Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 008943/001.

Names and composition

"DIAMOX" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ACETAZOLAMIDE.
It belongs to the class Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and is used in Glaucoma (Eye)

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
008943/001 DIAMOX ACETAZOLAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 125MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008943/002 DIAMOX ACETAZOLAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009388/001 DIAMOX ACETAZOLAMIDE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 500MG BASE per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012945/001 DIAMOX ACETAZOLAMIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
008943/001 DIAMOX ACETAZOLAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 125MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008943/002 DIAMOX ACETAZOLAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012945/001 DIAMOX ACETAZOLAMIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
040195/001 ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 125MG
040195/002 ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
040904/001 ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
083320/001 ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
084498/002 ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
084840/001 ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
087654/001 ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
087686/001 ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
088882/001 ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
089752/001 ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 125MG
089753/001 ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
090779/001 ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
203434/001 ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
204691/001 ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
205530/001 ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 125MG
205530/002 ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Concordia International

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Answered questions

Diamox - side effects?
Appears to have strange side effects like making Diet Coke taste bitter. I also noticed mild tingling in my fingers and heel. Asked by Virgina Deramus 1 year ago.

Diamox is Acetazolamide. Common side effects of using this drug include numbness and tingling in the fingers and toes, and taste alterations (parageusia), especially for carbonated drinks; both are usually due to mild hypokalemia (low potassium levels). Some may also experience blurred vision but this usually disappears shortly after stopping the medication. Acetazolamide also increases the risk of developing calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate kidney stones. Everyone will experience more frequent urination as a result of using acetazolamide. One should drink more fluids than usual to prevent dehydration and headaches. Acetazolamide prolongs the effects of amphetamines and related drugs. - Wikipedia You should see your doctor to get your blood electrolytes checked. This could cause paraesthesia. You should avoid drinking other diuretics such as caffeine containing beverages (eg. Diet Coke) while taking Acetazolamide. Answered by Matt Nagle 1 year ago.


While taking diamox pill?
I just want know while taking diamox and does its cause sense of smell to increase???? Thanks Asked by Fleta Mcnulty 1 year ago.

Diamox is the trade name of the drug called Actazolamide. According to the British National Formulary of 2008 this drug can cause altered sensations of taste and smell. That fits in to the side effect you have. I am a medical doctor Answered by Eloisa Ganser 1 year ago.

Yes, expect your bowel movements to both increase in toxicity & frequency...and your ability to appreciate them. Answered by Maura Conlin 1 year ago.


Alternatives to Diamox?
I have recently been prescribed Diamox (Acetazolamide 500 mg daily) to manage pseudotumor cerebri. I already have a shunt that just doesnt do enough. While adding Diamox does keep my CSF fluid under control, the side effects have been very frustrating. I can deal with the tingly fingertips and toes, however I also... Asked by Daina Johnshoy 1 year ago.

I have recently been prescribed Diamox (Acetazolamide 500 mg daily) to manage pseudotumor cerebri. I already have a shunt that just doesnt do enough. While adding Diamox does keep my CSF fluid under control, the side effects have been very frustrating. I can deal with the tingly fingertips and toes, however I also seem to be struggling with the lack of potassium (even though I added potassium to my diet as well as a potassium supplement), muscle spasms and pain that prevent me from doing what I normally do as well as some pain that I believe is coming from my kidney area. I've tried drinking a lot of water to flush my kidneys. I'm about to see a new neurologist to get bloodwork and properly follow the usage of this medicine, but I'd like to come prepared with a list of alternative medications. I'm looking online, but I'd appreciate any suggestions others can offer. I know there are other drugs to try with less complications and danger to the body over long term use. I've already tried simply not taking Diamox at all and I need to go back on it within a week - I can't stay off completely. Answered by Keely Wittig 1 year ago.


Diamox for Pseudotumor? Side effects?
I have a pseudotumor cerebri and need to take Diamox for a few months. Im just wondering if anyones ever taken this med (or another one like it) and if someone can tell me what side effects to expect...also what do I need to stay away from, like foods/alcohol? My doc told me that while I have the Pseudotumor I need... Asked by Reagan Massay 1 year ago.

I have a pseudotumor cerebri and need to take Diamox for a few months. Im just wondering if anyones ever taken this med (or another one like it) and if someone can tell me what side effects to expect...also what do I need to stay away from, like foods/alcohol? My doc told me that while I have the Pseudotumor I need to stay away from anything with Vitamin A in it. Answered by Francesca Vy 1 year ago.

I have pseudo-tumor cerebri too and take Diamox for it. I am currently taking 250mg 3 x's a day. I've been taking the Diamox (2nd time) for about 4 years now. The first time I took it for just a little of a year, then 10 years to the date was back on it again. I really don't recall any major side effects, just makes you urinate a lot because it is a diuretic that reduces the spinal fluid to help keep the pressure off your brain to reduce the headaches. It works like lasix without messing with your electrolytes as strongly as lasix. You have to get blood tests to make sure you electrolytes are okay. I've noticed quite often that my urine is sometimes cloudy, and that I have come to the conclusion is just some of the spinal fluid that it is removing. Have had lots of urine tests, but it is never cloudy. It is usually when I first get up. I'm telling you the relieve from those terrible headaches is so nice. I started off with 2 pills per day, then we went down to 1 pill per day then back up, and then symptoms starting coming back so now I'm up to 3 pills a day. The maximum amount is 4 pills per day at 250mg. As far as foods/alcohol to stay away from, 1st of all I'm not much of an alcohol drinker (maybe 2-3 times/year). I'm suppose to stay away from wine, cheese, & caffeine because of my migraines. I don't remember being told of any certain foods to stay away from while on this medication. However, your pharmacist could answer that question. Good Luck to you and I hope the Diamox works well for you. Answered by Maris Vonderhaar 1 year ago.

The answers given are correct. This posting is directed to "Jimmy." True, the terminology may be somewhat misleading and even scary, but cancer it is not. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension is a condition of high pressure in the fluid around the brain. It is also known as pseudotumor cerebri because there are some of the signs and symptoms of a brain tumor without a brain tumor being present (pseudo meaning false). The space around the brain is filled with a water-like fluid. If there is too much of this fluid present, (for example, if not enough being absorbed), the pressure around the brain rises. This is because the space containing the fluid cannot expand. It is this high pressure that produces the symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (idiopathic means unknown cause; intracranial means inside the head; hypertension means the fluid is under high pressure). Answered by Jeanice Mickus 1 year ago.


How much does Diamox cost? Has anyone else used it.?
I have Pseudotumor cerebri. They want to give me this medicine and I don't know how much it cost. Asked by Marcos Mcelyea 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much does Diamox cost? Has anyone else used it.? I have Pseudotumor cerebri. They want to give me this medicine and I don't know how much it cost. Answered by Eufemia Neske 1 year ago.

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Anyone taking the med Diamox?
Has anyone else had weird side effects from the medicine, Diamox? I take it for psuedotumorcelebri. Just started taking it a few days ago. Feel tired 24/7, dizzy, like I'm walking around in a fog. Thanks for any info. Asked by Russell Meunier 1 year ago.

Diamox is the trade name of Acetazolamide. It can cause the following side effects. Nausea, Vomiting, DIZZINESS, depression, irritability and many more. If the side effects are a problem inform your doctor. Sometimes after a few days of use some of the side effects disappear. I am a medical doctor Answered by Wally Hoemann 1 year ago.


Is it ok to take Diamox and Dramamine together? If not, which one should I take?
That would put me out wouldn't it, taking both? I have to fly into Flagstaff, Arizona next week. Flagstaff is about 7200ft above sea level and where I live, it's about 87ft. I get nauseous pretty easily, so I'm thinking I'll be affected by the altitude of Flagstaff. Especially since I'm not... Asked by Anjelica Saintlouis 1 year ago.

That would put me out wouldn't it, taking both? I have to fly into Flagstaff, Arizona next week. Flagstaff is about 7200ft above sea level and where I live, it's about 87ft. I get nauseous pretty easily, so I'm thinking I'll be affected by the altitude of Flagstaff. Especially since I'm not slowly accelerating, but rather flying right into the altitude. The pressure in the plane made me nauseous the last few times I've ridden it. I took a Dramamine last time before the flight and I was great. I had been planning on taking the Diamox before I arrived so that I would adjust right away. But then I remembered the Dramamine. When should I take these? I really don't want to feel horrible on the plane and I really don't want to feel horrible when I get there. Answered by Bev Vandeveble 1 year ago.

Diamox is a diuretic IE it increases urination. It has nothing to do motion sickness .Take only Dramamine Answered by Maire Matar 1 year ago.

Hey! you better use a Scopolamine patch go to a pharmacy:D Answered by Aleida Zylstra 1 year ago.


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