Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 011641/003.

Names and composition

"DIABINESE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CHLORPROPAMIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011641/003 DIABINESE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
011641/006 DIABINESE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011641/003 DIABINESE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
011641/006 DIABINESE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
084669/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
086865/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
086866/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
087353/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
088175/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088176/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
088549/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
088549/002 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088568/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
088608/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088641/001 GLUCAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
088662/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
088694/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088695/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
088708/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088709/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
088725/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088726/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
088768/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088812/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088813/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
088826/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
088840/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088852/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088918/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088919/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
088921/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088922/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
089321/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
089446/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
089447/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
089561/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
089562/001 CHLORPROPAMIDE CHLORPROPAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG

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Answered questions

If I have diabinese 0.1 g po daily.....?
The order is : diabinese 0.1 g PO daily on hand: diabinese 100 mg tablets Administer: tablets (s) I've divided and tried other things and this is rather tricky!! Asked by Anjelica Herrington 1 year ago.

0.1G = 100mg Answered by Chery Gipp 1 year ago.


I want to know what a pill is with L373 on it?
Asked by Marg Thorndyke 1 year ago.

Drug/Strength/Manufacturer: Chlorpropamide 250mg - Sidmak DIABINESE is indicated as an adjunct to diet to lower the blood glucose in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type II) whose hyperglycemia cannot be controlled by diet alone. In initiating treatment for non-insulin-dependent diabetes, diet should be emphasized as the primary form of treatment. Caloric restriction and weight loss are essential in the obese diabetic patient. Proper dietary management alone may be effective in controlling the blood glucose and symptoms of hyperglycemia. The importance of regular physical activity should also be stressed, and cardiovascular risk factors should be identified and corrective measures taken where possible. If this treatment program fails to reduce symptoms and/or blood glucose, the use of an oral sulfonylurea or insulin should be considered. Use of DIABINESE must be viewed by both the physician and patient as a treatment in addition to diet, and not as a substitute for diet or as a convenient mechanism for avoiding dietary restraint. Furthermore, loss of blood glucose control on diet alone may be transient, thus requiring only short-term administration of DIABINESE. During maintenance programs, DIABINESE should be discontinued if satisfactory lowering of blood glucose is no longer achieved. Judgments should be based on regular clinical and laboratory evaluations. Answered by Natalia Soliman 1 year ago.

get on webmd.com and go to th drug checker... sounds like generic vicodin Answered by Cordelia Hyde 1 year ago.


How many oral hypoglycemics are there?
Asked by Terresa Stipes 1 year ago.

Acetohexamide (Dymelor) Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) Glipizide (Glucotrol) Glyburide (DiaBeta, Micronase) Glimepiride (Amaryl) Tolbutamide (Orinase) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Answered by Josphine Placino 1 year ago.


I need the names of several diabetic meds P.O that doesn't cost and arm?
Asked by Emiko Talbott 1 year ago.

What Types of Oral Diabetes Medicine Are Available? Diabetes medications are grouped in categories based on medication type. There are several categories of oral diabetes medicine -- each works differently. Sulfonylureas. These drugs lower blood glucose by stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin. The first drugs of this type that were developed -- Dymelor, Diabinese, Orinase and Tolinase -- are not as widely used since they tend to be less potent and shorter acting drugs than the newer sulfonylureas. They include Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, DiaBeta, Micronase, Glynase PresTab and Amaryl. These drugs can cause a decrease in the hemoglobin A1c (/content/article/46/1667_50945?z=1667_5... [link] of up to 1%-2%. Biguanides. These drugs improve insulin's ability to move glucose into cells especially into the muscle cells. They also prevent the liver from releasing stored glucose. Biguanides should not be used in people who have kidney damage or heart failure because of the risk of precipitating a severe build up of acid (called lactic acidosis) in these patients. Biguanides can decrease the HbA1c 1%-2%. Examples include metformin (Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet and Glumetza). Thiazolidinediones. These drugs improve insulin's effectiveness (improving insulin resistance) in muscle and in fat tissue. They lower the amount of glucose released by the liver and make fat cells more sensitive to the effects of insulin. Actos and Avandia are the two drugs of this class. A decrease in the HbA1c of 1%-2% can be seen with this class of medications. These drugs may take a few weeks before they have an effect in lowering blood glucose. They should be used with caution in people with heart failure. Your doctor will do periodic blood testing of your liver function when using this medication. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, including Precose and Glyset. These drugs block enzymes that help digest starches, slowing the rise in blood glucose. These drugs may cause diarrhea or gas. These drugs can result in the reduction of the level of HbA1c of 0.5%-1%. Meglitinides, including Prandin and Starlix. These medicines lower blood glucose by stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin. The effects of these medications depend on the level of glucose. They are said to be glucose dependant. High sugars make this class of medications release insulin. This is unlike the sulfonylureas that cause an increase in insulin release, regardless of glucose levels, and can lead to hypoglycemia. Combination therapy. There are several combination pills that combine two medications into one tablet. One example of this is Glucovance, which combines glyburide (a sulfonylurea) and metformin. Others include Metaglip, which combines glipizide (a sulfonylurea) and metformin, and Avandamet which utilizes both metformin and rosiglitazone (Avandia) in one pill. Metformin and glipizide are generic products which would be less costly that the brand counterparts. Answered by Saundra Aimone 1 year ago.

There are pharmaceutical companies that have prescription drug assistance plans for people with limited income -- whether you have insurance, or not. You may be able to get the application from your pharmacist or online. Good luck! Answered by Siobhan Naftzger 1 year ago.

Why? Are you planning on prescribing them for yourself? Answered by Merle Milderberger 1 year ago.

whats that. Answered by Lucie Condina 1 year ago.


Can I mix these prescription medications?
I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know... Asked by Kevin Elldrege 1 year ago.

I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know for sure if you don't move on to the next question don't make a stupid comment about nothing you know. Answered by Zula Bindrup 1 year ago.

Mucinex is a multi-ingredient drug consisting of pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. If you'd like to know more about how either one interacts with other medication, Google "pseudoephedrine drug interactions" and "guaifenesin drug interactions," although I don't believe you should be having any problems while on seroquel and lamictal. Here's a list of medication that WILL, however, interact with Mucinex, which I have looked into to double-check myself. I didn't see either of the two medications that you are on on any of the three lists, but here they are anyway, in case you'd like to see so for yourself: Major Interactions Atapryl, Azilect, Carbex, Eldepryl, Emsam, furazolidone, Furoxone, isocarboxazid, Jumex, linezolid, Marplan, Matulane, Nardil, Parnate, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, Selgene, tranylcypromine, Zelapar, Zyvox Moderate Interactions acarbose, acetoHEXAMIDE, Aldomet, Amaryl, Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, bromocriptine, chlorproPAMIDE, Citra pH, Citrate-Phos-Dex, D.H.E. 45, deserpidine, DiaBeta, Diabinese, dihydroergotamine, Dymelor, epoprostenol, ergoloid mesylates, Ergomar, ergonovine, ergotamine, Ergotrate Maleate, EXUBERA, EXUBERA Combination Pack 12, EXUBERA Combination Pack 15, EXUBERA Kit, Flolan, Fortamet, glimepiride, glipiZIDE, glipiZIDE extended release, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, Glumetza, glyBURIDE, glyBURIDE micronized, Glynase PresTab, Glyset, guanadrel, guanethidine, Harmonyl, Humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Humulin L, Humulin N, Humulin N Pen, Humulin R, Humulin R (Concentrated), Humulin U, Hydergine, Hydergine LC, Hylorel, Iletin II Lente Pork, Iletin II NPH Pork, Iletin II Regular Pork, Iletin Lente, Iletin NPH, Iletin Regular, iloprost, insulin, insulin analog, insulin aspart, insulin aspart protamine, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, insulin inhalation, rapid acting, insulin isophane, Insulin Lente Pork, insulin lispro, insulin lispro protamine, Insulin Purified NPH Pork, Insulin Purified Regular Pork, insulin regular, insulin zinc, insulin zinc extended, insulin, lente, insulin, NPH, insulin, ultralente, Inversine, Ismelin, Januvia, Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen, Lente insulin, Levemir, Levemir FlexPen, Levemir InnoLet, Levemir PenFill, mecamylamine, Meridia, metformin, metformin extended release, Methergine, methyldopa, methylergonovine, methysergide maleate, Micronase, midodrine, miglitol, Migranal, nateglinide, Neut, Novolin L, Novolin N, Novolin N Innolet, Novolin N PenFill, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill, NPH insulin, Orinase, Orvaten, oxytocin, Parlodel, Pitocin, potassium citrate, Prandin, Precose, ProAmatine, prostacyclin, protamine zinc insulin, Rauwolfemms, Rauwolfia 1X, rauwolfia serpentina, regular insulin, Relion Novolin N, ReliOn/Novolin R, Remodulin, repaglinide, reserpine, Riomet, Sansert, sibutramine, sitagliptin, sodium acetate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, sodium lactate, Starlix, Syntocinon, Tham, Tol-Tab, TOLAZamide, TOLBUTamide, Tolinase, treprostinil, Tricitrasol, tromethamine, Twin-K, Ultralente insulin, Urocit-K, Velosulin BR, Ventavis Minor Interactions Acerola, ammonium chloride, Ascor L 500, ascorbic acid, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, Ascot, atomoxetine, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cardoxin, Cecon, Cee-500, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Cenolate, Centrum Singles-Vitamin C, Cevi-Bid, Cotameth, Digitek, digitoxin, digoxin, digoxin capsule, Ester-C, K-Phos Original, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, M-Caps, Mega-C/A Plus, methionine, N Ice with Vitamin C, Pedameth, potassium acid phosphate, sodium acid phosphate, sodium ascorbate, Strattera, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips Answered by Jennette Marconi 1 year ago.

No interactions were reported. I also checked Mucinex D and Mucinex DM too, just in case. (I am a pharmacist, BTW) Answered by Edmundo Hermez 1 year ago.


Is the medicines trileptal for people that can't sleep at night?
Asked by Cherelle Mackel 1 year ago.

What is Trileptal used for? Trileptal is a medicine to treat partial seizures in adults. It is taken alone or with other seizure medicines. Taken with other seizure medicines, Trileptal is also used to help treat partial seizures in children 4-16 years old. Special Warning(s) with Trileptal: Trileptal can cause low levels of sodium in the blood. Signs of low levels of blood sodium include nausea, extreme drowsiness and discomfort, headache, confusion, or dullness, which can be dangerous. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medications that may lower the level of sodium in your blood. Medications that lower sodium include: carbamazepine (Tegretol®) chlorpropamide (Diabinese®) cyclophosphamide diuretics (water pills) octreotide vincristine Trileptal can cause allergic reactions. If you have had an allergic reaction to other anti-seizure medicines, especially carbamazepine (Tegretol®), tell your health care provider. Talk to your health care provider before stopping Trileptal or any other seizure medicine. Stopping a seizure medicine all at once can cause status epilepticus, a serious problem. General Precautions with Trileptal: Some people taking Trileptal can get serious reactions, including: Dizziness Drowsiness Depression or abnormal thinking Difficulty concentrating Speech or language problems Difficulty with coordination and walking Trileptal can cause drowsiness. Do not drive a car or operate complex machinery until you know how Trileptal affects you. Do not drink alcohol while you are taking Trileptal. Alcohol can increase the side effects of Trileptal. What should I tell my doctor or health care provider? Because certain other medications can interact with Trileptal, review all medications that you are taking with your health care provider, including those that you take without a prescription. Trileptal may reduce the effectiveness of: some medications used to lower blood pressure (e.g., calcium channel blockers) birth control pills other anti-seizure medications Trileptal may cause birth defects. Tell your doctor or health care provider right away if you are pregnant, or plan to become pregnant. Before taking Trileptal, tell your doctor if you are nursing or planning to nurse your baby. What are some possible side effects of Trileptal? (This is NOT a complete list of side effects reported with Trileptal. Your health care provider can discuss with you a more complete list of side effects.) Common side effects include: Dizziness or vertigo Drowsiness Double vision or other vision problems Feeling tired Nausea Vomiting Coordination problems Stomach pain Tremor Upset stomach Headache For more detailed information about Trileptal, ask your health care provider Answered by Jermaine Vegh 1 year ago.

No. Trileptal is a medicine to treat partial seizures in adults. Answered by Stefania Lomonte 1 year ago.

section outcomes can incorporate an allergic reaction (undertaking respiration; very final of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · alerts of low blood sodium (nausea, widely used soreness, headache, severe drowsiness, or confusion); · efficient apprehensive gadget outcomes (undertaking with concentration, speech, or language; severe sleepiness or fatigue; a loss of coordination or worry strolling); · double imaginitive and prescient, nystagmus (decrease back-and-forth strikes of the eyes), blurred imaginitive and prescient, or diverse seen disturbances; or · increasing frequency or worsening of seizures. • diverse, much less extreme section outcomes might desire to be plenty extra effective probable to take place. proceed to take Trileptal and communicate on your widely used practitioner in case you journey · headache; · undemanding sleepiness or fatigue; · nausea, vomiting, or abdomen soreness; · tremor; · dizziness; · rash; · diarrhea, constipation, or decreased urge for nutrients; · weight earnings; or · dry mouth. • section outcomes diverse than those listed top right here might additionally take place. Answered by Lucie Sieler 1 year ago.


If I have diabinese 0.1 g po daily.....?
The order is : diabinese 0.1 g PO daily on hand: diabinese 100 mg tablets Administer: tablets (s) I've divided and tried other things and this is rather tricky!! Asked by Corinna Rerko 1 year ago.

0.1G = 100mg Answered by Lila Chant 1 year ago.


I want to know what a pill is with L373 on it?
Asked by Elisha Warford 1 year ago.

Drug/Strength/Manufacturer: Chlorpropamide 250mg - Sidmak DIABINESE is indicated as an adjunct to diet to lower the blood glucose in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type II) whose hyperglycemia cannot be controlled by diet alone. In initiating treatment for non-insulin-dependent diabetes, diet should be emphasized as the primary form of treatment. Caloric restriction and weight loss are essential in the obese diabetic patient. Proper dietary management alone may be effective in controlling the blood glucose and symptoms of hyperglycemia. The importance of regular physical activity should also be stressed, and cardiovascular risk factors should be identified and corrective measures taken where possible. If this treatment program fails to reduce symptoms and/or blood glucose, the use of an oral sulfonylurea or insulin should be considered. Use of DIABINESE must be viewed by both the physician and patient as a treatment in addition to diet, and not as a substitute for diet or as a convenient mechanism for avoiding dietary restraint. Furthermore, loss of blood glucose control on diet alone may be transient, thus requiring only short-term administration of DIABINESE. During maintenance programs, DIABINESE should be discontinued if satisfactory lowering of blood glucose is no longer achieved. Judgments should be based on regular clinical and laboratory evaluations. Answered by Elana Kerper 1 year ago.

get on webmd.com and go to th drug checker... sounds like generic vicodin Answered by Gretta Bendall 1 year ago.


How many oral hypoglycemics are there?
Asked by Lena Fugit 1 year ago.

Acetohexamide (Dymelor) Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) Glipizide (Glucotrol) Glyburide (DiaBeta, Micronase) Glimepiride (Amaryl) Tolbutamide (Orinase) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Answered by Leeanne Reasner 1 year ago.


I need the names of several diabetic meds P.O that doesn't cost and arm?
Asked by Divina Freedle 1 year ago.

What Types of Oral Diabetes Medicine Are Available? Diabetes medications are grouped in categories based on medication type. There are several categories of oral diabetes medicine -- each works differently. Sulfonylureas. These drugs lower blood glucose by stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin. The first drugs of this type that were developed -- Dymelor, Diabinese, Orinase and Tolinase -- are not as widely used since they tend to be less potent and shorter acting drugs than the newer sulfonylureas. They include Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, DiaBeta, Micronase, Glynase PresTab and Amaryl. These drugs can cause a decrease in the hemoglobin A1c (/content/article/46/1667_50945?z=1667_5... [link] of up to 1%-2%. Biguanides. These drugs improve insulin's ability to move glucose into cells especially into the muscle cells. They also prevent the liver from releasing stored glucose. Biguanides should not be used in people who have kidney damage or heart failure because of the risk of precipitating a severe build up of acid (called lactic acidosis) in these patients. Biguanides can decrease the HbA1c 1%-2%. Examples include metformin (Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet and Glumetza). Thiazolidinediones. These drugs improve insulin's effectiveness (improving insulin resistance) in muscle and in fat tissue. They lower the amount of glucose released by the liver and make fat cells more sensitive to the effects of insulin. Actos and Avandia are the two drugs of this class. A decrease in the HbA1c of 1%-2% can be seen with this class of medications. These drugs may take a few weeks before they have an effect in lowering blood glucose. They should be used with caution in people with heart failure. Your doctor will do periodic blood testing of your liver function when using this medication. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, including Precose and Glyset. These drugs block enzymes that help digest starches, slowing the rise in blood glucose. These drugs may cause diarrhea or gas. These drugs can result in the reduction of the level of HbA1c of 0.5%-1%. Meglitinides, including Prandin and Starlix. These medicines lower blood glucose by stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin. The effects of these medications depend on the level of glucose. They are said to be glucose dependant. High sugars make this class of medications release insulin. This is unlike the sulfonylureas that cause an increase in insulin release, regardless of glucose levels, and can lead to hypoglycemia. Combination therapy. There are several combination pills that combine two medications into one tablet. One example of this is Glucovance, which combines glyburide (a sulfonylurea) and metformin. Others include Metaglip, which combines glipizide (a sulfonylurea) and metformin, and Avandamet which utilizes both metformin and rosiglitazone (Avandia) in one pill. Metformin and glipizide are generic products which would be less costly that the brand counterparts. Answered by Lynette Hackford 1 year ago.

There are pharmaceutical companies that have prescription drug assistance plans for people with limited income -- whether you have insurance, or not. You may be able to get the application from your pharmacist or online. Good luck! Answered by Shan Odegard 1 year ago.

Why? Are you planning on prescribing them for yourself? Answered by Mario Yip 1 year ago.

whats that. Answered by Luz Asif 1 year ago.


Can I mix these prescription medications?
I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know... Asked by Vannessa Reichelt 1 year ago.

I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know for sure if you don't move on to the next question don't make a stupid comment about nothing you know. Answered by Brittani Beechner 1 year ago.

Mucinex is a multi-ingredient drug consisting of pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. If you'd like to know more about how either one interacts with other medication, Google "pseudoephedrine drug interactions" and "guaifenesin drug interactions," although I don't believe you should be having any problems while on seroquel and lamictal. Here's a list of medication that WILL, however, interact with Mucinex, which I have looked into to double-check myself. I didn't see either of the two medications that you are on on any of the three lists, but here they are anyway, in case you'd like to see so for yourself: Major Interactions Atapryl, Azilect, Carbex, Eldepryl, Emsam, furazolidone, Furoxone, isocarboxazid, Jumex, linezolid, Marplan, Matulane, Nardil, Parnate, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, Selgene, tranylcypromine, Zelapar, Zyvox Moderate Interactions acarbose, acetoHEXAMIDE, Aldomet, Amaryl, Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, bromocriptine, chlorproPAMIDE, Citra pH, Citrate-Phos-Dex, D.H.E. 45, deserpidine, DiaBeta, Diabinese, dihydroergotamine, Dymelor, epoprostenol, ergoloid mesylates, Ergomar, ergonovine, ergotamine, Ergotrate Maleate, EXUBERA, EXUBERA Combination Pack 12, EXUBERA Combination Pack 15, EXUBERA Kit, Flolan, Fortamet, glimepiride, glipiZIDE, glipiZIDE extended release, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, Glumetza, glyBURIDE, glyBURIDE micronized, Glynase PresTab, Glyset, guanadrel, guanethidine, Harmonyl, Humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Humulin L, Humulin N, Humulin N Pen, Humulin R, Humulin R (Concentrated), Humulin U, Hydergine, Hydergine LC, Hylorel, Iletin II Lente Pork, Iletin II NPH Pork, Iletin II Regular Pork, Iletin Lente, Iletin NPH, Iletin Regular, iloprost, insulin, insulin analog, insulin aspart, insulin aspart protamine, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, insulin inhalation, rapid acting, insulin isophane, Insulin Lente Pork, insulin lispro, insulin lispro protamine, Insulin Purified NPH Pork, Insulin Purified Regular Pork, insulin regular, insulin zinc, insulin zinc extended, insulin, lente, insulin, NPH, insulin, ultralente, Inversine, Ismelin, Januvia, Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen, Lente insulin, Levemir, Levemir FlexPen, Levemir InnoLet, Levemir PenFill, mecamylamine, Meridia, metformin, metformin extended release, Methergine, methyldopa, methylergonovine, methysergide maleate, Micronase, midodrine, miglitol, Migranal, nateglinide, Neut, Novolin L, Novolin N, Novolin N Innolet, Novolin N PenFill, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill, NPH insulin, Orinase, Orvaten, oxytocin, Parlodel, Pitocin, potassium citrate, Prandin, Precose, ProAmatine, prostacyclin, protamine zinc insulin, Rauwolfemms, Rauwolfia 1X, rauwolfia serpentina, regular insulin, Relion Novolin N, ReliOn/Novolin R, Remodulin, repaglinide, reserpine, Riomet, Sansert, sibutramine, sitagliptin, sodium acetate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, sodium lactate, Starlix, Syntocinon, Tham, Tol-Tab, TOLAZamide, TOLBUTamide, Tolinase, treprostinil, Tricitrasol, tromethamine, Twin-K, Ultralente insulin, Urocit-K, Velosulin BR, Ventavis Minor Interactions Acerola, ammonium chloride, Ascor L 500, ascorbic acid, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, Ascot, atomoxetine, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cardoxin, Cecon, Cee-500, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Cenolate, Centrum Singles-Vitamin C, Cevi-Bid, Cotameth, Digitek, digitoxin, digoxin, digoxin capsule, Ester-C, K-Phos Original, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, M-Caps, Mega-C/A Plus, methionine, N Ice with Vitamin C, Pedameth, potassium acid phosphate, sodium acid phosphate, sodium ascorbate, Strattera, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips Answered by Shannan Flaig 1 year ago.

No interactions were reported. I also checked Mucinex D and Mucinex DM too, just in case. (I am a pharmacist, BTW) Answered by Fabian Titch 1 year ago.


Is the medicines trileptal for people that can't sleep at night?
Asked by Mireya Cammack 1 year ago.

What is Trileptal used for? Trileptal is a medicine to treat partial seizures in adults. It is taken alone or with other seizure medicines. Taken with other seizure medicines, Trileptal is also used to help treat partial seizures in children 4-16 years old. Special Warning(s) with Trileptal: Trileptal can cause low levels of sodium in the blood. Signs of low levels of blood sodium include nausea, extreme drowsiness and discomfort, headache, confusion, or dullness, which can be dangerous. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medications that may lower the level of sodium in your blood. Medications that lower sodium include: carbamazepine (Tegretol®) chlorpropamide (Diabinese®) cyclophosphamide diuretics (water pills) octreotide vincristine Trileptal can cause allergic reactions. If you have had an allergic reaction to other anti-seizure medicines, especially carbamazepine (Tegretol®), tell your health care provider. Talk to your health care provider before stopping Trileptal or any other seizure medicine. Stopping a seizure medicine all at once can cause status epilepticus, a serious problem. General Precautions with Trileptal: Some people taking Trileptal can get serious reactions, including: Dizziness Drowsiness Depression or abnormal thinking Difficulty concentrating Speech or language problems Difficulty with coordination and walking Trileptal can cause drowsiness. Do not drive a car or operate complex machinery until you know how Trileptal affects you. Do not drink alcohol while you are taking Trileptal. Alcohol can increase the side effects of Trileptal. What should I tell my doctor or health care provider? Because certain other medications can interact with Trileptal, review all medications that you are taking with your health care provider, including those that you take without a prescription. Trileptal may reduce the effectiveness of: some medications used to lower blood pressure (e.g., calcium channel blockers) birth control pills other anti-seizure medications Trileptal may cause birth defects. Tell your doctor or health care provider right away if you are pregnant, or plan to become pregnant. Before taking Trileptal, tell your doctor if you are nursing or planning to nurse your baby. What are some possible side effects of Trileptal? (This is NOT a complete list of side effects reported with Trileptal. Your health care provider can discuss with you a more complete list of side effects.) Common side effects include: Dizziness or vertigo Drowsiness Double vision or other vision problems Feeling tired Nausea Vomiting Coordination problems Stomach pain Tremor Upset stomach Headache For more detailed information about Trileptal, ask your health care provider Answered by Rochel Hatman 1 year ago.

No. Trileptal is a medicine to treat partial seizures in adults. Answered by Machelle Yacavone 1 year ago.

section outcomes can incorporate an allergic reaction (undertaking respiration; very final of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · alerts of low blood sodium (nausea, widely used soreness, headache, severe drowsiness, or confusion); · efficient apprehensive gadget outcomes (undertaking with concentration, speech, or language; severe sleepiness or fatigue; a loss of coordination or worry strolling); · double imaginitive and prescient, nystagmus (decrease back-and-forth strikes of the eyes), blurred imaginitive and prescient, or diverse seen disturbances; or · increasing frequency or worsening of seizures. • diverse, much less extreme section outcomes might desire to be plenty extra effective probable to take place. proceed to take Trileptal and communicate on your widely used practitioner in case you journey · headache; · undemanding sleepiness or fatigue; · nausea, vomiting, or abdomen soreness; · tremor; · dizziness; · rash; · diarrhea, constipation, or decreased urge for nutrients; · weight earnings; or · dry mouth. • section outcomes diverse than those listed top right here might additionally take place. Answered by Tijuana Diebold 1 year ago.


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