Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019794/001.

Names and composition

"DEPAKOTE CP" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DIVALPROEX SODIUM.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019794/001 DEPAKOTE CP DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG BASE
019794/002 DEPAKOTE CP DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018723/001 DEPAKOTE DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
018723/002 DEPAKOTE DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
018723/003 DEPAKOTE DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
019680/001 DEPAKOTE DIVALPROEX SODIUM CAPSULE, DELAYED REL PELLETS/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
019794/001 DEPAKOTE CP DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG BASE
019794/002 DEPAKOTE CP DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG BASE
020782/001 DEPAKOTE ER DIVALPROEX SODIUM Tablet, Extended Release/ Oral 250MG
020782/002 DEPAKOTE ER DIVALPROEX SODIUM Tablet, Extended Release/ Oral 500MG
021168/001 DEPAKOTE ER DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
021168/002 DEPAKOTE ER DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
022267/001 DEPAKOTE ER DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 250MG
022267/002 DEPAKOTE ER DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 500MG
076941/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
076941/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
076941/003 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
077100/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
077100/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
077100/003 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
077254/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
077254/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
077254/003 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
077296/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
077296/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
077296/003 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
077567/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
077567/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
077615/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
077615/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
077615/003 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
078182/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
078182/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
078182/003 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
078239/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
078239/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
078290/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
078290/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
078290/003 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
078411/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
078445/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
078445/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
078597/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
078597/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
078597/003 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
078700/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
078705/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
078705/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
078755/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
078755/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
078755/003 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
078790/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
078790/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
078790/003 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
078791/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
078791/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
078853/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
078853/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
078853/003 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
078919/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM CAPSULE, DELAYED REL PELLETS/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
078979/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM CAPSULE, DELAYED REL PELLETS/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
079080/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
079163/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
079163/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
079163/003 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
090062/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
090062/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
090062/003 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
090070/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
090161/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
090210/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
090210/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
090210/003 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
090407/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM CAPSULE, DELAYED REL PELLETS/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
090554/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 125MG VALPROIC ACID
090554/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
090554/003 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
202419/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
202419/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID
203730/001 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 250MG VALPROIC ACID
203730/002 DIVALPROEX SODIUM DIVALPROEX SODIUM TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 500MG VALPROIC ACID

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Answered questions

Depakote and multivitamins?
hello, i have been given depakote to treat what my doctor thinks is bi-polarness.. I am currently taking a multivitamin.. I am concerned that taking both might mess something up, Ive heard that both can cause liver damage, here is the vitamins that im... Asked by Andria Boger 1 year ago.

The multivitamin that you are taking is just Vitamin B complex which does not interact with Depakote. Vitamin B complex may cause liver damage if you overdose on it. At regular doses, it will not cause liver damage. Also Depakote may cause liver failure. That's why you need to get your liver function tests performed at baseline and at regular intervals after initiation of therapy, especially within the first 6 months because liver damage has usually been reported within 6 months of depakote initiation. Your doctor should closely monitor you for appearance of discomfort, weakness, facial edema, anorexia, jaundice, and vomiting. If you experience any of these side effects, you should also let your doctor know immediately. Your doctor should have told you about this already. As long as your tests are within range and you do not overdose on Vitamin B complex, you can take them together. However, you should always tell your doctor and pharmacist about any supplements and herbs you are taking. Answered by Roseann Terrell 1 year ago.


Ist there anyone that takes Depakote 500mg EC for seizures?
I have MILD MILD MILD Epilepsy.. I have had 3 seizures in the last 12 years. I take Depakote 1 every other day. I have missed 4 days and am wondering if there's enough in my system to prevent me from having a seizure and/or would I have a seizure by stopping abruptly? Asked by Brendon Hartlage 1 year ago.

my son takes 750 mg depakote sprinkle caps everyday to control his seizures. he has cp. you need to go for lab work to see if you have the right levels in your system. call nyour neurologist and explain what happened. he may have you double up for a couple days. good luck!! Answered by Bridget Affelt 1 year ago.

I have juvenile myoclonic epilepsy since i was 13 and i am now 26. I take 725mg a day.... during my menstrual cycle i feel more auras than at any time. Anyway, you know yourself, if you drive, work under hazardous conditions, or take care of children, take 2 in one day. But if you feel one coming on call 911 or tell someone so they can help you. Also, call your neurologist and ask about a med called Ativan or Lorazapam (same thing). It has saved my life. I haven;t had a seizure in like almost 5 years. When I have an aura i just let one disolve under my tongue and the aura goes away and then no seizure! i used to have seizures all the time expecially during my teens when my hormones were bad and i didnt get a lot fo sleep and had alot of stress. altogether i have had around 16 seizures. now i have it under control...most neurologist wont prescribe it because they dont want patients to become dependent, ya know? just get some good sleep and take care of yourself...you should know what triggers your seizures. until you get the meds in your system again, take it easy. Good Luck. Answered by Dexter Dobrinski 1 year ago.

I`m currenly taking 1000mgrs of Valproic Acid VALNARª in my country, URUGUAY. I am having this medication because I have a Borderline Personlaity Disorder, and is helping a lot, great pills :P BUT DO NOT MISS DOSES, AND IF YOU DO, DONNOT TAKE THE LOST ONE WITH THE NEW ONE. and If you do, speak with your physician inmediatly :) Answered by Quintin Zumbach 1 year ago.

I stopped depokote abruptly and had no ill affects ive been off it for 6 years now, but you really really NEED to talk to your Dr. Everyone is different. Answered by Raphael Ferouz 1 year ago.

The Valproate Family No, the valproate family isn't one of the Mafia families with whom the Corleones had issues. It's a group of three medications, sold in the US under the brand names of Depakote (divalproex sodium), Depakene (valproic acid) and Depacon (valproate sodium). All three convert, in equivalent dosages, to the same metabolite that does all the work in your brain - valproate ion. Valproic acid has been around a long time. It was synthesized in the 1880s, and just used as a solvent until 1962 when Pierre Eyrnard found that the solvent seemed to be the key component instead of the other anticonvulsants being investigated on rats. In 1963 it was being tried on humans for a variety of generalized epilepsies. By 1967 it was approved for usage in treating epilepsy in France. Boy, things were different back then. It wasn't approved in the US until 1983, by which time Tegretol (carbamazepine USP) was already established here as a modern anticonvulsant. Yet with all that time in use in Europe, valproic acid has been studied, studied and studied. Then Abbott synthesizes valproate sodium, and later combines equal parts of the two to produce Depakote. Yet all three meds convert to the same metabolite, so what's the point? Does it really make a difference if you take Depakene or Depakote? That depends. It's almost like the difference between brand and generic drugs. Ultimately Depakene, Depacon and Depakote all convert to the valproate ion, and in theory once a steady state is reached it shouldn't make any difference if you switch between one or the other. In practice the road from your tummy to your brain and out your liver can vary wildly depending on the form and formulation of the three medications. People have reported huge differences in effect and side effects when switching between Depakote and Depakene, usually by accident. By accident? Yes. You see, because the drugs have been around for so long the literature is rather confusing. Sometimes studies and whatnot refer to valproate itself, and I've never seen the metabolite of a med referenced outside of the PI sheet or a study on the pharmacokinetics. But because there are three meds that are supposedly interchangeable, if your study refers to "valproate" then you cover all three. The other thing is that the majority of the studies use valproic acid (as all studies use generics to be international and scientific and all that crap) - and valproic acid is Depakene. But Abbott is pushing Depakote, which is divalproex sodium, or a fusion of equal parts of Depakene and Depacon. Are you confused yet? Then you may understand how this scenario frequently happens: Somebody is taking brand name Depakote. Circumstances force them to switch to generic, so the prescription is written for valproic acid, because everyone knows that is the generic for Depakote. You don't have to look that one up. That misinformation is so prevalent that in the current PI sheets for all three medications the efficacy rates from the clinical trials and the adverse effects are all for Depakote! This practice goes back to 1998 for Depacon, as my 1999 edition of the PDR has a mix of Depakote and Depacon data for Depacon's entry. In that edition all of Depakene's data are for Depakene, but in the current PI sheet for Depakene the efficacy and adverse effects are for Depakote. Is anyone at the FDA paying attention? Hello! These are different medications! They may metabolize to the same substance but the way they are metabolized by our hard-working cytochrome P450 isozymes can be very, very different. Different metabolism can result in different side effects as well as different valproate blood levels. Different blood levels mean different effects, and potentially different side effects as well. The clinical trials and adverse effects for Depakote on the Depacon and Depakene PI sheets are just not acceptable! OK, now that I got that out of my system, for a lot of people these meds are interchangeable and the effects and side effects will be the same. It's just for a lot of people they will be different. Mileage will always vary. I've read enough accounts of people having nasty experiences when they got the wrong med by accident (e.g. the pharmacy substitutes Depakene for Depakote or vice versa) to know that not everyone can just switch these meds, otherwise why would Abbott have bothered to create Depacon and Depakote in the first place? Remedy Find lumps them all together. Who knows what the people there have actually been taking. Raymott conflates valproic acid and divalproex sodium, including Depakote with Depakene. Even US Government health information sites will conflate valproic acid and divalproex sodium, yet leave sodium valproate out in the cold. For example: tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially acetazolamide (Diamox); anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin); corticosteroids such as cortisone (Cortone), dexamethasone (Decadron), hydrocortisone (Cortef), or prednisone (Deltasone); medications for diabetes, gout, or high blood pressure; methotrexate; nizatidine (Azid); valproic acid (Depakene, Depakote); and vitamins. And when you run a search on PubMed it's pointless to specify a particular valproate, as it returns results for all three, as well as papers with the vague "valproate" regardless of which generic name you enter. Everybody does it, so it's no surprise if your doctor does it. It doesn't help the way the drug is named. In the UK, South Africa and in many parts of the world valproic acid is sold in tablets as Convulex, yet in South Africa you can also get Convulex syrup. But that's sodium valproate. If you want sodium valproate syrup in the UK you ask for Olept. Epilim is sold in many Commonwealth countries as the tablet form of sodium valproate, but in Canada Epival is divalproex sodium while the injectable Epiject is valproic acid. Valproate Sodium is sold in Japan as Depakene and in several other countries as Depakin and Depakine. Hell, in France it's sold as Depakote. Understand why some researchers just refer to the valproate ion in their papers? Why a doctor that had you on brand name Depakote gives you a prescription for generic Depakene? It's far too easy to get confused. So, what can you expect from the valproate meds? Instant middle age, no matter how old you are. Suddenly you'll be old. You'll get fat. You'll go bald, or your hair will thin or change in some way. You'll always have heartburn, diarrhea, nausea, abdominal pain or similar stomach complaints. You'll be tired all the time. Your hearing won't be as good as it used to be. You'll have the shakes a lot. Gee, and this is an anticonvulsant? Your liver will hate you. You just won't feel that sexual any more. As if all the the above weren't enough to turn you off, valproates and other anticonvulsants mess with your testosterone. Maybe Valproate was a mob family in The Godfather. The one to which Abe Vigoda belonged. As the lithium group has similar side effects all anticonvulsants/mood stabilizers have been tarred with the same brush. Thus everyone is afraid to take any of them because they don't want the Depabloat effect. Yet every other anticonvulsant is either weight neutral or you'll even lose weight with them. And while all anticonvulsants are going to slow you down and make naps a good idea, none is as likely to mess with your tummy or hair like the valproates and lithium tend to do. It's just that the valproates have dominance of the anticonvulsant market, due in part to their effectiveness and being the first (and so far only) to have the trifecta of official approval for: Monotherapy for a variety of generalized and partial seizure forms of epilepsy Migraines Mania Thus when anyone thinks "anticonvulsant" they think of a valproate medication. And when doctors prescribe anticonvulsants for whatever reason, they often go with a valproate first. Still, they have good reason to do so. It's not just the data published in the PI sheets from Depakote's clinical trials. A variety of studies for a wide type of applications in the epilepsy and bipolar spectra can back up the decision to go with a valproate medication. So, how do these meds work on your brain? You can get a really detailed answer here. (Bear with me, they keep moving that article around. Let me know if it disappears again.) I'll give you the short form I've picked up from that site, the PI sheets and the books listed in the bibliography and the references below. Basically they increase the concentration of the neurotransmitter GABA (gama aminobutyric acid) in particular regions of your brain. Other meds affect how GABA works in your head, like benzodiazepines. For some reason increasing the concentration of GABA doesn't make you feel good like a benzo's affect on a GABA receptor does. Go figure. So your neurons get to marinate in GABA, similar to the marinating effect of an SSRI but really more like Remeron's (mirtazapine) serotonergic effect, if I'm understanding everything correctly. Anyway while you don't get to feel particularly mellow, your brain certainly mellows out by that concentration of GABA, and thus the hyperactivity in neurons that would otherwise cause seizures and/or bipolar activity is halted. In addition to the action on GABA, the valproates really clamp down on NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate), which is on the bleeding edge of research into what makes us mentally interesting in a lot of different ways, and they do something with the sodium and potassium channels. Although the effects on those voltage channels may or may not be significant. Further research is required. I don't know why it works on migraines, but my guess is that it's for similar reasons. In reading the experiences of people who have had migraines they read very much like types of seizures, right down to the auras. I had one event in my life that I still can't figure out if it was a migraine or a type of oddball seizure where I had a shitload of pain in my head before I collapsed to the floor. So if you're stuck getting government or HMO healthcare and you're in Epilepsyland and/or Bipolarland, the odds are you're going to become acquainted with some form of a generic valproate. Which is a shame because The extended release form of Depakote has the best chance of avoiding all of the most common side effects. Because valproic acid is such an old med and Abbott has just totally ****** around with the FDA on the PI sheets I'll lay you good odds that the generics have some wildly different bioavailability than the brand name meds. Which means you'll need to take more to get the same blood levels, which means more side effects for some people. That's twice I've mentioned blood levels. Like the lithium meds, the valproates are all about blood levels, not dosage. Your starting dosage will be guessed at based on your weight - hell it's as good a metric as any. After that you'll need to have a regular blood panel taken for three important reasons: To see where your valproate levels are, and thus to see if the drug is doing you any damn good or if it's your liver that just isn't getting things right yet. To make sure your white cell count is OK. To see if your liver hates you yet, because the valproates are really tough on your liver. You have to be careful when mixing the valproates with other drugs that give your liver a real workout - alcohol, Serzone (nefazodone), Wellbutrin (bupropion) and Zyprexa (olanzapine) immediately come to mind. You'd have to have a liver made of titanium to be mixing Depakote and Serzone (nefazodone). You also have to watch out for the sudden onset of side effects like bruising, excessive tiredness (on top of what you've already been experiencing), weakness, vomiting, edema (especially in your face) and the surprising effect of losing a lot of weight when taking a valproate. Normally mixing booze and anticonvulsants is weird but not necessarily a big deal. With the valproates it's best to give up drinking all together, or at least restrict it to just very little booze on very few occasions. Valproate and alcohol just doesn't mix. Your liver will thank you for your temperance. Depakote (divalproex sodium) interacts with aspirin. Aspirin prevents you from metabolizing Depakote properly, so you're better off with ibuprofen. Your doctor had better damn well be telling you about the regular blood work you need, to check your valproate levels and to make sure your liver is functioning normally. Depakote 750mg three times a day about 4 years ago and I have gained over 50pounds....this is very discouraging especially because I have worked very to lose 50lbs.....I was told by my neurologist that Depakote does cause and increase in appetite hence the weight gain....... Answered by Sherry Shoumaker 1 year ago.


CP and Bi-polar?
My wife is bi-polar and has CP. the primary indicator of her CP is her myo-clonus. The medication she takes for her bi-polar increases her jerkiness to the point she has a hard time typing and drinking from a cup. Her walking is becoming more spasctic. She is almost falling. Her psychiatrist has given her... Asked by Pearl Frist 1 year ago.

My wife is bi-polar and has CP. the primary indicator of her CP is her myo-clonus. The medication she takes for her bi-polar increases her jerkiness to the point she has a hard time typing and drinking from a cup. Her walking is becoming more spasctic. She is almost falling. Her psychiatrist has given her depakote for this. Other meds are lithium, klonopin, effexor xr, and luvox. Over the weekend the Dr also decreased her lithium from 300 in the am and 450 HS to 150 am and 300 HS. What can I do about her myoclonus problem? She seen a neurologist but was referred back to her psychiatrist. Her psychiatrist is not really listening and there is only 4 other psychiatrists on my side of the island---live on the big island of Hawaii. Answered by Ardis Ingmire 1 year ago.

Depakote will cause the jerkiness to get worse for her. I have Bipolar and was on Depakote for six months before they realized why I was so shaky. I am now on Lamictal and the shaking has stopped. She needs different medications that won't interact with one another. Good luck and keeping you in my prayers. Answered by Becky Kilton 1 year ago.

see need to see dr again . they need to help her one of the med is what makeing her jerk sometime you have to take another med good luck Answered by John Enlow 1 year ago.


A list of the most common anti-convulsant drugs?
I am doing some ongoing research and looking for a list of the most common anti-convulsant drugs Asked by Cornell Nusz 1 year ago.

there are lots of different names for anti-convulsant or anti-seizure drugs which are used to treat conditions like epilepsy - one name brand drug may be listed under many generic names. Here is a complete list of names for the anti-convulsant drug depakote: •Depacon (valproate sodium or sodium valproate) •Depakote, Depakote CP, Depakote ER, Depakote Sprinkles (dilvalproex sodium) •Depakene (valproic acid) •Stavzor (valproic acid) Answered by Antonette Howenstine 1 year ago.


CP and Bi-polar?
My wife is bi-polar and has CP. the primary indicator of her CP is her myo-clonus. The medication she takes for her bi-polar increases her jerkiness to the point she has a hard time typing and drinking from a cup. Her walking is becoming more spasctic. She is almost falling. Her psychiatrist has given her... Asked by Lillian Decola 1 year ago.

My wife is bi-polar and has CP. the primary indicator of her CP is her myo-clonus. The medication she takes for her bi-polar increases her jerkiness to the point she has a hard time typing and drinking from a cup. Her walking is becoming more spasctic. She is almost falling. Her psychiatrist has given her depakote for this. Other meds are lithium, klonopin, effexor xr, and luvox. Over the weekend the Dr also decreased her lithium from 300 in the am and 450 HS to 150 am and 300 HS. What can I do about her myoclonus problem? She seen a neurologist but was referred back to her psychiatrist. Her psychiatrist is not really listening and there is only 4 other psychiatrists on my side of the island---live on the big island of Hawaii. Answered by Rayna Hudes 1 year ago.

My daughter swears certain meds made her jumpy and twitch a lot. She gets very nervous and is now only taking zanax. She feels better than ever at 26. They started her over from scratch because meds were all messed up and she was not taking them properly. This could be the problem and one that is hard to fix. However getting clean then finding what works will help. She may need to go to a clinic for awhile but we did whatever we could to get her better, she was not embarrased at all but was desperate. She still suffers somewhat from depression but zanax helps keep everything even keel. Now in nursing school. But too much stress causes more problems just taking a few courses at a time I would suggest you find a medical person to help weed her off of all meds then go from there. Again, my daughter knows her body better than any doctor and says some meds or worse for you than just being clean. Answered by Santa Coward 1 year ago.

I have worked with some students who have CP. We have used weighted utensils to help them be able to feed themselves without loosing the food. Possibly a weighted cup of some sort would help with the drinking. An occupational therapist may be able to help out with some of this. Maybe a consult with one of the other phychiatrisits would also help......i would think you want the doctor to be someone who listens to the patient.....Good luck. Answered by Lan Banis 1 year ago.

for CP i suggest using a physical therapist. Answered by Daniel Cereceres 1 year ago.


Cerebral palsy and myoclonus?
my wife has CP. She was a preemie breach birth. She also has Bi-polar disorder. She is on Lithium 300mg caps--3 caps AM, 4 Caps HS, Depakote ER 250mg tabs--3 tabs PM, and Effexor ER 75mg caps--3 caps AM. She takes the depakote for sleep. In the recent months her myoclonus is increasing, and her stamina is also... Asked by Lanell Lahip 1 year ago.

my wife has CP. She was a preemie breach birth. She also has Bi-polar disorder. She is on Lithium 300mg caps--3 caps AM, 4 Caps HS, Depakote ER 250mg tabs--3 tabs PM, and Effexor ER 75mg caps--3 caps AM. She takes the depakote for sleep. In the recent months her myoclonus is increasing, and her stamina is also decreasing. Her shaking is so bad that now she needs help with drinking and eating. Can the meds cause that or can her CP get worse as she age? Answered by Priscila Firenze 1 year ago.

Have her meds changed? That's the first place I'd consider. I know next to nothing about CP. All I can do is share my experience on these meds. Maybe something will be useful. Just remember, each person responds differently. Lithium can cause tremor, it's a common side effect. I only get a slight one in my left hand when I am dehydrated or something like an underlying body one when my blood pressure is real high (hard to describe). I have a friend who says it can magnify anything underneath for her. These two are abstract, non-medical descriptions. Not really sure how to describe. Effexor made me shakey, but it also made me manic. Depakote just makes my hair fall out while making me hungry... and my brain loves it, so I deal with the side effects. Not sure if that helps at all. Answered by Damien Rick 1 year ago.


Bi-polar and cerebral palsy?
My wife is bi-polar and has CP. the primary indicator of her CP is her myo-clonus. The medication she takes for her bi-polar increases her jerkiness to the point she has a hard time typing and drinking from a cup. Her psychiatrist has given her depakote for this. Other med are lithium, klonopin, effexor xr, and... Asked by Bethany Hornshaw 1 year ago.

My wife is bi-polar and has CP. the primary indicator of her CP is her myo-clonus. The medication she takes for her bi-polar increases her jerkiness to the point she has a hard time typing and drinking from a cup. Her psychiatrist has given her depakote for this. Other med are lithium, klonopin, effexor xr, and luvox. Over the weekend the Dr also decreased her lithium from 300 in the am and 450 HS to 150 am and 300 HS. My wife is still exhibiting signs of mania---not sleeping, not eating, running thoughts, hypersexuality, and anger. What should I do? What can i do with the myoclonus problem and her mania? Her Dr. is not really listening and there is only 4 other psychiatrists on my island --live one the big island of Hawaii. Answered by Mitsue Goertz 1 year ago.

Hi...here are some of my thoughts....first of all, when was the last time your wife had a Lithium level drawn? Was her level at a toxic level so the Dr. lowered her dosage? Without knowing the dosage of the Depakote, it's hard to establish whether or not it's being given at a therapeutic level (when was the last time she had a Depakote level drawn?)....if Depakote and Lithium are both being taken and your wife is still experiencing all these manic symptoms, it's safe to say they're not working. May I ask you some questions? 1) Since your wife is in the manic phase of her illness, has the dr. considered taking her off the 2 antidepressants she's on? (Effexor and Luvox?) The aim of treatment for mania is to lower the high mood to a balanced one...antidepressants may be contributing to kicking her mood higher and higher because they are designed to ELEVATE the mood. The meds may be working against each other. 2) Luvox is primarily used for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder....is your wife diagnosed with this? 3) Have you seen a Neurologist about her CP? He would be a good person to prescribe correctly for the myoclonus, and might be a good resource for getting your wife's mood stable....many Neuro medications are used by Psychiatry as well, such as the Klonopin and Depakote. A Neurologist will know how to treat the myoclonus without further increasing the movements 4) Has anyone ever suggested Risperdal, Seroquel, or anything else for the treatment of the mania...need to look into that because you are overlooking a great group of drugs which really are terrific with these symptoms. 5) Are there any more meds that you didn't list? If so, what are they?? These are just some of the things that I think might be going on...if I can provide any more suggestions, please let me know. Good luck and God Bless you as you both go thru this very difficult time!!! Answered by Margrett Stumb 1 year ago.

First I AM NOT a Dr., but I have bi Polar and it was believed that I had ALS. Effexor almost killed me I was totally out of control I am on Lithium, prosac,& klonopin. luvox I have not been on, but I also have had problems with others. I am also Hypothyroid and when it gets out control (often) I am manic also. One more thing is she taking any cholestrol med this will contribute to the shaking. I was on depakote but was taken off. 4 psys try another anyway. Answered by Imogene Biava 1 year ago.

find out immediately why she is on BOTH depakote AND lithium most dr.s only put you on one not both together, could be the MAJOR reason for the jerkyness. i would get in contact with another dr. and see if you can see one of them to discuss their opinion on what meds she should be on and to discuss other options. if a dr. wont listen to the patient and family who are they there for? hope this helps Answered by Lakisha Nosacka 1 year ago.


Bi-polar and cerebral palsy?
My wife is bi-polar and has CP. the primary indicator of her CP is her myo-clonus. The medication she takes for her bi-polar increases her jerkiness to the point she has a hard time typing and drinking from a cup. Her psychiatrist has given her depakote for this. Other med are lithium, klonopin, effexor xr, and... Asked by Vernell Smtih 1 year ago.

My wife is bi-polar and has CP. the primary indicator of her CP is her myo-clonus. The medication she takes for her bi-polar increases her jerkiness to the point she has a hard time typing and drinking from a cup. Her psychiatrist has given her depakote for this. Other med are lithium, klonopin, effexor xr, and luvox. Over the weekend the Dr also decreased her lithium from 300 in the am and 450 HS to 150 am and 300 HS. My wife is still exhibiting signs of mania---not sleeping, not eating, running thoughts, hypersexuality, and anger. What should I do? What can i do with the myoclonus problem and her mania? Her Dr. is not really listening and there is only 4 other psychiatrists on my island --live one the big island of Hawaii. Answered by Britteny Moceri 1 year ago.

Every person has a different response to medications, especially when they are on a mix of two or more med's. I know that, for me, lithium caused severe tremors, especially in my hands. (I have been treated for Bipolar I for over 20 years) The mix of medications that works for me now is Lamictal, Tegretol, and Seroquel. That doesn't mean that would be the right solution for your wife, though. I also suffer from jerking and tremors now. I am in the early stages of Huntington's disease. There is some thought that biological disorders of the brain may actually be the cause of Bipolar disorder in people with these organic problems. I'm sorry that there are so few doc's available for you to choose from. Perhaps the doc treating her for the CP might be able to help in this case. My best wishes to you both. Answered by Inell Casillas 1 year ago.

First I AM NOT a Dr., but I have bi Polar and it was believed that I had ALS. Effexor almost killed me I was totally out of control I am on Lithium, prosac,& klonopin. luvox I have not been on, but I also have had problems with others. I am also Hypothyroid and when it gets out control (often) I am manic also. One more thing is she taking any cholestrol med this will contribute to the shaking. I was on depakote but was taken off. 4 psys try another anyway. Answered by Xuan Botting 1 year ago.

Why not check out the other doctors or maybe do inter-island travel and find out what is on Oahu in Honolulu or Waikiki. Answered by Yasmine Kondos 1 year ago.

find out immediately why she is on BOTH depakote AND lithium most dr.s only put you on one not both together, could be the MAJOR reason for the jerkyness. i would get in contact with another dr. and see if you can see one of them to discuss their opinion on what meds she should be on and to discuss other options. if a dr. wont listen to the patient and family who are they there for? hope this helps Answered by Marilu Leandro 1 year ago.

Change your Medication, get an antidepression Medicament this will stop the jerkyness..and help her to relax more ...ok. Answered by Nannette Darland 1 year ago.


Depakote and multivitamins?
hello, i have been given depakote to treat what my doctor thinks is bi-polarness.. I am currently taking a multivitamin.. I am concerned that taking both might mess something up, Ive heard that both can cause liver damage, here is the vitamins that im... Asked by Wally Overbaugh 1 year ago.

The multivitamin that you are taking is just Vitamin B complex which does not interact with Depakote. Vitamin B complex may cause liver damage if you overdose on it. At regular doses, it will not cause liver damage. Also Depakote may cause liver failure. That's why you need to get your liver function tests performed at baseline and at regular intervals after initiation of therapy, especially within the first 6 months because liver damage has usually been reported within 6 months of depakote initiation. Your doctor should closely monitor you for appearance of discomfort, weakness, facial edema, anorexia, jaundice, and vomiting. If you experience any of these side effects, you should also let your doctor know immediately. Your doctor should have told you about this already. As long as your tests are within range and you do not overdose on Vitamin B complex, you can take them together. However, you should always tell your doctor and pharmacist about any supplements and herbs you are taking. Answered by Devin Dukette 1 year ago.


Ist there anyone that takes Depakote 500mg EC for seizures?
I have MILD MILD MILD Epilepsy.. I have had 3 seizures in the last 12 years. I take Depakote 1 every other day. I have missed 4 days and am wondering if there's enough in my system to prevent me from having a seizure and/or would I have a seizure by stopping abruptly? Asked by Penny Chiem 1 year ago.

my son takes 750 mg depakote sprinkle caps everyday to control his seizures. he has cp. you need to go for lab work to see if you have the right levels in your system. call nyour neurologist and explain what happened. he may have you double up for a couple days. good luck!! Answered by Janine Estanislau 1 year ago.

I have juvenile myoclonic epilepsy since i was 13 and i am now 26. I take 725mg a day.... during my menstrual cycle i feel more auras than at any time. Anyway, you know yourself, if you drive, work under hazardous conditions, or take care of children, take 2 in one day. But if you feel one coming on call 911 or tell someone so they can help you. Also, call your neurologist and ask about a med called Ativan or Lorazapam (same thing). It has saved my life. I haven;t had a seizure in like almost 5 years. When I have an aura i just let one disolve under my tongue and the aura goes away and then no seizure! i used to have seizures all the time expecially during my teens when my hormones were bad and i didnt get a lot fo sleep and had alot of stress. altogether i have had around 16 seizures. now i have it under control...most neurologist wont prescribe it because they dont want patients to become dependent, ya know? just get some good sleep and take care of yourself...you should know what triggers your seizures. until you get the meds in your system again, take it easy. Good Luck. Answered by Vita Brockmeier 1 year ago.

I`m currenly taking 1000mgrs of Valproic Acid VALNARª in my country, URUGUAY. I am having this medication because I have a Borderline Personlaity Disorder, and is helping a lot, great pills :P BUT DO NOT MISS DOSES, AND IF YOU DO, DONNOT TAKE THE LOST ONE WITH THE NEW ONE. and If you do, speak with your physician inmediatly :) Answered by Tula Litecky 1 year ago.

I stopped depokote abruptly and had no ill affects ive been off it for 6 years now, but you really really NEED to talk to your Dr. Everyone is different. Answered by Mauro Kawa 1 year ago.

The Valproate Family No, the valproate family isn't one of the Mafia families with whom the Corleones had issues. It's a group of three medications, sold in the US under the brand names of Depakote (divalproex sodium), Depakene (valproic acid) and Depacon (valproate sodium). All three convert, in equivalent dosages, to the same metabolite that does all the work in your brain - valproate ion. Valproic acid has been around a long time. It was synthesized in the 1880s, and just used as a solvent until 1962 when Pierre Eyrnard found that the solvent seemed to be the key component instead of the other anticonvulsants being investigated on rats. In 1963 it was being tried on humans for a variety of generalized epilepsies. By 1967 it was approved for usage in treating epilepsy in France. Boy, things were different back then. It wasn't approved in the US until 1983, by which time Tegretol (carbamazepine USP) was already established here as a modern anticonvulsant. Yet with all that time in use in Europe, valproic acid has been studied, studied and studied. Then Abbott synthesizes valproate sodium, and later combines equal parts of the two to produce Depakote. Yet all three meds convert to the same metabolite, so what's the point? Does it really make a difference if you take Depakene or Depakote? That depends. It's almost like the difference between brand and generic drugs. Ultimately Depakene, Depacon and Depakote all convert to the valproate ion, and in theory once a steady state is reached it shouldn't make any difference if you switch between one or the other. In practice the road from your tummy to your brain and out your liver can vary wildly depending on the form and formulation of the three medications. People have reported huge differences in effect and side effects when switching between Depakote and Depakene, usually by accident. By accident? Yes. You see, because the drugs have been around for so long the literature is rather confusing. Sometimes studies and whatnot refer to valproate itself, and I've never seen the metabolite of a med referenced outside of the PI sheet or a study on the pharmacokinetics. But because there are three meds that are supposedly interchangeable, if your study refers to "valproate" then you cover all three. The other thing is that the majority of the studies use valproic acid (as all studies use generics to be international and scientific and all that crap) - and valproic acid is Depakene. But Abbott is pushing Depakote, which is divalproex sodium, or a fusion of equal parts of Depakene and Depacon. Are you confused yet? Then you may understand how this scenario frequently happens: Somebody is taking brand name Depakote. Circumstances force them to switch to generic, so the prescription is written for valproic acid, because everyone knows that is the generic for Depakote. You don't have to look that one up. That misinformation is so prevalent that in the current PI sheets for all three medications the efficacy rates from the clinical trials and the adverse effects are all for Depakote! This practice goes back to 1998 for Depacon, as my 1999 edition of the PDR has a mix of Depakote and Depacon data for Depacon's entry. In that edition all of Depakene's data are for Depakene, but in the current PI sheet for Depakene the efficacy and adverse effects are for Depakote. Is anyone at the FDA paying attention? Hello! These are different medications! They may metabolize to the same substance but the way they are metabolized by our hard-working cytochrome P450 isozymes can be very, very different. Different metabolism can result in different side effects as well as different valproate blood levels. Different blood levels mean different effects, and potentially different side effects as well. The clinical trials and adverse effects for Depakote on the Depacon and Depakene PI sheets are just not acceptable! OK, now that I got that out of my system, for a lot of people these meds are interchangeable and the effects and side effects will be the same. It's just for a lot of people they will be different. Mileage will always vary. I've read enough accounts of people having nasty experiences when they got the wrong med by accident (e.g. the pharmacy substitutes Depakene for Depakote or vice versa) to know that not everyone can just switch these meds, otherwise why would Abbott have bothered to create Depacon and Depakote in the first place? Remedy Find lumps them all together. Who knows what the people there have actually been taking. Raymott conflates valproic acid and divalproex sodium, including Depakote with Depakene. Even US Government health information sites will conflate valproic acid and divalproex sodium, yet leave sodium valproate out in the cold. For example: tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially acetazolamide (Diamox); anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin); corticosteroids such as cortisone (Cortone), dexamethasone (Decadron), hydrocortisone (Cortef), or prednisone (Deltasone); medications for diabetes, gout, or high blood pressure; methotrexate; nizatidine (Azid); valproic acid (Depakene, Depakote); and vitamins. And when you run a search on PubMed it's pointless to specify a particular valproate, as it returns results for all three, as well as papers with the vague "valproate" regardless of which generic name you enter. Everybody does it, so it's no surprise if your doctor does it. It doesn't help the way the drug is named. In the UK, South Africa and in many parts of the world valproic acid is sold in tablets as Convulex, yet in South Africa you can also get Convulex syrup. But that's sodium valproate. If you want sodium valproate syrup in the UK you ask for Olept. Epilim is sold in many Commonwealth countries as the tablet form of sodium valproate, but in Canada Epival is divalproex sodium while the injectable Epiject is valproic acid. Valproate Sodium is sold in Japan as Depakene and in several other countries as Depakin and Depakine. Hell, in France it's sold as Depakote. Understand why some researchers just refer to the valproate ion in their papers? Why a doctor that had you on brand name Depakote gives you a prescription for generic Depakene? It's far too easy to get confused. So, what can you expect from the valproate meds? Instant middle age, no matter how old you are. Suddenly you'll be old. You'll get fat. You'll go bald, or your hair will thin or change in some way. You'll always have heartburn, diarrhea, nausea, abdominal pain or similar stomach complaints. You'll be tired all the time. Your hearing won't be as good as it used to be. You'll have the shakes a lot. Gee, and this is an anticonvulsant? Your liver will hate you. You just won't feel that sexual any more. As if all the the above weren't enough to turn you off, valproates and other anticonvulsants mess with your testosterone. Maybe Valproate was a mob family in The Godfather. The one to which Abe Vigoda belonged. As the lithium group has similar side effects all anticonvulsants/mood stabilizers have been tarred with the same brush. Thus everyone is afraid to take any of them because they don't want the Depabloat effect. Yet every other anticonvulsant is either weight neutral or you'll even lose weight with them. And while all anticonvulsants are going to slow you down and make naps a good idea, none is as likely to mess with your tummy or hair like the valproates and lithium tend to do. It's just that the valproates have dominance of the anticonvulsant market, due in part to their effectiveness and being the first (and so far only) to have the trifecta of official approval for: Monotherapy for a variety of generalized and partial seizure forms of epilepsy Migraines Mania Thus when anyone thinks "anticonvulsant" they think of a valproate medication. And when doctors prescribe anticonvulsants for whatever reason, they often go with a valproate first. Still, they have good reason to do so. It's not just the data published in the PI sheets from Depakote's clinical trials. A variety of studies for a wide type of applications in the epilepsy and bipolar spectra can back up the decision to go with a valproate medication. So, how do these meds work on your brain? You can get a really detailed answer here. (Bear with me, they keep moving that article around. Let me know if it disappears again.) I'll give you the short form I've picked up from that site, the PI sheets and the books listed in the bibliography and the references below. Basically they increase the concentration of the neurotransmitter GABA (gama aminobutyric acid) in particular regions of your brain. Other meds affect how GABA works in your head, like benzodiazepines. For some reason increasing the concentration of GABA doesn't make you feel good like a benzo's affect on a GABA receptor does. Go figure. So your neurons get to marinate in GABA, similar to the marinating effect of an SSRI but really more like Remeron's (mirtazapine) serotonergic effect, if I'm understanding everything correctly. Anyway while you don't get to feel particularly mellow, your brain certainly mellows out by that concentration of GABA, and thus the hyperactivity in neurons that would otherwise cause seizures and/or bipolar activity is halted. In addition to the action on GABA, the valproates really clamp down on NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate), which is on the bleeding edge of research into what makes us mentally interesting in a lot of different ways, and they do something with the sodium and potassium channels. Although the effects on those voltage channels may or may not be significant. Further research is required. I don't know why it works on migraines, but my guess is that it's for similar reasons. In reading the experiences of people who have had migraines they read very much like types of seizures, right down to the auras. I had one event in my life that I still can't figure out if it was a migraine or a type of oddball seizure where I had a shitload of pain in my head before I collapsed to the floor. So if you're stuck getting government or HMO healthcare and you're in Epilepsyland and/or Bipolarland, the odds are you're going to become acquainted with some form of a generic valproate. Which is a shame because The extended release form of Depakote has the best chance of avoiding all of the most common side effects. Because valproic acid is such an old med and Abbott has just totally ****** around with the FDA on the PI sheets I'll lay you good odds that the generics have some wildly different bioavailability than the brand name meds. Which means you'll need to take more to get the same blood levels, which means more side effects for some people. That's twice I've mentioned blood levels. Like the lithium meds, the valproates are all about blood levels, not dosage. Your starting dosage will be guessed at based on your weight - hell it's as good a metric as any. After that you'll need to have a regular blood panel taken for three important reasons: To see where your valproate levels are, and thus to see if the drug is doing you any damn good or if it's your liver that just isn't getting things right yet. To make sure your white cell count is OK. To see if your liver hates you yet, because the valproates are really tough on your liver. You have to be careful when mixing the valproates with other drugs that give your liver a real workout - alcohol, Serzone (nefazodone), Wellbutrin (bupropion) and Zyprexa (olanzapine) immediately come to mind. You'd have to have a liver made of titanium to be mixing Depakote and Serzone (nefazodone). You also have to watch out for the sudden onset of side effects like bruising, excessive tiredness (on top of what you've already been experiencing), weakness, vomiting, edema (especially in your face) and the surprising effect of losing a lot of weight when taking a valproate. Normally mixing booze and anticonvulsants is weird but not necessarily a big deal. With the valproates it's best to give up drinking all together, or at least restrict it to just very little booze on very few occasions. Valproate and alcohol just doesn't mix. Your liver will thank you for your temperance. Depakote (divalproex sodium) interacts with aspirin. Aspirin prevents you from metabolizing Depakote properly, so you're better off with ibuprofen. Your doctor had better damn well be telling you about the regular blood work you need, to check your valproate levels and to make sure your liver is functioning normally. Depakote 750mg three times a day about 4 years ago and I have gained over 50pounds....this is very discouraging especially because I have worked very to lose 50lbs.....I was told by my neurologist that Depakote does cause and increase in appetite hence the weight gain....... Answered by Nakia Galper 1 year ago.


CP and Bi-polar?
My wife is bi-polar and has CP. the primary indicator of her CP is her myo-clonus. The medication she takes for her bi-polar increases her jerkiness to the point she has a hard time typing and drinking from a cup. Her walking is becoming more spasctic. She is almost falling. Her psychiatrist has given her... Asked by Valene Kronk 1 year ago.

My wife is bi-polar and has CP. the primary indicator of her CP is her myo-clonus. The medication she takes for her bi-polar increases her jerkiness to the point she has a hard time typing and drinking from a cup. Her walking is becoming more spasctic. She is almost falling. Her psychiatrist has given her depakote for this. Other meds are lithium, klonopin, effexor xr, and luvox. Over the weekend the Dr also decreased her lithium from 300 in the am and 450 HS to 150 am and 300 HS. What can I do about her myoclonus problem? She seen a neurologist but was referred back to her psychiatrist. Her psychiatrist is not really listening and there is only 4 other psychiatrists on my side of the island---live on the big island of Hawaii. Answered by Polly Lamar 1 year ago.

Depakote will cause the jerkiness to get worse for her. I have Bipolar and was on Depakote for six months before they realized why I was so shaky. I am now on Lamictal and the shaking has stopped. She needs different medications that won't interact with one another. Good luck and keeping you in my prayers. Answered by Hyun Fathy 1 year ago.

see need to see dr again . they need to help her one of the med is what makeing her jerk sometime you have to take another med good luck Answered by Adela Leitao 1 year ago.


A list of the most common anti-convulsant drugs?
I am doing some ongoing research and looking for a list of the most common anti-convulsant drugs Asked by Amina Summerour 1 year ago.

there are lots of different names for anti-convulsant or anti-seizure drugs which are used to treat conditions like epilepsy - one name brand drug may be listed under many generic names. Here is a complete list of names for the anti-convulsant drug depakote: •Depacon (valproate sodium or sodium valproate) •Depakote, Depakote CP, Depakote ER, Depakote Sprinkles (dilvalproex sodium) •Depakene (valproic acid) •Stavzor (valproic acid) Answered by Sammie Toya 1 year ago.


CP and Bi-polar?
My wife is bi-polar and has CP. the primary indicator of her CP is her myo-clonus. The medication she takes for her bi-polar increases her jerkiness to the point she has a hard time typing and drinking from a cup. Her walking is becoming more spasctic. She is almost falling. Her psychiatrist has given her... Asked by Antonio Petrovich 1 year ago.

My wife is bi-polar and has CP. the primary indicator of her CP is her myo-clonus. The medication she takes for her bi-polar increases her jerkiness to the point she has a hard time typing and drinking from a cup. Her walking is becoming more spasctic. She is almost falling. Her psychiatrist has given her depakote for this. Other meds are lithium, klonopin, effexor xr, and luvox. Over the weekend the Dr also decreased her lithium from 300 in the am and 450 HS to 150 am and 300 HS. What can I do about her myoclonus problem? She seen a neurologist but was referred back to her psychiatrist. Her psychiatrist is not really listening and there is only 4 other psychiatrists on my side of the island---live on the big island of Hawaii. Answered by Evelynn Sheakley 1 year ago.

My daughter swears certain meds made her jumpy and twitch a lot. She gets very nervous and is now only taking zanax. She feels better than ever at 26. They started her over from scratch because meds were all messed up and she was not taking them properly. This could be the problem and one that is hard to fix. However getting clean then finding what works will help. She may need to go to a clinic for awhile but we did whatever we could to get her better, she was not embarrased at all but was desperate. She still suffers somewhat from depression but zanax helps keep everything even keel. Now in nursing school. But too much stress causes more problems just taking a few courses at a time I would suggest you find a medical person to help weed her off of all meds then go from there. Again, my daughter knows her body better than any doctor and says some meds or worse for you than just being clean. Answered by Margareta Komer 1 year ago.

I have worked with some students who have CP. We have used weighted utensils to help them be able to feed themselves without loosing the food. Possibly a weighted cup of some sort would help with the drinking. An occupational therapist may be able to help out with some of this. Maybe a consult with one of the other phychiatrisits would also help......i would think you want the doctor to be someone who listens to the patient.....Good luck. Answered by Henrietta Cordeiro 1 year ago.

for CP i suggest using a physical therapist. Answered by Synthia Varakuta 1 year ago.


Cerebral palsy and myoclonus?
my wife has CP. She was a preemie breach birth. She also has Bi-polar disorder. She is on Lithium 300mg caps--3 caps AM, 4 Caps HS, Depakote ER 250mg tabs--3 tabs PM, and Effexor ER 75mg caps--3 caps AM. She takes the depakote for sleep. In the recent months her myoclonus is increasing, and her stamina is also... Asked by Mila Atchison 1 year ago.

my wife has CP. She was a preemie breach birth. She also has Bi-polar disorder. She is on Lithium 300mg caps--3 caps AM, 4 Caps HS, Depakote ER 250mg tabs--3 tabs PM, and Effexor ER 75mg caps--3 caps AM. She takes the depakote for sleep. In the recent months her myoclonus is increasing, and her stamina is also decreasing. Her shaking is so bad that now she needs help with drinking and eating. Can the meds cause that or can her CP get worse as she age? Answered by Nikole Blalock 1 year ago.

Have her meds changed? That's the first place I'd consider. I know next to nothing about CP. All I can do is share my experience on these meds. Maybe something will be useful. Just remember, each person responds differently. Lithium can cause tremor, it's a common side effect. I only get a slight one in my left hand when I am dehydrated or something like an underlying body one when my blood pressure is real high (hard to describe). I have a friend who says it can magnify anything underneath for her. These two are abstract, non-medical descriptions. Not really sure how to describe. Effexor made me shakey, but it also made me manic. Depakote just makes my hair fall out while making me hungry... and my brain loves it, so I deal with the side effects. Not sure if that helps at all. Answered by Barry Blumenstein 1 year ago.


Bi-polar and cerebral palsy?
My wife is bi-polar and has CP. the primary indicator of her CP is her myo-clonus. The medication she takes for her bi-polar increases her jerkiness to the point she has a hard time typing and drinking from a cup. Her psychiatrist has given her depakote for this. Other med are lithium, klonopin, effexor xr, and... Asked by Louvenia Sundborg 1 year ago.

My wife is bi-polar and has CP. the primary indicator of her CP is her myo-clonus. The medication she takes for her bi-polar increases her jerkiness to the point she has a hard time typing and drinking from a cup. Her psychiatrist has given her depakote for this. Other med are lithium, klonopin, effexor xr, and luvox. Over the weekend the Dr also decreased her lithium from 300 in the am and 450 HS to 150 am and 300 HS. My wife is still exhibiting signs of mania---not sleeping, not eating, running thoughts, hypersexuality, and anger. What should I do? What can i do with the myoclonus problem and her mania? Her Dr. is not really listening and there is only 4 other psychiatrists on my island --live one the big island of Hawaii. Answered by Frances Sixtos 1 year ago.

Hi...here are some of my thoughts....first of all, when was the last time your wife had a Lithium level drawn? Was her level at a toxic level so the Dr. lowered her dosage? Without knowing the dosage of the Depakote, it's hard to establish whether or not it's being given at a therapeutic level (when was the last time she had a Depakote level drawn?)....if Depakote and Lithium are both being taken and your wife is still experiencing all these manic symptoms, it's safe to say they're not working. May I ask you some questions? 1) Since your wife is in the manic phase of her illness, has the dr. considered taking her off the 2 antidepressants she's on? (Effexor and Luvox?) The aim of treatment for mania is to lower the high mood to a balanced one...antidepressants may be contributing to kicking her mood higher and higher because they are designed to ELEVATE the mood. The meds may be working against each other. 2) Luvox is primarily used for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder....is your wife diagnosed with this? 3) Have you seen a Neurologist about her CP? He would be a good person to prescribe correctly for the myoclonus, and might be a good resource for getting your wife's mood stable....many Neuro medications are used by Psychiatry as well, such as the Klonopin and Depakote. A Neurologist will know how to treat the myoclonus without further increasing the movements 4) Has anyone ever suggested Risperdal, Seroquel, or anything else for the treatment of the mania...need to look into that because you are overlooking a great group of drugs which really are terrific with these symptoms. 5) Are there any more meds that you didn't list? If so, what are they?? These are just some of the things that I think might be going on...if I can provide any more suggestions, please let me know. Good luck and God Bless you as you both go thru this very difficult time!!! Answered by Verena Debelak 1 year ago.

First I AM NOT a Dr., but I have bi Polar and it was believed that I had ALS. Effexor almost killed me I was totally out of control I am on Lithium, prosac,& klonopin. luvox I have not been on, but I also have had problems with others. I am also Hypothyroid and when it gets out control (often) I am manic also. One more thing is she taking any cholestrol med this will contribute to the shaking. I was on depakote but was taken off. 4 psys try another anyway. Answered by Tammie Bough 1 year ago.

find out immediately why she is on BOTH depakote AND lithium most dr.s only put you on one not both together, could be the MAJOR reason for the jerkyness. i would get in contact with another dr. and see if you can see one of them to discuss their opinion on what meds she should be on and to discuss other options. if a dr. wont listen to the patient and family who are they there for? hope this helps Answered by Zonia Cerverizzo 1 year ago.


Bi-polar and cerebral palsy?
My wife is bi-polar and has CP. the primary indicator of her CP is her myo-clonus. The medication she takes for her bi-polar increases her jerkiness to the point she has a hard time typing and drinking from a cup. Her psychiatrist has given her depakote for this. Other med are lithium, klonopin, effexor xr, and... Asked by Librada Leghorn 1 year ago.

My wife is bi-polar and has CP. the primary indicator of her CP is her myo-clonus. The medication she takes for her bi-polar increases her jerkiness to the point she has a hard time typing and drinking from a cup. Her psychiatrist has given her depakote for this. Other med are lithium, klonopin, effexor xr, and luvox. Over the weekend the Dr also decreased her lithium from 300 in the am and 450 HS to 150 am and 300 HS. My wife is still exhibiting signs of mania---not sleeping, not eating, running thoughts, hypersexuality, and anger. What should I do? What can i do with the myoclonus problem and her mania? Her Dr. is not really listening and there is only 4 other psychiatrists on my island --live one the big island of Hawaii. Answered by Julene Warbington 1 year ago.

Every person has a different response to medications, especially when they are on a mix of two or more med's. I know that, for me, lithium caused severe tremors, especially in my hands. (I have been treated for Bipolar I for over 20 years) The mix of medications that works for me now is Lamictal, Tegretol, and Seroquel. That doesn't mean that would be the right solution for your wife, though. I also suffer from jerking and tremors now. I am in the early stages of Huntington's disease. There is some thought that biological disorders of the brain may actually be the cause of Bipolar disorder in people with these organic problems. I'm sorry that there are so few doc's available for you to choose from. Perhaps the doc treating her for the CP might be able to help in this case. My best wishes to you both. Answered by Sherri Nawrocki 1 year ago.

First I AM NOT a Dr., but I have bi Polar and it was believed that I had ALS. Effexor almost killed me I was totally out of control I am on Lithium, prosac,& klonopin. luvox I have not been on, but I also have had problems with others. I am also Hypothyroid and when it gets out control (often) I am manic also. One more thing is she taking any cholestrol med this will contribute to the shaking. I was on depakote but was taken off. 4 psys try another anyway. Answered by Olin Mcquown 1 year ago.

Why not check out the other doctors or maybe do inter-island travel and find out what is on Oahu in Honolulu or Waikiki. Answered by Kimberlie Blong 1 year ago.

find out immediately why she is on BOTH depakote AND lithium most dr.s only put you on one not both together, could be the MAJOR reason for the jerkyness. i would get in contact with another dr. and see if you can see one of them to discuss their opinion on what meds she should be on and to discuss other options. if a dr. wont listen to the patient and family who are they there for? hope this helps Answered by Christiana Dionisio 1 year ago.

Change your Medication, get an antidepression Medicament this will stop the jerkyness..and help her to relax more ...ok. Answered by Margert Mandril 1 year ago.


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