Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 009986/002.

Names and composition

"DELTASONE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PREDNISONE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009986/002 DELTASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009986/005 DELTASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009986/006 DELTASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009986/007 DELTASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009986/008 DELTASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009766/001 METICORTEN PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
009766/002 METICORTEN PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
009986/002 DELTASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009986/005 DELTASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009986/006 DELTASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009986/007 DELTASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009986/008 DELTASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
010962/002 PARACORT PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
017109/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
040256/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040256/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040362/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040362/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040362/003 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
040392/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
040538/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040581/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040584/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040611/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040890/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080209/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080223/001 SERVISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080232/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080237/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080279/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080283/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080292/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080293/001 DELTA-DOME PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080300/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080301/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080306/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
080320/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080321/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
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080334/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
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080343/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080350/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080350/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
080350/003 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080352/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080353/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080356/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080359/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080359/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
080359/003 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080371/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080397/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080491/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080506/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080514/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080563/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
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080701/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080782/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
083009/001 ORASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
083009/002 ORASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
083009/003 ORASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
083009/004 ORASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
083059/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
083364/001 FERNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
083676/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
083677/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
083807/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
084122/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
084133/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
084134/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
084236/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
084275/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
084283/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
084341/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
084417/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
084440/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
084440/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
084440/003 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
084634/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
084655/001 PREDNICEN-M PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
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084774/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
084913/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
084913/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085084/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
085115/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
085151/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085161/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085162/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
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085811/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085813/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085999/001 ORASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086061/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
086062/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086595/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086596/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086813/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
086867/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086946/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086968/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
087342/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
087470/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
087471/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
087480/001 CORTAN PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
087611/002 LIQUID PRED PREDNISONE SYRUP/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
087682/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
087701/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
087772/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087773/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
087800/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
087801/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
087833/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087984/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
087985/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
087986/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
088394/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
088395/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
088396/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
088465/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088703/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
088810/001 PREDNISONE INTENSOL PREDNISONE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per ML
088832/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
088865/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
088866/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
088867/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
089028/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089245/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
089246/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089247/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
089387/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
089388/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089389/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
089597/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
089598/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089599/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
089726/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
089983/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089984/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
202020/001 RAYOS PREDNISONE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 1MG
202020/002 RAYOS PREDNISONE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 2MG
202020/003 RAYOS PREDNISONE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 5MG
204867/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 1MG
204867/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 2MG
204867/003 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 5MG

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Does deltasone increase testosterone?
does deltasone increase testosterone Asked by Bethany Holzerland 1 year ago.

No, not at all. It's a "steroid" in the chemical sense of the word as far as it's molecular structure, but its effects are nothing like androgens like testosterone. In fact, long term use of glucocorticoids like deltasone have been shown to reduce testosterone considerably. I've seen declines of 33% cited in some literature. Answered by Shizue Abramovitz 1 year ago.


Buy deltasone online?
Asked by Meda Castrejon 1 year ago.

you can, look at World-Rx.net and do a search - Answered by Deadra Fegles 1 year ago.


Soo a doctor told me to try delasone?
i dnt kno what deltasone does im having chest pain on the left and right side and the middle feels as if its burning im having troouble breathing i feel pain in my neck arm back and a little in my jaw and sumthing in my throat feels swollen...will deltasone help this? Asked by Arnetta Moons 1 year ago.

Deltasone sounds like a cortisone. A doctor has examined you personally and advised, it won;t be proper to support or contradict that. I may only supplement that you need to exclude following two conditions among others- Cervical spondylosis and coronary artery disease. you may suggest that if you go to the same doctor or try another. All the best! Answered by Olimpia Puent 1 year ago.


I dont want my dog to have heart problems....help?
Well she said he had lupus and just gave him those meds. However, i think those meds are only for Systemic Lupus and what my dog has is Discoid Lupus. Asked by Jeanie Lenderman 1 year ago.

I need help deciding what to do. My dogs vet prescribed deltasone for him but she said it will have side effects on his heart. unfortunately, he's been taking it for two days and i dont want to continue giving it to him. What would be best: for my dog to finish what was prescribed to him, or to just stop giving it to him once and for all. Answered by Marian Godek 1 year ago.

Deltasone should not be stopped abruptly.Keep giving it over the weekend then call your vet about weaning him off on Monday. Just read about the lupus,you need to sit down and have a pro and con talk with your vet Answered by Antonio Britz 1 year ago.

I wouldnt just stop giving it to him. I dont know what the vet gave it to him for, I'm not familiar with the med., but, I would talk to the vet the first of the week and tell her your concerns about his heart. Discuss the options and go from there. It might hurt him to just stop the meds though...some things have to be cut back a little at a time.....like I said, not sure why he is taking it, but check back with the vet before just taking him off of it. Hope he's fine. Answered by Lou Driessen 1 year ago.


Which of the following drugs is classified as a topical steriod?
Albuterol (ventolin, Proventil) Salmeterol (Serevent) Fluocinolone (Synalar) Prednisone (Deltasone) Asked by Usha Persechino 1 year ago.

Marie, These details could have been researched personally using your library or the internet. I presume that this method involves less work for you. Your answer should be Fluocinolone (Synalar) which is a topical steroid. Prednisone (Deltasone) is a Corticosteroid, which is a medication that is chemically similar to natural steroids and duplicates their actions. Salmeterol (Serevent) is a long-acting beta2-adrenergic receptor agonist drug that is currently prescribed for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Albuterol (ventolin, Proventil) is a bronchodilator used for asthma and emphysema and other lung conditions. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Toby Hazeltine 1 year ago.

Steroid creams could irritate zits simply by fact bacteria are in touch. Prescription For organic remedies (Balch & Stengler) lists: Vitex; necessary Fatty Acids; zinc; Burdock root; Tea Tree oil; diet A; and homeopathy as effective. The reference additionally has good information and suggestion on eating regimen and different possible effective remedies. good success! Answered by Alene Kock 1 year ago.


Chest discomfort when i shift my weight....heart problem?
it's usually when im sitting or lying down. ive had an EKG, blood tests, x ray done and it's all come back fine. still,at times i have a racing heartbeat and i feel light headed temporarily. the reports say im fine but obviously i havent done all the tests.im also young, 20 years old and no family history... Asked by Louis Stoia 1 year ago.

it's usually when im sitting or lying down. ive had an EKG, blood tests, x ray done and it's all come back fine. still,at times i have a racing heartbeat and i feel light headed temporarily. the reports say im fine but obviously i havent done all the tests. im also young, 20 years old and no family history of heart disease. yet, i keep feeling chest discomfort over the past three months. thanks Answered by Belen Cecot 1 year ago.

Deltasone?? Are you kidding? Why do you need a steroid? That's for a joint like a shoulder. It's not your shoulder is it? It's your heart, right? Crappy answers can kill people. Gotta go with the OBVIOUS answer, which is to, YES, go see your internist, and preferably, cardiologist. If you're (maybe?) morbidly overweight), it's obvious you need to rule out coronary disease. They can do different types of EKG, stress tests, Holter monitor, echocardiogram (ultransound of your heart) to examine further. But I think a stress test of some sort following a basic EKG, would be suitable. Hey, if it's nothing, we can start looking for zebras. You know what they say, "if you hear the sound of hooves, don't go looking for horses" (unless you're in the Serengeti Plains). :) Good luck. Make your appointment soon. If you are seriously overweight EVEN IF they don't find any heart disease, they should consider getting you on "preventitive" medication, ie to keep you from heart attack or stroke. TC Answered by Joaquin Say 1 year ago.

You need to provide allot more info if you want any sort of a reasonable answer such as: Are you standing, sitting, laying down, and does any of these positions change the sensation? Does the pain ever vary in intensity with activity or strenuous activity? Are you ever short of breath? Do you ever get sharp pains in the area as well? Can you feel the pain increase if you palpate or push down over the area? Have you had any episodes of light-headedness or blackout lately or ever? If you can include this info I will check back later and see If I can give you any more ideas. Good Luck Answered by Carlton Solari 1 year ago.

Your heart is not on the left side of your chest; it is in the center of your chest. Answered by Drew Jaster 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
Asked by Dora Schwartze 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Rina Scharbach 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Yael Seiffert 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Loreta Rizzi 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Julieann Desue 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Kelvin Prudent 1 year ago.


Does deltasone increase testosterone?
does deltasone increase testosterone Asked by Sonja Schreuder 1 year ago.

No, not at all. It's a "steroid" in the chemical sense of the word as far as it's molecular structure, but its effects are nothing like androgens like testosterone. In fact, long term use of glucocorticoids like deltasone have been shown to reduce testosterone considerably. I've seen declines of 33% cited in some literature. Answered by Francene Crummitt 1 year ago.


Buy deltasone online?
Asked by Velda Woolford 1 year ago.

you can, look at World-Rx.net and do a search - Answered by Genia Wyker 1 year ago.


Soo a doctor told me to try delasone?
i dnt kno what deltasone does im having chest pain on the left and right side and the middle feels as if its burning im having troouble breathing i feel pain in my neck arm back and a little in my jaw and sumthing in my throat feels swollen...will deltasone help this? Asked by Lanell Verano 1 year ago.

Deltasone sounds like a cortisone. A doctor has examined you personally and advised, it won;t be proper to support or contradict that. I may only supplement that you need to exclude following two conditions among others- Cervical spondylosis and coronary artery disease. you may suggest that if you go to the same doctor or try another. All the best! Answered by Kirstin Bohrman 1 year ago.


I dont want my dog to have heart problems....help?
Well she said he had lupus and just gave him those meds. However, i think those meds are only for Systemic Lupus and what my dog has is Discoid Lupus. Asked by Latashia Smith 1 year ago.

I need help deciding what to do. My dogs vet prescribed deltasone for him but she said it will have side effects on his heart. unfortunately, he's been taking it for two days and i dont want to continue giving it to him. What would be best: for my dog to finish what was prescribed to him, or to just stop giving it to him once and for all. Answered by Georgia Fleeting 1 year ago.

Deltasone should not be stopped abruptly.Keep giving it over the weekend then call your vet about weaning him off on Monday. Just read about the lupus,you need to sit down and have a pro and con talk with your vet Answered by Robbin Loman 1 year ago.

I wouldnt just stop giving it to him. I dont know what the vet gave it to him for, I'm not familiar with the med., but, I would talk to the vet the first of the week and tell her your concerns about his heart. Discuss the options and go from there. It might hurt him to just stop the meds though...some things have to be cut back a little at a time.....like I said, not sure why he is taking it, but check back with the vet before just taking him off of it. Hope he's fine. Answered by Raye Stofflet 1 year ago.


Which of the following drugs is classified as a topical steriod?
Albuterol (ventolin, Proventil) Salmeterol (Serevent) Fluocinolone (Synalar) Prednisone (Deltasone) Asked by Jacqui Hatzenbihler 1 year ago.

Marie, These details could have been researched personally using your library or the internet. I presume that this method involves less work for you. Your answer should be Fluocinolone (Synalar) which is a topical steroid. Prednisone (Deltasone) is a Corticosteroid, which is a medication that is chemically similar to natural steroids and duplicates their actions. Salmeterol (Serevent) is a long-acting beta2-adrenergic receptor agonist drug that is currently prescribed for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Albuterol (ventolin, Proventil) is a bronchodilator used for asthma and emphysema and other lung conditions. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Rina Chung 1 year ago.

Steroid creams could irritate zits simply by fact bacteria are in touch. Prescription For organic remedies (Balch & Stengler) lists: Vitex; necessary Fatty Acids; zinc; Burdock root; Tea Tree oil; diet A; and homeopathy as effective. The reference additionally has good information and suggestion on eating regimen and different possible effective remedies. good success! Answered by Galina Auyong 1 year ago.


Chest discomfort when i shift my weight....heart problem?
it's usually when im sitting or lying down. ive had an EKG, blood tests, x ray done and it's all come back fine. still,at times i have a racing heartbeat and i feel light headed temporarily. the reports say im fine but obviously i havent done all the tests.im also young, 20 years old and no family history... Asked by Gayle Sischo 1 year ago.

it's usually when im sitting or lying down. ive had an EKG, blood tests, x ray done and it's all come back fine. still,at times i have a racing heartbeat and i feel light headed temporarily. the reports say im fine but obviously i havent done all the tests. im also young, 20 years old and no family history of heart disease. yet, i keep feeling chest discomfort over the past three months. thanks Answered by Sharie Hayek 1 year ago.

Deltasone?? Are you kidding? Why do you need a steroid? That's for a joint like a shoulder. It's not your shoulder is it? It's your heart, right? Crappy answers can kill people. Gotta go with the OBVIOUS answer, which is to, YES, go see your internist, and preferably, cardiologist. If you're (maybe?) morbidly overweight), it's obvious you need to rule out coronary disease. They can do different types of EKG, stress tests, Holter monitor, echocardiogram (ultransound of your heart) to examine further. But I think a stress test of some sort following a basic EKG, would be suitable. Hey, if it's nothing, we can start looking for zebras. You know what they say, "if you hear the sound of hooves, don't go looking for horses" (unless you're in the Serengeti Plains). :) Good luck. Make your appointment soon. If you are seriously overweight EVEN IF they don't find any heart disease, they should consider getting you on "preventitive" medication, ie to keep you from heart attack or stroke. TC Answered by Kizzie Rago 1 year ago.

You need to provide allot more info if you want any sort of a reasonable answer such as: Are you standing, sitting, laying down, and does any of these positions change the sensation? Does the pain ever vary in intensity with activity or strenuous activity? Are you ever short of breath? Do you ever get sharp pains in the area as well? Can you feel the pain increase if you palpate or push down over the area? Have you had any episodes of light-headedness or blackout lately or ever? If you can include this info I will check back later and see If I can give you any more ideas. Good Luck Answered by Altagracia Lempicki 1 year ago.

Your heart is not on the left side of your chest; it is in the center of your chest. Answered by Marquetta Filippini 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
Asked by Gayle Dubicki 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Charis Montroy 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Charles Wassman 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Vanda Hahs 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Odelia Theall 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Kathaleen Hissom 1 year ago.


Does deltasone increase testosterone?
does deltasone increase testosterone Asked by Ardelle Blackmon 1 year ago.

No, not at all. It's a "steroid" in the chemical sense of the word as far as it's molecular structure, but its effects are nothing like androgens like testosterone. In fact, long term use of glucocorticoids like deltasone have been shown to reduce testosterone considerably. I've seen declines of 33% cited in some literature. Answered by Loreta Vandunk 1 year ago.


Buy deltasone online?
Asked by Jerlene Rothenberger 1 year ago.

you can, look at World-Rx.net and do a search - Answered by Lemuel Aschenbrenner 1 year ago.


Soo a doctor told me to try delasone?
i dnt kno what deltasone does im having chest pain on the left and right side and the middle feels as if its burning im having troouble breathing i feel pain in my neck arm back and a little in my jaw and sumthing in my throat feels swollen...will deltasone help this? Asked by Nathanial Medford 1 year ago.

Deltasone sounds like a cortisone. A doctor has examined you personally and advised, it won;t be proper to support or contradict that. I may only supplement that you need to exclude following two conditions among others- Cervical spondylosis and coronary artery disease. you may suggest that if you go to the same doctor or try another. All the best! Answered by Marvin Dzuro 1 year ago.


I dont want my dog to have heart problems....help?
Well she said he had lupus and just gave him those meds. However, i think those meds are only for Systemic Lupus and what my dog has is Discoid Lupus. Asked by Venice Alexandria 1 year ago.

I need help deciding what to do. My dogs vet prescribed deltasone for him but she said it will have side effects on his heart. unfortunately, he's been taking it for two days and i dont want to continue giving it to him. What would be best: for my dog to finish what was prescribed to him, or to just stop giving it to him once and for all. Answered by Chad Pruessner 1 year ago.

Deltasone should not be stopped abruptly.Keep giving it over the weekend then call your vet about weaning him off on Monday. Just read about the lupus,you need to sit down and have a pro and con talk with your vet Answered by Evelina Twichell 1 year ago.

I wouldnt just stop giving it to him. I dont know what the vet gave it to him for, I'm not familiar with the med., but, I would talk to the vet the first of the week and tell her your concerns about his heart. Discuss the options and go from there. It might hurt him to just stop the meds though...some things have to be cut back a little at a time.....like I said, not sure why he is taking it, but check back with the vet before just taking him off of it. Hope he's fine. Answered by Yer Rangasammy 1 year ago.


Which of the following drugs is classified as a topical steriod?
Albuterol (ventolin, Proventil) Salmeterol (Serevent) Fluocinolone (Synalar) Prednisone (Deltasone) Asked by Lacresha Demora 1 year ago.

Marie, These details could have been researched personally using your library or the internet. I presume that this method involves less work for you. Your answer should be Fluocinolone (Synalar) which is a topical steroid. Prednisone (Deltasone) is a Corticosteroid, which is a medication that is chemically similar to natural steroids and duplicates their actions. Salmeterol (Serevent) is a long-acting beta2-adrenergic receptor agonist drug that is currently prescribed for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Albuterol (ventolin, Proventil) is a bronchodilator used for asthma and emphysema and other lung conditions. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Paula Mesteth 1 year ago.

Steroid creams could irritate zits simply by fact bacteria are in touch. Prescription For organic remedies (Balch & Stengler) lists: Vitex; necessary Fatty Acids; zinc; Burdock root; Tea Tree oil; diet A; and homeopathy as effective. The reference additionally has good information and suggestion on eating regimen and different possible effective remedies. good success! Answered by Chi Okoye 1 year ago.


Chest discomfort when i shift my weight....heart problem?
it's usually when im sitting or lying down. ive had an EKG, blood tests, x ray done and it's all come back fine. still,at times i have a racing heartbeat and i feel light headed temporarily. the reports say im fine but obviously i havent done all the tests.im also young, 20 years old and no family history... Asked by Elisa Huhn 1 year ago.

it's usually when im sitting or lying down. ive had an EKG, blood tests, x ray done and it's all come back fine. still,at times i have a racing heartbeat and i feel light headed temporarily. the reports say im fine but obviously i havent done all the tests. im also young, 20 years old and no family history of heart disease. yet, i keep feeling chest discomfort over the past three months. thanks Answered by Tawanna Amiot 1 year ago.

Deltasone?? Are you kidding? Why do you need a steroid? That's for a joint like a shoulder. It's not your shoulder is it? It's your heart, right? Crappy answers can kill people. Gotta go with the OBVIOUS answer, which is to, YES, go see your internist, and preferably, cardiologist. If you're (maybe?) morbidly overweight), it's obvious you need to rule out coronary disease. They can do different types of EKG, stress tests, Holter monitor, echocardiogram (ultransound of your heart) to examine further. But I think a stress test of some sort following a basic EKG, would be suitable. Hey, if it's nothing, we can start looking for zebras. You know what they say, "if you hear the sound of hooves, don't go looking for horses" (unless you're in the Serengeti Plains). :) Good luck. Make your appointment soon. If you are seriously overweight EVEN IF they don't find any heart disease, they should consider getting you on "preventitive" medication, ie to keep you from heart attack or stroke. TC Answered by Clarence Citizen 1 year ago.

You need to provide allot more info if you want any sort of a reasonable answer such as: Are you standing, sitting, laying down, and does any of these positions change the sensation? Does the pain ever vary in intensity with activity or strenuous activity? Are you ever short of breath? Do you ever get sharp pains in the area as well? Can you feel the pain increase if you palpate or push down over the area? Have you had any episodes of light-headedness or blackout lately or ever? If you can include this info I will check back later and see If I can give you any more ideas. Good Luck Answered by Dale Kolber 1 year ago.

Your heart is not on the left side of your chest; it is in the center of your chest. Answered by Alexander Kingry 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
Asked by Florance Timas 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Fannie Claghorn 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Elisabeth Gerry 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Flora Starken 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Ione Broccolo 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Deon Zearfoss 1 year ago.


Does deltasone increase testosterone?
does deltasone increase testosterone Asked by Jose Chicoine 1 year ago.

No, not at all. It's a "steroid" in the chemical sense of the word as far as it's molecular structure, but its effects are nothing like androgens like testosterone. In fact, long term use of glucocorticoids like deltasone have been shown to reduce testosterone considerably. I've seen declines of 33% cited in some literature. Answered by Rosy Tabarez 1 year ago.


Buy deltasone online?
Asked by Essie Swindler 1 year ago.

you can, look at World-Rx.net and do a search - Answered by Reatha Krabill 1 year ago.


Soo a doctor told me to try delasone?
i dnt kno what deltasone does im having chest pain on the left and right side and the middle feels as if its burning im having troouble breathing i feel pain in my neck arm back and a little in my jaw and sumthing in my throat feels swollen...will deltasone help this? Asked by Wilfredo Jericho 1 year ago.

Deltasone sounds like a cortisone. A doctor has examined you personally and advised, it won;t be proper to support or contradict that. I may only supplement that you need to exclude following two conditions among others- Cervical spondylosis and coronary artery disease. you may suggest that if you go to the same doctor or try another. All the best! Answered by Karla Brockhouse 1 year ago.


I dont want my dog to have heart problems....help?
Well she said he had lupus and just gave him those meds. However, i think those meds are only for Systemic Lupus and what my dog has is Discoid Lupus. Asked by Thaddeus Fridell 1 year ago.

I need help deciding what to do. My dogs vet prescribed deltasone for him but she said it will have side effects on his heart. unfortunately, he's been taking it for two days and i dont want to continue giving it to him. What would be best: for my dog to finish what was prescribed to him, or to just stop giving it to him once and for all. Answered by Karole Jokinen 1 year ago.

Deltasone should not be stopped abruptly.Keep giving it over the weekend then call your vet about weaning him off on Monday. Just read about the lupus,you need to sit down and have a pro and con talk with your vet Answered by Cherryl Smitreski 1 year ago.

I wouldnt just stop giving it to him. I dont know what the vet gave it to him for, I'm not familiar with the med., but, I would talk to the vet the first of the week and tell her your concerns about his heart. Discuss the options and go from there. It might hurt him to just stop the meds though...some things have to be cut back a little at a time.....like I said, not sure why he is taking it, but check back with the vet before just taking him off of it. Hope he's fine. Answered by Eun Macvane 1 year ago.


Which of the following drugs is classified as a topical steriod?
Albuterol (ventolin, Proventil) Salmeterol (Serevent) Fluocinolone (Synalar) Prednisone (Deltasone) Asked by Marilou Grev 1 year ago.

Marie, These details could have been researched personally using your library or the internet. I presume that this method involves less work for you. Your answer should be Fluocinolone (Synalar) which is a topical steroid. Prednisone (Deltasone) is a Corticosteroid, which is a medication that is chemically similar to natural steroids and duplicates their actions. Salmeterol (Serevent) is a long-acting beta2-adrenergic receptor agonist drug that is currently prescribed for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Albuterol (ventolin, Proventil) is a bronchodilator used for asthma and emphysema and other lung conditions. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Tricia Brooks 1 year ago.

Steroid creams could irritate zits simply by fact bacteria are in touch. Prescription For organic remedies (Balch & Stengler) lists: Vitex; necessary Fatty Acids; zinc; Burdock root; Tea Tree oil; diet A; and homeopathy as effective. The reference additionally has good information and suggestion on eating regimen and different possible effective remedies. good success! Answered by Carlena Mccammon 1 year ago.


Chest discomfort when i shift my weight....heart problem?
it's usually when im sitting or lying down. ive had an EKG, blood tests, x ray done and it's all come back fine. still,at times i have a racing heartbeat and i feel light headed temporarily. the reports say im fine but obviously i havent done all the tests.im also young, 20 years old and no family history... Asked by Jona Woodie 1 year ago.

it's usually when im sitting or lying down. ive had an EKG, blood tests, x ray done and it's all come back fine. still,at times i have a racing heartbeat and i feel light headed temporarily. the reports say im fine but obviously i havent done all the tests. im also young, 20 years old and no family history of heart disease. yet, i keep feeling chest discomfort over the past three months. thanks Answered by Venessa Bronder 1 year ago.

Deltasone?? Are you kidding? Why do you need a steroid? That's for a joint like a shoulder. It's not your shoulder is it? It's your heart, right? Crappy answers can kill people. Gotta go with the OBVIOUS answer, which is to, YES, go see your internist, and preferably, cardiologist. If you're (maybe?) morbidly overweight), it's obvious you need to rule out coronary disease. They can do different types of EKG, stress tests, Holter monitor, echocardiogram (ultransound of your heart) to examine further. But I think a stress test of some sort following a basic EKG, would be suitable. Hey, if it's nothing, we can start looking for zebras. You know what they say, "if you hear the sound of hooves, don't go looking for horses" (unless you're in the Serengeti Plains). :) Good luck. Make your appointment soon. If you are seriously overweight EVEN IF they don't find any heart disease, they should consider getting you on "preventitive" medication, ie to keep you from heart attack or stroke. TC Answered by Flo Merrow 1 year ago.

You need to provide allot more info if you want any sort of a reasonable answer such as: Are you standing, sitting, laying down, and does any of these positions change the sensation? Does the pain ever vary in intensity with activity or strenuous activity? Are you ever short of breath? Do you ever get sharp pains in the area as well? Can you feel the pain increase if you palpate or push down over the area? Have you had any episodes of light-headedness or blackout lately or ever? If you can include this info I will check back later and see If I can give you any more ideas. Good Luck Answered by Polly Roose 1 year ago.

Your heart is not on the left side of your chest; it is in the center of your chest. Answered by Josette Benell 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
Asked by Christiane Burritt 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Alfredia Turrentine 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Jorge Balhorn 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Armand Pecore 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Cathleen Perotta 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Blythe Colbenson 1 year ago.


Does deltasone increase testosterone?
does deltasone increase testosterone Asked by Arnoldo Mone 1 year ago.

No, not at all. It's a "steroid" in the chemical sense of the word as far as it's molecular structure, but its effects are nothing like androgens like testosterone. In fact, long term use of glucocorticoids like deltasone have been shown to reduce testosterone considerably. I've seen declines of 33% cited in some literature. Answered by Foster Chalifoux 1 year ago.


Buy deltasone online?
Asked by Angelita Shipp 1 year ago.

you can, look at World-Rx.net and do a search - Answered by Hermila Pashel 1 year ago.


Soo a doctor told me to try delasone?
i dnt kno what deltasone does im having chest pain on the left and right side and the middle feels as if its burning im having troouble breathing i feel pain in my neck arm back and a little in my jaw and sumthing in my throat feels swollen...will deltasone help this? Asked by Roxanne Blankenbecler 1 year ago.

Deltasone sounds like a cortisone. A doctor has examined you personally and advised, it won;t be proper to support or contradict that. I may only supplement that you need to exclude following two conditions among others- Cervical spondylosis and coronary artery disease. you may suggest that if you go to the same doctor or try another. All the best! Answered by Goldie Turansky 1 year ago.


I dont want my dog to have heart problems....help?
Well she said he had lupus and just gave him those meds. However, i think those meds are only for Systemic Lupus and what my dog has is Discoid Lupus. Asked by Jettie Jinenez 1 year ago.

I need help deciding what to do. My dogs vet prescribed deltasone for him but she said it will have side effects on his heart. unfortunately, he's been taking it for two days and i dont want to continue giving it to him. What would be best: for my dog to finish what was prescribed to him, or to just stop giving it to him once and for all. Answered by Heidy Rippey 1 year ago.

Deltasone should not be stopped abruptly.Keep giving it over the weekend then call your vet about weaning him off on Monday. Just read about the lupus,you need to sit down and have a pro and con talk with your vet Answered by Lashandra Gruwell 1 year ago.

I wouldnt just stop giving it to him. I dont know what the vet gave it to him for, I'm not familiar with the med., but, I would talk to the vet the first of the week and tell her your concerns about his heart. Discuss the options and go from there. It might hurt him to just stop the meds though...some things have to be cut back a little at a time.....like I said, not sure why he is taking it, but check back with the vet before just taking him off of it. Hope he's fine. Answered by Jon Rector 1 year ago.


Which of the following drugs is classified as a topical steriod?
Albuterol (ventolin, Proventil) Salmeterol (Serevent) Fluocinolone (Synalar) Prednisone (Deltasone) Asked by Deangelo Daste 1 year ago.

Marie, These details could have been researched personally using your library or the internet. I presume that this method involves less work for you. Your answer should be Fluocinolone (Synalar) which is a topical steroid. Prednisone (Deltasone) is a Corticosteroid, which is a medication that is chemically similar to natural steroids and duplicates their actions. Salmeterol (Serevent) is a long-acting beta2-adrenergic receptor agonist drug that is currently prescribed for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Albuterol (ventolin, Proventil) is a bronchodilator used for asthma and emphysema and other lung conditions. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Jacquline Rostad 1 year ago.

Steroid creams could irritate zits simply by fact bacteria are in touch. Prescription For organic remedies (Balch & Stengler) lists: Vitex; necessary Fatty Acids; zinc; Burdock root; Tea Tree oil; diet A; and homeopathy as effective. The reference additionally has good information and suggestion on eating regimen and different possible effective remedies. good success! Answered by Enda Siliezar 1 year ago.


Chest discomfort when i shift my weight....heart problem?
it's usually when im sitting or lying down. ive had an EKG, blood tests, x ray done and it's all come back fine. still,at times i have a racing heartbeat and i feel light headed temporarily. the reports say im fine but obviously i havent done all the tests.im also young, 20 years old and no family history... Asked by Harley Doby 1 year ago.

it's usually when im sitting or lying down. ive had an EKG, blood tests, x ray done and it's all come back fine. still,at times i have a racing heartbeat and i feel light headed temporarily. the reports say im fine but obviously i havent done all the tests. im also young, 20 years old and no family history of heart disease. yet, i keep feeling chest discomfort over the past three months. thanks Answered by Lonna Huffstutler 1 year ago.

Deltasone?? Are you kidding? Why do you need a steroid? That's for a joint like a shoulder. It's not your shoulder is it? It's your heart, right? Crappy answers can kill people. Gotta go with the OBVIOUS answer, which is to, YES, go see your internist, and preferably, cardiologist. If you're (maybe?) morbidly overweight), it's obvious you need to rule out coronary disease. They can do different types of EKG, stress tests, Holter monitor, echocardiogram (ultransound of your heart) to examine further. But I think a stress test of some sort following a basic EKG, would be suitable. Hey, if it's nothing, we can start looking for zebras. You know what they say, "if you hear the sound of hooves, don't go looking for horses" (unless you're in the Serengeti Plains). :) Good luck. Make your appointment soon. If you are seriously overweight EVEN IF they don't find any heart disease, they should consider getting you on "preventitive" medication, ie to keep you from heart attack or stroke. TC Answered by Clemencia Scherzer 1 year ago.

You need to provide allot more info if you want any sort of a reasonable answer such as: Are you standing, sitting, laying down, and does any of these positions change the sensation? Does the pain ever vary in intensity with activity or strenuous activity? Are you ever short of breath? Do you ever get sharp pains in the area as well? Can you feel the pain increase if you palpate or push down over the area? Have you had any episodes of light-headedness or blackout lately or ever? If you can include this info I will check back later and see If I can give you any more ideas. Good Luck Answered by Darrell Giampaolo 1 year ago.

Your heart is not on the left side of your chest; it is in the center of your chest. Answered by Johnette Schaich 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
Asked by Jerold Pernell 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Jamaal Nishitani 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Machelle Vicente 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Janis Chesser 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Terica Wyatt 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Deandre Brailey 1 year ago.


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