DACTINOMYCIN Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 090304/001.

Names and composition

"DACTINOMYCIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DACTINOMYCIN.

Answered questions

Post chemotherapy knee/leg pain? Read details?
He has not been on any meds., other than the occasional Benedryl, since chemo. Asked by Iola Schilmoeller 3 months ago.

My 4 1/2 yr old son has been off treatment for a Wilms Tumor since January 2006. He was given Vincristine, Doxyrubicin and Dactinomycin. In August 2006 he started complaining of knee and leg pain. It is not growing pains. Has anyone else, who has been through chemo., had or have this problem???? I know of a few other children (that have had the same form of cancer as my son) that are also experiencing this. No answers so far as to why.... Answered by Elodia Woolems 3 months ago.

Veer Sir.. I understood your situation.. You have used a Language of Tamil in your answer.. But you should provide english meaning to that tamil words.. If not.. Its a violation.. Some people are here to report the Questions & Answers unnecessarily.. Yahoo! staff members dont know the language Tamil.. So you have to ask appeal and you should tell the reason that you have not posted any unwanted things or Violation things.. Then after Yahoo! will accept your appeal and approve it.. It happened to me many a times and i won all my violation reports.. Hope you got it.. have a good luck... Answered by Lashonda Palacios 3 months ago.

Chemo patients often experience what are frequenty referred to as "bone flares" for up to several years after their treatments. I don't know about the specific drug combo that your little guy had, but I know that it's not particularly uncommon. For me, not much has helped and the docs are somewhat at a loss as to what to do for the pain. What helps most is heat and massage. I'd say talk to your son's oncologist and go from there. Hang tough...it sucks, but the only failure comes in giving up. Answered by Katheryn Maaske 3 months ago.

This is really a question for your son's doctors. Can they say it isn't gout? If there is enough destruction of tumor cells, uric acid levels can go up and crystals can deposit in the joints. I could make a bunch of wild guesses, but in the end, if you don't like your doctors' answers, ask them to refer you to a pediatric rheumatologist, preferably one with experience with cancer patients. Answered by Doretta Catmull 3 months ago.

YOU NEED TO PUSH THAT CHEMO OUT OF YOUR CHILD SO HE CAN HEAL.GO ON-LINE AND TYPE IN THE WORD black seed and order the gel caps.IT WORKS AND IS ALL-NATURAL.I HAVE THE PATENTS AND CAN E-MAIL OR MAIL THEM TO YOU.IT IS 13 PAGES [email protected] MAKE NO MONEY OUT OF THIS.ALSO MAKE SURE HE EATS YOGURT DAILY,AS LONG AS HE IS ON THOSE ANTIBIOTICS.HE HAS NO FLORA IN HIS BODY.ANTIBIOTICS NOT ONLY KILL INFECTIONS BUT KILLS ALL THE ACIDOLFOLUS(FLORA) IN YOUR BODY.PLEASE PASS THE WORD.ASK HIS DOCTOR SHOULD HE BE TAKING ACIDOLFOLUS WHILE TAKING ANTIBIOTICS.THIS (FLORA)IS BILLOINS OF GOOD BACTERIA THAT IS IN EVERYBODY AND HELPS FIGHT OFF BAD THINGS IN YOUR BODY YOGURT CONTAINS THIS AND THEY DONT TELL YOU CAUSE IT IS OVER THE COUNTER.THE OIL IS ONLY $7 A BOTTLE IF U BUY A CASE OR MORE AT SWEET SUNNAHCOM YOU CAN ALSO CALL THEM,OTHERWISE IT IS $12 A BOTTLE.IT IS ALSO GREAT FOR UR IMMUNE SYSTEM AND YOUR WHOLE FAMILY .YOUR BODY IS ORGANIC. MY AUNT AND COUSIN HAD CHEMO AND ARE DOING GREAT NOW. WITH LOVE RALPH Answered by Lezlie Eblen 3 months ago.

is he comimg off of any pain medication? sometimes this type of pain will occur when doing so. it is essentially a withdrawal symptom. Answered by Raguel Lohnes 3 months ago.


Chemotherapy side effect question?
i am getting vincristine and Dactinomycin and i got it on monday usually i feel terrible (tired, lethargic, stomach ache, not hungry etc) until late friday or saturday. Will drinking more make it go away sooner or lessen the side effects? Asked by Shanice Topor 3 months ago.

I haven't had that chemo regiment, but was told to drink lots of water to flush the chemo out of your system as fast as possible. I take my zofran for nausea first, because I hate to throw up, then about 30 minutes later take my chemo and chug water till I can't hold anymore. I always feel better in the morning, the more water I can get down that night. Answered by Nickolas Gebert 3 months ago.

Side effects can be the pits, and everyone is different. Your Chemo nurse should be told, and will almost certainly have good ideas. If you go to www.after-cancer.com, although it is really meant for those undergoing hormonal therapy, all drugs have same side effects, so if you trawl around you will probably come across a hint or tip to help. And if you find any good ones - leave a comment so others can benefit. Good luck Verite R Answered by Carissa Roura 3 months ago.

I took vincrstine too for lymphoma. One of the side effects to vincritine is tincking in your feet and hands. I did not take caffine either but they never told me why. Just said not to take during chemo thought it might cause it not to work so I was scared to drink it.lol The side effect to chemo effect every one different. I would say take a nausea pill would help lessen the side effects. I would soak in the tub to relax and that helped me Answered by Dayle Bjorkquist 3 months ago.

told me drink lots water on vincristine + no caffiene so drug can leave you fast think not so much better for drinking water but worse without! Answered by Cami Haft 3 months ago.


Calculate the amount of this medication to be given to the patient.?
if the patient's body surface area is 200 meter sq. height: 5'11" weight: 154 lbs medication order: dactinomycin IV qd for 4 days dosage instruction: 400 mcg/meter sq. with solution please Asked by Mirta Depippo 3 months ago.

The patient's BSA IS NOT 200m^2!!!! BSA (m^2) = SQRT[(weight (kg) * height (cm)) / 3600] = SQRT[(69.8kg * 180.34cm) / 3600] = SQRT[3.5] = 1.87m^2 1.8m^2 * 400mcg/m^2 ~ 750micrograms Answered by Homer Hilderbrandt 3 months ago.

400 mcg per m^2 for 200 m^2 = 400*200 mcg = 80000 mcg = 80 mg Answered by Neoma Norskog 3 months ago.


Does metoclopramide cause these side effects?
Hi I am on metoclopramide every three weeks due to chemotherapy (my drugs are ifosfamide, vinchristine and dactinomycin). Whenever I have it I get odd Sensations in my leg and I can't stop moving them. I'm also quite a bit anxious and a bit drowsy but I cant get sleep without lorazepam. After a week of... Asked by Hana Boyarsky 3 months ago.

Hi I am on metoclopramide every three weeks due to chemotherapy (my drugs are ifosfamide, vinchristine and dactinomycin). Whenever I have it I get odd Sensations in my leg and I can't stop moving them. I'm also quite a bit anxious and a bit drowsy but I cant get sleep without lorazepam. After a week of first taking the metoclopramide the sensations go and I can sleep again. HOwever its still very annoying. any help? is it the metoclopramide or the chemotherapy? Answered by Taryn Yasui 3 months ago.

It is the lorazepam causing you the drowsiness and anxiety. Best is to consult your family physician for best way of starting to get you off that medication. Good Health To You! Answered by Rema Heckler 3 months ago.


Wilms tumor ?
thank you for your help but i already researched through 6 websites. and i want to know if a PREGNANT WOMAN can receive treatment for her child that is yet to be born. Asked by Nadia Maradiaga 3 months ago.

I did some fast research for you, and I found appropriate information which could help you. Best of Luck. Feel free to continue your research on the following website provided for you under sources. :) Treatment In the United States, treatment for Wilms' tumor almost always begins with surgery to remove or decrease the size of the kidney tumor. Except in patients who have tumors in both kidneys, this surgery usually will require complete removal of the affected kidney. During surgery, the surrounding lymph nodes, the area around the kidneys, and the entire abdomen will also be examined. While the tumor can spread to these surrounding areas, it is less likely to do so compared to other types of cancer. In cases where the tumor affects both kidneys, surgeons will try to preserve the kidney with the smaller tumor by removing only a portion of the kidney, if possible. Additional biopsies of these areas may be done to see if the cancer has spread. The next treatment steps depend on whether/where the cancer has spread. Samples of the tumor are also examined under a microscope to determine particular characteristics of the cells making up the tumor. Information about the tumor cell type and the spread of the tumor is used to decide the best kind of treatment for a particular patient. Treatment is usually a combination of surgery, medications used to kill cancer cells (chemotherapy), and x rays or other high-energy rays used to kill cancer cells (radiation therapy). These therapies are called adjuvant therapies, and this type of combination therapy has been shown to substantially improve outcome in patients with Wilms' tumor. It has long been known that Wilms' tumors respond to radiation therapy. Likewise, some types of chemotherapy have been found to be effective in treating Wilms' tumor. These effective drugs include dactinomycin, doxorubicin, vincristine, and cyclophosphamide. In rare cases, bone marrow transplantation may be used. The National Wilms' Tumor Study Group (NWTSG) has developed a staging system to describe Wilms' tumors. All of the stages assume that surgical removal of the tumor has occurred. Stage I involves "favorable" Wilms' tumor cells and is usually treated successfully with combination chemotherapy involving dactinomycin and vincristine and without abdominal radiation therapy. Stage II tumors involving a favorable histology (cell characteristics) are usually treated with the same therapy as Stage I. Stage III tumors with favorable histology are usually treated with a combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin, dactinomycin, and vincristine along with radiation therapy to the abdomen. Stage IV disease with a favorable histology is generally treated with combination chemotherapy with dactinomycin, doxorubicin, and vincristine. These patients usually receive abdominal radiation therapy and lung radiation therapy if the tumor has spread to the lungs. In the case of Stage II through IV tumors with unfavorable, or anaplastic, cells, then the previously-mentioned combination chemotherapy is used along with the drug cyclophosphamide. These patients also receive lung radiation therapy if the tumor has spread to the lungs. Another type of tumor cell can be present in Stages I through IV. This cell type is called clear cell sarcoma of the kidney. If this type of cell is present, then patients receive combination therapy with vincristine, doxorubicin, and dactinomycin. All of these patients receive abdominal radiation therapy and lung radiation therapy if the tumor has spread to the lungs. As of 2004, there are significant differences between the treatment protocols of the NWTSG and its European counterpart, the Société Internationale d'Oncologie Pédiatrique (SIOP). Whereas American practice favors surgery followed by chemotherapy, European oncologists use preoperative chemotherapy and stage the tumor at the time of surgery rather than at the point of initial imaging studies. Prognosis The prognosis for patients with Wilms' tumor is quite good, compared to the prognosis for most types of cancer. One German study reported the overall five-year survival rate to be 89.5%. The patients who have the best prognosis are usually those who have a small-sized tumor, a favorable cell type, are young (especially under two years old), and have an early stage of cancer that has not spread. Modern treatments have been especially effective in the treatment of this cancer. Patients with the favorable type of cell have a long-term survival rate of 93%, whereas those with anaplasia have a long-term survival rate of 43% and those with the sarcoma form have a survival rate of 36%. EDIT: i'm sorry I provided you w\ something you weren't looking for, but to be honest, I don't think anything can be done until the baby is born. Answered by Susana Dewolff 3 months ago.

I would research this on the Baylor Medical University site in Dallas, Texas as they allow you to submit questions and subscribe to their free medical library and medical newsletter. John Hopkins Hospital probably has a medical site too. Answered by Mohammad Kager 3 months ago.


What is the major of chemotherapy agents in anti-cancer drugs ?
Asked by Telma Criste 3 months ago.

There are many different chemotherapy agents. Different drugs work for different cancers, and they are frequently used in combination. You need to be more specific. Here is a list of chemo drugs: 13-cis-Retinoic Acid 2-CdA 2-Chlorodeoxyadenosine 5-Fluorouracil 5-FU 6-Mercaptopurine 6-MP 6-TG 6-Thioguanine Abraxane Accutane ® Actinomycin-D Adriamycin ® Adrucil ® Agrylin ® Ala-Cort ® Aldesleukin Alemtuzumab ALIMTA Alitretinoin Alkaban-AQ ® Alkeran ® All-transretinoic acid Alpha interferon Altretamine Amethopterin Amifostine Aminoglutethimide Anagrelide Anandron ® Anastrozole Arabinosylcytosine Ara-C Aranesp ® Aredia ® Arimidex ® Aromasin ® Arranon ® Arsenic trioxide Asparaginase ATRA Avastin ® Azacitidine BCG BCNU Bevacizumab Bexarotene BEXXAR ® Bicalutamide BiCNU Blenoxane ® Bleomycin Bortezomib Busulfan Busulfex ® C225 Calcium Leucovorin Campath ® Camptosar ® Camptothecin-11 Capecitabine Carac ™ Carboplatin Carmustine Carmustine wafer Casodex ® CC-5013 CCNU CDDP CeeNU Cerubidine ® Cetuximab Chlorambucil Cisplatin Citrovorum Factor Cladribine Cortisone Cosmegen ® CPT-11 Cyclophosphamide Cytadren ® Cytarabine Cytarabine liposomal Cytosar-U ® Cytoxan ® Dacarbazine Dacogen Dactinomycin Darbepoetin alfa Daunomycin Daunorubicin Daunorubicin hydrochloride Daunorubicin liposomal DaunoXome ® Decadron Decitabine Delta-Cortef ® Deltasone ® Denileukin diftitox DepoCyt ™ Dexamethasone Dexamethasone acetate Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Dexasone Dexrazoxane DHAD DIC Diodex Docetaxel Doxil ® Doxorubicin Doxorubicin liposomal Droxia ™ DTIC DTIC-Dome ® Duralone ® Efudex ® Eligard ™ Ellence ™ Eloxatin ™ Elspar ® Emcyt ® Epirubicin Epoetin alfa Erbitux ™ Erlotinib Erwinia L-asparaginase Estramustine Ethyol Etopophos ® Etoposide Etoposide Phosphate Eulexin ® Evista ® Exemestane Fareston ® Faslodex ® Femara ® Filgrastim Floxuridine Fludara ® Fludarabine Fluoroplex ® Fluorouracil Fluorouracil (cream) Fluoxymesterone Flutamide Folinic Acid FUDR ® Fulvestrant G-CSF Gefitinib Gemcitabine Gemtuzumab ozogamicin Gemzar ® GleevecTM Gliadel wafer (t) GM-CSF Goserelin granulocyte - colony stimulating factor (t) Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (o) Halotestin (t) Herceptin (t) Hexadrol (t) Hexalen (t) Hexamethylmelamine (t) HMM (t) Hycamtin (t) Hydrea (t) Hydrocort Acetate (t) Hydrocortisone Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate Hydrocortisone sodium succinate Hydrocortone phosphate (t) Hydroxyurea Ibritumomab Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Idamycin ® Idarubicin Ifex ® IFN-alpha Ifosfamide IL-11 IL-2 Imatinib mesylate Imidazole Carboxamide Interferon alfa Interferon Alfa-2b (PEG conjugate) (o) Interleukin - 2 (t) Interleukin-11 (o) Intron A® (interferon alfa-2b) Iressa ® Irinotecan Isotretinoin Kidrolase (t) Lanacort (t) L-asparaginase (t) LCR (o) Lenalidomide Letrozole Leucovorin Leukeran (t) Leukine (t) Leuprolide Leurocristine (o) Leustatin (t) Liposomal Ara-C (t) Liquid Pred (t) Lomustine L-PAM (o) L-Sarcolysin (o) Lupron (t) Lupron Depot ® Matulane (t) Maxidex (t) Mechlorethamine Mechlorethamine Hydrochloride Medralone (t) Medrol ® Megace (t) Megestrol Megestrol Acetate (o) Melphalan Mercaptopurine Mesna Mesnex (t) Methotrexate Methotrexate Sodium (o) Methylprednisolone Meticorten (t) Mitomycin Mitomycin-C (o) Mitoxantrone M-Prednisol (t) MTC (o) MTX (o) Mustargen (t) Mustine Mutamycin (t) Myleran (t) Mylocel (t) Mylotarg (t) Navelbine ® Nelarabine Neosar (t) Neulasta (t) Neumega (t) Neupogen ® Nexavar ® Nilandron (t) Nilutamide Nipent ® Nitrogen Mustard (o) Novaldex (t) Novantrone (t) Octreotide Octreotide acetate (o) Oncospar (t) Oncovin (t) Ontak (t) Onxal (t) Oprevelkin Orapred (t) Orasone (t) Oxaliplatin Paclitaxel Paclitaxel Protein-bound Pamidronate Panretin (t) Paraplatin (t) Pediapred (t) PEG Interferon Pegaspargase Pegfilgrastim PEG-INTRON (t) PEG-L-asparaginase PEMETREXED Pentostatin Phenylalanine Mustard (o) Platinol (t) Platinol-AQ (t) Prednisolone Prednisone Prelone (t) Procarbazine PROCRIT ® Proleukin (t) Prolifeprospan 20 with Carmustine implant (t) Purinethol ® Raloxifene Revlimid ® Rheumatrex (t) Rituxan (t) Rituximab Roferon-A® (interferon alfa-2a) Rubex (t) Rubidomycin hydrochloride (t) Sandostatin ® Sandostatin LAR (t) Sargramostim Solu-Cortef (t) Solu-Medrol (t) Sorafenib STI-571 Streptozocin SU11248 Sunitinib Sutent ® Tamoxifen Tarceva ® Targretin (t) Taxol ® Taxotere ® Temodar ® Temozolomide Teniposide TESPA (o) Thalidomide Thalomid ® TheraCys (t) Thioguanine Thioguanine Tabloid ® Thiophosphoamide (o) Thioplex (t) Thiotepa TICE ® Toposar (t) Topotecan Toremifene Tositumomab Trastuzumab Tretinoin Trexall (t) Trisenox (t) TSPA (o) VCR (o) Velban (t) Velcade ® VePesid (t) Vesanoid (t) Viadur (t) Vidaza (t) Vinblastine Vinblastine Sulfate (o) Vincasar Pfs (t) Vincristine Vinorelbine Vinorelbine tartrate (o) VLB (o) VM-26 (o) VP-16 (t) Vumon (t) Xeloda ® Zanosar (t) Zevalin TM Zinecard (t) Zoladex ® Zoledronic acid Zometa ® See? There's a lot of them. Answered by Mitsuko Hoague 3 months ago.

antineoplastics, monoclonal antibodies, Answered by Gil Sax 3 months ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Chemotherapy. Answered by Lee Lanciotti 3 months ago.


Why does chemotherapy make you lose your hair?
I have had only one treatment of chemo and recently lost all my hair within a month.. Asked by Marth Stutsman 3 months ago.

it was the side effect,of the medicine.. Answered by Kim Bombardier 3 months ago.


What's the most common treatment for bone cancer?
My sister was recently diagnosed and was wondering what the treatment would be. Asked by Pamila Marxsen 3 months ago.

The treatment of cancer of the bone, especially metastatic cancer, has two goals: management of the neoplasm and management of the symptoms produced by the local lesion. Prognosis is affected by a patient's age, the size of the primary tumor, grade and stage, degree of lymphatic and blood vessel invasion, the duration of symptoms and the location of the tumor on the arm, leg or trunk. There are two ways bone metastasis is treated. Systemic therapy, aimed at cancer cells that have spread throughout the body, includes chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and immunotherapy. Local therapy, aimed at killing cancer cells in one specific part of the body, includes radiation therapy and surgery. Surgery often has to be extensive, with a wide margin of tissue around the tumor being removed. Sarcomas involving muscles require removal of the entire affected muscle group. Radiation therapy is used to prevent local recurrences of radiosensitive tumors and may be given either before or after surgery. Chemotherapy - a number of drugs have proven to be effective in treating bone and soft tissue sarcomas. The dosages required to provide a good chance for cure often produce significant side effects. Effective single agents may include doxorubicin (Adriamycin), cyclophosphamide, high-dose methotrexate (with leucovorin rescue), ifosfamide, dacarbazine, vincristine, dactinomycin (Actinomycin D), etoposide and investigational agents. Combinations of these drugs are often used. Hormone therapy is either the removal of the organs which produce hormones which can promote the growth of certain types of cancer (such as testosterone in males and estrogen in females), or drug therapy to keep the hormones from promoting cancer growth. Biphosphonates are drugs that can be used to reduce bone pain and slow down bone damage in people who have cancer that has spread to their bones. Even if a bone or soft tissue sarcoma is appears to be localized and could apparently be completely removed, there is still significant risk that tumor cells too small to detect have already spread to other places in the body. Additional treatment with chemotherapy (adjuvant chemotherapy) attempts to eliminate these tumor deposits. There are also safe and effective ways to treat pain. Medications can allow people to be free of pain so that they can continue the activities that are important to them. Answered by Lindsy Dorio 3 months ago.

My dog has a bone tumor right now. He is a 10 yr old German Shepherd. He is my baby. He was diagnosed 2 years ago, and under the advice of my vet and Tufts, we had his leg amputated. I never thought the tumor would return, but it did. We didn't think he would even make Thanksgiving, but here it is after Christmas and he is still here. I watch him every day for suffering, but honestly, he still eats (when we feed him what he loves) and he still wants to play and go for rides. I know he will tell me when it is time. My heart is broken but I refuse to put him through any more surgery or chemo, as I know the end result will not change anyways. I am just making him as comfortable as possible and enjoying every minute I have left with him. I am sorry for your pain. Answered by Santina Burvine 3 months ago.

my x has bone cancer and he had chemo and then chemo administered in the hospital to kill all his immune system. then they did a stem cell transplant. and he stayed in remission for 5 years. now his blood work has shown the re-occurrence of cancer once again. they also have a new pill, not sure of the name. he tried it but was unable to take it. it cost around $10,000. a month for the meds. as long as it has not mastasied the chances for a longer life is greater. sorry to hear about your sister. prayer will go a long way. God Bless! Answered by Shanae Shor 3 months ago.

The primary method of treatment is surgery. In worst cases, it can lead to amputation, BUT, nowadays they mix chemo with surgery, so it really minimizes the chances. Also, just parts of the bone can be removed and substituted with prosthetic devices. Radiation can be used. Now, Ewings sarcoma is treated by multidrug chemo, in conjunction with radiation and surgery on the tumor. This type of sarcoma metastasize quickly. It may be also treated with biological therapy, chemotherapy (high-dose), radiation therapy, hormone therapy, surgery (marrow transplant) or radiosurgery. But not all are used at first, just when the cancer is malignant (metastatic). Hope this helped, tried to keep it brief... And, I hope your sister gets well. 100%. Answered by Tonda Lierz 3 months ago.

One of the challenges of gene therapy is finding safe and effective ways to deliver genes or genetically altered cells to the site of the tumor. Answered by Honey Dembinski 3 months ago.


When to expect hairloss?
Hi, my 5 year old who was diagnosed with Stage III B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma started treatment today. His first course of treatment is 7 days long. This course consists of Vincristine sulfate IV (Day 1), Cyclophosphamide IV (Day 1), Prednisone (Pill form, twice a day for all 7 days), and Methotrexate (IT) and... Asked by Elfreda Guzzio 3 months ago.

Hi, my 5 year old who was diagnosed with Stage III B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma started treatment today. His first course of treatment is 7 days long. This course consists of Vincristine sulfate IV (Day 1), Cyclophosphamide IV (Day 1), Prednisone (Pill form, twice a day for all 7 days), and Methotrexate (IT) and hydrocortisone (IT) (Day 1). Terrible, but it's all in the fight :/ Anyways, I was told we should start seeing hair around 2 weeks after the start of treatment, but I wanted to come on here and see how some of your experiences have been? What should we expect? Answered by Keeley Burdg 3 months ago.

My daughter (15 when diagnosed) found she began losing her hair within 3 weeks. It started to thin at first, and then just came out in handfulls. She clipped her hair and the rest just rubbed off after a couple of days. Also on vinc, cyclo (also etop, ifos, irinitecan, doxo and dactinomycin 20 rounds in total). Your son is very brave, and my thoughts are with you. Its a tough fight, and can be done, but I know its hard to watch your baby go through all this. Tc > Answered by Tarah Arrott 3 months ago.

my boyfriend has lymphoma as well. first round of chemo he would have to go to the outpatient clinic for his chemo which would take like 5 hours and he went 6 times with 3 weeks inbetween. im not sure the name of the drugs he got. he started to lost hair just after his second treatment. i came home from work and he was pulling chunks out of his head one day. i had to make a midnight run to wally for clippers to cut it. it was a night to remember lol. this was the ONLY side effect he had from those chemo days. so i would say it took 4 weeks? i was asking the nurses about this and they said every patient besides one they had lost hair. it seems to be a pretty common side effect. but you never know. he could be that one person who doesnt. i do remember her saying it usually starts to happen within the first couple treatments. but on a good note. it was like 3 weeks after his last chemo it started to grow back right away. Answered by Krystin Lukaszewicz 3 months ago.

It's different for every patient. Some patients lose their hair within the first treatment while others may take a few treatments. Answered by Carmelita Crowther 3 months ago.

His Dr & Nurses would be able to give the best indication. THey have experience with a wide variety of patients. I was under a totally different treatment so my results are irrelevant except to say they were exactly as my Dr predicted. Answered by Camelia Rush 3 months ago.

Your boy might not experience any hair loss at all. Everyone reacts to chemotherapy differently, kids are no different - my grandpa didn't experience hair loss and neither did my cousin. Just take each day at a time. He might not lose any hair. That's always a possibility. Answered by Dannie Meleen 3 months ago.

I'm sorry your son is having to go through this. I wish him the best. Hair loss varies from person to person. My hair started to fall out 13 days after my first chemo. Answered by Kristen Jeansonne 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
090304/001 DACTINOMYCIN DACTINOMYCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per VIAL
202562/001 DACTINOMYCIN DACTINOMYCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
050682/001 COSMEGEN DACTINOMYCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per VIAL
090304/001 DACTINOMYCIN DACTINOMYCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per VIAL
202562/001 DACTINOMYCIN DACTINOMYCIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per VIAL

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