Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 010997/001.

Names and composition

"DARVON" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010997/001 DARVON PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 32MG
010997/003 DARVON PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010997/001 DARVON PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 32MG
010997/003 DARVON PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
040569/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
040908/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
080269/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
080530/001 DOLENE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
080783/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
080908/002 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
083089/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 32MG
083089/002 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
083113/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
083125/002 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
083184/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
083185/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
083186/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
083278/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
083299/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
083317/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
083464/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 32MG
083501/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
083528/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 32MG
083538/002 PROPHENE 65 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
083544/001 KESSO-GESIC PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
083597/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 32MG
083688/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
083786/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE 65 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
083870/002 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
084014/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 32MG
084551/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
085190/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
086495/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG
088615/001 PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE PROPOXYPHENE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 65MG

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Has anyone ever takin Darvon?
This is no help to me and has nothing to do with my question? Asked by Jessi Hausner 1 year ago.

Always. It's the only way to live! She told me that just last night! Hey! I was spent... Answered by Johnette Palmo 1 year ago.


Will it get addicted to darvon?
I was prescribed darvon n and i am scared to take it. Will it get me "high?" I heard people get addicted to it. Asked by Amber Tiley 1 year ago.

Darvon, a dextropropxyphene made by Eli Lilly, which had been on the market for 25 years, came under heavy fire in 1978 by consumer groups that said it was associated with suicide. Darvon was never withdrawn from the market, but Lilly has waged a sweeping, and largely successful, campaign among doctors, pharmacists and Darvon users to defend the drug as safe when it is used in proper doses and not mixed with alcohol. Dextropropoxyphene is subject to some controversy: while many physicians prescribe it for a wide range of mildly to moderately painful symptoms as well as for treatment of diarrhoea, many others refuse to prescribe it, citing its highly addictive nature and limited effectiveness. The therapeutic index of dextroproxyphene is relatively small. In the UK, dextropropoxyphene and co-proxamol are now discouraged from general use; and, since 2004, preparations containing only dextropropoxyphene have been discontinued. This has been a somewhat controversial decision, since it has caused abusers to switch to the combined product and risk acetaminophen toxicity. Australia declined to follow suit and opted to allow pure dextropropoxyphene to remain available by prescription. In the United States, dextropropoxyphene HCl is available as a prescription formulation with acetaminophen in ratio anywhere from 30mg / 600mg to 100mg / 650mg, respectively. These are usually named "Darvocet." On the other hand, "Darvon" is a pure Propoxyphene preparation available in the U.S. that does not contain acetaminophen. In Australia, dextropropoxyphene is available on prescription, both as a combined product (32.5mg dextropropoxyphene per 325mg acetaminophen) known as either "Di-gesic", "Capadex", or "Paradex," and in pure form (100mg capsules) known as "Doloxene". You should read the site below for more information Answered by Diego Reffner 1 year ago.

As a mental health professional with 20+ years experience, now retired, much of my practice which was involved in alcohol and other drug abuse and dependence, I must advise you that at some time, and often times sooner than many people want to, you must allow the person to "sink or swim" on their own. Many rehab programs say that dealing with addictions is not a matter of will, but then, as you read further down the small print, you find that they say the very revealing words: "Of course, the success or failure of the individual in our program depends on their level of participation and adherence to the program". In more readable words, what they're saying is EXACTLY what they said wasn't true, that the success or failure of an individual in dealing with their addiction IS a matter of will, THEIR will, and others can't keep running around trying to rescue them from their relapses. Those that do, like yourself, are called co-dependents, and aren't helpful to the addicts success, but help in their failure. So, you can worry about his symptoms and what you "should do" now, and every successive time he relapses, and wear yourself out on an endless downward spiral of addiction, or you can drop him until he very successfully achieves sobriety over a specified period of time. One thing you each may find is that you don't need each other, because that's what an addiction relationship is, a NEED, rather than a WANT. You may find you don't need him anymore, and you may finally realize it's a NEED you've been addressing in ya'll's relationship, and he may discover he doesn't NEED you either. As tough as that sounds, at least you have the opportunity to find a relationship you and your partner WANT, as opposed to NEED. God Bless you. Answered by Kiersten Olores 1 year ago.


How does darvon work?
i have kidney stones and whenever they occur i take vicodin which my doctor prescribed me but whenever i do, i become very sick from the vicodin. i heard darvon does the same thing as vicodin but it doesnt make you sick. does anyone know if this is true or not? Asked by Freeda Carvalno 1 year ago.

darvon/darvocet is a weird drug. any doc that is honest will tell you that nobody is really sure how it works. in the 70's it was the 3rd most prescribed drug behind lithium and valium. then people started dying from overdoses. then ralph nader did an investigation and docs started moving to safer drugs like lortab/lorcet/vicodin. if you can't take lortab/vicodin it's probably because of the codiene. my patients who have codiene sensitivity tend to do much better on ultram or toradol. there was a study done in the early 80's that showed darvon was no more effective than aspirin. i find that hard to believe since darvon is addictive and aspirin isn't. talk to your doc about what he would suggest. i'll bet darvon doesn't come up in the conversation. percocet might be an alternative but you're still dealing dealing with the codiene factor. darvon is in the methadone family which, despite governmental denial, is highly addictive. the manufacturer, eli lilly, was forced at one point to reissue the package insert to say that it is not more effective than 2 normal aspirin. so there it is. there's a ton of info on the interweb about it. Answered by Cherie Zanchez 1 year ago.

I have the same problem, and do not take anything with an opiate in it. Darvocet works well on any kind of pain that tylenol or motrin doesn't. I know docs are really strung on the opiates in the past few years, but there appears to be more to the hydrocodone addictions than to the darvons or perhaps they are the same. But for me, I would rather have the darvocet and be pain free than to over use the vicodins/loritabs and never be pain free. Toradol works well with the injection, but not much with the pills and the pills are hard on the stomach. Answered by Yong Yarborough 1 year ago.


Will i get addicted to darvon?
I was prescribed darvon n and i am scared to take it. Will it get me "high?" I heard people get addicted to it. Asked by Billy Traino 1 year ago.

Darvon is a synthetic opiate and yes, it can be addictive. I was in rehab for opiate dependancy and Darvon was prescribed to help me come off of the harder narcotic drugs I had been abusing (such as Vicodin, Percocet, etc). If you are prone to addictive behaviors, let your doctor know. Otherwise just dont take more than what was prescribed and dont take it for any longer than you need to. Answered by Jeanene Outen 1 year ago.


How is a Darvon cocktail made and used?
First, let me preface this by saying: I am NOT interested in actually trying this! I'm writing a screenplay where a character is suicidal and tries this. Answers from an actual doctor on the methods and (more importantly to my story) effects of the Darvon cocktail would be greatly appreciated. Asked by Chiquita Mestrovich 1 year ago.

Darvon is commonly used to commit suicide in a combination of others drugs, known as a Darvon cocktail. Dextropropoxyphene (Darvon) is used as a pain killer because it is an opiate. Given this, it lowers blood pressure and suppresses breathing. Therefore, when taken in a Darvon cocktail, the person will fall asleep until eventually they stop breathing. An over dose of the drug will stop breathing anyway so you dont need anything else... Answered by Bradly Hurtt 1 year ago.

Darvon Cocktail Answered by Tereasa Keiter 1 year ago.

idk how its used... but its made with juice Answered by Judy Mistry 1 year ago.


Does Darvon show a positive for opiates on a instant drug test?
I have a prescription for darvon, I tested positive for opiates on my drug screen, but i was told darvon would not show up as an opiate, there is a seperate test for it. I am not not being believed about just taking darvon (which I showed them the prescription for) they think I took some other kind of opiate. It is... Asked by Zola Razey 1 year ago.

I have a prescription for darvon, I tested positive for opiates on my drug screen, but i was told darvon would not show up as an opiate, there is a seperate test for it. I am not not being believed about just taking darvon (which I showed them the prescription for) they think I took some other kind of opiate. It is being sent off to a lab for confirmation, can anyone tell me if it will still show as an opiate after confirmation, or do you think it will change to the correct drug witch is darvon-PROPOXYPHENE. Answered by Renae Vaughan 1 year ago.

Darvon is a synthetic opiate, so it is no surprise it would show up on an initial drug screen. The lab confirmation should verify that it is Darvon. There is a chance that urine samples have been mixed up and someone else who is actually using some illicit opiates peed in a bottle that now has your name on it. I don't know who is testing you, but if they know what they are doing they are very VERY picky about making absolutely 100% certain that a bottle of pee with your name on it is definitely your pee. For instance, you signature should be on the bottle. Also, the bottle should be sealed with, for instance a paper label with your signature on it. When the results come back, E-Mail me and let me know what happened. Answered by Evie Kehm 1 year ago.


Can Dilaudid and Darvon be taken together? ?
Prognosis is 6 mos has been on taking prescription pain relievers for 15 years for back pain, Now has Lung cancer Stage 4 Asked by Humberto Beckles 1 year ago.

This person could take Darvon and Dilaudid together without any real risk. If the Darvon somehow helps this person's chronic back pain and has for 15 years, there is no need to stop it because of the Dilaudid for the cancer discomfort. Darvon is a much weaker opiate compared with Dilaudid, but it has no narcotic antagonist effect. It's always a good idea to discuss this with the oncologist and primary care physicians who are managing this person's care. They know the full details of the case. Anything that works to provide comfort is OK for people facing the last six months of life due to an incurable malignancy. I've always though propoxyphene (Darvon) was fairly ineffective for real pain relief, but some people seem to feel it helps them. Whatever works is OK in my book for Hospice patients. Answered by Bernadine Liddell 1 year ago.

When I was on dilaudid they told me not to take anything at all with it without asking cause it interacts with lots of meds badly. Darvon is a relatively low pain killer - not much theraputic use except when you need something a little stronger than asprin and something that won't affect your mind much. I would ask - the risks may be higher than the help it will give you. If you are in the US you could call a 24 hour pharmacy - tell them you have 2 prescriptions prescribed at different times, you use their pharmacy sometimes, can they tell you whether or not to take them together. Talk to the pharmacist. Answered by Sharita Warboys 1 year ago.

I certainly wouldn't. Dilaudid will make you hallucinate. I know because I was in the hospital seeing vampires in my hospital room. I turned into a werewolf and attacked the guy in the next bed. Blood was everywhere. Whew, I need to stay off that stuff. Answered by Winter Barden 1 year ago.

Unless these were prescribed for you, no don't take those together. Answered by Shera Cayo 1 year ago.


Has anyone ever takin Darvon?
This is no help to me and has nothing to do with my question? Asked by Kareem Borruso 1 year ago.

Always. It's the only way to live! She told me that just last night! Hey! I was spent... Answered by Cicely Alepin 1 year ago.


Will it get addicted to darvon?
I was prescribed darvon n and i am scared to take it. Will it get me "high?" I heard people get addicted to it. Asked by Miesha Mceneny 1 year ago.

Darvon, a dextropropxyphene made by Eli Lilly, which had been on the market for 25 years, came under heavy fire in 1978 by consumer groups that said it was associated with suicide. Darvon was never withdrawn from the market, but Lilly has waged a sweeping, and largely successful, campaign among doctors, pharmacists and Darvon users to defend the drug as safe when it is used in proper doses and not mixed with alcohol. Dextropropoxyphene is subject to some controversy: while many physicians prescribe it for a wide range of mildly to moderately painful symptoms as well as for treatment of diarrhoea, many others refuse to prescribe it, citing its highly addictive nature and limited effectiveness. The therapeutic index of dextroproxyphene is relatively small. In the UK, dextropropoxyphene and co-proxamol are now discouraged from general use; and, since 2004, preparations containing only dextropropoxyphene have been discontinued. This has been a somewhat controversial decision, since it has caused abusers to switch to the combined product and risk acetaminophen toxicity. Australia declined to follow suit and opted to allow pure dextropropoxyphene to remain available by prescription. In the United States, dextropropoxyphene HCl is available as a prescription formulation with acetaminophen in ratio anywhere from 30mg / 600mg to 100mg / 650mg, respectively. These are usually named "Darvocet." On the other hand, "Darvon" is a pure Propoxyphene preparation available in the U.S. that does not contain acetaminophen. In Australia, dextropropoxyphene is available on prescription, both as a combined product (32.5mg dextropropoxyphene per 325mg acetaminophen) known as either "Di-gesic", "Capadex", or "Paradex," and in pure form (100mg capsules) known as "Doloxene". You should read the site below for more information Answered by Dana Heckford 1 year ago.

As a mental health professional with 20+ years experience, now retired, much of my practice which was involved in alcohol and other drug abuse and dependence, I must advise you that at some time, and often times sooner than many people want to, you must allow the person to "sink or swim" on their own. Many rehab programs say that dealing with addictions is not a matter of will, but then, as you read further down the small print, you find that they say the very revealing words: "Of course, the success or failure of the individual in our program depends on their level of participation and adherence to the program". In more readable words, what they're saying is EXACTLY what they said wasn't true, that the success or failure of an individual in dealing with their addiction IS a matter of will, THEIR will, and others can't keep running around trying to rescue them from their relapses. Those that do, like yourself, are called co-dependents, and aren't helpful to the addicts success, but help in their failure. So, you can worry about his symptoms and what you "should do" now, and every successive time he relapses, and wear yourself out on an endless downward spiral of addiction, or you can drop him until he very successfully achieves sobriety over a specified period of time. One thing you each may find is that you don't need each other, because that's what an addiction relationship is, a NEED, rather than a WANT. You may find you don't need him anymore, and you may finally realize it's a NEED you've been addressing in ya'll's relationship, and he may discover he doesn't NEED you either. As tough as that sounds, at least you have the opportunity to find a relationship you and your partner WANT, as opposed to NEED. God Bless you. Answered by Fernanda Lucke 1 year ago.


How does darvon work?
i have kidney stones and whenever they occur i take vicodin which my doctor prescribed me but whenever i do, i become very sick from the vicodin. i heard darvon does the same thing as vicodin but it doesnt make you sick. does anyone know if this is true or not? Asked by Kecia Hasselbarth 1 year ago.

darvon/darvocet is a weird drug. any doc that is honest will tell you that nobody is really sure how it works. in the 70's it was the 3rd most prescribed drug behind lithium and valium. then people started dying from overdoses. then ralph nader did an investigation and docs started moving to safer drugs like lortab/lorcet/vicodin. if you can't take lortab/vicodin it's probably because of the codiene. my patients who have codiene sensitivity tend to do much better on ultram or toradol. there was a study done in the early 80's that showed darvon was no more effective than aspirin. i find that hard to believe since darvon is addictive and aspirin isn't. talk to your doc about what he would suggest. i'll bet darvon doesn't come up in the conversation. percocet might be an alternative but you're still dealing dealing with the codiene factor. darvon is in the methadone family which, despite governmental denial, is highly addictive. the manufacturer, eli lilly, was forced at one point to reissue the package insert to say that it is not more effective than 2 normal aspirin. so there it is. there's a ton of info on the interweb about it. Answered by Jewel Mcdoniel 1 year ago.

I have the same problem, and do not take anything with an opiate in it. Darvocet works well on any kind of pain that tylenol or motrin doesn't. I know docs are really strung on the opiates in the past few years, but there appears to be more to the hydrocodone addictions than to the darvons or perhaps they are the same. But for me, I would rather have the darvocet and be pain free than to over use the vicodins/loritabs and never be pain free. Toradol works well with the injection, but not much with the pills and the pills are hard on the stomach. Answered by Bernadine Mccully 1 year ago.


Will i get addicted to darvon?
I was prescribed darvon n and i am scared to take it. Will it get me "high?" I heard people get addicted to it. Asked by Eusebia Stoyle 1 year ago.

Darvon is a synthetic opiate and yes, it can be addictive. I was in rehab for opiate dependancy and Darvon was prescribed to help me come off of the harder narcotic drugs I had been abusing (such as Vicodin, Percocet, etc). If you are prone to addictive behaviors, let your doctor know. Otherwise just dont take more than what was prescribed and dont take it for any longer than you need to. Answered by Sacha Oren 1 year ago.


How is a Darvon cocktail made and used?
First, let me preface this by saying: I am NOT interested in actually trying this! I'm writing a screenplay where a character is suicidal and tries this. Answers from an actual doctor on the methods and (more importantly to my story) effects of the Darvon cocktail would be greatly appreciated. Asked by Charline Himmel 1 year ago.

Darvon is commonly used to commit suicide in a combination of others drugs, known as a Darvon cocktail. Dextropropoxyphene (Darvon) is used as a pain killer because it is an opiate. Given this, it lowers blood pressure and suppresses breathing. Therefore, when taken in a Darvon cocktail, the person will fall asleep until eventually they stop breathing. An over dose of the drug will stop breathing anyway so you dont need anything else... Answered by Sid Couzens 1 year ago.

Darvon Cocktail Answered by Vinita Straub 1 year ago.

idk how its used... but its made with juice Answered by Ludie Galante 1 year ago.


Does Darvon show a positive for opiates on a instant drug test?
I have a prescription for darvon, I tested positive for opiates on my drug screen, but i was told darvon would not show up as an opiate, there is a seperate test for it. I am not not being believed about just taking darvon (which I showed them the prescription for) they think I took some other kind of opiate. It is... Asked by Erline Capehart 1 year ago.

I have a prescription for darvon, I tested positive for opiates on my drug screen, but i was told darvon would not show up as an opiate, there is a seperate test for it. I am not not being believed about just taking darvon (which I showed them the prescription for) they think I took some other kind of opiate. It is being sent off to a lab for confirmation, can anyone tell me if it will still show as an opiate after confirmation, or do you think it will change to the correct drug witch is darvon-PROPOXYPHENE. Answered by Shawnda Thurstonson 1 year ago.

Darvon is a synthetic opiate, so it is no surprise it would show up on an initial drug screen. The lab confirmation should verify that it is Darvon. There is a chance that urine samples have been mixed up and someone else who is actually using some illicit opiates peed in a bottle that now has your name on it. I don't know who is testing you, but if they know what they are doing they are very VERY picky about making absolutely 100% certain that a bottle of pee with your name on it is definitely your pee. For instance, you signature should be on the bottle. Also, the bottle should be sealed with, for instance a paper label with your signature on it. When the results come back, E-Mail me and let me know what happened. Answered by Dante Santa 1 year ago.


Can Dilaudid and Darvon be taken together? ?
Prognosis is 6 mos has been on taking prescription pain relievers for 15 years for back pain, Now has Lung cancer Stage 4 Asked by Eloy Siriani 1 year ago.

This person could take Darvon and Dilaudid together without any real risk. If the Darvon somehow helps this person's chronic back pain and has for 15 years, there is no need to stop it because of the Dilaudid for the cancer discomfort. Darvon is a much weaker opiate compared with Dilaudid, but it has no narcotic antagonist effect. It's always a good idea to discuss this with the oncologist and primary care physicians who are managing this person's care. They know the full details of the case. Anything that works to provide comfort is OK for people facing the last six months of life due to an incurable malignancy. I've always though propoxyphene (Darvon) was fairly ineffective for real pain relief, but some people seem to feel it helps them. Whatever works is OK in my book for Hospice patients. Answered by Hanna Summerour 1 year ago.

When I was on dilaudid they told me not to take anything at all with it without asking cause it interacts with lots of meds badly. Darvon is a relatively low pain killer - not much theraputic use except when you need something a little stronger than asprin and something that won't affect your mind much. I would ask - the risks may be higher than the help it will give you. If you are in the US you could call a 24 hour pharmacy - tell them you have 2 prescriptions prescribed at different times, you use their pharmacy sometimes, can they tell you whether or not to take them together. Talk to the pharmacist. Answered by Joanne Petrossian 1 year ago.

I certainly wouldn't. Dilaudid will make you hallucinate. I know because I was in the hospital seeing vampires in my hospital room. I turned into a werewolf and attacked the guy in the next bed. Blood was everywhere. Whew, I need to stay off that stuff. Answered by Marchelle Zollars 1 year ago.

Unless these were prescribed for you, no don't take those together. Answered by Coral Stower 1 year ago.


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