DESFERAL Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016267/001.

Names and composition

"DESFERAL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE.
It belongs to the class Chelating agents and is used in Poisoning (Poisoning and Drug Dependence)

Answered questions

Why is desferal infusion always go with blood transfusion?
Asked by Bev Kuehnel 3 months ago.

Desferal's only function is to prevent problems due to iron overload. It helps in two ways. Firstly, it picks up iron from your cells and brings it out in your urine and stool, and this keeps down the total amount of iron in your body. Secondly, it prevents the iron that is stored in your body from interfering with its normal functions. The iron that is given in blood causes visible damage only after about 10 years of age, and can cause death after about 16 years of age. Thalassaemia patients who are on a low transfusion scheme usually die around the age of 12 years, for other reasons. Desferal treatment will not prevent this. It is therefore useless to give Desferal to patients who are on low transfusion. Desferal does not solve any of the problems that are due to low transfusion. It does not help with anaemia, bone changes, big liver, big spleen, or big blood volume. It should not be given to low-transfused thalassaemics unless they are more than 10 years old, or their skin is slatey gray. Otherwise it is a waste of money for the parents, and uncomfortable for the child. Problems must be solved one at a time. First and most important is to make sure that the patient is on high transfusion. Next, is to make sure that the spleen is not destroying the blood transfused. It is only worth worrying about iron overload when these two problems are under control. Answered by Diana Plutt 3 months ago.

Desferal Infusion Answered by Elidia Levron 3 months ago.


Sickle Cell,Desferal,Vitamin C?
tweedy bird:the dose was recommended by his heamotologist.i did not realise it seems too much until i got the new monthly supply of desferal and it was in different package than the ones we usually get. he's having his transfusion next week so i better speak to his doc and see.thanks for the info Asked by Stephnie Zimerman 3 months ago.

Vitamin C increases availability of iron for chelation. So it works with Desferal as you already know. In general, the vit. C dosage for kids your son's age is 100 mg daily and larger doses of vit. C fail to produce any additional increase in excretion of iron complex. But 1 gram of C may be too much and actually a waste. Even in clinical trials using antioxidant supplements to treat serum deficits, only 600 mg was used. I don't know what your rationale is for giving him a gram of C daily but since vit. C is water soluble, the excess is excreted in the urine and your son literally "pissing your money away". Answered by Alana Bednorz 3 months ago.

what's your question speak english lol Answered by Leonardo Sherbondy 3 months ago.


What can be used as substitute for desferal?
this injection is used for iron chelation in thallassemia patients. if there is some oral medicines plz tell me Asked by Elizbeth Madlem 3 months ago.

The only oral product I know of is a prescription product called Exjade. Answered by Versie Click 3 months ago.


Thalassemia lifespan?
How much lifespan does a person have for major and minor thalassemia? and i need sources about the information u got Asked by Jamila Lukander 3 months ago.

Prognosis Previous to Desferal, individuals with thalassemia could only expect to live into their late teens and early 20's, eventually succumbing to iron overload. Since the iron-removing Desferal was only introduced in the mid-70's, we are still watching the life span of adults with thalassemia. Our oldest patient is in her early 40's. The life expectancy of children who have used Desferal since a very young age remains to be seen, though researchers and physicians expect to see long, productive lives. In affluent countries, a child who is born with thalassemia major (either beta thalassemia or alpha thalassemia) will face a lifetime of monthly blood transfusions and nightly infusions of desferoxamine. Over the past several decades with the progress of medical technology,this once universally fatal disease has been converted to a chronic illness. Now a fortunate few have the opportunity of cure through bone marrow transplantation. Generally speaking, the younger the recipient, the more optimistic the outcome. The Lucarelli Staging System is based on the amount of liver damage sustained as a consequence of iron overload from chronic transfusion therapy and the adequacy of Desferal chelation therapy. The staging includes evaluations of liver size, the schedule and compliance of desferrioxamine therapy, and liver biopsy (in children over 3 years) to determine whether or not there has been microscopic liver damage. Only a precious few children who have this complex disease will be cured by a bone marrow transplant. The rest of these children need continued support and acceptance that they may live normal healthy lives in spite of their illness. Answered by Afton Kondratowicz 3 months ago.

Thalassemia Life Expectancy Answered by Marcella Priest 3 months ago.

Thalassemia Major Life Expectancy Answered by Glennis Zagulski 3 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: thalassemia lifespan? How much lifespan does a person have for major and minor thalassemia? and i need sources about the information u got Answered by Makeda Blew 3 months ago.

Best I can tell from limited reading, distinctions need to be made between Thalassemia minor and Thalassemia major (the latter showing symptoms within one year of birth and often resulting in death within five years of birth if left untreated. Both should probably be treated albeit differently and certainly only by an experienced physician and not over the internet! Answered by Ardelle Boryszewski 3 months ago.

Well, I was diagnosed with thalassemia when I was 15 and I am now 23, I'm fine. Answered by Gaston Olszowka 3 months ago.


Anyone have a good chelation for too much iron I suffer hemochromatosis and I don't like leeches?
is there some way or place i can purchase a chelation agent Asked by Edra Chaple 3 months ago.

Chelating agents include Desferal, Deferiprone, also BAL. Drinking tea with meals reduces the absorption of iron from food. Desferal is injectable while Deferiprone is oral. Answered by Laurie Lansberg 3 months ago.

There is no effective and safe do-it-yourself chelation therapy. I don't know where you got the idea that leeches are involved in all therapeutic phlebotomy. (Phlebotomy is opening a vein.) It's usually just like a regular blood donation and many with this condition can actually be blood donors and do a good deed while treating there condition. Chelation therapy can be effective for many conditions but it can have some unpleasant side effects as well. If something about "bloodletting" is bothering you, share it frankly with your doctors. Answered by Maria Santrizos 3 months ago.

Leeches are no longer used atleast not in the US. You can go to a Phlebotomist and he will draw blood on a constant basis. You can also used ceratin medications that are chelating agents and the iron will be excreted through the urine. I wouldnt worry about the leeches. Answered by Dawn Letman 3 months ago.

A chelation, if I remember what I read, has to do with IV feed. You'll have to consult a professional for that one for best results. As for me, I can't keep enough iron in my blood stream. lol. I've looked at the articles due to the fact I've an autistic child and they usually have heavy metals in their bloodstream. But the procedure is a bit too much for him from what I've read. Answered by Martin Lipe 3 months ago.


Iron chelation drugs causing a rash?
I have been on iron chelation drugs (desferal) for about 3 weeks, and I have a persistent sore flaky rash on my abdomen on the infusion site. (The drugs are infused subcutaneously 3 times a week.) I was supposed to see a Doctor about this when I was in hospital on Thursday having a blood transfusion, but the... Asked by Cathryn Linard 3 months ago.

I have been on iron chelation drugs (desferal) for about 3 weeks, and I have a persistent sore flaky rash on my abdomen on the infusion site. (The drugs are infused subcutaneously 3 times a week.) I was supposed to see a Doctor about this when I was in hospital on Thursday having a blood transfusion, but the doctor got called away on an emergency, so I was told to mention it to the district nurse when she came to administer the infusion. She said she wasnt sure whether it was normal or whether it was an allergic reaction, and said i was best to speak to my doctor, but i wont see her for 6 weeks now. My question is, is it usual to have this sore rash from iron chelation drugs, or do i need to book an appointment to see my GP or book an emergency appointment with my doctor? Or can i just put some cream on it? iI i can put cream on it, which one is best? Sorry for all the questions, i've tried googling this but can't get any definitive answers anywhere!! Thanks in advance. Answered by Lorean Lebovic 3 months ago.

my son who is nearly three started using desfral near the site he would get rash this is very normal and then he has a recation wich nowne ever has had he bloated and he looked like he was pregnet so now he is on exjade can i ask why you on desfral how high is your ferritin levels ? Answered by Jayna Cabotaje 3 months ago.

There are often additives and preservatives in the supplements. Check the ingredients. Citric acid, for example, is a common preservation, and it gives a lot of babies diaper rash. Answered by Phebe Crapps 3 months ago.


Any treatment available of major thelesemia??
Asked by Latoria Kullman 3 months ago.

1: frequent (every 3-4 weeks) transfusion; when iron build up occurs, Desferal treatment is added. This treatment is one that is used for patients who have simultaneous anemia and iron loading conditions. Desferal is administered subcutaneously (under the skin) from a small battery operated pump about the size of a portable cassette tape player. 2:Bone marrow transplantation may be considered but it is expensive and a suitable donor must be identified. 3: Cord blood transplant is presently being done experimentally in China. 4:gene therapy?? Answered by Genoveva Viniegra 3 months ago.


B.thalassemia clinical treatment & timing prospect other than BMT&blood transfusion?
I know about following treatment- blood transfusion(on routine base to live with disease,not for recovery from disease. result in iron excess in blood.- desferal(Deferoxamine)(chelating)a painfull way to remove excess iron.- bone marrow transplantation. for full recovery from disease but require doner and... Asked by Loyce Yuk 3 months ago.

I know about following treatment - blood transfusion(on routine base to live with disease,not for recovery from disease. result in iron excess in blood. - desferal(Deferoxamine)(chelating)a painfull way to remove excess iron. - bone marrow transplantation. for full recovery from disease but require doner and still there is risk of life I want to know about: - prospect of genetic engineering for curing b.thalassemia - prospect of gene transfere methode for curing b.thalassemia - any oral medical way to remove excss iron - clinical result and timing when above treatment successfully will be used Answered by Temple Burges 3 months ago.

I even have had 13 surgical procedures in my existence. some significant. without blood transfusion. i did no longer have something different than non blood fluids. I recovered swifter than anyone the medical doctors had operated on for an identical situation. I had a storage sale some weeks in the past and that i replaced into speaking to a minimum of certainly one of my customers. She instructed me approximately her daughter. She did no longer be attentive to i replaced right into a Witness. yet her daughter replaced into born with a blood ailment. She won blood maximum of her existence however the final one killed her. the guy who had donated the blood had hepatitis and no-one knew it. The daughter did no longer have the ability to combat it. This youthful lady died at 22 from the blood transfusion. If basically she had a physician that knew sufficient to furnish her the alternative blood. Answered by Samara Golen 3 months ago.


What is thalasiemia treatment?
Asked by Rossie Sovak 3 months ago.

Traditional Treatment 1.Blood Transfusion Blood Transfusion is one of the most regularly practiced treatments for Thalassemia. To be precise, the treatment is not blood transfusion, but transfusion of red blood cells. These transfusions are necessary to provide the patient with a temporary supply of healthy red blood cells with normal hemoglobin capable of carrying the oxygen that the patient's body needs. Today, most patients with a major form of Thalassemia receive red blood cell transfusions every two to three weeks. There are three reasons for blood transfusions. a.To correct anemia and make sure that tissues get a normal amount of oxygen. This allows thalassemics to live and grow normally. b.To let the bone marrow rest, so that the bones can develop normally and do not get deformed. c.To slow down or prevent any increase in the size of spleen. 2. Splenectomy (Removing the Spleen) When the spleen becomes too active and starts to destroy the red blood cell, transfusions become lesser and less effective. Then it may become necessary to take the spleen out through surgery. This operation is called "Splenectomy". 3. Desferal Treatment Blood transfusions bring extra iron into the body and if transfusions are regular, iron gradually accumulates in the body. It is stored in certain organs, especially the liver, the heart, and the endocrine glands. The iron behaves like a foreign body, and in the end would damage the organs where it is deposited. Fortunately, there are drugs that help the drainage of iron out of the body. The medication used very regularly is Desferrioxamine, more commonly called ‘Desferal’. Desferal keeps the amount of iron under a safe level in a Thalassemic’s body. Bone-marrow Transplantation A Thalassemic's bone marrow is not able to make a normal amount of red blood cells. If the malfunctioning bone marrow can be replaced with a normal bone marrow, this problem is solved. At present, only young people with a fully compatible donor can have a bone-marrow transplant. A transplant in Pakistan (Zia-ud-Din Hospital, Karachi) or India (Apollo Hospital, Chennai) costs the equivalent of $13,000 to $14,000 (Pak Rs. 9-10 Lakh). A transplant in any other country may vary in cost. Life Expectancy A difficult question perhaps, but Thalassemic’s and their families must be aware of this subject. The illness and its implications are changing almost from day to day, due to advances in treatment. With timely and correct treatment, Thalassemic’s live longer and healthier now. It is reasonable to think that people with Thalassemia, well treated from the beginning, may live as long as people without Thalassemia, mean an excellent life-expectancy. Quality of life A chronic illness always causes some limitation of life, especially when it requires frequent and complex treatment, as Thalassemia does. But still, the treatment should not be allowed to have a profound effect on a Thalassemic's life. In particular doctors and hospitals should make the effort to arrange out-patients visits for transfusions so that they interfere as little as possible with normal life. Treatment should not interrupt schooling or work. To manage this, some centers arrange transfusions on week-ends, others in late afternoon or at night. Apart from a few cases, most Thalassemic’s lead a normal life. They go to school, take part in social activities and work, get engaged, and get married like everyone else. We are certain that, as time passes, the quality of life will steadily improve. Answered by Sharmaine Edlund 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016267/001 DESFERAL DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
016267/002 DESFERAL DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016267/001 DESFERAL DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
016267/002 DESFERAL DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per VIAL
076019/001 DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
076019/002 DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per VIAL
076806/001 DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
076806/002 DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per VIAL
078086/001 DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
078086/002 DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per VIAL
078718/001 DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
078718/002 DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE DEFEROXAMINE MESYLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2GM per VIAL

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd

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