DEPAKENE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018081/001.

Names and composition

"DEPAKENE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of VALPROIC ACID.

Answered questions

Could Depakene cause addiction/dependence? Trazodone?
I am prescribed Depakene and I'm slightly worried that it'll start causing some sort of dependence, especially since it's prescribed to me to help get me off of another type of prescription medicine. I've also been prescribed Trazodone as a sleep aid/anti-anxiety medicine and I'm wondering about... Asked by Ahmed Antonis 3 months ago.

I am prescribed Depakene and I'm slightly worried that it'll start causing some sort of dependence, especially since it's prescribed to me to help get me off of another type of prescription medicine. I've also been prescribed Trazodone as a sleep aid/anti-anxiety medicine and I'm wondering about the addiction potential for that too. Thank you. Answered by Xiomara Depaola 3 months ago.

Neither of those drugs have what's considered a risk for abuse. And sometimes using one drug to get off another has more to do with transitioning to the new drug, and nothing more. Trazodone is widely prescribed, and while it doesn't get people "high" it does cause drowsiness. It is pretty good to help with sleep problems and also treats depression. Any time you take something for sleep there is a risk of becoming dependent on it; you get used to relying on it each night, and then if you don't take it you can have trouble getting asleep. All that has more to do with patterns than any sort of real addiction. . Answered by Antone Rhoades 3 months ago.

Trazodone Dependence Answered by Suk Santheson 3 months ago.


What are the side effects of Depakene?
I have metabolic sindrum in my leaver I want to know if this has been caused by Depakene. Asked by Robt Persons 3 months ago.

Here are some common ones * drowsiness * dizziness * headache * diarrhea * constipation * heartburn * changes in appetite * weight changes * back pain * agitation * mood swings * abnormal thinking * memory loss * uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body * loss of coordination * uncontrollable movements of the eyes * blurred or double vision * ringing in the ears * stuffed or runny nose * sore throat * hair loss Here are some serious ones, call your doctor immediately if you experience these. * unusual bruising or bleeding * tiny purple spots on the skin * fever * blisters or rash * itching * hives * confusion * difficulty breathing or swallowing * swollen glands * weakness in the joints * depression * thinking about killing yourself or planning or trying to do so Answered by Rosena Barksdale 3 months ago.


While taking valproic acid (depakene), is it safer to use acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin)?
This is for a 7-year-old child who weighs 50-60 lbs.I've spoken with 2 different doctors and they have different views. If possible, please let me know where you got your information.One concern was the effect on the liver since depakene is metabolized through the liver. I know acetaminophen is also... Asked by Deidre Loerzel 3 months ago.

This is for a 7-year-old child who weighs 50-60 lbs. I've spoken with 2 different doctors and they have different views. If possible, please let me know where you got your information. One concern was the effect on the liver since depakene is metabolized through the liver. I know acetaminophen is also metabolized through the liver but ibuprofen isn't. Answered by Mozell Mizell 3 months ago.

This is a drug book. Type in the drug you're using and it will give you all the information doctors and nurses have about it. Look under pediatric dosage for the amount that's safe for the child. Look under "drug interactions" to see if they're contraindicated or if they don't work together. Answered by Rossie Kuzara 3 months ago.


My son was in jail and on Elavil, Risperdal, Depakene & Benadryl together. After release, he has nothing.?
They gave him a list of drugs when he was released, but no pills; it was an abrupt & total withdrawl. He trembled for a week. We refilled his Elavil RX with an old RX, but he's not taking the other three. He gained 40 pounds, and he has constant headaches and anxiety. At least the trembling has stopped, but... Asked by Muoi Dilmore 3 months ago.

They gave him a list of drugs when he was released, but no pills; it was an abrupt & total withdrawl. He trembled for a week. We refilled his Elavil RX with an old RX, but he's not taking the other three. He gained 40 pounds, and he has constant headaches and anxiety. At least the trembling has stopped, but I worry about the long-term effects of all those drugs together. He was never diagnosed with any mental illness, worked at a job, etc. before jail. I'm sure he was a very sedated inmate, causing no problems, which is what the institution wanted. Any advice on such an abrupt withdrawl, weight gain, headaches, etc.? I know he should see a doctor asap and we're working on that. Answered by Inell Kutella 3 months ago.

Well honestly maybe its all the drugs they gave him... and that he keeps taking... maybe you should just stop treatment all together... sure if hes an addict he will tremble i mean hes an addict thats what happens with all drugs... but still he need to cleanse his system and maybe it might be better that way... and you should take him to a doc. asap... maybe it would be best if you got a friend who is a doc. or a friend who has a doc. in there family or knows one personally so there is no record of it you know... good luck from one human being to the next Answered by Lavelle Konzen 3 months ago.

Suing is not the answer. The jail is not responsible for supplying your son's medications to him. You said he was not diagnosed with anything, but had an old RX for Elavil, which is an antidepressent. I can't imagine a doctor would have given him an RX without a Dx. As for Risperadal and Depakene, those are some serious medications that the jail would not have given him without a professional seeing him, so I'm going to assume that your son has some mental health issues that need to be dealt with, and may be a cause for his criminal activity, though not the only factor. Yes, there are long term effects, and they can be easily researched through google, but if they are going to control behaviors, they may be worth the effects. Answered by Marlana Lipps 3 months ago.

Your son has had time enough to have the effects of withdrawal out of his system. The elavil as you know is an anti-depressant, is he depressed? Life circumstances cause us to have anxiety and lulls of feeling bad but when we act on the feelings to correct them they go away, mediation usually postpones or obliterates the need to act, I would look at the things that are obvious, your son was not fed well in jail and I am sure he is compensating for that now. He needs to get his life back. Focus in on the little things first. Have him exercise everyday, this will accomplish many things, weight, headaches and self-esteem. The thing is if you talk yourself any of us in it to having a problem or illness you'll find someone to validate it no matter how wrong it may be. Don't let your son get sucked into the abyss of the system. He paid his dues, he needs to put that chapter behind him now and look for the wonderful thing life has to hold for a free man! He can do anything, be anything if he puts his heart mind and soul in to it! Work from the positive momma and in force it into his head! Don't reinforce bad behavior or tactical behavior. Get him going! Answered by Eileen Howett 3 months ago.

wow, sue i guess Answered by Katelyn Ilg 3 months ago.


What are the newest anti-depressants on today's market???
I have heard of Slexa and Depakene(Depakote)..... Asked by Kristie Misuraca 3 months ago.

The latest are the SSNRI, meaning Selective Serotonine and Neuropenephrine Reuptake inhibitors. They include Effexor and Cymbalta. Wellbutrin is relatively new. It works on Dopamine, so it is not an SSRI or an SSNRI, though it is combined often with them. Typical SSRIs that have been around a while are Prozac, Zoloft, and Paxil. The newest SSRIs have less side effects than the older SSRIs and include Celexa and Lexapro. SSRIs work primarily on Serotonine. Depakote is not strictly an anti-depressant, but often used in bi-polar patients or patients with some mood disorder, but not exclusively depressed. Abilify and Risperdal are also in that group with Depakote, as well as Topamax. I highly recommend a site called www.remedyfind.com. Customers critique their medications, why they are on them, how they work, etc... Answered by Kendall Annese 3 months ago.

Right now I am on Effexor I am dealing with Post Partum Depression and I havent had a problem with them. I was hesitant to take them at first beacuase of all the romours of anit-depressants, but when I tried to get over Post Partum my self it got worse and not better, so the Doc put me off Effexor. So far so good Answered by Jacqualine Quadnau 3 months ago.

10mg of escitalopram is an identical to roughly 20mg of citalopram. citalopram involves the D & L isomers of which the d or dextro type is almost inactive. the levo or S type is the lively component. they're the identical chemical however you could be getting a much better dose with the 10mg of escitalopram than with 10mg of citalopram. p.s. S stands for sinister and is used to designate levo or left since in olden days it was once inspiration that left-passed persons have been sinister. the designation is established on whether or not an answer of the isomer rotates a airplane of polarized mild to the proper or to the left. in an effort to grow to be opitcally lively, a drug calls for an uneven carbon atom (a carbon atom with one of a kind corporations connected). hence ends my pharmaceutical chem lecture for at present. Answered by Lee Llanas 3 months ago.

I don't know about the newest, but I tried a few before I found the one that worked for me.......Wellbutrin XL. Please be under a doctor's care & discontinue the drugs if you have a bad reaction. Answered by Stephanie Rochlin 3 months ago.

honestly i have just tried then all and most of then do not work some of these medcines do work for others i wold try effexor i hope it will work for you. Answered by Kasha Cavanah 3 months ago.

never mind that take magnesium and calcium tons of it...it will take care of your depression in a jiffy. Answered by Jeremy Piermarini 3 months ago.

lexapro is a new one Answered by Lynn Gooch 3 months ago.


Is memory loss a side effect of sodium valproate medicine? memory loss? weak in maths?
after gradually decreasing the dose, will epilepsy occur again? pl explain side effects in simple lang, not in medical terms. my daughter is only 14 yrs old. can dizziness n headache be effects of dose adjustment? How long Will she have to take medicines? PLEASE HELP. Asked by Celesta Presswood 3 months ago.

Sodium valproate (Depakene) is a drug used to treat epilepsy. It's not clear how Depakene controls epilepsy, but it increases the concentration of gamma-aminobutyric acid, a chemical neurotransmitter that carries impulses from one nerve cell to another. Depakene is almost completely metabolized or broken down in the liver and can cause toxic reactions that can lead to liver failure and death. Depakene can cause severe birth defects, including neural tube defects such as spina bifida, heart defects and bone defects. Depakene can cause inflammation of the pancreas. Pancreatitis is characterized by severe abdominal pain, as well as nausea, vomiting and loss of appetite. Depakene may cause depression that leads to suicidal thoughts and attempted suicide, so people should be monitored carefully for mood changes or signs of depression during treatment. Somnolence, a constant state of sleepiness, may occur in older adults taking Depakene. Platelets (thrombocytes) are necessary for blood clotting and to prevent hemorrhage, but Depakene can cause thrombocytopenia, a reduced number of platelets, so platelets should be monitored with increased bruising or bleeding. High levels of ammonia may occur with Depakene. Hymperammonemia may result in encephalopathy with mental changes, nausea and vomiting. Sometimes Depakene causes the normal body temperature to fall to abnormal levels below 35 degrees Celsius or 95 degrees Fahrenheit. This may affect multiple body systems as circulation slows. Hypothermia may also be a sign of hyperammonemia. Q__after gradually decreasing the dose, will epilepsy occur again? Q__can dizziness n headache be effects of dose adjustment? Q__How long Will she have to take medicines? Only qualified Medical Doctors can give you an answer to all your queations.Please consult your doctor or search the web. Take care as always!!! Answered by Darrin Bowthorpe 3 months ago.

I've been having amazing memory problems on 1000mg of Lithium. I would think something and it would be gone within a couple of seconds, often before I'd had time to remember to write it down. It was partly amusing and partly terrifying. However, both a psychiatrist and a pharmacist say it's not the lithium. So, with you, I guess it must part of the bipolar. I think as evidence for that is the fact that my memory is better on some days than others. I assume if it was just the lithium, the memory failures would be a steady feature. Good luck working out how to cope with it. Buy a notebook, is the best I can advise. Answered by Tomoko Schwichtenber 3 months ago.

yes defintely, and other side effects are: erectile dysfunction, bleeding in stool, and a gradual shrinking of genitalia. Good day to you. Answered by Mitsuko Fricano 3 months ago.


Delayed reactions to medication?
I started taking Depakote about 4 weeks ago for bi-polar disorder, and I'm also taking Seroquel as well. I've felt pretty good the last few weeks, but in the last 3 or 4 days I have had many bursts of anger that I have not had before and have no explanation for. Is it possible that it is the depakote? Asked by Priscila Celadon 3 months ago.

My child takes depakene (depakote). It is known for being a mood stabilizer. She taken hers since she was an infant for seizures. I know it takes weeks for the medicine to rise to therapeutic levels in the blood. This is the case for many drugs. It takes time. Since you seem to have been taking it long enough for it to be in the therapeutic blood levels, I would think that it would be somethng to suspect. It could also be interacting strangely with the seroquel. It's hard to say. My child was taking an antibiotic for a short while and she would have outbursts of aggression (she's normally passive) while taking this antibiotic. As it turns out, this particular antibiotic shares the same excretion pathway in the kidney as the carnitine she has to take. Talk to your doctor because behavior changes such as this are something to take note of. Keep a journal and note the times these happen. Oh, in addition, the depakene makes my child fatigued. She is less able to tolerate stress by the afternoon and becomes grumpy. It's totally due to the meds. You might want to note if these instances occur at the same time of day. Look for patterns. Answered by Dannielle Escorza 3 months ago.


Prescription Question?
Thanks, I didn't understand the ii, but I understand the qid. I'm taking a courses on this and I'm stuck on answering the question about how long the prescription will last? for the bottom one, I think I should be dispensing .5 gm 4 times daily a day for a month. Correct me if I'm wrong.. Asked by Annabel Deckers 3 months ago.

Rx Proventil Syrup Sig: ii tsp qid Disp. 8 oz. What is the daily dose? How long will the prescription last? _____________________ Rx Depakene 250 mg tabs Sig: 0.5 gm qid for one month What quantity should be dispensed? Just don't answer it. Can somebody please explain it to me step by step? Answered by Sharla Nenninger 3 months ago.

Well, the ii is a symbol for 2. QID means 4 times a day. That's just what is written on the actual prescription. The prescription bottle should have it written out in a way that's easier to understand. The quantity for the depakene will be however many pills it will take for a month supply (4 pills a day for 30 days) The quantity for the Proventil will be 8oz. You'll take 2 tsp of that 4 times a day. Answered by Janeth Binstock 3 months ago.

Proventil Syrup Answered by Judy Pera 3 months ago.


Is chemotherapy the only treatment that causes hair lose ?
Hey, I really need an answer- is chemotherapy the only therapy that causes hair lose , IF NO then what are exsamples to other treatment that cause hair lose? Asked by Pauline Crellin 3 months ago.

Radiation therapy. Depakote/ Depakene. Answered by An Iden 3 months ago.

Patchy hair loss in children and young adults, often sudden in onset, is known as alopecia areata. This condition may result in complete baldness, but in about 90% of cases the hair returns, usually within a few years. With alopecia universalis, all body hair falls out. Tearing out one's own hair, a psychological disorder known as trichotillomania, is seen most frequently in children. Telogen effluvium is hair thinning over the scalp that occurs because of changes in the growth cycle of hair. A large number of hairs enter the resting phase at the same time, causing shedding and subsequent thinning. Answered by Jimmie Gress 3 months ago.

some drugs can cause hair loss or thinning Answered by Berniece Balentine 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018081/001 DEPAKENE VALPROIC ACID CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
018082/001 DEPAKENE VALPROIC ACID SYRUP/ORAL 250MG per 5ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018081/001 DEPAKENE VALPROIC ACID CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
018082/001 DEPAKENE VALPROIC ACID SYRUP/ORAL 250MG per 5ML
022152/001 STAVZOR VALPROIC ACID CAPSULE, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 125MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
022152/002 STAVZOR VALPROIC ACID CAPSULE, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 250MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
022152/003 STAVZOR VALPROIC ACID CAPSULE, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
070195/001 VALPROIC ACID VALPROIC ACID CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
070431/001 VALPROIC ACID VALPROIC ACID CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
070631/001 VALPROIC ACID VALPROIC ACID CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
070868/001 VALPROIC ACID VALPROIC ACID SYRUP/ORAL 250MG per 5ML
073178/001 VALPROIC ACID VALPROIC ACID SYRUP/ORAL 250MG per 5ML
073229/001 VALPROIC ACID VALPROIC ACID CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
073484/001 VALPROIC ACID VALPROIC ACID CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
074060/001 VALPROIC ACID VALPROIC ACID SYRUP/ORAL 250MG per 5ML
075379/001 VALPROIC ACID VALPROIC ACID SYRUP/ORAL 250MG per 5ML
075782/001 VALPROIC ACID VALPROIC ACID SYRUP/ORAL 250MG per 5ML
077105/001 VALPROIC ACID VALPROIC ACID SYRUP/ORAL 250MG per 5ML
077960/001 VALPROIC ACID VALPROIC ACID SYRUP/ORAL 250MG per 5ML
090517/001 VALPROIC ACID VALPROIC ACID SYRUP/ORAL 250MG per 5ML
091037/001 VALPROIC ACID VALPROIC ACID CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG

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