DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 071588/001.

Names and composition

"DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
071588/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071601/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
071602/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
071766/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071803/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071803/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
071803/003 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071803/004 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
071803/005 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
071864/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
071865/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071866/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
071867/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
072099/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
072100/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
072101/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
072102/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
072103/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
072104/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
074430/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
074430/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
205153/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
205153/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
205153/003 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
205153/004 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
205153/005 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
205153/006 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
207433/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
207433/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
207433/003 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
207433/004 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
207433/005 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
207433/006 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
208105/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
208105/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
208105/003 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
208105/004 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
208105/005 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
208105/006 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
013621/001 PERTOFRANE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
013621/002 PERTOFRANE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
014399/001 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
014399/003 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
014399/004 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
014399/005 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
014399/006 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
014399/007 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
071588/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071601/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
071602/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
071766/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071803/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071803/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
071803/003 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071803/004 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
071803/005 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
071864/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
071865/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071866/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
071867/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
072099/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
072100/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
072101/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
072102/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
072103/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
072104/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
074430/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
074430/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
205153/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
205153/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
205153/003 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
205153/004 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
205153/005 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
205153/006 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
207433/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
207433/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
207433/003 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
207433/004 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
207433/005 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
207433/006 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
208105/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
208105/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
208105/003 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
208105/004 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
208105/005 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
208105/006 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Answered questions

Can anyone find me an antidepressant without an 'x' or a 'z' in the name?
Well, if you insist. Asked by Syble Torrisi 1 month ago.

Here is a list wit not an x or a z in either the generic or trade name. Amitryptiline ( Elavil, Tryptanol or Endep) Bupropion Hydrochloride (Wellbutrin) Clomipramine hydrochloride (Placil) Desipramine Hydrochloride (Norpramin) Imipramine Hydrochloride (Tofranil) Nortryptiline Hydrochloride (Allergron) Tranylcypromine Sulfate (Parnate) Trimimpramine Maleate (Surmontil) (Wow I have too much time on my hands!!) Answered by Idalia Haaker 1 month ago.

Xerxes - He tried to beat the Greeks approximately 3 hundred BC Zeno - the guy with the ambiguity Zena Zee Zaq Zebedee - caricature character and somebody in Bible Zacharia - in bible Xander - guy's call Zander - place call in action picture identify X-Ray guy - made that up nicely, that's 10 - bit i'm uncertain all are good! Answered by Lawrence Kuehneman 1 month ago.

cymbalta, wellbutrin Answered by Abbey Puterbaugh 1 month ago.

cipramil (citalopram) or lovan (escitalopram) Answered by Cedric Krupinsky 1 month ago.

Seroquel. May I ask why? Answered by Hayley Foglia 1 month ago.


What is a pill that has the numbers "167" printed on them?
Asked by Lory Merrifield 1 month ago.

go to www.drugs.com go to the pill finder section. type in the characteristics of the pill and it will tell you what it is. Answered by Leanne Tempesta 1 month ago.


Drugs which suppressive the immune system can make swollen lymph node?
Asked by Carolyne Saler 1 month ago.

yeah there are some drugs like INDOMETHACIN ,anti -convulsant drugs and ethosuximide that cause lymphnode enlargement!! they even cause a condition Pseudolymphoma" refers to a group of non-cancerous lymphocytic disorders of the skin that simulate malignant lymphomas. However, unlike lymphomas, patients who have a pseudolymphoma usually undergo spontaneous remission and will not die of the disease. The term "pseudo" means "not real", and "lymphoma" means "a cancerous tumor of lymphocytes". The causes of pseudolymphoma are broad and are classified based on their clinical features: drug induced causes : a. anticonvulsants b. antipsychotics: chlorpromazine, thioridazine c. antihypertensives: captopril, atenolol, verapamil, diltiazem, moduretic, hydrochlorothiazide d. cytotoxics: cyclosporine, methotrexate e. antirheumatics: gold, salicylates, phenacetin, D-penicillamine, allopurinol f. antibiotics: penicillin, nitrofurantoin g. antidepressants: fluoxetine, doxepin, desipramine, amitriptyline hydrochloride, lithium h. anxiolytics: alprazolam, clonazepam, lorazepam i. antihistamines: diphenhydramine, cimetidine, ranitidine j. antiarrhythmics: mexiletine chloride Answered by Cinda Mccardle 1 month ago.


How many anti depressants is there on the Market?
Asked by Sean Pulkkinen 1 month ago.

•Amitriptyline (Elavil®) •Amoxapine (Asendin®) •Bupropion (Aplenzin™, Budeprion XL®, Budeprion™ SR, Buproban®, Wellbutrin SR®, Wellbutrin XL®, Wellbutrin®, Zyban®) •Citalopram (Celexa®) •Clomipramine (Anafranil®) •Desipramine (Norpramin®) •Desvenlafaxine (Pristiq™) •Doxepin (Sinequan®, Silenor®) •Duloxetine (Cymbalta®) •Escitalopram (Lexapro®) •Fluoxetine (Prozac®, Sarafem®, Selfemra™) •Fluvoxamine (Luvox®, Luvox® CR) •Imipramine hydrochloride (Tofranil®) •Imipramine pamoate (Tofranil PM®) •Isocarboxazid (Marplan®) •Maprotiline (Ludiomil®) •Mirtazapine (Remeron®) •Nefazodone (Serzone®) •Nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) •Phenelzine (Nardil®) •Protriptyline (Vivactil®) •Selegiline (Emsam®) •Sertraline (Zoloft®) •Tranylcypromine (Parnate®) •Trazodone (Desyrel®) or trazodone ER (Oleptro™) •Trimipramine (Surmontil®) •Venlafaxine (Effexor®, Effexor XR®). •Citalopram (Celexa®) •Escitalopram (Lexapro®) •Fluoxetine (Prozac®, Sarafem®, Selfemra™) •Fluvoxamine (Luvox®, Luvox® CR) •Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) •Sertraline (Zoloft®). Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) include: •Duloxetine (Cymbalta®) •Desvenlafaxine (Pristiq™) •Venlafaxine (Effexor®, Effexor XR®). There is one SNRI, milnacipran (Savella™) that is not approved for treating depression, although it may be used "off-label" for this purpose. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) used for depression include: •Isocarboxazid (Marplan®) •Phenelzine (Nardil®) •Selegiline (Emsam®) •Tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Tricyclic antidepressants include: •Amitriptyline (Elavil®) •Amoxapine (Asendin®) •Clomipramine (Anafranil®) •Desipramine (Norpramin®) •Doxepin (Sinequan®, Silenor®) •Imipramine hydrochloride (Tofranil®) •Imipramine pamoate (Tofranil PM®) •Maprotiline (Ludiomil®) •Nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •Protriptyline (Vivactil®) •Trimipramine (Surmontil®). Miscellaneous other antidepressants include: •Bupropion (Aplenzin™, Budeprion XL®, Budeprion™ SR, Buproban®, Wellbutrin SR®, Wellbutrin XL®, Wellbutrin®, Zyban®), a norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitor (NDRI) •Mirtazapine (Remeron®) •Nefazodone (Serzone®) •Trazodone (Desyrel®) or trazodone ER (Oleptro™). Answered by Shizue Claxton 1 month ago.

Being that this alt med web page has been hijacked by means of druggies, I am now not certain what so as to add. Do your due diligence regarding drug results. If you arn't suidical and are open to "choices", check out one million hr full of life rigorous activity according to day that could be running, get a few solar, or typical gentle in your dermis, and watch much less TV. Make certain your bod can tolerate activity, get a pressure scan if integral. Answered by Mana Puff 1 month ago.


Role played by amines in nature?
Asked by Jayson Doler 1 month ago.

primary aromatic amines are used as a starting material for the manufacture of azo dyes. It reacts with nitric(III) acid to form diazonium salt, which can undergo coupling reaction to form azo compound. As azo-compounds are highly coloured, they are widely used in dyeing industries Drugs Many drugs are designed to mimic or to interfere with the action of natural amine neurotransmitters, exemplified by the amine drugs: Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine that helps to relieve allergic disorders due to cold, hay fever, itchy skin, insect bites and stings. Chlorpromazine is a tranquillizer that sedates without inducing sleep. It is used to relieve anxiety, excitement, restlessness or even mental disorder. Ephedrine and Phenylephrine, as amine hydrochlorides, are used as decongestants. Amphetamine, Methamphetamine, and Methcathinone are amines that are listed as controlled substances by the DEA. Amitriptyline, Imipramine, Lofepramine and Clomipramine are tricyclic antidepressants and tertiary amines Nortriptyline, Desipramine, and Amoxapine are tricyclic antidepressants and secondary amines (The tricyclics are grouped by the nature of the final amine group on the side chain.) [edit]Gas Treatment Aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA), diglycolamine (DGA), diethanolamine (DEA), diisopropanolamine (DIPA) and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) are widely used industrially for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from natural gas streams and refinery process streams. They may also be used to remove CO2 from combustion gases / flue gases and may have potential for abatement of greenhouse gases. Answered by Gloria Stoffels 1 month ago.


What are the health and environmental impacts of these chemicals ?
these chemicals are glycol, amines, synthetic membrane Asked by Regina Pautler 1 month ago.

1. Upon ingestion, ethylene glycol is chemically broken down in the body into toxic compounds. It and its toxic byproducts first affect the central nervous system, then the heart, and finally the kidneys. Ingestion of sufficient amounts can be fatal. It was produced on a small scale during World War I as a coolant and as an ingredient in explosives. Widespread industrial production began in 1937 when ethylene oxide, a component in its synthesis, became cheaply available. When first introduced it created a minor revolution in aircraft design because when used in place of water as an engine coolant, its higher boiling point allowed for smaller radiators operating at higher temperatures. Prior to the widespread availability of ethylene glycol, many aircraft manufacturers tried to use evaporative cooling systems which used water at high pressure. Invariably, these proved to be rather unreliable and were easily damaged in combat because they took up large amounts of room on the plane, where they were easily hit by gunfire. 2. Amines have strong, characteristic odors, and are toxic. The smells of ammonia, old fish, urine, rotting flesh, and semen are all mainly composed of amines. Many kinds of biological activity produce amines by breakdown of amino acids. Many natural neurotransmitters like epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonine, histamine are amines. Many drugs are designed to mimic or to interfere with the action of natural amine neurotransmitters, exemplified by the amine drugs: Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine that helps to relieve allergic disorders due to cold, hay fever, itchy skin, insect bites and stings. Chlorpromazine is a tranquillizer that sedates without inducing sleep. It is used to relieve anxiety, excitement, restlessness or even mental disorder. Ephedrine and Phenylephrine, as amine hydrochlorides, are used as decongestants. Amphetamine, Methamphetamine, and Methcathinone are amines that are listed as controlled substances by the DEA. Amitriptyline, Imipramine, Lofepramine and Clomipramine are tricyclic antidepressants and tertiary amines Nortriptyline, Desipramine, and Amoxapine are tricyclic antidepressants and secondary amines (The tricyclics are grouped by the nature of the final amine group on the side chain. Answered by Mitchell Burtell 1 month ago.


Different types of anti-depressents?
Can anyone tell me what different types of anti-depressents there are (SSRI's, beta blockers or whatever) and which brand names fall into each category? Asked by Tobie Theinert 1 month ago.

Classes of antidepressants (in order of most commonly prescribed) with lists of types followed by brand names: SSRI (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor) -Sertraline - Zoloft®, Lustral®, Apo-Sertral®, Asentra® -Escitalopram - Lexapro®, Cipralex® -Fluoxetine - Prozac®, Sarafem®, Fluctin® -Citalopram - Celexa®, Cipramil®, Talohexane® -Paroxetine - Paxil®, Seroxat®, Aropax® SNRI (Selective Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor) -Venlafaxine - Effexor XR®, Efexor® Tetracyclic -Trazodone® - *used as a sleep agent, prescribed like crazy nowadays Tricyclic -Amitriptyline - Elavil® imipramine - Tofranil® desipramine - Norpramin®, Pertofrane® trimipramine - Surmontil® clomipramine - Anafranil® lofepramine - Gamanil®, Lomont® amitriptyline - Elavil®, Endep®, Tryptanol®, Trepiline® nortriptyline - Pamelor® protriptyline - Vivactil® dothiepin hydrochloride - Prothiaden®, Thaden® doxepin - Adapin®, Sinequan® DRI/NRI (Dopamine/Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor) -Bupropion - Wellbutrin®, Zyban® MAOI (Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor) -Phenelzine - Nardil® -Tranylcypromine - Parnate® -Isocarboxazid - Marplan® -Moclobemide - Aurorix®, Manerix®, Moclodura® -Selegiline - Selegiline®, Eldepryl®, Emsam® Answered by Burma Ewing 1 month ago.

I suffered intense melancholy for a decade. when you consider that being given anti depressants i'm living a classic existence. I in no way think of of suicide anymore, I actually have a job a dream and that i study. They actual paintings yet for some it takes time to detect the dazzling ones. additionally I see a psychiatrist as nicely and that helps immensely. Answered by Lita Kahrer 1 month ago.

It is too hard to answer that question completly... In fact, daily practice they can be seperated in two main groups.. SSRIs and tricyclics.. but many drugs which can not be icluded in these groups (e.g. bupropion, buspiron, RIMAs and other MAO inhibitors). Fluoxetine, sertraline, citalopram, s-citalopram, venlafaxine-a SNRI-, fluvoxamine, are SSRI s and most common using antidepressants. Tricyclics are also effective drugs but since they have many side effects, it is not possible to use them so often, and patients who took them, can give up to use tricyclics easily.. Answered by Ann Mazzuca 1 month ago.

SSRIs are Selective Serotonin Reuptake inhibitors, they include prozac, paxil and many others. There are also SNRIs, or selective nor-epinephrine reuptake inhibitors, including cymbalta. There are Tricyclics, including imiprimine, clomiprimine (alot of iprimines basically). Also there are MAOIs, monoamine oxadase inhibitors. This group includes old medication with names I can't remember. Answered by Treena Junke 1 month ago.

Wait let me ask my husband he knows about things like this. Answered by Cordia Belanich 1 month ago.


How stressed is the liver when taking fluvoxamine compared to clomipramine?
Asked by Leoma Hankin 1 month ago.

Sertraline hydrochloride (trade names Zoloft, Lustral) is an antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class. It was introduced to the market by Pfizer in 1991. Sertraline is primarily used to treat major depression in adult outpatients as well as obsessive-compulsive, panic and social anxiety disorders in both adults and children. In 2007 it was the most prescribed antidepressant on the US retail market, with 29,652,000 prescriptions.[1] According to a meta-analysis of 12 new-generation antidepressants, sertraline and escitalopram are the best in terms of efficacy and acceptability in the acute-phase treatment of adults with unipolar major depression. Reboxetine was significantly worse.[2][3] The efficacy of sertraline for depression is similar to that of older tricyclic antidepressants, but its side effects are much less pronounced. Differences with newer antidepressants are subtler and also mostly confined to side effects. Evidence suggests that sertraline may work better than fluoxetine (Prozac) for some subtypes of depression.[4] Sertraline is highly effective for the treatment of panic disorder, but cognitive behavioral therapy is a better treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder, whether by itself or in combination with sertraline. Although approved for social phobia and posttraumatic stress disorder, sertraline leads to only modest improvement in these conditions.[5][6] Sertraline also alleviates the symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder and can be used in sub-therapeutic doses or intermittently for its treatment. Sertraline shares the common side effects and contraindications of other SSRIs, with high rates of nausea, diarrhea, insomnia, and sexual side effects; however, it does not cause weight gain, and its effects on cognition are mild. In pregnant women taking sertraline, the drug was present in significant concentrations in fetal blood, and was also associated with a higher rate of various birth defects. Similarly to other antidepressants, the use of sertraline for depression may be associated with a higher rate of suicidality. Due to the rarity of this side effect, statistically significant data is difficult to obtain, and suicidality continues to be a subject of controversy. Depression The original pre-marketing clinical trials demonstrated only weak-to-moderate efficacy of sertraline for depression.[24] Nevertheless, a considerable body of later research established it as one of the drugs of choice for the treatment of depression in outpatients. Despite the negative results of early trials, sertraline is often used to treat depressed inpatients as well.[25] Sertraline is effective for both severe depression[26] and dysthymia, a milder and more chronic variety of depression. In several double-blind studies, sertraline was consistently more effective than placebo for dysthymia[27][28][29][30] and comparable to imipramine (Tofranil) in that respect.[28] Sertraline also improved the depression of dysthymic patients to a greater degree than group cognitive behavioral therapy or interpersonal psychotherapy, and adding psychotherapy to sertraline did not seem to enhance the outcome.[29][30] These results also held up in a two-year follow-up of sertraline-treated and interpersonal-therapy-treated groups.[31] In the treatment of depression accompanied by OCD, sertraline performed significantly better than desipramine (Norpramine) on the measures of both OCD and depression.[32] Sertraline was equivalent to imipramine for the treatment of depression with co-morbid panic disorder, but it was better tolerated.[33] Sertraline treatment of depressed patients with co-morbid personality disorders improved their personality traits, and this improvement was almost independent from the improvement of their depression.[34] [edit] Comparison with tricyclic antidepressants The effect of sertraline on the core symptoms of depression is similar to that of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs); however, it is better tolerated and results in a better quality of life. Similar improvement of depression scores was seen in studies comparing sertraline with clomipramine (Anafranil)[26] and amitriptyline (Elavil).[35][36] At the same time, sertraline resulted in a much lower rate of side effects than amitriptyline (49%, vs. 72% for amitriptyline and 32% for placebo), particularly dry mouth, somnolence, constipation and increased appetite.[36] However, there were more cases of nausea and sexual dysfunction in the sertraline group.[35][36] Participants taking sertraline showed a greater improvement of the subjective quality of life on such measures as work satisfaction, subjective feeling, perceptions of health and cognitive function.[36] A large and thorough double-blind study compared sertraline—prescribed for chronic (longer than two years) depression or depression with dysthymia—to the "gold standard" of depression treatment, the TCA imipramine (Tofranil). Sertraline was Answered by Hiroko Durrwachter 1 month ago.

No takes 2 months or so Ignore him , why even bother replying , he wins at the end of the day now because you fed the troll :( But like i said before , it takes a month or 2 months depending on the person , we are all different. Side affect most people get is dizziness , i hated that it was like feeling on a roller-coaster 24-7. Answered by Floyd Patajo 1 month ago.


What is the difference between meth, herion,cocaine?
what happends when people use these different kinds of drugs Asked by Laverna Sinko 1 month ago.

Difference Between Speed And Meth Answered by Naida Cato 1 month ago.

Speed is slang for amphetamine; meth stands for methamphetamine. The names are from organic chemistry - adding "meth" in front of "amphetamine" means that in a methamphetamine molecule, a methyl group is attached to the amphetamine skeleton. (It's way more complicated than that, but you get the idea.) Biologically, methamphetamines are a lot more pleasurable, and therefore more addictive. The start of addiction is usually when the user realizes that nothing in normal life can ever attain the level of pleasure that his/her drug of choice provides. Regular amphetamines are like a weak version of meth, less pleasurable, and therefore less addictive. Methmouth (rotting teeth) is not an intrinsic effect of meth - the reason that rotting teeth is associated with meth usage is because meth causes severe cottonmouth - dry mouth - and also a craving for sweets. So pop (or soda, whichever term you use) tends to be the drink of choice. Add that to the poor hygiene of a typical addict, you get methmouth. (Again, more complicated than this in reality, but you get the idea) In fact, almost all the physical damage from drug abuse is due to the destructive aspects of the junkie lifestyle - poor nutrition, poor hygiene, sleeping on a street corner, etc. - and not due to the drug itself. I know methheads with good hygiene who show almost no physical symptoms of drug abuse. Just got to be rich enough to afford drugs and food and a home if you want to be a healthy and attractive drug addict =P Few people are though - that sort of lifestyle will cost you into the 6 figures over several years. Answered by Olive Endow 1 month ago.

Why don't you type each one in the search browser and look them up one by one. There is a whole lot to this question and way too much to post on here. There isn't just a simple answer like they are made from different things and they all have very different effects of the body. Answered by Grisel Speicher 1 month ago.

The same thing happens. You wind up on the road to ruin. Answered by Letha Texter 1 month ago.


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