DILTZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076395/005 DILTZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
076563/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
076563/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
076563/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
076563/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
076563/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076563/006 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
077686/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
077686/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
077686/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
077686/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
077686/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
077686/006 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
078538/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
090421/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
090421/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
090421/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
090421/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
090421/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
090492/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
090492/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
090492/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
090492/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
090492/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
091022/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
091022/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
091022/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
091022/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
091022/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
091022/006 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
202463/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
202651/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
202651/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 50MG per 10ML
202651/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 125MG per 25ML
203023/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
203023/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
203023/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
203023/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
203023/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG

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Answered questions

What happens when a doctor prescribes cardizem to a 62 yr old man with normal blood pressure?
Had heart attack caused by cardizem Asked by Zenia Marlowe 1 year ago.

Brand name: Cardizem Pronounced: CAR-di-zem Generic name: Diltiazem hydrochloride Other brand names: Cardizem CD, Cardizem SR, Dilacor XR, Tiazac Why is this drug prescribed? Cardizem and Cardizem CD (a controlled release form of diltiazem) are used in the treatment of angina pectoris (chest pain usually caused by lack of oxygen to the heart due to clogged arteries) and chronic stable angina (caused by exertion). Cardizem CD is also used to treat high blood pressure. Another controlled release form, Cardizem SR, is used only in the treatment of high blood pressure. Cardizem, a calcium channel blocker, dilates blood vessels and slows the heart to reduce blood pressure and the pain of angina. Doctors sometimes prescribe Cardizem for loss of circulation in the fingers and toes (Raynaud's phenomenon), for involuntary movements (tardive dyskinesia), and to prevent heart attack. Tiazac and Dilacor XR are used in the treatment of high blood pressure and chronic stable angina. They may be taken alone or combined with other blood pressure medications. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Cardizem. •More common side effects may include: Abnormally slow heartbeat (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), dizziness, fluid retention, flushing (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), headache, nausea, rash, weakness •Less common or rare side effects may include: Abnormal dreams, allergic reaction, altered way of walking, amnesia, anemia, angina (severe chest pain), blood disorders, congestive heart failure, constipation, cough, depression, diarrhea, difficulty sleeping, drowsiness, dry mouth, excessive urination at night, eye irritation, fainting, flu symptoms, hair loss, hallucinations, heart attack, high blood sugar, hives, impotence, increased output of pale urine, indigestion, infection, irregular heartbeat, itching, joint pain, labored breathing, loss of appetite, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, muscle cramps, nasal congestion or inflammation, nervousness, nosebleed, pain, personality change, pounding heartbeat, rapid heartbeat, reddish or purplish spots on skin, ringing in ears, sexual difficulties, skin inflammation/flaking or peeling, sensitivity to light, sleepiness, sore throat, taste alteration, thirst, tingling or pins and needles, tremor, vision changes, vomiting, welts, weight increase Answered by Kermit Ornelos 1 year ago.

The American Heart Association set new guidelines for normal B/P ranges and 120/90 is too high. They want to see an average pressure of 117/68. So, your B/P of 120/90 is too high and 100/50 is okay. Please remember that B/P fluctuates throughout the day and night and throughout your lifetime. B/Ps are typically lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon/early evening. And the average B/P for a healthy 5-year-old is very different from that of a healthy 15-year-old and a healthy 75-year-old. B/P is affected by stress. Stress comes in many forms. Even Illness, strong emotions and obesity are forms of stress on the body. Pretty much everything is a form of stress. And stress can, at times, be a good thing. So "stress" is a general, catch-all word. Yes, of course you experience stress whether or not you know it when you see it. An isolated reading of 120/90 may not be significant. High or low blood pressure is generally determined by what the values are consistently. Spot checks won't establish a baseline unless done in a specific way. Check your B/P with the same equipment on 3 different days and at 3 different times of day (Morning, mid day and night). You'll get a much better idea of what your baseline B/P is and how it rates according to the AHA. Answered by Juli Cabarcas 1 year ago.

High blood pressure is not the only reason Cardizem can be prescribed. It does have other uses. Who told you Cardizem caused the heart attack? I have never heard of that. Answered by Maximo Didomenico 1 year ago.


Is a heartbeat of 43 beats per min too slow?
and not athlete thanks Asked by Magdalene Marchesseault 1 year ago.

Yes it is too slow. Normal Heart Beat for adult ranges from 60-100 beats per min. It is called bradycardia. Bradycardia is an abnormally slow heart rate of less than 60 beats per minute. A normal heartbeat is between 60 and 100 beats per minute. Here's what happens during a normal heartbeat: The electrical signal that starts a heartbeat comes from the heart's sinus node, the natural pacemaker located in the upper portion of the right atrium. From the sinus node, the heartbeat signal travels to the atrioventricular (A-V) node, located between the atria, and then through the bundle of His (pronounced "hiss") — a series of modified heart-muscle fibers located between the ventricles to the muscles of the ventricles. This triggers a contraction of the ventricles and produces a heartbeat. Bradycardia, even as low as 50 beats per minute, can be normal in athletes and other people who are physically active. In these people, regular exercise improves the heart's ability to pump blood efficiently, so fewer heart contractions are required to supply the body's needs. In other cases, bradycardia can be a form of cardiac arrhythmia, a heart-rate abnormality. Cardiac arrhythmia can be caused by a problem in the sinus node, or it can be related to some disturbance in the passage of heartbeat signals through the A-V node and bundle of His. Also, bradycardia sometimes is a side effect of certain medications, including propranolol (Inderal), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Toprol-XL), sotalol (Betapace), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan) and diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor-XR). Bradycardia also occurs in some people who have certain medical illnesses not related to the heart, such as: Abnormally low level of thyroid hormones (hypothyroidism) Severe liver disease An abnormally low body temperature (hypothermia) Typhoid fever Brucellosis, an infectious disease marked by fever, sweating and weakness that is transmitted to humans by direct contact with diseased animals or through ingestion of contaminated meat, milk or cheese Symptoms Bradycardia can cause dizziness, weakness, lack of energy, or fainting spells. If bradycardia is caused by a medical illness, there will be additional symptoms that are specific to that illness. For example, people whose bradycardia is due to severe hypothyroidism also can have constipation, muscle cramps, weight gain (often despite poor appetite), very dry skin, hair that is thin and dry, an abnormal sensitivity to cold temperatures and other symptoms related to low levels of thyroid hormones. Diagnosis Your doctor will ask about your family history of heart disease, cardiac arrhythmias and fainting spells. He or she also will review your current symptoms and your personal medical history, including your use of medications that may cause bradycardia. During the physical examination, your doctor will check your heart rate and rhythm, and your pulse. You may be asked to do some sit-ups or other exercise so that your doctor can see if your heart rate rises normally when your heart is asked to do more work. Your doctor also will check for physical signs of thyroid abnormalities, including an enlarged thyroid gland, very dry skin, and hair that is thin and dry. To further evaluate your bradycardia, your doctor will order an electrocardiogram (EKG). However, because some forms of bradycardia come and go, a one-time office EKG may be normal. If this is the case, a test called ambulatory electrocardiography may be done. During this test, the patient wears a portable EKG machine called a Holter monitor, usually for 24 hours. If your symptoms are infrequent, you may wear a monitor for longer. You will be taught to press a button to record your EKG reading when your symptoms occur. Depending on the results of your physical examination, other tests may be necessary to check for medical illnesses that produce bradycardia. For example, if you have symptoms and physical signs of hypothyroidism, your doctor may order blood tests to measure levels of thyroid hormones and TSH, a pituitary gland hormone that stimulates the thyroid. Your doctor also may order blood tests for cholesterol and certain liver enzymes, which often are elevated in people with hypothyroidism. Expected Duration How long bradycardia lasts depends on its cause. For example, normal bradycardia in a well-trained athlete will last as long as the athlete maintains his or her usual level of exercise. When bradycardia occurs as a side effect of medication, it usually will go away as soon as the drug that triggered the bradycardia is used by the body or excreted in the urine. Bradycardia caused by hypothyroidism will go away quickly after treatment with thyroid hormones. Certain forms of bradycardia resulting from cardiac arrhythmias can be cured with a permanent pacemaker. Prevention There are no general guidelines to prevent all forms of bradycardia. When bradycardia occurs as a side effect of medication, the problem can be prevented by either switching the drug or reducing its dose. Treatment In most cases, bradycardia in healthy, well-trained athletes does not need to be treated. In fact, in most people, bradycardia does not require treatment unless patients have symptoms that are clearly due to a slow heartbeat. The following are conditions that produce bradycardia that requires treatment: Cardiac arrhythmias resulting from sinus-node dysfunction — In people with frequent, severe symptoms of sinus-node dysfunction, the main treatment is usually a permanent pacemaker, an implanted device that generates electrical impulses to regulate the heartbeat. Cardiac arrhythmias resulting from A-V node problems — In people with A-V node problems, the passage of heartbeat signals may be blocked to different degrees. Some patients with less severe degrees of A-V block do not need treatment. Others may simply be monitored with frequent EKGs, especially if they don't have any symptoms and have a heart rate that is adequate for their daily activities. People with the most severe form of A-V block (called third-degree A-V block) can be treated with a special dual-chambered permanent pacemaker, a pacemaker with one electrode in the atrium and one in the ventricle. Hypothyroidism — Hypothyroidism is treated with replacement doses of thyroid hormones. Synthetic forms of these hormones are available — llevothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid and others), liothyronine (Cytomel, Triostat) or liotrix (Thyrolar) — as well as thyroid extract. When To Call A Professional Call your doctor if your pulse is less than 60 beats per minute. This is especially important if you have had dizziness, weakness, lack of energy or fainting spells. Prognosis In well-trained athletes with normal bradycardia, the slow heartbeat is often a sign of overall good health. In other people with bradycardia, the outlook depends on the underlying disorder. For example, the prognosis is usually good in people with hypothyroidism, since treatment with thyroid hormones can relieve bradycardia and other symptoms related to low hormone levels. In some elderly patients, hormone dosages may need to be increased very slowly over several weeks to prevent straining the heart. At one time, the prognosis for people with third-degree A-V block was poor, with 50% of patients dying within one year of diagnosis. Now, however, the availability of permanent pacemakers has improved the prognosis for many people with cardiac arrhythmias. Answered by Joanna Sobolik 1 year ago.

That is a pretty slow heartbeat, but evidently you are still conscious. If you were passing out frequently then of course you would be very concerned. How long has it been since you have seen a doctor? You should see one if you see black when you rise suddenly from a chair. I would exercise, like run up the stairs and down again and take the pulse again. It should then be more than 43 beats per minute. Like maybe 80 or 100. Is it just 43 first thing in the morning before you get out of bed? You might want to take it during the middle of the day or when you are moderately active. Answered by Maryjo Grable 1 year ago.

Yes, definitley. Only well trained athletes have low hear rates, and I'm not sure if that low is even normal for them. You should be experienciing some fatigue with walking, or strenuous excerise. If you are taking meds, then something needs to be adjusted. It's important to have your doctor give you a thorough exam.asap! You can also experience dizziness, so don't delay getting a doctor's appt. Take Care! Answered by Shaunta Sherard 1 year ago.

Very, very few healthy, normal people will have a resting HR in the 40's (usually in a deep sleep). I work in an ICU and all of our patients are monitored so I see I wide range of heart rates but, this definitely falls out of "normal range" (60-100bpm). As previous posters have mentioned the cause could be a medication (this is the most frequent cause that I personally see). If you suspect it is medication related, do not stop your medication suddenly as this could cause severe side effects. Discuss this with your physician. Answered by Zulema Kosch 1 year ago.

yes this is considerably low and should be evaluated quickly. normal heartrate is a healthy adult is 60-80. some people (mostly athletes) run low naturally and some run high (like me-my norm is about 110). if you're currently on medication for blood pressure-this could lower your heartrate. dehydration could lower it as well (it's the body's way of preserving energy and trying to keep itself alive) make sure to have this checked out asap (24-48 hours max). it could be an indication of a serious problem. Answered by Cherly Komatsu 1 year ago.

No, the more in shape you are, the slower your resting heart rate will be. There are some athletes that have resting heart rates as slow as 16 Beats per minute. Answered by Emilia Verrastro 1 year ago.

It depends! when you are resting for example sleeping a heart beat rate of 43per minute might not be too slow. but if it is while you are active it might be seen as low. the average is about 70per minute. Answered by Abdul Cassisse 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Jacquelyne Haffey 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Regena Hulse 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Eliana Hougen 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Karlene Stockel 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Wilbur Lemler 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Carly Hagert 1 year ago.


Beta blockers slow me down too much. What else can I take?
Have been taking twice a day two bisoprolol pills to treat high blood pressure. I have ran out and could not get to the doctor in time to refill the prescription. My blood pressure is of course higher than normal but I no longer feel so weak and tired like I did on the beta blocker. Before I was prescribed... Asked by Colton Voeltz 1 year ago.

Have been taking twice a day two bisoprolol pills to treat high blood pressure. I have ran out and could not get to the doctor in time to refill the prescription. My blood pressure is of course higher than normal but I no longer feel so weak and tired like I did on the beta blocker. Before I was prescribed bisoprolol the doctor wanted to put me on an ACE inhibitor but I requested a beta blocker as I heard the other can cause coughing. I do not want to take them so what else other than beta blockers or ACE inhibitors can I take? I will be discussing this with the doctor tomorrow but I'd like to know about a few other pills I could possibly take and not walk in there knowing nothing on the subject. Answered by Thomas Lieb 1 year ago.

There are many medications for high blood pressure that work in several approaches. Talk to your doctor about getting you a different one. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. These allow blood vessels to widen by preventing a hormone called angiotensin from affecting blood vessels. Frequently prescribed ACE inhibitors include captopril (Capoten), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril) and ramipril (Altace). Angiotensin II receptor blockers. These help blood vessels relax by blocking the action of angiotensin. Frequently prescribed angiotensin II receptor blockers include losartan (Cozaar), olmesartan (Benicar) and valsartan (Diovan). Beta blockers. These work by blocking certain nerve and hormonal signals to the heart and blood vessels, thus lowering blood pressure. Frequently prescribed beta blockers include metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (Corgard) and penbutolol (Levatol). Calcium channel blockers. These prevent calcium from going into heart and blood vessel muscle cells, thus causing the cells to relax, which lowers blood pressure. Frequently prescribed calcium channel blockers include amlodipine (Norvasc), diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor XR) and nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia). Renin inhibitors. Renin is an enzyme produced by your kidneys that starts a chain of chemical steps that increases blood pressure. Aliskiren (Tekturna) slows down the production of renin, reducing its ability to begin this process... Answered by Yon Shauf 1 year ago.

A side effect of most beta blockers is fatigue. It can be a side effect of almost every medication that is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), but beta blockers cause a bit more. Not everyone who takes an ACE Inhibitor develops a cough. ACE inhibitors are "terrific" medications for treating high blood pressure; consider giving them a try (I've been taking one for 6 months without a cough). If you do develop a cough, a good alternative are medications in the classification of Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARBs). There are also the Calcium Channel Blockers, but I'd try the ACE inhibitors first. Answered by Aileen Sheffo 1 year ago.

Ace inhibitors can cause coughing, but this is a type of reaction, and you will be taken off if it causes this. I cannot take them, but know a number of people who do with no problem. There is also a type of BP medications called ARB (angiotensin II receptor antagonist), as well as calcium channel blockers, alpha blockers, and vasodialators. You can search for these medications online and read up on them. For example, I have some heart issues so I cannot take the calcium channel blockers. But definitely discuss with your doctor. I have to take beta blockers, but you do get used to them after a while. FYI however, NEVER just stop taking blood pressure medication. Beta Blockers, for example, if you just stop them cold turkey, they can result in a serious heart related issue. Answered by Modesta Jarboe 1 year ago.

Magnesium regulates blood pressure. Find out why it's high in the first place and work on that. is it due to high cholesterol? Try red yeast rice Answered by Fleta Decasanova 1 year ago.

poor you,i have suffered sporadically with this since the age of 6 and it is awful,i have found a way to stop them 98% of the time,like you i used to lay down and wait but that used to take ages,to calm it down , my tip is at the first flutter take an intake of breath ,hold nose and breath ,bend forward and ,bear down blowing out but holding it in at same time,put pressure with hands on the solar plexus area under your rib cage,mid centre,above belly button,this really does work,also get your iron levels checked as a low iron level can cause attacks to.fizzy drinks also aggravate it,all the best,by the way i am 60 now and you can e mail me if you want Answered by Joe Krings 1 year ago.

And the same question pops up again Answered by Tandra Wies 1 year ago.


Side efects of cyclosporine?
Asked by Clora Hoadley 1 year ago.

Cyclosporine is a very strong medicine. It may cause side effects that could be very serious, such as high blood pressure and kidney and liver problems. It may also reduce the body's ability to fight infections. You and your doctor should talk about the good this medicine will do as well as the risks of using it. Notify your doctor immediately if you develop fever or chills, a sore throat, unusual bleeding or bruising, mouth sores, abdominal pain, pale stools, or darkened urine. These symptoms could be early signs of dangerous side effects. If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking cyclosporine and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives); unusual tiredness or weakness; cough or hoarseness, fever, or chills; painful or difficult urination; severe nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; unusual bleeding or bruising; seizures; or a sudden unusual feeling of discomfort or illness. Other, less serious side effects may also occur. Continue to take cyclosporine and notify your doctor if you experience tremor (shaking); increased bodily hair growth; gum problems; high blood pressure; numbness or tingling; or decreased appetite. Immunosuppressant drugs such as cyclosporine increase your risk of certain types of cancer, such as lymphomas or skin cancer. Ask you doctor about the risks and benefits of cyclosporine in your treatment. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. (back to top) What other drugs will affect cyclosporine? There are many drug/drug interactions with cyclosporine and you should tell your doctor of any drugs you are on and any new drugs, including herbal products, you start. The interactions could alter cyclosporine levels causing a decrease in effectiveness or an increase in side effects. The side effects or effectiveness of the other drugs may also be altered. The following are some examples of medicatoins that may result in a drug/drug interaction when taken with cyclosporine: trimethoprim with sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, Sulfatrim, others), gentamicin (Garamycin, others), and vancomycin (Vancocin); ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin, others), naproxen (Naprosyn, Anaprox, Aleve, others), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), fenoprofen (Nalfon), indomethacin (Indocin), ketorolac (Toradol), ketoprofen (Orudis KT, Orudis, Oruvail), nabumetone (Relafen), oxaprozin (Daypro), piroxicam (Feldene), sulindac (Clinoril), and tolmetin (Tolectin); amphotericin B (Fungizone) and ketoconazole (Nizoral); tacrolimus (Prograf); melphalan (Alkeran); cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB) and ranitidine (Zantac, Zantac 75); diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor XR, Tiazac), nicardipine (Cardene), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone) and verapamil (Calan, Verelan); ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), and fluconazole (Diflucan); danazol (Danocrine) and methylprednisolone (Medrol, others); erythromycin (Ery-Tab, E-Mycin, E.E.S., P.C.E., others), clarithromycin (Biaxin); bromocriptine (Parlodel); colchicine and allopurinol (Aloprim, Lopurin, Zyloprim); indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), ritonavir (Norvir), lopinavir-ritonavir(Kaletra) and saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase); metoclopramide (Reglan); prednisolone (Prelone, Pediapred, others); digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); lovastatin (Mevacor), fluvastatin (Lescol), pravastatin (Pravachol), simvastatin (Zocor), or atorvastatin (Lipitor); PUVA or UVB therapy; and potassium-sparing diuretics (water pills) such as amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone, Spironol), or triamterene (Dyrenium); and any type of vaccination. Answered by Rubie Bettle 1 year ago.

Hi -- "It may cause side effects that could be very serious, such as high blood pressure and kidney and liver problems. It may also reduce the body's ability to fight infections. " Answered by Drew Krenek 1 year ago.


Can I take Benadryl while taking Toprol XL?
Asked by Kaleigh Walstrum 1 year ago.

No, you should not a drug interaction may occur. You should ask you local pharmacist what would be acceptable to take without having any type of drug interaction. Here are a list of medications (prescription & OTC) that should not be taken with Toprol XL... (Partial List) There are a number of medicines that may interact with Toprol-XL® (metoprolol succinate). Some Toprol-XL drug interactions can involve medications such as: Reserpine Clonidine (Catapres®, Duraclon®) Amiodarone (Cordarone®) Cimetidine (Tagamet®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) Bupropion (Wellbutrin®) Thioridazine (Mellaril®) Quinidine Propafenone (Rythmol®) Ritonavir (Norvir®) Diphenhydramine (Banophen®, Benadryl®) ************** Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil®) Terbinafine (Lamisil®) Calcium channel blockers, such as: o Amlodipine (Norvasc®) o Verapamil (Calan®, Isoptin®) o Verapamil Extended-Release (Calan® SR, Covera-HS®, Isoptin® SR, Verelan®, Verelan® PM) o Diltiazem (Cardizem®) o Diltiazem ER (Cardizem® CD, Cardizem® LA, Cardizem® SR, Dilacor XR®, Diltia XT™, Tiazac®) o Nifedipine (Adalat®, Procardia®) o Nifedipine ER (Adalat® CC, Procardia XL®) o Felodipine (Plendil®) o Nisoldipine (Sular®) o Isradipine (DynaCirc®) o Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®), naproxen (Naprosyn®), naproxen sodium (Aleve®, Anaprox®, Naprelan®), diclofenac (Cataflam®, Voltaren®), indomethacin (Indocin®), nabumetone (Relafen®), oxaprozin (Daypro®), celecoxib (Celebrex®), meloxicam (Mobic®), etodolac (Lodine®), ketoprofen, ketorolac (Toradol®), and others Certain diabetes medicines, such as glyburide (DiaBeta®, Glynase®, Micronase®) Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), selegiline (Eldepryl®, EMSAM®), and tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Answered by Lily Herbster 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl Interactions Answered by Teodoro Hochstein 1 year ago.

I looked at the list of meds that you shouldn't take with Toprol. My daughter is on Toprol and she was recently given ibuprofen for an injury per the advise of her doctor. She took it for several days without complications. Why aren't you supposed to take it? Just wondering for future use. Answered by Hsiu Bores 1 year ago.

And I take Norvasc with Toprol XL per doc? Answered by Jay Huitzacua 1 year ago.

I wouldn't mess with anything till you know how you will react to the medication. Although if you are thinking of maybe a glass of wine once in a while you should be fine, but I would ask my doctor to make sure. Answered by Steven Strubel 1 year ago.

Benadryl may raise your blood pressure. I would check with your Dr. first. Answered by Paz Runnels 1 year ago.


Best Med For Extra Heart Beats?
ok im 21 m 5'5 144lbs ive been diagnosed with several extra heart beats..ive been on toprol xl 50mg and now on atenolol 50mg twice a day so taking 100 mg a day...both only help a little i think i need something that last longer and maybe stronger before i got to my dr can people give me some name of meds that... Asked by Brendon Penderel 1 year ago.

ok im 21 m 5'5 144lbs ive been diagnosed with several extra heart beats..ive been on toprol xl 50mg and now on atenolol 50mg twice a day so taking 100 mg a day...both only help a little i think i need something that last longer and maybe stronger before i got to my dr can people give me some name of meds that might benefit me that i can bring up to him..right now i feel the atenolol works the majority of the time during the day i dont feel anything but by night time when i lay down i feel and can see the beating with my stomach moving Answered by Ninfa Roybal 1 year ago.

I am a Pharmacy Technician. Generic(Brand) Enalapril Maleate (Vasotec) Lisinopril (Zestril) Fosinopril Sodium (Monopril) Metoprolol (Lopressor) propanolol (Inderal) atenolol (Tenormin) Verapamil HCL (Calan) Diltiazem (Dilacor XR) furosemide (Lasix) Hydrochlorthiazide(Hydrodiuril) Answered by Freda Anglin 1 year ago.

status in a historical redwood woodland, surrounded with the aid of timber that have been 800 years previous, I additionally had an epiphany of insignificance. That 2d once you recognize what a great, wild, and majestic international surrounds us. the 2d once you be-come small earlier God. In all those moments we understand that God has located human beings right into a definite courting with something of the living international. i'm reminded of maximum of alternative Bible verses: The mountains and the hills will burst into music earlier you. Isaiah fifty 5:12 The wild animals honor me, the jackals, and the owls. Isaiah 40 3:20 compliment the Lord from the Earth, you large sea creatures…you mountains and all cedars, wild animals, and flying birds. Psalm 148 Answered by Estrella Dangel 1 year ago.

Don't ask for advice here. In the old days, antiarrhythmic drugs were prescribed very freely. Later, it turned out that the downside of having fewer irregular heartbeats was that some people started having no heartbeats at all, and that I can promise you is not good for your health. It's best to be conservative. By the way, the beta-blockers you've been on are very good choices, without the pro-arrhythmic potential of many of the alternatives you're likely to have suggested. Answered by Roman Salvemini 1 year ago.


What happens when a doctor prescribes cardizem to a 62 yr old man with normal blood pressure?
Had heart attack caused by cardizem Asked by Roscoe Dales 1 year ago.

Brand name: Cardizem Pronounced: CAR-di-zem Generic name: Diltiazem hydrochloride Other brand names: Cardizem CD, Cardizem SR, Dilacor XR, Tiazac Why is this drug prescribed? Cardizem and Cardizem CD (a controlled release form of diltiazem) are used in the treatment of angina pectoris (chest pain usually caused by lack of oxygen to the heart due to clogged arteries) and chronic stable angina (caused by exertion). Cardizem CD is also used to treat high blood pressure. Another controlled release form, Cardizem SR, is used only in the treatment of high blood pressure. Cardizem, a calcium channel blocker, dilates blood vessels and slows the heart to reduce blood pressure and the pain of angina. Doctors sometimes prescribe Cardizem for loss of circulation in the fingers and toes (Raynaud's phenomenon), for involuntary movements (tardive dyskinesia), and to prevent heart attack. Tiazac and Dilacor XR are used in the treatment of high blood pressure and chronic stable angina. They may be taken alone or combined with other blood pressure medications. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Cardizem. •More common side effects may include: Abnormally slow heartbeat (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), dizziness, fluid retention, flushing (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), headache, nausea, rash, weakness •Less common or rare side effects may include: Abnormal dreams, allergic reaction, altered way of walking, amnesia, anemia, angina (severe chest pain), blood disorders, congestive heart failure, constipation, cough, depression, diarrhea, difficulty sleeping, drowsiness, dry mouth, excessive urination at night, eye irritation, fainting, flu symptoms, hair loss, hallucinations, heart attack, high blood sugar, hives, impotence, increased output of pale urine, indigestion, infection, irregular heartbeat, itching, joint pain, labored breathing, loss of appetite, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, muscle cramps, nasal congestion or inflammation, nervousness, nosebleed, pain, personality change, pounding heartbeat, rapid heartbeat, reddish or purplish spots on skin, ringing in ears, sexual difficulties, skin inflammation/flaking or peeling, sensitivity to light, sleepiness, sore throat, taste alteration, thirst, tingling or pins and needles, tremor, vision changes, vomiting, welts, weight increase Answered by Shonna Stradtner 1 year ago.

The American Heart Association set new guidelines for normal B/P ranges and 120/90 is too high. They want to see an average pressure of 117/68. So, your B/P of 120/90 is too high and 100/50 is okay. Please remember that B/P fluctuates throughout the day and night and throughout your lifetime. B/Ps are typically lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon/early evening. And the average B/P for a healthy 5-year-old is very different from that of a healthy 15-year-old and a healthy 75-year-old. B/P is affected by stress. Stress comes in many forms. Even Illness, strong emotions and obesity are forms of stress on the body. Pretty much everything is a form of stress. And stress can, at times, be a good thing. So "stress" is a general, catch-all word. Yes, of course you experience stress whether or not you know it when you see it. An isolated reading of 120/90 may not be significant. High or low blood pressure is generally determined by what the values are consistently. Spot checks won't establish a baseline unless done in a specific way. Check your B/P with the same equipment on 3 different days and at 3 different times of day (Morning, mid day and night). You'll get a much better idea of what your baseline B/P is and how it rates according to the AHA. Answered by Caitlin Farinella 1 year ago.

High blood pressure is not the only reason Cardizem can be prescribed. It does have other uses. Who told you Cardizem caused the heart attack? I have never heard of that. Answered by Tamara Lorkowski 1 year ago.


Is a heartbeat of 43 beats per min too slow?
and not athlete thanks Asked by Wei Salzer 1 year ago.

Yes it is too slow. Normal Heart Beat for adult ranges from 60-100 beats per min. It is called bradycardia. Bradycardia is an abnormally slow heart rate of less than 60 beats per minute. A normal heartbeat is between 60 and 100 beats per minute. Here's what happens during a normal heartbeat: The electrical signal that starts a heartbeat comes from the heart's sinus node, the natural pacemaker located in the upper portion of the right atrium. From the sinus node, the heartbeat signal travels to the atrioventricular (A-V) node, located between the atria, and then through the bundle of His (pronounced "hiss") — a series of modified heart-muscle fibers located between the ventricles to the muscles of the ventricles. This triggers a contraction of the ventricles and produces a heartbeat. Bradycardia, even as low as 50 beats per minute, can be normal in athletes and other people who are physically active. In these people, regular exercise improves the heart's ability to pump blood efficiently, so fewer heart contractions are required to supply the body's needs. In other cases, bradycardia can be a form of cardiac arrhythmia, a heart-rate abnormality. Cardiac arrhythmia can be caused by a problem in the sinus node, or it can be related to some disturbance in the passage of heartbeat signals through the A-V node and bundle of His. Also, bradycardia sometimes is a side effect of certain medications, including propranolol (Inderal), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Toprol-XL), sotalol (Betapace), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan) and diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor-XR). Bradycardia also occurs in some people who have certain medical illnesses not related to the heart, such as: Abnormally low level of thyroid hormones (hypothyroidism) Severe liver disease An abnormally low body temperature (hypothermia) Typhoid fever Brucellosis, an infectious disease marked by fever, sweating and weakness that is transmitted to humans by direct contact with diseased animals or through ingestion of contaminated meat, milk or cheese Symptoms Bradycardia can cause dizziness, weakness, lack of energy, or fainting spells. If bradycardia is caused by a medical illness, there will be additional symptoms that are specific to that illness. For example, people whose bradycardia is due to severe hypothyroidism also can have constipation, muscle cramps, weight gain (often despite poor appetite), very dry skin, hair that is thin and dry, an abnormal sensitivity to cold temperatures and other symptoms related to low levels of thyroid hormones. Diagnosis Your doctor will ask about your family history of heart disease, cardiac arrhythmias and fainting spells. He or she also will review your current symptoms and your personal medical history, including your use of medications that may cause bradycardia. During the physical examination, your doctor will check your heart rate and rhythm, and your pulse. You may be asked to do some sit-ups or other exercise so that your doctor can see if your heart rate rises normally when your heart is asked to do more work. Your doctor also will check for physical signs of thyroid abnormalities, including an enlarged thyroid gland, very dry skin, and hair that is thin and dry. To further evaluate your bradycardia, your doctor will order an electrocardiogram (EKG). However, because some forms of bradycardia come and go, a one-time office EKG may be normal. If this is the case, a test called ambulatory electrocardiography may be done. During this test, the patient wears a portable EKG machine called a Holter monitor, usually for 24 hours. If your symptoms are infrequent, you may wear a monitor for longer. You will be taught to press a button to record your EKG reading when your symptoms occur. Depending on the results of your physical examination, other tests may be necessary to check for medical illnesses that produce bradycardia. For example, if you have symptoms and physical signs of hypothyroidism, your doctor may order blood tests to measure levels of thyroid hormones and TSH, a pituitary gland hormone that stimulates the thyroid. Your doctor also may order blood tests for cholesterol and certain liver enzymes, which often are elevated in people with hypothyroidism. Expected Duration How long bradycardia lasts depends on its cause. For example, normal bradycardia in a well-trained athlete will last as long as the athlete maintains his or her usual level of exercise. When bradycardia occurs as a side effect of medication, it usually will go away as soon as the drug that triggered the bradycardia is used by the body or excreted in the urine. Bradycardia caused by hypothyroidism will go away quickly after treatment with thyroid hormones. Certain forms of bradycardia resulting from cardiac arrhythmias can be cured with a permanent pacemaker. Prevention There are no general guidelines to prevent all forms of bradycardia. When bradycardia occurs as a side effect of medication, the problem can be prevented by either switching the drug or reducing its dose. Treatment In most cases, bradycardia in healthy, well-trained athletes does not need to be treated. In fact, in most people, bradycardia does not require treatment unless patients have symptoms that are clearly due to a slow heartbeat. The following are conditions that produce bradycardia that requires treatment: Cardiac arrhythmias resulting from sinus-node dysfunction — In people with frequent, severe symptoms of sinus-node dysfunction, the main treatment is usually a permanent pacemaker, an implanted device that generates electrical impulses to regulate the heartbeat. Cardiac arrhythmias resulting from A-V node problems — In people with A-V node problems, the passage of heartbeat signals may be blocked to different degrees. Some patients with less severe degrees of A-V block do not need treatment. Others may simply be monitored with frequent EKGs, especially if they don't have any symptoms and have a heart rate that is adequate for their daily activities. People with the most severe form of A-V block (called third-degree A-V block) can be treated with a special dual-chambered permanent pacemaker, a pacemaker with one electrode in the atrium and one in the ventricle. Hypothyroidism — Hypothyroidism is treated with replacement doses of thyroid hormones. Synthetic forms of these hormones are available — llevothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid and others), liothyronine (Cytomel, Triostat) or liotrix (Thyrolar) — as well as thyroid extract. When To Call A Professional Call your doctor if your pulse is less than 60 beats per minute. This is especially important if you have had dizziness, weakness, lack of energy or fainting spells. Prognosis In well-trained athletes with normal bradycardia, the slow heartbeat is often a sign of overall good health. In other people with bradycardia, the outlook depends on the underlying disorder. For example, the prognosis is usually good in people with hypothyroidism, since treatment with thyroid hormones can relieve bradycardia and other symptoms related to low hormone levels. In some elderly patients, hormone dosages may need to be increased very slowly over several weeks to prevent straining the heart. At one time, the prognosis for people with third-degree A-V block was poor, with 50% of patients dying within one year of diagnosis. Now, however, the availability of permanent pacemakers has improved the prognosis for many people with cardiac arrhythmias. Answered by Julene Dorshimer 1 year ago.

That is a pretty slow heartbeat, but evidently you are still conscious. If you were passing out frequently then of course you would be very concerned. How long has it been since you have seen a doctor? You should see one if you see black when you rise suddenly from a chair. I would exercise, like run up the stairs and down again and take the pulse again. It should then be more than 43 beats per minute. Like maybe 80 or 100. Is it just 43 first thing in the morning before you get out of bed? You might want to take it during the middle of the day or when you are moderately active. Answered by Carol Brasseur 1 year ago.

Yes, definitley. Only well trained athletes have low hear rates, and I'm not sure if that low is even normal for them. You should be experienciing some fatigue with walking, or strenuous excerise. If you are taking meds, then something needs to be adjusted. It's important to have your doctor give you a thorough exam.asap! You can also experience dizziness, so don't delay getting a doctor's appt. Take Care! Answered by Danny Desjardin 1 year ago.

Very, very few healthy, normal people will have a resting HR in the 40's (usually in a deep sleep). I work in an ICU and all of our patients are monitored so I see I wide range of heart rates but, this definitely falls out of "normal range" (60-100bpm). As previous posters have mentioned the cause could be a medication (this is the most frequent cause that I personally see). If you suspect it is medication related, do not stop your medication suddenly as this could cause severe side effects. Discuss this with your physician. Answered by Eryn Brydon 1 year ago.

yes this is considerably low and should be evaluated quickly. normal heartrate is a healthy adult is 60-80. some people (mostly athletes) run low naturally and some run high (like me-my norm is about 110). if you're currently on medication for blood pressure-this could lower your heartrate. dehydration could lower it as well (it's the body's way of preserving energy and trying to keep itself alive) make sure to have this checked out asap (24-48 hours max). it could be an indication of a serious problem. Answered by Carri Unterman 1 year ago.

No, the more in shape you are, the slower your resting heart rate will be. There are some athletes that have resting heart rates as slow as 16 Beats per minute. Answered by Brandy Bockrath 1 year ago.

It depends! when you are resting for example sleeping a heart beat rate of 43per minute might not be too slow. but if it is while you are active it might be seen as low. the average is about 70per minute. Answered by Theo Samaha 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Libbie Fabeck 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Dollie Brumbach 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Irene Cilibrasi 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Jacinda Napolitano 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Carletta Rudder 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Neda Windler 1 year ago.


Beta blockers slow me down too much. What else can I take?
Have been taking twice a day two bisoprolol pills to treat high blood pressure. I have ran out and could not get to the doctor in time to refill the prescription. My blood pressure is of course higher than normal but I no longer feel so weak and tired like I did on the beta blocker. Before I was prescribed... Asked by Noel Mayone 1 year ago.

Have been taking twice a day two bisoprolol pills to treat high blood pressure. I have ran out and could not get to the doctor in time to refill the prescription. My blood pressure is of course higher than normal but I no longer feel so weak and tired like I did on the beta blocker. Before I was prescribed bisoprolol the doctor wanted to put me on an ACE inhibitor but I requested a beta blocker as I heard the other can cause coughing. I do not want to take them so what else other than beta blockers or ACE inhibitors can I take? I will be discussing this with the doctor tomorrow but I'd like to know about a few other pills I could possibly take and not walk in there knowing nothing on the subject. Answered by Voncile Hommell 1 year ago.

There are many medications for high blood pressure that work in several approaches. Talk to your doctor about getting you a different one. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. These allow blood vessels to widen by preventing a hormone called angiotensin from affecting blood vessels. Frequently prescribed ACE inhibitors include captopril (Capoten), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril) and ramipril (Altace). Angiotensin II receptor blockers. These help blood vessels relax by blocking the action of angiotensin. Frequently prescribed angiotensin II receptor blockers include losartan (Cozaar), olmesartan (Benicar) and valsartan (Diovan). Beta blockers. These work by blocking certain nerve and hormonal signals to the heart and blood vessels, thus lowering blood pressure. Frequently prescribed beta blockers include metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (Corgard) and penbutolol (Levatol). Calcium channel blockers. These prevent calcium from going into heart and blood vessel muscle cells, thus causing the cells to relax, which lowers blood pressure. Frequently prescribed calcium channel blockers include amlodipine (Norvasc), diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor XR) and nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia). Renin inhibitors. Renin is an enzyme produced by your kidneys that starts a chain of chemical steps that increases blood pressure. Aliskiren (Tekturna) slows down the production of renin, reducing its ability to begin this process... Answered by Leonard Lebeouf 1 year ago.

A side effect of most beta blockers is fatigue. It can be a side effect of almost every medication that is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), but beta blockers cause a bit more. Not everyone who takes an ACE Inhibitor develops a cough. ACE inhibitors are "terrific" medications for treating high blood pressure; consider giving them a try (I've been taking one for 6 months without a cough). If you do develop a cough, a good alternative are medications in the classification of Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARBs). There are also the Calcium Channel Blockers, but I'd try the ACE inhibitors first. Answered by Shawnna Ivancevic 1 year ago.

Ace inhibitors can cause coughing, but this is a type of reaction, and you will be taken off if it causes this. I cannot take them, but know a number of people who do with no problem. There is also a type of BP medications called ARB (angiotensin II receptor antagonist), as well as calcium channel blockers, alpha blockers, and vasodialators. You can search for these medications online and read up on them. For example, I have some heart issues so I cannot take the calcium channel blockers. But definitely discuss with your doctor. I have to take beta blockers, but you do get used to them after a while. FYI however, NEVER just stop taking blood pressure medication. Beta Blockers, for example, if you just stop them cold turkey, they can result in a serious heart related issue. Answered by Rob Hiraldo 1 year ago.

Magnesium regulates blood pressure. Find out why it's high in the first place and work on that. is it due to high cholesterol? Try red yeast rice Answered by Hillary Niedbalec 1 year ago.

poor you,i have suffered sporadically with this since the age of 6 and it is awful,i have found a way to stop them 98% of the time,like you i used to lay down and wait but that used to take ages,to calm it down , my tip is at the first flutter take an intake of breath ,hold nose and breath ,bend forward and ,bear down blowing out but holding it in at same time,put pressure with hands on the solar plexus area under your rib cage,mid centre,above belly button,this really does work,also get your iron levels checked as a low iron level can cause attacks to.fizzy drinks also aggravate it,all the best,by the way i am 60 now and you can e mail me if you want Answered by Lia Bakeley 1 year ago.

And the same question pops up again Answered by Almeta Kassel 1 year ago.


Side efects of cyclosporine?
Asked by Mila Sigafus 1 year ago.

Cyclosporine is a very strong medicine. It may cause side effects that could be very serious, such as high blood pressure and kidney and liver problems. It may also reduce the body's ability to fight infections. You and your doctor should talk about the good this medicine will do as well as the risks of using it. Notify your doctor immediately if you develop fever or chills, a sore throat, unusual bleeding or bruising, mouth sores, abdominal pain, pale stools, or darkened urine. These symptoms could be early signs of dangerous side effects. If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking cyclosporine and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives); unusual tiredness or weakness; cough or hoarseness, fever, or chills; painful or difficult urination; severe nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; unusual bleeding or bruising; seizures; or a sudden unusual feeling of discomfort or illness. Other, less serious side effects may also occur. Continue to take cyclosporine and notify your doctor if you experience tremor (shaking); increased bodily hair growth; gum problems; high blood pressure; numbness or tingling; or decreased appetite. Immunosuppressant drugs such as cyclosporine increase your risk of certain types of cancer, such as lymphomas or skin cancer. Ask you doctor about the risks and benefits of cyclosporine in your treatment. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. (back to top) What other drugs will affect cyclosporine? There are many drug/drug interactions with cyclosporine and you should tell your doctor of any drugs you are on and any new drugs, including herbal products, you start. The interactions could alter cyclosporine levels causing a decrease in effectiveness or an increase in side effects. The side effects or effectiveness of the other drugs may also be altered. The following are some examples of medicatoins that may result in a drug/drug interaction when taken with cyclosporine: trimethoprim with sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, Sulfatrim, others), gentamicin (Garamycin, others), and vancomycin (Vancocin); ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin, others), naproxen (Naprosyn, Anaprox, Aleve, others), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), fenoprofen (Nalfon), indomethacin (Indocin), ketorolac (Toradol), ketoprofen (Orudis KT, Orudis, Oruvail), nabumetone (Relafen), oxaprozin (Daypro), piroxicam (Feldene), sulindac (Clinoril), and tolmetin (Tolectin); amphotericin B (Fungizone) and ketoconazole (Nizoral); tacrolimus (Prograf); melphalan (Alkeran); cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB) and ranitidine (Zantac, Zantac 75); diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor XR, Tiazac), nicardipine (Cardene), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone) and verapamil (Calan, Verelan); ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), and fluconazole (Diflucan); danazol (Danocrine) and methylprednisolone (Medrol, others); erythromycin (Ery-Tab, E-Mycin, E.E.S., P.C.E., others), clarithromycin (Biaxin); bromocriptine (Parlodel); colchicine and allopurinol (Aloprim, Lopurin, Zyloprim); indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), ritonavir (Norvir), lopinavir-ritonavir(Kaletra) and saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase); metoclopramide (Reglan); prednisolone (Prelone, Pediapred, others); digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); lovastatin (Mevacor), fluvastatin (Lescol), pravastatin (Pravachol), simvastatin (Zocor), or atorvastatin (Lipitor); PUVA or UVB therapy; and potassium-sparing diuretics (water pills) such as amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone, Spironol), or triamterene (Dyrenium); and any type of vaccination. Answered by Krystyna Ferraraccio 1 year ago.

Hi -- "It may cause side effects that could be very serious, such as high blood pressure and kidney and liver problems. It may also reduce the body's ability to fight infections. " Answered by Laurena Steinacker 1 year ago.


Can I take Benadryl while taking Toprol XL?
Asked by Temeka Rax 1 year ago.

No, you should not a drug interaction may occur. You should ask you local pharmacist what would be acceptable to take without having any type of drug interaction. Here are a list of medications (prescription & OTC) that should not be taken with Toprol XL... (Partial List) There are a number of medicines that may interact with Toprol-XL® (metoprolol succinate). Some Toprol-XL drug interactions can involve medications such as: Reserpine Clonidine (Catapres®, Duraclon®) Amiodarone (Cordarone®) Cimetidine (Tagamet®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) Bupropion (Wellbutrin®) Thioridazine (Mellaril®) Quinidine Propafenone (Rythmol®) Ritonavir (Norvir®) Diphenhydramine (Banophen®, Benadryl®) ************** Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil®) Terbinafine (Lamisil®) Calcium channel blockers, such as: o Amlodipine (Norvasc®) o Verapamil (Calan®, Isoptin®) o Verapamil Extended-Release (Calan® SR, Covera-HS®, Isoptin® SR, Verelan®, Verelan® PM) o Diltiazem (Cardizem®) o Diltiazem ER (Cardizem® CD, Cardizem® LA, Cardizem® SR, Dilacor XR®, Diltia XT™, Tiazac®) o Nifedipine (Adalat®, Procardia®) o Nifedipine ER (Adalat® CC, Procardia XL®) o Felodipine (Plendil®) o Nisoldipine (Sular®) o Isradipine (DynaCirc®) o Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®), naproxen (Naprosyn®), naproxen sodium (Aleve®, Anaprox®, Naprelan®), diclofenac (Cataflam®, Voltaren®), indomethacin (Indocin®), nabumetone (Relafen®), oxaprozin (Daypro®), celecoxib (Celebrex®), meloxicam (Mobic®), etodolac (Lodine®), ketoprofen, ketorolac (Toradol®), and others Certain diabetes medicines, such as glyburide (DiaBeta®, Glynase®, Micronase®) Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), selegiline (Eldepryl®, EMSAM®), and tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Answered by Palmira Helstad 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl Interactions Answered by Susanne Doremus 1 year ago.

I looked at the list of meds that you shouldn't take with Toprol. My daughter is on Toprol and she was recently given ibuprofen for an injury per the advise of her doctor. She took it for several days without complications. Why aren't you supposed to take it? Just wondering for future use. Answered by Roxane Armor 1 year ago.

And I take Norvasc with Toprol XL per doc? Answered by Kerri Horridge 1 year ago.

I wouldn't mess with anything till you know how you will react to the medication. Although if you are thinking of maybe a glass of wine once in a while you should be fine, but I would ask my doctor to make sure. Answered by Flavia Worrell 1 year ago.

Benadryl may raise your blood pressure. I would check with your Dr. first. Answered by Erinn Akes 1 year ago.


Best Med For Extra Heart Beats?
ok im 21 m 5'5 144lbs ive been diagnosed with several extra heart beats..ive been on toprol xl 50mg and now on atenolol 50mg twice a day so taking 100 mg a day...both only help a little i think i need something that last longer and maybe stronger before i got to my dr can people give me some name of meds that... Asked by Rowena Brundin 1 year ago.

ok im 21 m 5'5 144lbs ive been diagnosed with several extra heart beats..ive been on toprol xl 50mg and now on atenolol 50mg twice a day so taking 100 mg a day...both only help a little i think i need something that last longer and maybe stronger before i got to my dr can people give me some name of meds that might benefit me that i can bring up to him..right now i feel the atenolol works the majority of the time during the day i dont feel anything but by night time when i lay down i feel and can see the beating with my stomach moving Answered by Elli Edwardson 1 year ago.

I am a Pharmacy Technician. Generic(Brand) Enalapril Maleate (Vasotec) Lisinopril (Zestril) Fosinopril Sodium (Monopril) Metoprolol (Lopressor) propanolol (Inderal) atenolol (Tenormin) Verapamil HCL (Calan) Diltiazem (Dilacor XR) furosemide (Lasix) Hydrochlorthiazide(Hydrodiuril) Answered by Marci Sczygiel 1 year ago.

status in a historical redwood woodland, surrounded with the aid of timber that have been 800 years previous, I additionally had an epiphany of insignificance. That 2d once you recognize what a great, wild, and majestic international surrounds us. the 2d once you be-come small earlier God. In all those moments we understand that God has located human beings right into a definite courting with something of the living international. i'm reminded of maximum of alternative Bible verses: The mountains and the hills will burst into music earlier you. Isaiah fifty 5:12 The wild animals honor me, the jackals, and the owls. Isaiah 40 3:20 compliment the Lord from the Earth, you large sea creatures…you mountains and all cedars, wild animals, and flying birds. Psalm 148 Answered by Don Krupiak 1 year ago.

Don't ask for advice here. In the old days, antiarrhythmic drugs were prescribed very freely. Later, it turned out that the downside of having fewer irregular heartbeats was that some people started having no heartbeats at all, and that I can promise you is not good for your health. It's best to be conservative. By the way, the beta-blockers you've been on are very good choices, without the pro-arrhythmic potential of many of the alternatives you're likely to have suggested. Answered by Elease Diffenderfer 1 year ago.


What happens when a doctor prescribes cardizem to a 62 yr old man with normal blood pressure?
Had heart attack caused by cardizem Asked by Concha Basone 1 year ago.

Brand name: Cardizem Pronounced: CAR-di-zem Generic name: Diltiazem hydrochloride Other brand names: Cardizem CD, Cardizem SR, Dilacor XR, Tiazac Why is this drug prescribed? Cardizem and Cardizem CD (a controlled release form of diltiazem) are used in the treatment of angina pectoris (chest pain usually caused by lack of oxygen to the heart due to clogged arteries) and chronic stable angina (caused by exertion). Cardizem CD is also used to treat high blood pressure. Another controlled release form, Cardizem SR, is used only in the treatment of high blood pressure. Cardizem, a calcium channel blocker, dilates blood vessels and slows the heart to reduce blood pressure and the pain of angina. Doctors sometimes prescribe Cardizem for loss of circulation in the fingers and toes (Raynaud's phenomenon), for involuntary movements (tardive dyskinesia), and to prevent heart attack. Tiazac and Dilacor XR are used in the treatment of high blood pressure and chronic stable angina. They may be taken alone or combined with other blood pressure medications. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Cardizem. •More common side effects may include: Abnormally slow heartbeat (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), dizziness, fluid retention, flushing (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), headache, nausea, rash, weakness •Less common or rare side effects may include: Abnormal dreams, allergic reaction, altered way of walking, amnesia, anemia, angina (severe chest pain), blood disorders, congestive heart failure, constipation, cough, depression, diarrhea, difficulty sleeping, drowsiness, dry mouth, excessive urination at night, eye irritation, fainting, flu symptoms, hair loss, hallucinations, heart attack, high blood sugar, hives, impotence, increased output of pale urine, indigestion, infection, irregular heartbeat, itching, joint pain, labored breathing, loss of appetite, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, muscle cramps, nasal congestion or inflammation, nervousness, nosebleed, pain, personality change, pounding heartbeat, rapid heartbeat, reddish or purplish spots on skin, ringing in ears, sexual difficulties, skin inflammation/flaking or peeling, sensitivity to light, sleepiness, sore throat, taste alteration, thirst, tingling or pins and needles, tremor, vision changes, vomiting, welts, weight increase Answered by Raymond Valverde 1 year ago.

The American Heart Association set new guidelines for normal B/P ranges and 120/90 is too high. They want to see an average pressure of 117/68. So, your B/P of 120/90 is too high and 100/50 is okay. Please remember that B/P fluctuates throughout the day and night and throughout your lifetime. B/Ps are typically lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon/early evening. And the average B/P for a healthy 5-year-old is very different from that of a healthy 15-year-old and a healthy 75-year-old. B/P is affected by stress. Stress comes in many forms. Even Illness, strong emotions and obesity are forms of stress on the body. Pretty much everything is a form of stress. And stress can, at times, be a good thing. So "stress" is a general, catch-all word. Yes, of course you experience stress whether or not you know it when you see it. An isolated reading of 120/90 may not be significant. High or low blood pressure is generally determined by what the values are consistently. Spot checks won't establish a baseline unless done in a specific way. Check your B/P with the same equipment on 3 different days and at 3 different times of day (Morning, mid day and night). You'll get a much better idea of what your baseline B/P is and how it rates according to the AHA. Answered by Carrol Jephson 1 year ago.

High blood pressure is not the only reason Cardizem can be prescribed. It does have other uses. Who told you Cardizem caused the heart attack? I have never heard of that. Answered by Catalina Roetcisoender 1 year ago.


Is a heartbeat of 43 beats per min too slow?
and not athlete thanks Asked by Deloris Vuong 1 year ago.

Yes it is too slow. Normal Heart Beat for adult ranges from 60-100 beats per min. It is called bradycardia. Bradycardia is an abnormally slow heart rate of less than 60 beats per minute. A normal heartbeat is between 60 and 100 beats per minute. Here's what happens during a normal heartbeat: The electrical signal that starts a heartbeat comes from the heart's sinus node, the natural pacemaker located in the upper portion of the right atrium. From the sinus node, the heartbeat signal travels to the atrioventricular (A-V) node, located between the atria, and then through the bundle of His (pronounced "hiss") — a series of modified heart-muscle fibers located between the ventricles to the muscles of the ventricles. This triggers a contraction of the ventricles and produces a heartbeat. Bradycardia, even as low as 50 beats per minute, can be normal in athletes and other people who are physically active. In these people, regular exercise improves the heart's ability to pump blood efficiently, so fewer heart contractions are required to supply the body's needs. In other cases, bradycardia can be a form of cardiac arrhythmia, a heart-rate abnormality. Cardiac arrhythmia can be caused by a problem in the sinus node, or it can be related to some disturbance in the passage of heartbeat signals through the A-V node and bundle of His. Also, bradycardia sometimes is a side effect of certain medications, including propranolol (Inderal), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Toprol-XL), sotalol (Betapace), verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan) and diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor-XR). Bradycardia also occurs in some people who have certain medical illnesses not related to the heart, such as: Abnormally low level of thyroid hormones (hypothyroidism) Severe liver disease An abnormally low body temperature (hypothermia) Typhoid fever Brucellosis, an infectious disease marked by fever, sweating and weakness that is transmitted to humans by direct contact with diseased animals or through ingestion of contaminated meat, milk or cheese Symptoms Bradycardia can cause dizziness, weakness, lack of energy, or fainting spells. If bradycardia is caused by a medical illness, there will be additional symptoms that are specific to that illness. For example, people whose bradycardia is due to severe hypothyroidism also can have constipation, muscle cramps, weight gain (often despite poor appetite), very dry skin, hair that is thin and dry, an abnormal sensitivity to cold temperatures and other symptoms related to low levels of thyroid hormones. Diagnosis Your doctor will ask about your family history of heart disease, cardiac arrhythmias and fainting spells. He or she also will review your current symptoms and your personal medical history, including your use of medications that may cause bradycardia. During the physical examination, your doctor will check your heart rate and rhythm, and your pulse. You may be asked to do some sit-ups or other exercise so that your doctor can see if your heart rate rises normally when your heart is asked to do more work. Your doctor also will check for physical signs of thyroid abnormalities, including an enlarged thyroid gland, very dry skin, and hair that is thin and dry. To further evaluate your bradycardia, your doctor will order an electrocardiogram (EKG). However, because some forms of bradycardia come and go, a one-time office EKG may be normal. If this is the case, a test called ambulatory electrocardiography may be done. During this test, the patient wears a portable EKG machine called a Holter monitor, usually for 24 hours. If your symptoms are infrequent, you may wear a monitor for longer. You will be taught to press a button to record your EKG reading when your symptoms occur. Depending on the results of your physical examination, other tests may be necessary to check for medical illnesses that produce bradycardia. For example, if you have symptoms and physical signs of hypothyroidism, your doctor may order blood tests to measure levels of thyroid hormones and TSH, a pituitary gland hormone that stimulates the thyroid. Your doctor also may order blood tests for cholesterol and certain liver enzymes, which often are elevated in people with hypothyroidism. Expected Duration How long bradycardia lasts depends on its cause. For example, normal bradycardia in a well-trained athlete will last as long as the athlete maintains his or her usual level of exercise. When bradycardia occurs as a side effect of medication, it usually will go away as soon as the drug that triggered the bradycardia is used by the body or excreted in the urine. Bradycardia caused by hypothyroidism will go away quickly after treatment with thyroid hormones. Certain forms of bradycardia resulting from cardiac arrhythmias can be cured with a permanent pacemaker. Prevention There are no general guidelines to prevent all forms of bradycardia. When bradycardia occurs as a side effect of medication, the problem can be prevented by either switching the drug or reducing its dose. Treatment In most cases, bradycardia in healthy, well-trained athletes does not need to be treated. In fact, in most people, bradycardia does not require treatment unless patients have symptoms that are clearly due to a slow heartbeat. The following are conditions that produce bradycardia that requires treatment: Cardiac arrhythmias resulting from sinus-node dysfunction — In people with frequent, severe symptoms of sinus-node dysfunction, the main treatment is usually a permanent pacemaker, an implanted device that generates electrical impulses to regulate the heartbeat. Cardiac arrhythmias resulting from A-V node problems — In people with A-V node problems, the passage of heartbeat signals may be blocked to different degrees. Some patients with less severe degrees of A-V block do not need treatment. Others may simply be monitored with frequent EKGs, especially if they don't have any symptoms and have a heart rate that is adequate for their daily activities. People with the most severe form of A-V block (called third-degree A-V block) can be treated with a special dual-chambered permanent pacemaker, a pacemaker with one electrode in the atrium and one in the ventricle. Hypothyroidism — Hypothyroidism is treated with replacement doses of thyroid hormones. Synthetic forms of these hormones are available — llevothyroxine (Synthroid, Levothroid and others), liothyronine (Cytomel, Triostat) or liotrix (Thyrolar) — as well as thyroid extract. When To Call A Professional Call your doctor if your pulse is less than 60 beats per minute. This is especially important if you have had dizziness, weakness, lack of energy or fainting spells. Prognosis In well-trained athletes with normal bradycardia, the slow heartbeat is often a sign of overall good health. In other people with bradycardia, the outlook depends on the underlying disorder. For example, the prognosis is usually good in people with hypothyroidism, since treatment with thyroid hormones can relieve bradycardia and other symptoms related to low hormone levels. In some elderly patients, hormone dosages may need to be increased very slowly over several weeks to prevent straining the heart. At one time, the prognosis for people with third-degree A-V block was poor, with 50% of patients dying within one year of diagnosis. Now, however, the availability of permanent pacemakers has improved the prognosis for many people with cardiac arrhythmias. Answered by Perry Dagan 1 year ago.

That is a pretty slow heartbeat, but evidently you are still conscious. If you were passing out frequently then of course you would be very concerned. How long has it been since you have seen a doctor? You should see one if you see black when you rise suddenly from a chair. I would exercise, like run up the stairs and down again and take the pulse again. It should then be more than 43 beats per minute. Like maybe 80 or 100. Is it just 43 first thing in the morning before you get out of bed? You might want to take it during the middle of the day or when you are moderately active. Answered by Jacquelyn Wilken 1 year ago.

Yes, definitley. Only well trained athletes have low hear rates, and I'm not sure if that low is even normal for them. You should be experienciing some fatigue with walking, or strenuous excerise. If you are taking meds, then something needs to be adjusted. It's important to have your doctor give you a thorough exam.asap! You can also experience dizziness, so don't delay getting a doctor's appt. Take Care! Answered by Bianca Bratchett 1 year ago.

Very, very few healthy, normal people will have a resting HR in the 40's (usually in a deep sleep). I work in an ICU and all of our patients are monitored so I see I wide range of heart rates but, this definitely falls out of "normal range" (60-100bpm). As previous posters have mentioned the cause could be a medication (this is the most frequent cause that I personally see). If you suspect it is medication related, do not stop your medication suddenly as this could cause severe side effects. Discuss this with your physician. Answered by Cordia Dropinski 1 year ago.

yes this is considerably low and should be evaluated quickly. normal heartrate is a healthy adult is 60-80. some people (mostly athletes) run low naturally and some run high (like me-my norm is about 110). if you're currently on medication for blood pressure-this could lower your heartrate. dehydration could lower it as well (it's the body's way of preserving energy and trying to keep itself alive) make sure to have this checked out asap (24-48 hours max). it could be an indication of a serious problem. Answered by Earl Jacobo 1 year ago.

No, the more in shape you are, the slower your resting heart rate will be. There are some athletes that have resting heart rates as slow as 16 Beats per minute. Answered by Gennie Bream 1 year ago.

It depends! when you are resting for example sleeping a heart beat rate of 43per minute might not be too slow. but if it is while you are active it might be seen as low. the average is about 70per minute. Answered by Cherie Staiger 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Jarred Ashcraft 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Bonny Dutile 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Johnnie Mckindra 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Angela Gonchoff 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Ouida Ristig 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Gwyn Spann 1 year ago.


Beta blockers slow me down too much. What else can I take?
Have been taking twice a day two bisoprolol pills to treat high blood pressure. I have ran out and could not get to the doctor in time to refill the prescription. My blood pressure is of course higher than normal but I no longer feel so weak and tired like I did on the beta blocker. Before I was prescribed... Asked by Annabell Gurry 1 year ago.

Have been taking twice a day two bisoprolol pills to treat high blood pressure. I have ran out and could not get to the doctor in time to refill the prescription. My blood pressure is of course higher than normal but I no longer feel so weak and tired like I did on the beta blocker. Before I was prescribed bisoprolol the doctor wanted to put me on an ACE inhibitor but I requested a beta blocker as I heard the other can cause coughing. I do not want to take them so what else other than beta blockers or ACE inhibitors can I take? I will be discussing this with the doctor tomorrow but I'd like to know about a few other pills I could possibly take and not walk in there knowing nothing on the subject. Answered by Dia Fleites 1 year ago.

There are many medications for high blood pressure that work in several approaches. Talk to your doctor about getting you a different one. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. These allow blood vessels to widen by preventing a hormone called angiotensin from affecting blood vessels. Frequently prescribed ACE inhibitors include captopril (Capoten), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril) and ramipril (Altace). Angiotensin II receptor blockers. These help blood vessels relax by blocking the action of angiotensin. Frequently prescribed angiotensin II receptor blockers include losartan (Cozaar), olmesartan (Benicar) and valsartan (Diovan). Beta blockers. These work by blocking certain nerve and hormonal signals to the heart and blood vessels, thus lowering blood pressure. Frequently prescribed beta blockers include metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (Corgard) and penbutolol (Levatol). Calcium channel blockers. These prevent calcium from going into heart and blood vessel muscle cells, thus causing the cells to relax, which lowers blood pressure. Frequently prescribed calcium channel blockers include amlodipine (Norvasc), diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor XR) and nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia). Renin inhibitors. Renin is an enzyme produced by your kidneys that starts a chain of chemical steps that increases blood pressure. Aliskiren (Tekturna) slows down the production of renin, reducing its ability to begin this process... Answered by Bree Nayee 1 year ago.

A side effect of most beta blockers is fatigue. It can be a side effect of almost every medication that is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), but beta blockers cause a bit more. Not everyone who takes an ACE Inhibitor develops a cough. ACE inhibitors are "terrific" medications for treating high blood pressure; consider giving them a try (I've been taking one for 6 months without a cough). If you do develop a cough, a good alternative are medications in the classification of Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARBs). There are also the Calcium Channel Blockers, but I'd try the ACE inhibitors first. Answered by Tonie Schmutzler 1 year ago.

Ace inhibitors can cause coughing, but this is a type of reaction, and you will be taken off if it causes this. I cannot take them, but know a number of people who do with no problem. There is also a type of BP medications called ARB (angiotensin II receptor antagonist), as well as calcium channel blockers, alpha blockers, and vasodialators. You can search for these medications online and read up on them. For example, I have some heart issues so I cannot take the calcium channel blockers. But definitely discuss with your doctor. I have to take beta blockers, but you do get used to them after a while. FYI however, NEVER just stop taking blood pressure medication. Beta Blockers, for example, if you just stop them cold turkey, they can result in a serious heart related issue. Answered by Zane Annen 1 year ago.

Magnesium regulates blood pressure. Find out why it's high in the first place and work on that. is it due to high cholesterol? Try red yeast rice Answered by Tonette Bunnell 1 year ago.

poor you,i have suffered sporadically with this since the age of 6 and it is awful,i have found a way to stop them 98% of the time,like you i used to lay down and wait but that used to take ages,to calm it down , my tip is at the first flutter take an intake of breath ,hold nose and breath ,bend forward and ,bear down blowing out but holding it in at same time,put pressure with hands on the solar plexus area under your rib cage,mid centre,above belly button,this really does work,also get your iron levels checked as a low iron level can cause attacks to.fizzy drinks also aggravate it,all the best,by the way i am 60 now and you can e mail me if you want Answered by Willard Mccoll 1 year ago.

And the same question pops up again Answered by Jalisa Moretti 1 year ago.


Side efects of cyclosporine?
Asked by Eve Hensdill 1 year ago.

Cyclosporine is a very strong medicine. It may cause side effects that could be very serious, such as high blood pressure and kidney and liver problems. It may also reduce the body's ability to fight infections. You and your doctor should talk about the good this medicine will do as well as the risks of using it. Notify your doctor immediately if you develop fever or chills, a sore throat, unusual bleeding or bruising, mouth sores, abdominal pain, pale stools, or darkened urine. These symptoms could be early signs of dangerous side effects. If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking cyclosporine and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives); unusual tiredness or weakness; cough or hoarseness, fever, or chills; painful or difficult urination; severe nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; unusual bleeding or bruising; seizures; or a sudden unusual feeling of discomfort or illness. Other, less serious side effects may also occur. Continue to take cyclosporine and notify your doctor if you experience tremor (shaking); increased bodily hair growth; gum problems; high blood pressure; numbness or tingling; or decreased appetite. Immunosuppressant drugs such as cyclosporine increase your risk of certain types of cancer, such as lymphomas or skin cancer. Ask you doctor about the risks and benefits of cyclosporine in your treatment. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. (back to top) What other drugs will affect cyclosporine? There are many drug/drug interactions with cyclosporine and you should tell your doctor of any drugs you are on and any new drugs, including herbal products, you start. The interactions could alter cyclosporine levels causing a decrease in effectiveness or an increase in side effects. The side effects or effectiveness of the other drugs may also be altered. The following are some examples of medicatoins that may result in a drug/drug interaction when taken with cyclosporine: trimethoprim with sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, Sulfatrim, others), gentamicin (Garamycin, others), and vancomycin (Vancocin); ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin, others), naproxen (Naprosyn, Anaprox, Aleve, others), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), fenoprofen (Nalfon), indomethacin (Indocin), ketorolac (Toradol), ketoprofen (Orudis KT, Orudis, Oruvail), nabumetone (Relafen), oxaprozin (Daypro), piroxicam (Feldene), sulindac (Clinoril), and tolmetin (Tolectin); amphotericin B (Fungizone) and ketoconazole (Nizoral); tacrolimus (Prograf); melphalan (Alkeran); cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB) and ranitidine (Zantac, Zantac 75); diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor XR, Tiazac), nicardipine (Cardene), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone) and verapamil (Calan, Verelan); ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), and fluconazole (Diflucan); danazol (Danocrine) and methylprednisolone (Medrol, others); erythromycin (Ery-Tab, E-Mycin, E.E.S., P.C.E., others), clarithromycin (Biaxin); bromocriptine (Parlodel); colchicine and allopurinol (Aloprim, Lopurin, Zyloprim); indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), ritonavir (Norvir), lopinavir-ritonavir(Kaletra) and saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase); metoclopramide (Reglan); prednisolone (Prelone, Pediapred, others); digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); lovastatin (Mevacor), fluvastatin (Lescol), pravastatin (Pravachol), simvastatin (Zocor), or atorvastatin (Lipitor); PUVA or UVB therapy; and potassium-sparing diuretics (water pills) such as amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone, Spironol), or triamterene (Dyrenium); and any type of vaccination. Answered by Marty Rain 1 year ago.

Hi -- "It may cause side effects that could be very serious, such as high blood pressure and kidney and liver problems. It may also reduce the body's ability to fight infections. " Answered by Glynis Cerri 1 year ago.


Can I take Benadryl while taking Toprol XL?
Asked by Sybil Schaumburg 1 year ago.

No, you should not a drug interaction may occur. You should ask you local pharmacist what would be acceptable to take without having any type of drug interaction. Here are a list of medications (prescription & OTC) that should not be taken with Toprol XL... (Partial List) There are a number of medicines that may interact with Toprol-XL® (metoprolol succinate). Some Toprol-XL drug interactions can involve medications such as: Reserpine Clonidine (Catapres®, Duraclon®) Amiodarone (Cordarone®) Cimetidine (Tagamet®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) Bupropion (Wellbutrin®) Thioridazine (Mellaril®) Quinidine Propafenone (Rythmol®) Ritonavir (Norvir®) Diphenhydramine (Banophen®, Benadryl®) ************** Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil®) Terbinafine (Lamisil®) Calcium channel blockers, such as: o Amlodipine (Norvasc®) o Verapamil (Calan®, Isoptin®) o Verapamil Extended-Release (Calan® SR, Covera-HS®, Isoptin® SR, Verelan®, Verelan® PM) o Diltiazem (Cardizem®) o Diltiazem ER (Cardizem® CD, Cardizem® LA, Cardizem® SR, Dilacor XR®, Diltia XT™, Tiazac®) o Nifedipine (Adalat®, Procardia®) o Nifedipine ER (Adalat® CC, Procardia XL®) o Felodipine (Plendil®) o Nisoldipine (Sular®) o Isradipine (DynaCirc®) o Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®), naproxen (Naprosyn®), naproxen sodium (Aleve®, Anaprox®, Naprelan®), diclofenac (Cataflam®, Voltaren®), indomethacin (Indocin®), nabumetone (Relafen®), oxaprozin (Daypro®), celecoxib (Celebrex®), meloxicam (Mobic®), etodolac (Lodine®), ketoprofen, ketorolac (Toradol®), and others Certain diabetes medicines, such as glyburide (DiaBeta®, Glynase®, Micronase®) Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), selegiline (Eldepryl®, EMSAM®), and tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Answered by Mindy Laforey 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl Interactions Answered by Clair Intrieri 1 year ago.

I looked at the list of meds that you shouldn't take with Toprol. My daughter is on Toprol and she was recently given ibuprofen for an injury per the advise of her doctor. She took it for several days without complications. Why aren't you supposed to take it? Just wondering for future use. Answered by Kendrick Hysell 1 year ago.

And I take Norvasc with Toprol XL per doc? Answered by Rhona Greif 1 year ago.

I wouldn't mess with anything till you know how you will react to the medication. Although if you are thinking of maybe a glass of wine once in a while you should be fine, but I would ask my doctor to make sure. Answered by Federico Ghiringhelli 1 year ago.

Benadryl may raise your blood pressure. I would check with your Dr. first. Answered by Jeffrey Requa 1 year ago.


Best Med For Extra Heart Beats?
ok im 21 m 5'5 144lbs ive been diagnosed with several extra heart beats..ive been on toprol xl 50mg and now on atenolol 50mg twice a day so taking 100 mg a day...both only help a little i think i need something that last longer and maybe stronger before i got to my dr can people give me some name of meds that... Asked by Maddie Whatcott 1 year ago.

ok im 21 m 5'5 144lbs ive been diagnosed with several extra heart beats..ive been on toprol xl 50mg and now on atenolol 50mg twice a day so taking 100 mg a day...both only help a little i think i need something that last longer and maybe stronger before i got to my dr can people give me some name of meds that might benefit me that i can bring up to him..right now i feel the atenolol works the majority of the time during the day i dont feel anything but by night time when i lay down i feel and can see the beating with my stomach moving Answered by Blondell Jumonville 1 year ago.

I am a Pharmacy Technician. Generic(Brand) Enalapril Maleate (Vasotec) Lisinopril (Zestril) Fosinopril Sodium (Monopril) Metoprolol (Lopressor) propanolol (Inderal) atenolol (Tenormin) Verapamil HCL (Calan) Diltiazem (Dilacor XR) furosemide (Lasix) Hydrochlorthiazide(Hydrodiuril) Answered by Chandra Schuckman 1 year ago.

status in a historical redwood woodland, surrounded with the aid of timber that have been 800 years previous, I additionally had an epiphany of insignificance. That 2d once you recognize what a great, wild, and majestic international surrounds us. the 2d once you be-come small earlier God. In all those moments we understand that God has located human beings right into a definite courting with something of the living international. i'm reminded of maximum of alternative Bible verses: The mountains and the hills will burst into music earlier you. Isaiah fifty 5:12 The wild animals honor me, the jackals, and the owls. Isaiah 40 3:20 compliment the Lord from the Earth, you large sea creatures…you mountains and all cedars, wild animals, and flying birds. Psalm 148 Answered by Delta Breck 1 year ago.

Don't ask for advice here. In the old days, antiarrhythmic drugs were prescribed very freely. Later, it turned out that the downside of having fewer irregular heartbeats was that some people started having no heartbeats at all, and that I can promise you is not good for your health. It's best to be conservative. By the way, the beta-blockers you've been on are very good choices, without the pro-arrhythmic potential of many of the alternatives you're likely to have suggested. Answered by Luisa Schmelter 1 year ago.


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