DICUMAROL Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 005509/001.

Names and composition

"DICUMAROL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DICUMAROL.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
005509/001 DICUMAROL DICUMAROL CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
005509/003 DICUMAROL DICUMAROL CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
005545/003 DICUMAROL DICUMAROL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
005545/004 DICUMAROL DICUMAROL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
005545/005 DICUMAROL DICUMAROL TABLET/ORAL 100MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
005509/001 DICUMAROL DICUMAROL CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
005509/003 DICUMAROL DICUMAROL CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
005545/003 DICUMAROL DICUMAROL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
005545/004 DICUMAROL DICUMAROL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
005545/005 DICUMAROL DICUMAROL TABLET/ORAL 100MG

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Answered questions

Heparin versus Dicumarol as an anti coagulants.?
Asked by Lu Bieniek 1 month ago.

Depending on what the anti-coagulant class medication is being used for. Heparin is good for treating patients with DVT (deep vein thrombosis) Dicumarol is a drug used as a vitamin K antagonist (reverses effects of vitamin K). I think these are poor choices for anti-coagulants. More common would be Warfarin and Coumadin Best of Luck, Answered by Vernie Fedde 1 month ago.


Any drug interaction with eptoin?
Asked by Leila Cardo 1 month ago.

It has significant interactions: Drug Interactions: There are many drugs which may increase or decrease phenytoin levels or which Phenytoin may affect. The most commonly occurring drug interactions are listed below: 1. Drugs which may increase Phenytoin serum levels include: chloramphenicol, dicumarol, disulfiram, tolbutamide, isoniazid, phenylbutazone, acute alcohol intake, salicylates, chlordiazepoxide, phenothiazines, diazepam, estrogens, ethosuximide, halothane, methylphenidate, sulfonamides, cimetidine, trazodone. 2. Drugs which may decrease Phenytoin levels include: carbamazepine, chronic alcohol abuse, reserpine, molindone hydrochloride which contains calcium ions interferes with the absorption of phenytoin. Ingestion times of Phenytoin and antacid preparations containing calcium should be staggered in patients with low serum Phenytoin levels to prevent absorption problems. 3. Drugs which may either increase or decrease phenytoin serum levels include: phenobarbital, valproic acid, and sodium valproate. Similarly, the effect of Phenytoin on phenobarbital, valproic acid and sodium valproate serum levels is unpredictable. 4. Although not a true drug interaction, tricyclic antidepressants may precipitate seizures in susceptible patients and Phenytoin dosage may need to be adjusted. 5. Drugs whose efficacy is impaired by Phenytoin include: corticosteroids, coumarin anticoagulants, oral contraceptives, quinidine, vitamin D, digitoxin, rifampin, doxycycline, estrogens, furosemide. Talk to your doctor/chemist/pharmacist Answered by Thu Klink 1 month ago.


Medical Problem........?
is it safe to use multivitamins with phenytoin.....? Asked by Gwyn Ginther 1 month ago.

Hey multivitamins is safe to use with Phenytoin. I have listed some of drugs which has certain effects while using it with phenytoin.. 1.Drugs which may increase phenytoin serum levels include: acute alcohol intake, amiodarone, chloramphenicol, chlordiazepoxide, cimetidine, diazepam, dicumarol, disulfiram, estrogens, ethosuximide, fluoxetine, H2-antagonists, halothane, isoniazid, methylphenidate, phenothiazines, phenylbutazone, salicylates, succinimides, sulfonamides, ticlopidine, tolbutamide, trazodone. 2. Drugs which may decrease phenytoin levels include: carbamazepine, chronic alcohol abuse, reserpine, and sucralfate. Moban® brand of molindone hydrochloride contains calcium ions which interfere with the absorption of phenytoin. Ingestion times of phenytoin and antacid preparations containing calcium should be staggered in patients with low serum phenytoin levels to prevent absorption problems. 3.Drugs which may either increase or decrease phenytoin serum levels include: phenobarbital, sodium valproate, and valproic acid. Similarly, the effect of phenytoin on phenobarbital, valproic acid, and sodium valproate serum levels is unpredictable. 4.Although not a true drug interaction, tricyclic antidepressants may precipitate seizures in susceptible patients and phenytoin dosage may need to be adjusted. 5.Drugs whose efficacy is impaired by phenytoin include: corticosteroids, coumarin anticoagulants, digitoxin, doxycycline, estrogens, furosemide, oral contraceptives, paroxetine, quinidine, rifampin, theophylline, vitamin D. Hope this helps Answered by Robyn Smerdon 1 month ago.


What are some drugs/medications that can cause increased ALT levels?
Asked by Kristel Gammond 1 month ago.

Drugs that may increase ALT levels include acetaminophen, ampicillin, codeine, dicumarol, indomethacin, methotrexate, oral contraceptives, tetracyclines, and verapamil. Previous intramuscular injections may cause elevated levels. Answered by Maryln Zukowski 1 month ago.

Tylenol and basically anything with alcohol in it like NyQuil etc Answered by Rosy Kary 1 month ago.


Will dilantin cause memory loss?
Asked by Flavia Autio 1 month ago.

Central Nervous System: The most common manifestations encountered with phenytoin therapy are referable to this system and are usually dose-related. These include nystagmus, ataxia, slurred speech, decreased coordination and mental confusion. Dizziness, insomnia, transient nervousness, motor twitchings, and headache have also been observed. There have also been rare reports of phenytoin induced dyskinesias, including chorea, dystonia, tremor and asterixis, similar to those induced by phenothiazine and other neuroleptic drugs. A predominantly sensory peripheral polyneuropathy has been observed in patients receiving long-term phenytoin therapy. Gastrointestinal System: Nausea, vomiting, constipation, toxic hepatitis and liver damage. Integumentary System: Dermatological manifestations sometimes accompanied by fever have included scarlatiniform or morbilliform rashes. A morbilliform rash (measles-like) is the most common; other types of dermatitis are seen more rarely. Other more serious forms which may be fatal have included bullous, exfoliative or purpuric dermatitis, lupus erythematosus, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis (see PRECAUTIONS.) Hemopoietic System: Hemopoietic complications, some fatal, have occasionally been reported in association with administration of phenytoin. These have included thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, agranulocytosis, and pancytopenia with or without bone marrow suppression. While macrocytosis and megaloblastic anemia have occurred, these conditions usually respond to folic acid therapy. Lymphadenopathy including benign lymph node hyperplasia, pseudolymphoma, lymphoma, and Hodgkin's disease have been reported (see WARNINGS). Connective Tissue System Coarsening of the facial features, enlargement of the lips, gingival hyperplasia, hypertrichosis and Peyronie's disease. Cardiovascular: Periarteritis nodosa. Immunologic: Hypersensitivity syndrome (which may include, but is not limited to, symptoms such as arthralgias, eosinophilia, fever, liver dysfunction, lymphadenopathy or rash), systemic lupus erythematosus, and immunoglobulin abnormalities. DRUG INTERACTIONS There are many drugs which may increase or decrease phenytoin levels or which phenytoin may affect. Serum level determinations for phenytoin are especially helpful when possible drug interactions are suspected. The most commonly occurring drug interactions are listed below: 1. Drugs which may increase phenytoin serum levels include: acute alcohol intake, amiodarone, chloramphenicol, chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, dicumarol, disulfiram, estrogens, H2-antagonists, halothane, isoniazid, methylphenidate, phenothiazines, phenylbutazone, salicylates, succinimides, sulfonamides, tolbutamide, trazodone. 2. Drugs which may decrease phenytoin serum levels include: carbamazepine, chronic alcohol abuse, reserpine, and sucralfate. Moban brand of Molindone Hydrochloride contains calcium ions which interfere with the absorption of phenytoin. Ingestion times of phenytoin and antacid preparations containing calcium should be staggered in patients with low serum phenytoin levels to prevent absorption problems. 3. Drugs which may either increase or decrease phenytoin serum levels include: phenobarbital, sodium valproate, and valproic acid. Similarly, the effect of phenytoin on phenobarbital, valproic acid and sodium valproate serum levels is unpredictable. 4. Although not a true drug interaction, tricyclic antidepressants may precipitate seizures in susceptible patients and phenytoin dosage may need to be adjusted. 5. Drugs whose efficacy is impaired by phenytoin include: corticosteroids, coumarin anticoagulants, digitoxin, doxycycline, estrogens, furosemide, oral contraceptives, quinidine, rifampin, theophylline, vitamin D. Drug/Laboratory Test Interactions Phenytoin may cause decreased serum levels of protein-bound iodine (PBI). It may also produce lower than normal values for dexamethasone or metyrapone tests. Phenytoin may cause increased serum levels of glucose, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT). Answered by Kala Abundiz 1 month ago.

I googled it and it said cause slurred speaks, visions loss so I believe it would be safe saying it will cause memory loss. It said definitely don't stop taking it all at once it had allot of side effects. Answered by Debbra Wenskoski 1 month ago.

did in my sister....short term. she had open heart surgery, and would wake up from the hospital bed and say and do things she had no clue about later when she 'came out of it'.......she was very happy and loving on it, tho.....lol Answered by Neil Mangicavallo 1 month ago.

Sorry, can't remember Answered by Jaunita Korvin 1 month ago.


What drugs inteact with zanac?? i ran out of my nexium and got gerd..but i have the zantacs 150mgs?
please help?? Asked by Mayra Cunico 1 month ago.

Here is a list of drugs that interact with zantac... according to micromedex major drug interactions: Atazanavir (probable) Dasatinib (theoretical) Delavirdine (theoretical) Tolazoline (probable) moderate drug interactions: Cefpodoxime Proxetil (probable) Dicumarol (probable) Enoxacin (probable) Fosamprenavir (probable) Gefitinib (probable) Glipizide (probable) Itraconazole (probable) Risperidone (probable) Triazolam (probable) Warfarin (probable) Answered by Drema Sionesini 1 month ago.


Physiology help, about clotting?
Which of these anticoagulants are effective when added to a test tube;aspirin, coumarin drugs, EDTA, and heparin ? Which are not? Why? Asked by Babette Okoye 1 month ago.

EDTA and heparin are effective when added to a test tube as they are in vitro anticoagulants (n.b. heparin is also given to patients who require it) and coumarin drugs are in vivo and will not be effective in a test tube ....im not too sure bout aspirin but my money would be on it being an in vivo one.... found a really useful document online that would prob help you understand more.... heres an extract... There are two general classes of anticoagulants. In vitro anticoagulants—in vitro means “in glass”—are substances that can prevent coagulation after the blood is removed from the body (e.g., in a test tube). They work by preventing the activation of existing factors in the blood. These include Ca++ chelators like EDTA (ethylene diamine tetraacetate) and citrate, that bind Ca++ and remove it from solution. Reducing the Ca++ concentration prevents activation of the vitamin-K-dependent factors. Calcium chelators cannot be used in the body, since reducing extracellular Ca++ levels to a level sufficient to prevent coagulation would have dire consequences: the heart would cease to function (recall, electrical activity and excitation-contraction coupling), synapses would cease to function (recall, the inward flow of Ca++ that triggers synaptic release), etc. Another in vitro anticoagulant is heparin. Heparin is a mucopolysaccharide that is normally made by mast cells (type of transformed leukocyte), and is found in particularly high concentrations in lung tissue; presumably its function in the lungs is to maintain the blood in a fluid state preventing blockage of small pulmonary vessels and capillaries. Heparin prevents coagulation (either in a test tube or in the body) principally by preventing activation of thrombin, but it also (to a lesser extent) prevents the activation of other factors. Heparin works in glass test tubes, but it can also be used clinically in patients. A problem, however, with the clinical use of heparin is that it cannot be given orally—it is degraded by digestive enzymes prior to absorption. Thus, it must be given intravenously, and this can be problematic. Namely, the injection site itself is an injury with a tendency to bleed; injecting the heparin prevents clotting at the injection site, and the patient usually develops a bruise (blood oozing out of the vein under the skin). Thus other drugs that can be administered orally are usually used for long-term treatment of patients prone to thromboembolisms. The other class of anticoagulants are in vivo anticoagulants—in vivo means “in life.” These types of anticoagulands are ineffective in preventing clotting involving existing clotting factors (i.e., the anticoagulants are not effective in vitro). Rather, these factors act by inhibiting the production of new clotting factors by the liver, and this is why they only work in vivo. An advantage to using these drugs is that they can be given orally, thereby avoiding the unpleasant bruising when administering heparin intrevenously. Thus, these drugs are clinically referred to as oral anticoagulants. The oral anticoagulants were first discovered in the 1920’s, when investigators discovered the cause of “sweet clover disease” in cattle. The disease was characterized by severe bleeding in cattle fed partially fermented sweet-clover hay. The offending compound in the hay was coumarin (Dicumarol®). Subsequently, additional derivatives were manufactured, notably warfaran (Coumadin®), which was originally developed as a rat poison. Coumarin and warfaran inhibit the conversion of vitamin K to its different forms as it participates as a cofactor in the synthesis of the vitamin-K-dependent factors. Namely, it prevents the synthesis of  carboxyglutamate (Gla) from glutamate (Glu), and thus patients receiving this type of anticoagulant therapy have lower levels of functional factors. It is important to emphasize that coumarin and warfarin have no effect on previously synthesized functional factors already circulating in the plasma! Finally, apart from the benefit of being able to administer these drugs orally, there is another benefit: patients who overdose on the drug can be effectively treated by administering an antidote, namely large doses of vitamin K. Answered by Jayne Spurgers 1 month ago.

I don't think it is possible.. Blood stops bleeding when platelets clot the blood Answered by Margie Oliphant 1 month ago.

EDTA is a common anticoag. added to test tubes. The others are not used for in vitro assays. Answered by Awilda Cordasco 1 month ago.


What is the primary purpose of drugs like Heparin?
Asked by Cuc Mehok 1 month ago.

shanise, welcome to Answers. The primary purpose of drugs like heparin is to prevent blood from clotting or to prevent an already existing clot from growing larger. It is commonly used with a suspected heart coronary artery blockage causing what appears to be a heart attack. It is injected intravenously and has an immediate effect till other long-term anti-clot medicines (like Coumadin or Dicumarol) can work by taking pills by mouth, maybe for a long time or life. It may also be given for what appears to be new clots in the lung pulmonary arteries. Answered by Lamont Alsheimer 1 month ago.

Heparin is a blood thinner/anticoagulant. Answered by Enola Glyn 1 month ago.


WhAt is pill pink e795 round?
I checked everywhere what is this pill Asked by Abe Peltzer 1 month ago.

Drug: Miradon Strength(s): 50 mg Imprint: 795 SCHERING Color: Pink Shape: Elliptical / Oval MIRADON Tablets contain a synthetic anticoagulant, anisindione, an indanedione derivative. Each tablet contains 50 mg anisin-dione. They also contain: corn starch, FD&C Red No. 3, gelatin, lactose, and hydrogenated cottonseed oil. Anticoagulant: Any agent used to prevent the formation of blood clots. Anticoagulants have various uses. Some are used for the prophylaxis (prevention) or the treatment of thromboembolic disorders. Thrombi are clots. Emboli are clots that break free, travel through the bloodstream, and lodge therein. The anticoagulant drugs used for these clinical purposes include: * Intravenous heparin -- which acts by inactivating thrombin and several other clotting factors required for a clot to form; * Oral anticoagulants such as warfarin and dicumarol -- which act by inhibiting the liver's production of vitamin K dependent factors crucial to clotting. Anticoagulant solutions are also used for the preservation of stored whole blood and blood fractions. These anticoagulants include heparin and acid citrate dextrose (commonly called ACD). Anticoagulants are also used to keep laboratory blood specimens from clotting. These agents include not only heparin but also several agents that make calcium ions unavailable to the clotting process and so prevent the formation of clots; these agents include ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (commonly called EDTA), citrate, oxalate and fluoride. Answered by Toshia Efthimiou 1 month ago.


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