Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016861/001.

Names and composition

"DARVON-N" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016861/001 DARVON-N PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE SUSPENSION/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
016862/002 DARVON-N PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE TABLET/ORAL 100MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016861/001 DARVON-N PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE SUSPENSION/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
016862/002 DARVON-N PROPOXYPHENE NAPSYLATE TABLET/ORAL 100MG

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Answered questions

What is darvon n 100mg?
Asked by Kris Speares 1 year ago.

Darvon-N 100 is a prescription narcotic painkiller. Each tablet contains 100 milligrams of propoxyphene napsylate (the narcotic) and 650 milligrams of acetaminophen (an additional painkiller). It is a strong painkiller used to treat moderate to severe pain and it also has cough suppressant properties. Answered by Tamekia Riggleman 1 year ago.

Darvocet N-100 is acetaminophen 650 mg (the equivalent of two regular-strength Tylenol) and 100 mg of propoxyphene napsylate (the equivalent of 65 mg propoxyphene sodium, which is what's in a Darvon-65). The effect of the two is partly additive, so the pain relief is better than taking two regular-strength Tylenol alone, but probably not better than taking two extra-strength Tylenol, though the propoxyphene also often gives a mild euphoric feeling that some people find useful, and some people like too much. It's something of a silly combination, because most people need to take two to get any reasonable level of pain relief, and over any period of time, that risks an acetaminophen overdose. Answered by Carlyn Holbein 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what is darvon n 100mg? Answered by Jerilyn Wolfsberger 1 year ago.

What Is Darvon Answered by Karissa Martsolf 1 year ago.

Its not anything to worry about 100mg over dont worry about. vocdin and lortab can have side effects you didnt have to make your self puke it will wear off. Answered by Mariano Isola 1 year ago.

can it be used to treat opiate withdrawal? Answered by Mardell Dolese 1 year ago.


Does the prescription drug Darvon-N cause headaches?
I have recently been prescribed Darvon-N for rhumatoid arthritis pain. It greatly takes the pain away, but I have been having terrible headaches. Is this a normal side effect of Darvon-N? Asked by Carita Fitzer 1 year ago.

I wouldn't say it's a normal side effect, but it has been reported, particularly with too high of a dose. Do you have any kidney disease, per chance? Are you taking as prescribed? Do you usually tolerate tylenol well? If so, perhaps you have a sensitivity to the propoxyphene napsylate. Are you drinking a full glass of water with each dose? If your headaches are terrible, you may want to hold off on further dosages and call the doctor on Monday. Answered by Kirby Doore 1 year ago.

typically no, It usually, if anything, makes them go away. That being said any drug can cause any side effect. It's probably just coincidental in it coming on at the same time. Answered by Jolene Half 1 year ago.

BECAUSE IT'S A DRUG..YOU SHOULD STICK WITH NATURAL HERBS... Answered by Danica Selmon 1 year ago.


Which is a stonger drug? Darvocet or Darvon-N?
My dad usually takes Darvon-N for arthritis pain, but he just had surgery and the told him they could only give him Darvocet. Is there any difference? Asked by Clint Bieler 1 year ago.

No, they're about the same (contain Darvon)......however, Darvocet contains acetaminophen. Neither controls severe pain very efficiently, but helps with mild pain. Answered by Kirby Vanderhorst 1 year ago.

What someone's mom said - they are both mild narcotics with Darvocet containing acetomminophen (Tylenol). Of the two, the Darvocet would probably be ''stonger' as it has an additional pain reliever, but it would depend on the amount of the effective drugs....... Answered by Gregory Malys 1 year ago.


Will i get addicted to darvon?
I was prescribed darvon n and i am scared to take it. Will it get me "high?" I heard people get addicted to it. Asked by Farrah Reddig 1 year ago.

Darvon is a synthetic opiate and yes, it can be addictive. I was in rehab for opiate dependancy and Darvon was prescribed to help me come off of the harder narcotic drugs I had been abusing (such as Vicodin, Percocet, etc). If you are prone to addictive behaviors, let your doctor know. Otherwise just dont take more than what was prescribed and dont take it for any longer than you need to. Answered by Enriqueta Parada 1 year ago.


Will it get addicted to darvon?
I was prescribed darvon n and i am scared to take it. Will it get me "high?" I heard people get addicted to it. Asked by Qiana Gillming 1 year ago.

Darvon, a dextropropxyphene made by Eli Lilly, which had been on the market for 25 years, came under heavy fire in 1978 by consumer groups that said it was associated with suicide. Darvon was never withdrawn from the market, but Lilly has waged a sweeping, and largely successful, campaign among doctors, pharmacists and Darvon users to defend the drug as safe when it is used in proper doses and not mixed with alcohol. Dextropropoxyphene is subject to some controversy: while many physicians prescribe it for a wide range of mildly to moderately painful symptoms as well as for treatment of diarrhoea, many others refuse to prescribe it, citing its highly addictive nature and limited effectiveness. The therapeutic index of dextroproxyphene is relatively small. In the UK, dextropropoxyphene and co-proxamol are now discouraged from general use; and, since 2004, preparations containing only dextropropoxyphene have been discontinued. This has been a somewhat controversial decision, since it has caused abusers to switch to the combined product and risk acetaminophen toxicity. Australia declined to follow suit and opted to allow pure dextropropoxyphene to remain available by prescription. In the United States, dextropropoxyphene HCl is available as a prescription formulation with acetaminophen in ratio anywhere from 30mg / 600mg to 100mg / 650mg, respectively. These are usually named "Darvocet." On the other hand, "Darvon" is a pure Propoxyphene preparation available in the U.S. that does not contain acetaminophen. In Australia, dextropropoxyphene is available on prescription, both as a combined product (32.5mg dextropropoxyphene per 325mg acetaminophen) known as either "Di-gesic", "Capadex", or "Paradex," and in pure form (100mg capsules) known as "Doloxene". You should read the site below for more information Answered by Kim Kemmler 1 year ago.

As a mental health professional with 20+ years experience, now retired, much of my practice which was involved in alcohol and other drug abuse and dependence, I must advise you that at some time, and often times sooner than many people want to, you must allow the person to "sink or swim" on their own. Many rehab programs say that dealing with addictions is not a matter of will, but then, as you read further down the small print, you find that they say the very revealing words: "Of course, the success or failure of the individual in our program depends on their level of participation and adherence to the program". In more readable words, what they're saying is EXACTLY what they said wasn't true, that the success or failure of an individual in dealing with their addiction IS a matter of will, THEIR will, and others can't keep running around trying to rescue them from their relapses. Those that do, like yourself, are called co-dependents, and aren't helpful to the addicts success, but help in their failure. So, you can worry about his symptoms and what you "should do" now, and every successive time he relapses, and wear yourself out on an endless downward spiral of addiction, or you can drop him until he very successfully achieves sobriety over a specified period of time. One thing you each may find is that you don't need each other, because that's what an addiction relationship is, a NEED, rather than a WANT. You may find you don't need him anymore, and you may finally realize it's a NEED you've been addressing in ya'll's relationship, and he may discover he doesn't NEED you either. As tough as that sounds, at least you have the opportunity to find a relationship you and your partner WANT, as opposed to NEED. God Bless you. Answered by Tinisha Wigren 1 year ago.


A question about propoxyphene?
How much propoxyphene (mg) would it take to overdose? Asked by Krishna Reinecke 1 year ago.

Propoxyphene (Darvocet, Darvon, Darvon-N,) is a opiate agonist which works like other opiates such as morphine, codeine etc.. The maximum amount of propoxyphene that can be taken safely in one day is 390 mg (6 Darvon capsules). Do not exceed this amount. Lethal doses occur in humans anywhere from 9 to 19 mg per kilogram of body weight. 1 kilogram = 2.2 pounds. Symptoms of a propoxyphene overdose include slow breathing or absence of breathing, seizures, dizziness, weakness, loss of consciousness, coma, confusion, tiredness, cold and clammy skin, and constricted (small) pupils. It's a horrible way to go, so just don't mess with the stuff. Answered by Serita Leapheart 1 year ago.

Propoxyphene Recreational Use Answered by Pedro Seider 1 year ago.

What is the most important information I should know about propoxyphene? • Do not stop taking propoxyphene suddenly if you have been taking it continuously for more than 5 to 7 days. Stopping suddenly could cause withdrawal symptoms and make you very uncomfortable. Your doctor may want to gradually reduce your dose. • Do not take propoxyphene if you suffer from depression or have suicidal thoughts. • Propoxyphene will cause drowsiness and fatigue. Avoid alcohol, sleeping pills, antihistamines, sedatives, and tranquilizers except under the supervision of your doctor. These may also make you drowsy. • Propoxyphene will also cause constipation. Drink plenty of water (six to eight full glasses a day) to lessen this side effect. Increasing the amount of fiber in your diet can also help to alleviate constipation. • Never take more propoxyphene than is prescribed for you. If your pain is not being adequately treated, talk to your doctor. What is propoxyphene? • Propoxyphene is in a class of drugs called narcotic analgesics. It relieves pain. • Propoxyphene is used to treat moderate-to-severe pain. • Propoxyphene may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Who should not take propoxyphene? • Propoxyphene is habit forming and should only be used under close supervision if you have an alcohol or drug addiction. • Propoxyphene should not be taken if you suffer from depression or have suicidal thoughts. • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have · kidney disease; · liver disease; · asthma; · urinary retention; · an enlarged prostate; · hypothyroidism; · seizures or epilepsy; · gallbladder disease; · a head injury; or · Addison's disease. • You may not be able to take propoxyphene, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Propoxyphene may cause addiction and withdrawal symptoms as well as other harmful effects in an unborn baby. Do not take propoxyphene without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. • Propoxyphene may also cause addiction and withdrawal symptoms in a nursing baby. Do not take propoxyphene without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. • Children younger than 12 years of age should not take propoxyphene. • If you are older than 60 years you may be more likely to experience side effects from propoxyphene therapy. Use extra caution. How should I take propoxyphene? • Take propoxyphene exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Take propoxyphene with food or milk if it upsets your stomach. • Never take more of this medication than is prescribed for you. Too much propoxyphene could be very harmful. The maximum amount of propoxyphene that can be taken safely in one day is 390 mg (6 Darvon capsules). Do not exceed this amount. • Do not stop taking propoxyphene suddenly if you have been taking it continuously for more than 5 to 7 days. Stopping suddenly could cause withdrawal symptoms and make you feel uncomfortable. Your doctor may want to gradually reduce your dose. • Increase the amount of fiber and water (six to eight full glasses daily) in your diet to prevent constipation. • Do not share this medication with anyone else. • Store propoxyphene at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Do not take a double dose of this medication. Wait the prescribed amount of time before taking your next dose. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • Symptoms of a propoxyphene overdose include slow breathing, seizures, dizziness, weakness, loss of consciousness, coma, confusion, tiredness, cold and clammy skin, and small pupils. What should I avoid while taking propoxyphene? • Avoid alcohol while taking propoxyphene. Alcohol will greatly increase the drowsiness and dizziness caused by propoxyphene and could be dangerous. • Also avoid sleeping pills, tranquilizers, sedatives, and antihistamines except under the supervision of your doctor. These medications also may cause dangerous sedation. • Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Propoxyphene may cause drowsiness. If you experience drowsiness, avoid these activities. What are the possible side effects of propoxyphene? • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking propoxyphene and seek emergency medical attention: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · slow, weak breathing; · seizures; · cold, clammy skin; · unconsciousness; or · severe weakness or dizziness. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take propoxyphene and talk to your doctor if you experience · constipation; · dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, or decreased appetite; · dizziness, tiredness, or lightheadedness; · muscle twitches; · sweating; · itching; · decreased urination; or · decreased sex drive. • Propoxyphene is habit forming. Do not stop taking it suddenly. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect propoxyphene? • Propoxyphene may increase the effects of oral anticoagulants such as warfarin (Coumadin), which could lead to bleeding. It may also increase the effects of carbamazepine (Tegretol), which could lead to dangerous side effects. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking either of these medications. • Do not take propoxyphene if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. Dangerous side effects could result. • The most serious interactions affecting propoxyphene are with those drugs that also cause sedation. The following drugs may lead to dangerous sedation if taken with propoxyphene: · antihistamines such as brompheniramine (Dimetane, Bromfed, others), diphenhydramine (Benadryl, Nytol, Compoz, others), chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton, Teldrin, others), and others; · tricyclic antidepressants, such as amitriptyline (Elavil) and doxepin (Sinequan), and serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil); · other commonly used antidepressants, including amoxapine (Asendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and protriptyline (Vivactil); · anticholinergics such as belladonna (Donnatal), clidinium (Quarzan), dicyclomine (Bentyl, Antispas), hyoscyamine (Levsin, Anaspaz), ipratropium (Atrovent), propantheline (Pro-Banthine), and scopolamine (Transderm-Scop); · phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), thioridazine (Mellaril), and prochlorperazine (Compazine); and · tranquilizers and sedatives such as phenobarbital (Solfoton, Luminal), amobarbital (Amytal), secobarbital (Seconal), alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), lorazepam (Ativan), flurazepam (Prosom), and temazepam (Restoril). • Do not take any of the drugs listed above without the approval of your doctor. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with propoxyphene. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about propoxyphene written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Dextropropoxyphene is an analgesic in the opioid category. It is used to treat mild to moderate pain and as an antitussive. It can be used to ease pain before, during and after an operation. It is often combined with acetaminophen in the preparation co-proxamol (Darvocet in the US and CAPADEX in AUS). It is an optical isomer of Levopropoxyphene. The racemic mixture is called Propoxyphene. Some preparations that contain dextropoxyphene include: Distalgesic and Doloxene. Indications [edit] Analgesia Dextropropoxyphene, like codeine, is a "weak" opioid. Codeine is more commonly used, however some individuals (approximately 10-20% of the Caucasian population) are unable to metabolize it, due to poor functioning of the enzyme CYP2D6. It is in these people that dextropropoxyphene is particularly useful, as its metabolism does not require CYP2D6. [edit] Opioid withdrawal In pure form, dextropropoxyphene is commonly used to ease the withdrawal symptoms in people addicted to opioids. Being very weak in comparison to the opioids that are commonly abused, dextropropoxyphene can only act as a "partial" substitute. It does not have much effect on mental cravings; however it can be effective in alleviating physical withdrawal effects, such as muscle cramps. Dextropropoxyphene is subject to some controversy: while many physicians prescribe it for a wide range of mildly to moderately painful symptoms as well as for treatment of diarrhoea, many others refuse to prescribe it, citing its highly addictive nature and limited effectiveness (some studies show it to be no more effective as a painkiller than aspirin). The therapeutic index of dextroproxyphene is relatively small. In the UK, dextropropoxyphene and co-proxamol are now discouraged from general use; and, since 2004, preparations containing only dextropropoxyphene have been discontinued. This has been a somewhat controversial decision, since it has caused abusers to switch to the combined product and risk acetaminophen toxicity. Australia declined to follow suit and opted to allow pure dextropropoxyphene to remain available by prescription. In the United States, dextropropoxyphene HCl is available as a prescription formulation with acetaminophen in ratio anywhere from 30mg / 600mg to 60mg / 325mg, respectively. These are usually named "Darvocet." On the other hand, "Darvon" is a pure Propoxyphene preparation available in the U.S. that does not contain acetaminophen. In Australia, dextropropoxyphene is available on prescription, both as a combined product (32.5mg dextropropoxyphene per 325mg acetaminophen) known as either "Di-gesic", "Capadex", or "Paradex," and in pure form (100mg capsules) known as "Doloxene". [edit] Adverse effects Darvocet overdose is commonly broken into two categories: liver toxicity (from acetaminophen poisoning) and dextropropoxyphene overdose. Many users experience toxic effects from the acetaminophen in pursuit of the endlessly-increasing dose required to achieve euphoria. They suffer acute liver toxicity, which causes severe stomach pain, nausea, and vomiting (all of which are increased by light or stimulation of the sense of sight). Dextropropoxyphene also has several other non-opioid side-effects. Both propoxyphene and its metabolite norpropoxyphene, have local anesthetic effects at concentrations about 10 times those necessary for opioid effects. In this respect, norpropoxyphene is more potent than propoxyphene, and they are both more potent than lidocaine.[1] Both propoxyphene and norpropoxyphene also have direct cardiac effects which include decreased heart rate, decreased contractility, and decreased electrical conductivity (ie, increased PR, AH, HV, and QRS intervals). Norpropoxyphene is several times more potent than propoxyphene in this activity. These effects appear to be due to their local anesthetic activity and are not reversed by naloxone.[1][2][3] Both propoxyphene and norpropoxyphene are potent blockers of cardiac membrane sodium channels and are more potent than lidocaine, quinidine, and procainamide in this respect.[4] They (propoxyphene and nor-propoxyphene) appear to have the characteristics of a Vaughn Williams Class IC antiarrhythmic. [edit] Toxicologic Mechanism A) Excessive opioid receptor stimulation is responsible for the CNS depression, respiratory depression, miosis, and gastrointestional effects seen in propoxyphene poisoning. It may also account for mood/thought altering effects. B) Local anesthetic activity appears to be responsible for the arrhythmias and cardiovascular depression seen in propoxyphene poisoning.[3] Widening of the QRS complex appears to be a result of a quinidine-like effect of propoxyphene, and sodium bicarbonate therapy appears to have a positive direct effect on the QRS dysrhythmia.[5] C) Seizures may result from either opioid or local anesthetic effects.[1] D) Pulmonary edema may result from direct pulmonary toxicity, neurogenic/anoxic effects, or cardiovascular depression.[3] [edit] Recreational use Recreational users tend to take anywhere from 240 to 420 milligrams of dextropropoxyphene (and the acetaminophen that goes with it). These users often suffer a persistent dry mouth, decreased appetite, urinary retention and constipation that may lead to diverticulitis. Dextropropoxyphene Hydrochloride is also used in the so-called "Darvon cocktail". Answered by Alex Budy 1 year ago.


What is darvon n 100mg?
Asked by Darline Breining 1 year ago.

Darvon-N 100 is a prescription narcotic painkiller. Each tablet contains 100 milligrams of propoxyphene napsylate (the narcotic) and 650 milligrams of acetaminophen (an additional painkiller). It is a strong painkiller used to treat moderate to severe pain and it also has cough suppressant properties. Answered by Tuyet Vonbraunsberg 1 year ago.

Darvocet N-100 is acetaminophen 650 mg (the equivalent of two regular-strength Tylenol) and 100 mg of propoxyphene napsylate (the equivalent of 65 mg propoxyphene sodium, which is what's in a Darvon-65). The effect of the two is partly additive, so the pain relief is better than taking two regular-strength Tylenol alone, but probably not better than taking two extra-strength Tylenol, though the propoxyphene also often gives a mild euphoric feeling that some people find useful, and some people like too much. It's something of a silly combination, because most people need to take two to get any reasonable level of pain relief, and over any period of time, that risks an acetaminophen overdose. Answered by Edra Hartgrove 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what is darvon n 100mg? Answered by Felicia Carlin 1 year ago.

What Is Darvon Answered by Aleisha Deckert 1 year ago.

Its not anything to worry about 100mg over dont worry about. vocdin and lortab can have side effects you didnt have to make your self puke it will wear off. Answered by Beverley Kovarovic 1 year ago.

can it be used to treat opiate withdrawal? Answered by Gretchen Previte 1 year ago.


Does the prescription drug Darvon-N cause headaches?
I have recently been prescribed Darvon-N for rhumatoid arthritis pain. It greatly takes the pain away, but I have been having terrible headaches. Is this a normal side effect of Darvon-N? Asked by Laquita Palmieri 1 year ago.

I wouldn't say it's a normal side effect, but it has been reported, particularly with too high of a dose. Do you have any kidney disease, per chance? Are you taking as prescribed? Do you usually tolerate tylenol well? If so, perhaps you have a sensitivity to the propoxyphene napsylate. Are you drinking a full glass of water with each dose? If your headaches are terrible, you may want to hold off on further dosages and call the doctor on Monday. Answered by Evangeline Beshara 1 year ago.

typically no, It usually, if anything, makes them go away. That being said any drug can cause any side effect. It's probably just coincidental in it coming on at the same time. Answered by Lance Goick 1 year ago.

BECAUSE IT'S A DRUG..YOU SHOULD STICK WITH NATURAL HERBS... Answered by Madaline Ogan 1 year ago.


Which is a stonger drug? Darvocet or Darvon-N?
My dad usually takes Darvon-N for arthritis pain, but he just had surgery and the told him they could only give him Darvocet. Is there any difference? Asked by Carolee Golojuch 1 year ago.

No, they're about the same (contain Darvon)......however, Darvocet contains acetaminophen. Neither controls severe pain very efficiently, but helps with mild pain. Answered by Emmy Ruddick 1 year ago.

What someone's mom said - they are both mild narcotics with Darvocet containing acetomminophen (Tylenol). Of the two, the Darvocet would probably be ''stonger' as it has an additional pain reliever, but it would depend on the amount of the effective drugs....... Answered by Diane Buttaro 1 year ago.


Will i get addicted to darvon?
I was prescribed darvon n and i am scared to take it. Will it get me "high?" I heard people get addicted to it. Asked by Lynsey Mountford 1 year ago.

Darvon is a synthetic opiate and yes, it can be addictive. I was in rehab for opiate dependancy and Darvon was prescribed to help me come off of the harder narcotic drugs I had been abusing (such as Vicodin, Percocet, etc). If you are prone to addictive behaviors, let your doctor know. Otherwise just dont take more than what was prescribed and dont take it for any longer than you need to. Answered by Londa Masure 1 year ago.


Will it get addicted to darvon?
I was prescribed darvon n and i am scared to take it. Will it get me "high?" I heard people get addicted to it. Asked by Blanch Hartstein 1 year ago.

Darvon, a dextropropxyphene made by Eli Lilly, which had been on the market for 25 years, came under heavy fire in 1978 by consumer groups that said it was associated with suicide. Darvon was never withdrawn from the market, but Lilly has waged a sweeping, and largely successful, campaign among doctors, pharmacists and Darvon users to defend the drug as safe when it is used in proper doses and not mixed with alcohol. Dextropropoxyphene is subject to some controversy: while many physicians prescribe it for a wide range of mildly to moderately painful symptoms as well as for treatment of diarrhoea, many others refuse to prescribe it, citing its highly addictive nature and limited effectiveness. The therapeutic index of dextroproxyphene is relatively small. In the UK, dextropropoxyphene and co-proxamol are now discouraged from general use; and, since 2004, preparations containing only dextropropoxyphene have been discontinued. This has been a somewhat controversial decision, since it has caused abusers to switch to the combined product and risk acetaminophen toxicity. Australia declined to follow suit and opted to allow pure dextropropoxyphene to remain available by prescription. In the United States, dextropropoxyphene HCl is available as a prescription formulation with acetaminophen in ratio anywhere from 30mg / 600mg to 100mg / 650mg, respectively. These are usually named "Darvocet." On the other hand, "Darvon" is a pure Propoxyphene preparation available in the U.S. that does not contain acetaminophen. In Australia, dextropropoxyphene is available on prescription, both as a combined product (32.5mg dextropropoxyphene per 325mg acetaminophen) known as either "Di-gesic", "Capadex", or "Paradex," and in pure form (100mg capsules) known as "Doloxene". You should read the site below for more information Answered by Dwain Spaide 1 year ago.

As a mental health professional with 20+ years experience, now retired, much of my practice which was involved in alcohol and other drug abuse and dependence, I must advise you that at some time, and often times sooner than many people want to, you must allow the person to "sink or swim" on their own. Many rehab programs say that dealing with addictions is not a matter of will, but then, as you read further down the small print, you find that they say the very revealing words: "Of course, the success or failure of the individual in our program depends on their level of participation and adherence to the program". In more readable words, what they're saying is EXACTLY what they said wasn't true, that the success or failure of an individual in dealing with their addiction IS a matter of will, THEIR will, and others can't keep running around trying to rescue them from their relapses. Those that do, like yourself, are called co-dependents, and aren't helpful to the addicts success, but help in their failure. So, you can worry about his symptoms and what you "should do" now, and every successive time he relapses, and wear yourself out on an endless downward spiral of addiction, or you can drop him until he very successfully achieves sobriety over a specified period of time. One thing you each may find is that you don't need each other, because that's what an addiction relationship is, a NEED, rather than a WANT. You may find you don't need him anymore, and you may finally realize it's a NEED you've been addressing in ya'll's relationship, and he may discover he doesn't NEED you either. As tough as that sounds, at least you have the opportunity to find a relationship you and your partner WANT, as opposed to NEED. God Bless you. Answered by Trinity Cante 1 year ago.


A question about propoxyphene?
How much propoxyphene (mg) would it take to overdose? Asked by Ophelia Cryder 1 year ago.

Propoxyphene (Darvocet, Darvon, Darvon-N,) is a opiate agonist which works like other opiates such as morphine, codeine etc.. The maximum amount of propoxyphene that can be taken safely in one day is 390 mg (6 Darvon capsules). Do not exceed this amount. Lethal doses occur in humans anywhere from 9 to 19 mg per kilogram of body weight. 1 kilogram = 2.2 pounds. Symptoms of a propoxyphene overdose include slow breathing or absence of breathing, seizures, dizziness, weakness, loss of consciousness, coma, confusion, tiredness, cold and clammy skin, and constricted (small) pupils. It's a horrible way to go, so just don't mess with the stuff. Answered by Vonda Laviola 1 year ago.

Propoxyphene Recreational Use Answered by Una Boock 1 year ago.

What is the most important information I should know about propoxyphene? • Do not stop taking propoxyphene suddenly if you have been taking it continuously for more than 5 to 7 days. Stopping suddenly could cause withdrawal symptoms and make you very uncomfortable. Your doctor may want to gradually reduce your dose. • Do not take propoxyphene if you suffer from depression or have suicidal thoughts. • Propoxyphene will cause drowsiness and fatigue. Avoid alcohol, sleeping pills, antihistamines, sedatives, and tranquilizers except under the supervision of your doctor. These may also make you drowsy. • Propoxyphene will also cause constipation. Drink plenty of water (six to eight full glasses a day) to lessen this side effect. Increasing the amount of fiber in your diet can also help to alleviate constipation. • Never take more propoxyphene than is prescribed for you. If your pain is not being adequately treated, talk to your doctor. What is propoxyphene? • Propoxyphene is in a class of drugs called narcotic analgesics. It relieves pain. • Propoxyphene is used to treat moderate-to-severe pain. • Propoxyphene may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Who should not take propoxyphene? • Propoxyphene is habit forming and should only be used under close supervision if you have an alcohol or drug addiction. • Propoxyphene should not be taken if you suffer from depression or have suicidal thoughts. • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have · kidney disease; · liver disease; · asthma; · urinary retention; · an enlarged prostate; · hypothyroidism; · seizures or epilepsy; · gallbladder disease; · a head injury; or · Addison's disease. • You may not be able to take propoxyphene, or you may require a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Propoxyphene may cause addiction and withdrawal symptoms as well as other harmful effects in an unborn baby. Do not take propoxyphene without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. • Propoxyphene may also cause addiction and withdrawal symptoms in a nursing baby. Do not take propoxyphene without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. • Children younger than 12 years of age should not take propoxyphene. • If you are older than 60 years you may be more likely to experience side effects from propoxyphene therapy. Use extra caution. How should I take propoxyphene? • Take propoxyphene exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Take propoxyphene with food or milk if it upsets your stomach. • Never take more of this medication than is prescribed for you. Too much propoxyphene could be very harmful. The maximum amount of propoxyphene that can be taken safely in one day is 390 mg (6 Darvon capsules). Do not exceed this amount. • Do not stop taking propoxyphene suddenly if you have been taking it continuously for more than 5 to 7 days. Stopping suddenly could cause withdrawal symptoms and make you feel uncomfortable. Your doctor may want to gradually reduce your dose. • Increase the amount of fiber and water (six to eight full glasses daily) in your diet to prevent constipation. • Do not share this medication with anyone else. • Store propoxyphene at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Do not take a double dose of this medication. Wait the prescribed amount of time before taking your next dose. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention. • Symptoms of a propoxyphene overdose include slow breathing, seizures, dizziness, weakness, loss of consciousness, coma, confusion, tiredness, cold and clammy skin, and small pupils. What should I avoid while taking propoxyphene? • Avoid alcohol while taking propoxyphene. Alcohol will greatly increase the drowsiness and dizziness caused by propoxyphene and could be dangerous. • Also avoid sleeping pills, tranquilizers, sedatives, and antihistamines except under the supervision of your doctor. These medications also may cause dangerous sedation. • Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Propoxyphene may cause drowsiness. If you experience drowsiness, avoid these activities. What are the possible side effects of propoxyphene? • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking propoxyphene and seek emergency medical attention: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · slow, weak breathing; · seizures; · cold, clammy skin; · unconsciousness; or · severe weakness or dizziness. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take propoxyphene and talk to your doctor if you experience · constipation; · dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, or decreased appetite; · dizziness, tiredness, or lightheadedness; · muscle twitches; · sweating; · itching; · decreased urination; or · decreased sex drive. • Propoxyphene is habit forming. Do not stop taking it suddenly. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect propoxyphene? • Propoxyphene may increase the effects of oral anticoagulants such as warfarin (Coumadin), which could lead to bleeding. It may also increase the effects of carbamazepine (Tegretol), which could lead to dangerous side effects. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking either of these medications. • Do not take propoxyphene if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. Dangerous side effects could result. • The most serious interactions affecting propoxyphene are with those drugs that also cause sedation. The following drugs may lead to dangerous sedation if taken with propoxyphene: · antihistamines such as brompheniramine (Dimetane, Bromfed, others), diphenhydramine (Benadryl, Nytol, Compoz, others), chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton, Teldrin, others), and others; · tricyclic antidepressants, such as amitriptyline (Elavil) and doxepin (Sinequan), and serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil); · other commonly used antidepressants, including amoxapine (Asendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and protriptyline (Vivactil); · anticholinergics such as belladonna (Donnatal), clidinium (Quarzan), dicyclomine (Bentyl, Antispas), hyoscyamine (Levsin, Anaspaz), ipratropium (Atrovent), propantheline (Pro-Banthine), and scopolamine (Transderm-Scop); · phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), thioridazine (Mellaril), and prochlorperazine (Compazine); and · tranquilizers and sedatives such as phenobarbital (Solfoton, Luminal), amobarbital (Amytal), secobarbital (Seconal), alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), lorazepam (Ativan), flurazepam (Prosom), and temazepam (Restoril). • Do not take any of the drugs listed above without the approval of your doctor. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with propoxyphene. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about propoxyphene written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Dextropropoxyphene is an analgesic in the opioid category. It is used to treat mild to moderate pain and as an antitussive. It can be used to ease pain before, during and after an operation. It is often combined with acetaminophen in the preparation co-proxamol (Darvocet in the US and CAPADEX in AUS). It is an optical isomer of Levopropoxyphene. The racemic mixture is called Propoxyphene. Some preparations that contain dextropoxyphene include: Distalgesic and Doloxene. Indications [edit] Analgesia Dextropropoxyphene, like codeine, is a "weak" opioid. Codeine is more commonly used, however some individuals (approximately 10-20% of the Caucasian population) are unable to metabolize it, due to poor functioning of the enzyme CYP2D6. It is in these people that dextropropoxyphene is particularly useful, as its metabolism does not require CYP2D6. [edit] Opioid withdrawal In pure form, dextropropoxyphene is commonly used to ease the withdrawal symptoms in people addicted to opioids. Being very weak in comparison to the opioids that are commonly abused, dextropropoxyphene can only act as a "partial" substitute. It does not have much effect on mental cravings; however it can be effective in alleviating physical withdrawal effects, such as muscle cramps. Dextropropoxyphene is subject to some controversy: while many physicians prescribe it for a wide range of mildly to moderately painful symptoms as well as for treatment of diarrhoea, many others refuse to prescribe it, citing its highly addictive nature and limited effectiveness (some studies show it to be no more effective as a painkiller than aspirin). The therapeutic index of dextroproxyphene is relatively small. In the UK, dextropropoxyphene and co-proxamol are now discouraged from general use; and, since 2004, preparations containing only dextropropoxyphene have been discontinued. This has been a somewhat controversial decision, since it has caused abusers to switch to the combined product and risk acetaminophen toxicity. Australia declined to follow suit and opted to allow pure dextropropoxyphene to remain available by prescription. In the United States, dextropropoxyphene HCl is available as a prescription formulation with acetaminophen in ratio anywhere from 30mg / 600mg to 60mg / 325mg, respectively. These are usually named "Darvocet." On the other hand, "Darvon" is a pure Propoxyphene preparation available in the U.S. that does not contain acetaminophen. In Australia, dextropropoxyphene is available on prescription, both as a combined product (32.5mg dextropropoxyphene per 325mg acetaminophen) known as either "Di-gesic", "Capadex", or "Paradex," and in pure form (100mg capsules) known as "Doloxene". [edit] Adverse effects Darvocet overdose is commonly broken into two categories: liver toxicity (from acetaminophen poisoning) and dextropropoxyphene overdose. Many users experience toxic effects from the acetaminophen in pursuit of the endlessly-increasing dose required to achieve euphoria. They suffer acute liver toxicity, which causes severe stomach pain, nausea, and vomiting (all of which are increased by light or stimulation of the sense of sight). Dextropropoxyphene also has several other non-opioid side-effects. Both propoxyphene and its metabolite norpropoxyphene, have local anesthetic effects at concentrations about 10 times those necessary for opioid effects. In this respect, norpropoxyphene is more potent than propoxyphene, and they are both more potent than lidocaine.[1] Both propoxyphene and norpropoxyphene also have direct cardiac effects which include decreased heart rate, decreased contractility, and decreased electrical conductivity (ie, increased PR, AH, HV, and QRS intervals). Norpropoxyphene is several times more potent than propoxyphene in this activity. These effects appear to be due to their local anesthetic activity and are not reversed by naloxone.[1][2][3] Both propoxyphene and norpropoxyphene are potent blockers of cardiac membrane sodium channels and are more potent than lidocaine, quinidine, and procainamide in this respect.[4] They (propoxyphene and nor-propoxyphene) appear to have the characteristics of a Vaughn Williams Class IC antiarrhythmic. [edit] Toxicologic Mechanism A) Excessive opioid receptor stimulation is responsible for the CNS depression, respiratory depression, miosis, and gastrointestional effects seen in propoxyphene poisoning. It may also account for mood/thought altering effects. B) Local anesthetic activity appears to be responsible for the arrhythmias and cardiovascular depression seen in propoxyphene poisoning.[3] Widening of the QRS complex appears to be a result of a quinidine-like effect of propoxyphene, and sodium bicarbonate therapy appears to have a positive direct effect on the QRS dysrhythmia.[5] C) Seizures may result from either opioid or local anesthetic effects.[1] D) Pulmonary edema may result from direct pulmonary toxicity, neurogenic/anoxic effects, or cardiovascular depression.[3] [edit] Recreational use Recreational users tend to take anywhere from 240 to 420 milligrams of dextropropoxyphene (and the acetaminophen that goes with it). These users often suffer a persistent dry mouth, decreased appetite, urinary retention and constipation that may lead to diverticulitis. Dextropropoxyphene Hydrochloride is also used in the so-called "Darvon cocktail". Answered by Basil Plevin 1 year ago.


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