Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020593/001.

Names and composition

"DEPACON" is the commercial name of a drug composed of VALPROATE SODIUM.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020593/001 DEPACON VALPROATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020593/001 DEPACON VALPROATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
076295/001 VALPROATE SODIUM VALPROATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
076539/001 VALPROATE SODIUM VALPROATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML
078523/001 VALPROATE SODIUM VALPROATE SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 100MG BASE per ML

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Seizures with a hot flash right before?
Ok my husbad started having seizures 2 years ago and we dont know why. The doctors cant figure it out. He gets real sick to his stomach and has very hot flashes right before to wear he soaks his clothes from his sweat then he goes into the gran mal seizures. What is going on with this hot flash before the seizure... Asked by Ginette Sugahara 1 year ago.

Ok my husbad started having seizures 2 years ago and we dont know why. The doctors cant figure it out. He gets real sick to his stomach and has very hot flashes right before to wear he soaks his clothes from his sweat then he goes into the gran mal seizures. What is going on with this hot flash before the seizure has anyone ever heard of this??? Is it a sign of what might be causing it? Please if someone knows please let us know. We already have enough to worry about with our special needs son and don't need him having a serious health problem too. I wanna get him healthy again cause I am so worried about losing him to one of these seizures and his meds arent working and the doctors arent doing anything about it. Please someone tell me what is going on. Answered by Ebonie Cappelluti 1 year ago.

Elizabeth C, Valproic acid (VPA) – recommended by Ana, above, is a chemical compound that has found clinical use as an anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing drug, primarily in the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar disorder, and less commonly major depression. It is also used to treat migraine headaches and schizophrenia. It is marketed under the brand names Depakote, Depakote ER, Depakene, Depacon, Stavzor. Related drugs include the sodium salts sodium valproate, used as an anticonvulsant, and a combined formulation, valproate semisodium, used as a mood stabilizer and additionally in the U.S. also as an anticonvulsant. Normally a prescription drug. Topiramate, recommended by Gisele, above, is used alone or with other medications to treat certain types of seizures in people who have epilepsy. This is also usually a prescription drug. Valproic acid, Sodium Valproate and Topiramate may cause side effects. Be guided by your doctor not by someone who has a ‘wonder medication’ to recommend. What may be successful for them may not affect you or may cause you a ‘problem.’ The hot flash which you mention, whilst not being amongst the “regular” signs and symptoms of epilepsy, in my experience, have often been experienced after the seizure in the postictal state, rarely before. I am presuming here, that when you speak of a Grand Mal Seizure, that your husband has a diagnosis of epilepsy. Hot flashes are directly related to the amount of testosterone in the system, which is why menopausal women often experience hot flashes as their bodies stop producing oestrogen and testosterone in response to the cessation of ovulation. The cause is the same in men. If he is experiencing hot flashes, then his body has probably started producing less testosterone for some reason. Maybe your/his doctor would initiate some tests to try to diagnose this. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Shalanda Carswell 1 year ago.

Have they checked him out for a virus as some are bad enough to cause seizures and can go on for a while. I know a little girl who when was younger caught an infection that knocked her immune system off guard and it made her very ill because she was only 5 then. Just something that sprung to my mind. Answered by Tawana Loreaux 1 year ago.

Sounds to me like you should get checked for diabetes just in case. May be gestational or could be juvenile onset. Otherwise hot flashes and all sorts of symptoms will come during pregnancy and they don't have to start in a certain month. Answered by Dona Cearley 1 year ago.


Dangers of anticonvulsant drugs?
I was wondering if anyone had a complete list of some of the dangers of anticonvulsant drugs? I am doing a research project on seizure disorders and need some side effect information. Asked by Remedios Saviola 1 year ago.

You can go to WebMd.com and type in seizure drugs or anticonvulsant drugs into their "drug" section and then read the side effects of each drug as you click on the specific drug name. You are asking way too much detail for a forum like this. Answered by Aldo Inocente 1 year ago.

anticonvulsant drugs typed into a search engine will give you a lot of results. Try webmd, drugs.com or even wikipedia. Answered by Roseanne Bylsma 1 year ago.

marijuanna does have actual and psychological outcomes (harm sensible), and you notice there is not any time rather to pin element how long it maintains to be on your gadget, because of the fact it relies upon on weight, you notice the thc shops itself on your fat cells, so it rather takes time, and additionally relies upon on how a lot you smoke..right this is a very powerful web site..btw in my view the only risky factor approximately weed isn't smoking adequate lol. Answered by Noble Shostak 1 year ago.


What are mood stabilizers?
Asked by Kendra Vuckovich 1 year ago.

A mood stabilizer is a psychiatric medication used to treat mood disorders characterized by rapid and unstable mood shifts. The most common is bipolar disorder, where mood stabilizers suppress swings between mania and depression, and these drugs are also used in borderline personality disorder. Most mood stabilizers are anticonvulsants, with the important exception of lithium, which is the oldest and best known mood stabilizing drug. Mood stabilizers include: Lithium carbonate —- Lithium is the 'classic' mood stabilizer. The first Food and Drug Administration-approved mood stabilizer, and still popular in treatment. Therapeutic drug monitoring required. Monitor blood lithium levels (therapeutic range: 0.6 or 0.8-1.2 mEq/L) and look for signs and symptoms of toxicity (such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, ataxia). See also lithium orotate, another lithium salt. Valproic acid (Depakene®), divalproex sodium (Depakote®), and sodium valproate (Depacon®) — Available in extended release form. Can be very irritating to the stomach, especially when taken as valproic acid. Liver function and CBC should be monitored. Therapeutic drug monitoring is required. Lamotrigine (Lamictal®) — Particularly effective for bipolar depression. Monitor for signs and symptoms of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, very rare but can be fatal. Carbamazepine (Tegretol®) — CBC should be monitored; can lower white blood cell count. Therapeutic drug monitoring is required. Not FDA-approved for bipolar disorder, but widely used for many years. Gabapentin (Neurontin®) — Not FDA approved for bipolar disorder. Recent scientific studies suggest it is not an effective treatment, however many psychiatrists continue to use it. Oxcarbazepine (Trileptal®) — Not FDA approved for bipolar disorder. Topiramate (Topamax®) — Not FDA approved for bipolar disorder. Sometimes mood stabilizers are used in combination, such as lithium with one of the anticonvulsants. Many atypical antipsychotics also have mood stabilizing effects and are thus commonly prescribed even when psychotic symptoms are absent. It is also conjectured that Omega-3 fatty acids may have a mood stabilizing effect. However, more research is needed to verify this (a multi-year study of this is now being carried out as of 2001). Most mood stabilizers are effective at treating mania and mood cycling and shifting, but are not very effective at treating depression (with lamotrigine and lithium carbonate being exceptions). Often, an antidepressant is prescribed in addition to the mood stabilizer during depressive phases. However this brings some risks, as antidepressants can induce mania, psychosis, and other disturbing problems in bipolar patients, particularly when taken alone, but sometimes even when used with a mood stabilizer. Answered by Ivory Veyna 1 year ago.

1) Eating a healthy diet. 2) Avoid eating anything with sugar in it. 3) Go for a walk. 4) Make a list of all the things in your life that are great. 5) Read that list over and over again. 6) Remind yourself you have good health. 7) Go volunteer somewhere. 8) Go to church and listen. 9) Get some St. John's Wort 10) Get off the sofa and do something....write a letter to someone you haven't seen in a long time, clean a closet, get items ready for a garage sale, plan your next vacation, etc, Answered by Jospeh Lofland 1 year ago.

mood stabilizers are these drugs- lithium, carbamazepine and valproic acid which are used to treat mood swings over the long term as they do take a couple of weeks to kick off ususally. Answered by Queen Sympson 1 year ago.

they help people with mood disorders not cycle. Bi polar for example its to keep you at an even level, not manic or depressed. Stable. Answered by Shella Beston 1 year ago.


What are Mood stabilizer?
Asked by Wendy Pott 1 year ago.

A mood stabilizer is a psychiatric medication used to treat mood disorders characterized by rapid and unstable mood shifts. The most common is bipolar disorder, where mood stabilizers suppress swings between mania and depression, and these drugs are also used in borderline personality disorder. Most mood stabilizers are anticonvulsants, with the important exception of lithium, which is the oldest and best known mood stabilizing drug. Mood stabilizers include: Lithium carbonate —- Lithium is the 'classic' mood stabilizer. The first Food and Drug Administration-approved mood stabilizer, and still popular in treatment. Therapeutic drug monitoring required. Monitor blood lithium levels (therapeutic range: 0.6 or 0.8-1.2 mEq/L) and look for signs and symptoms of toxicity (such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, ataxia). See also lithium orotate, another lithium salt. Valproic acid (Depakene®), divalproex sodium (Depakote®), and sodium valproate (Depacon®) — Available in extended release form. Can be very irritating to the stomach, especially when taken as valproic acid. Liver function and CBC should be monitored. Therapeutic drug monitoring is required. Lamotrigine (Lamictal®) — Particularly effective for bipolar depression. Monitor for signs and symptoms of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, very rare but can be fatal. Carbamazepine (Tegretol®) — CBC should be monitored; can lower white blood cell count. Therapeutic drug monitoring is required. Not FDA-approved for bipolar disorder, but widely used for many years. Gabapentin (Neurontin®) — Not FDA approved for bipolar disorder. Recent scientific studies suggest it is not an effective treatment, however many psychiatrists continue to use it. Oxcarbazepine (Trileptal®) — Not FDA approved for bipolar disorder. Topiramate (Topamax®) — Not FDA approved for bipolar disorder. Sometimes mood stabilizers are used in combination, such as lithium with one of the anticonvulsants. Many atypical antipsychotics also have mood stabilizing effects and are thus commonly prescribed even when psychotic symptoms are absent. It is also conjectured that Omega-3 fatty acids may have a mood stabilizing effect. However, more research is needed to verify this (a multi-year study of this is now being carried out as of 2001). Most mood stabilizers are effective at treating mania and mood cycling and shifting, but are not very effective at treating depression (with lamotrigine and lithium carbonate being exceptions). Often, an antidepressant is prescribed in addition to the mood stabilizer during depressive phases. However this brings some risks, as antidepressants can induce mania, psychosis, and other disturbing problems in bipolar patients, particularly when taken alone, but sometimes even when used with a mood stabilizer. Answered by Jeanene Menasco 1 year ago.

Mood stabilizers work by blocking sodium channels and increasing the levels of GABA throughout the brain. GABA is the main mood stabilizing neurotransmitter, and there has found to be a major deficit in patients with Bipolar disorder and BPD leading to uncontrolled and unstable moods. Mood stabilizers also suppress the levels of the excitatory neurotransmitter called Glutamate, elevated levels of Glutamate have found to be the main cause biochemical cause of both manic and depressive episodes. It has been found that bipolar patients have very low levels of Glial cells, (now these guys are the cleaners and janitors of the brain) and when stress levels rise, cortisol (stress hormone) is released which increases the levels of Glutamate. The problem is that there aren't enough Glial cells to clean out the excess Glutamate and the episode begins. Answered by Remedios Louria 1 year ago.

All medicines have side effects. But many people don't feel the side effects, or they are able to deal with them. Ask your pharmacist about the side effects of each medicine you take. Side effects are also listed in the information that comes with your medicine. Mood stabilizers can help to treat mania and to prevent the return of both manic and depressive episodes in bipolar disorder. They may also help for treat the mood problems associated with schizophrenia, such as depression. Some of these medicines are also used to treat some types of seizures. They are also known as anticonvulsants. Answered by Douglass Hochmuth 1 year ago.

They're supposed to "stabilize your mood" but I haven't seen any evidence of it yet~ Answered by Leandra Bizzard 1 year ago.

it depends on if you are looking to pick it up or bring it down. Answered by Maria Fritcher 1 year ago.


Does this sound like Parkinson's disease?
A person I know has been moving extremely slow all the time, taking forever to do things like cut food, move things, open containers etc. When he walks he does so slowly and shuffles his feet, and kind of holds one hand up by his side. He also behaves very indecisively and absentmindedly, like when he talks he says... Asked by Noreen Garde 1 year ago.

A person I know has been moving extremely slow all the time, taking forever to do things like cut food, move things, open containers etc. When he walks he does so slowly and shuffles his feet, and kind of holds one hand up by his side. He also behaves very indecisively and absentmindedly, like when he talks he says "um, i kinda um, have um, a question kind of" and stuff like that. His arms look kind of stiff but not the rest of his body, and sometimes when he's trying to do something small with his hands like take out his credit card they shake. He's been tested and they found that A) he has no tumors and B) his hormones were extremely low but the doctor said that that shouldn't make him move slowly. Parkinson's has been suggested by a number of people but not officially diagnosed. If anyone has known someone with Parkinson's or even have it yourself could you please tell me if this description sounds similar, or like something different. Answered by Caridad Constantini 1 year ago.

The Parkinson's Reversing Breakthrough? Answered by Enda Vicars 1 year ago.

you have no true symptoms of ANYTHING. i'm like you, i always worry so much that i get PHYSICALLY ill and start ACTUALLY seeing symptoms that i'm thinking about. you have nothing. if you had even a slight chance of anything, the doctor would have caught it at your checkup and made sure that nothing's wrong. the twitches are NOT seizures (trust me, if you were having seizures, even minor ones, you would be laying on the floor unconcious, and someone would call 911). you are WAY too young for parkinsons, and MS is an extremely unlikely possibility (and you're too young for it anyways). the best thing to do is to CALM DOWN! 99% of your symptoms will go away once you convince yourself that you're perfectly healthy. that's what I did, and now i rarely have any symptoms or twitches, only when i think about it. also, stress can bring out physical symptoms which is pretty weird, but true. a couple days ago, my brother actually had to get tests done to check for a brain tumor, and i was SOOOO stressed out that i woke up in the middle of the night and threw up! also, i would have random tremors of my whole body shaking for a couple seconds on and off. all of this is STRESS! when we got the good news of my brother being healthy, no more throwing up, no more shaking! your boyfriend is giving you lots of stress on top of your everyday stress. you'll be fine. Answered by Torri Schmaling 1 year ago.

I have had Parkinson's disease for over 11 years, and the symptoms you describe sound familiar. When my pills aren't working, I shuffle when I walk, I need help getting dressed, I need my food cut up for me. My right hand is often pulled up to my chest, and my arms are stiff when I walk. I don't have a noticeable tremor, but approximately 25% of PD patients don't. My diagnosis came after ruling out MS, a brain tumor, and a stroke. I would make sure your friend goes to a movement disorders specialist, a neurologist who specializes in Parkinson's. One way of possibly diagnosing PD is for the patient to take carbidopa/levodopa (Sinemet). If their symptoms improve, chances are good he has PD. Check these web sites for more info, and good luck. Answered by Lorrine Fornea 1 year ago.

My dad had Parkinsons and a lot of these things sound similar to what he was doing. The shaking for sure. I would take him to a specialist in Parkinsons. Answered by Clifford Rallison 1 year ago.

If it quacks like a duck... You're describing classic symptoms of Parkinson's. P.S. Huntington's causes people to have jerky, uncontrolled movements, so it doesn't sound like that to me. Answered by Naomi Laube 1 year ago.

You should also look up the signs and symptoms of Huntington's Disease as well. Answered by Winfred Roumeliotis 1 year ago.


WHAT CAN I TAKE FOR BIPOLAR?
Asked by Zenobia Streich 1 year ago.

Better try by counseling with experts... that is best. Treatment usually includes medications (such as mood stabilizers) and professional counseling, and often a combination of both is needed. Bipolar illness is a serious disorder that has a big impact on both the child and his or her family. Successful treatment requires that the child and family members understand what happens in bipolar disorder and that the family members help make sure that the child follows the treatment. It can take time for you and your child to accept that the child has a serious, long-term condition that requires ongoing treatment and constant monitoring. However, keep in mind that by working with your child's doctor, you and your child can find effective treatment for the condition. You and your child's doctor can discuss which treatment is right for your child. Older children and teenagers may want to participate in their own treatment decisions. Initial treatment The first step in determining appropriate treatment for your child with bipolar disorder is evaluating the severity of his or her symptoms. If your child's behavior is suicidal, aggressive, reckless, or dangerous, or if he or she is out of touch with reality (psychotic) or unable to function, the child may need a period of hospitalization. Also, many medications can make the symptoms of bipolar disorder worse, and if your child is taking one of these, he or she may need to taper off and stop the medication. This should only be done under the supervision of a doctor. Initial treatment usually includes medications and counseling. Medications. Medications most often used include: * Mood stabilizers, such as lithium (for example, Eskalith or Lithobid), divalproex (Depakote), carbamazepine (for example, Tegretol), lamotrigine (Lamictal), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), or valproate (Depacon). * Antipsychotics, such as olanzapine (Zyprexa) or risperidone (Risperdal), which your doctor may combine with a mood stabilizer for more effective control of manic episodes. * Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as fluoxetine (for example, Prozac), or other types of antidepressants to control episodes of depression. While antidepressants can be helpful for some children, they might also trigger mania. A doctor will usually prescribe antidepressants with other medications that help regulate mood, and he or she must carefully monitor the child. Before prescribing medicine to treat bipolar disorder, your doctor will check your child for possible suicidal behavior by asking a few questions. See a list of questions your doctor may ask your child. Professional counseling.Counseling works best when symptoms of bipolar disorder are controlled with medications. Several types of therapy may be helpful, depending on the age of the child. These include: * Cognitive-behavioral therapy, which focuses on modifying certain thinking and behavior patterns. * Interpersonal therapy, which focuses on social and personal relationships and related problems. * Problem-solving therapy, a brief type of cognitive therapy that helps you find immediate solutions to problems. * Family therapy, which can help educate and comfort the entire family. * Play therapy for very young children. * Psychological education and support groups. Ongoing treatment Ongoing treatment of bipolar disorder includes long-term treatment with medications and may include professional counseling. Some children and adolescents do not respond to the first medication they try, and they may need to try several different medications to find relief from the symptoms. A combination of medication and professional counseling may be the most effective treatment. An important part of ongoing treatment is making sure your child takes the medication as prescribed. Often people who feel better after taking bipolar medication for a period of time may feel that they are cured and no longer need treatment. However, when a person stops taking medication, symptoms usually return, so it is important that your child follows the treatment plan. Have a nice day... Answered by Niesha Walterscheid 1 year ago.

Lithium would work really good. Just listen to me for a second. Take a look at yourself in the mirror, smile, and I know this sounds weird, but tell yourself you are bi-winning, and not bipolar. It helped me loads :D Answered by Truman Valent 1 year ago.

This should be a question you ask your psychiatrist....... There is nothing over the counter that works for Bipolar. Answered by Bobette Bark 1 year ago.

i am bi polar and at this time my doctor has me on wellburtin,clomazapam,lomazapam,paxil very high dose and it took about 3 years to get the right combination to to help make me feel better.everybodys brain is different and missing different chemicals so we all of us take different meds and dosesI was born without five of the chemicals that help regulate the brain,my sis only 2 like my mom.,you just have to see your therapist and he/she will work with you until your moods have stabalized.have the dsr given you all the tests to see how your brain functions and what chemicals u may be missing as well. Answered by Risa Goranson 1 year ago.

Abilify Geodon Risperdol Lithium ....your prescribing psychiatrist will know more and probably will want to add an antidepressant SSRI along with one of the above "mood stabilizers" Answered by Gloria Fahl 1 year ago.


Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - All rights reserved