DACARBAZINE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 070821/001.

Names and composition

"DACARBAZINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DACARBAZINE.

Answered questions

Hodgkin's Lymphoma Question?
VinblastineDoxorubicinDacarbazineBleomycinThese are the 4 medications they have me on I get my treatment every other Wednesday for 6 months (i started on the 16th of September) i don't know the dose amount they are giving me (i weigh 120 and i am 5'4) oh and possibly stage 4 depending on if my... Asked by Yasmine Pickler 3 months ago.

Vinblastine Doxorubicin Dacarbazine Bleomycin These are the 4 medications they have me on I get my treatment every other Wednesday for 6 months (i started on the 16th of September) i don't know the dose amount they are giving me (i weigh 120 and i am 5'4) oh and possibly stage 4 depending on if my bone marrow biopsy comes back positive or not. I just want to know what i should be expecting or looking forward to, anything will help me understand my condition more... Thank you - Chelsea Answered by Shawanna Mietus 3 months ago.

Hello This is a common chemotherapy regimen for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Chemotherapy will make you feel really bad unfortunately, but hopefully it will achieve the ultimate goal of cure. Common side effects include nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and hair loss, mouth pain and ulcers. Chemotherapy also damages blood cells. This can lead to anemia, which can make you feel very tired and possibly shortness of breath. Low white blood cells put you at risk for any infection. And low platelets can make you bleed. Frequently patients require transfusions to support their blood counts during this time. Your blood counts should recover with time after you complete the chemotherapy. The current regimen you will get is also associated with rarer side effects including nerve damage (causing weakness, numbness etc.), heart damage, and lung damage. Your oncologist will monitor you for all of these with different tests. Unfortunately it will be a difficult process, but necessary to cure the disease. I hope you will have a lot of support from the people who love you. Good luck to you. Answered by Gus Mckinna 3 months ago.

I recently finished my hodgkin's lymphoma treatment with ABVD chemo. I listed out a few of the symptoms/problems I had at the beginning of treatment. Severe bone paid & muscle aches, it kind of felt like I had been working out for hours without stretching or taking any breaks. Mouth sores throughout my mouth that made it difficult to eat or drink, however, my doctor prescribed some magic mouthwash that took care of the problem. Extreme Fatigue. Hair loss started about 3-4 weeks after my first treatment. On the brighter side of things you may not have to shave at all during treatment. I had to shave my legs for the first time in 8 months and it's really a benefit to not have to worry about those things. One thing I would suggest is taking different friends with you to chemo each time. I did this and it made it pass much more quickly and the whole 6 months seemed to fly by. Try to make yourself look to the future as much as possible because it really helps. Good Luck with everything. Answered by Jessenia Trapanese 3 months ago.


No chemo hair loss? is it possible?
My mother has been claiming she has some mysterious life threatening disease for years now, but she has never made it clear what she has. She has a giant cocktail of prescriptions that she takes that she never talks about what they're for. Recently she's been claiming she's been undergoing chemo for 4-5... Asked by Shana Lahmers 3 months ago.

My mother has been claiming she has some mysterious life threatening disease for years now, but she has never made it clear what she has. She has a giant cocktail of prescriptions that she takes that she never talks about what they're for. Recently she's been claiming she's been undergoing chemo for 4-5 months but she's hasn't lost ANY HAIR (She has waist length hair also). Is it possible to not loose any hair during chemo? This may be the one lie that we can use to get her to admit she's faking it. Answered by Particia Melandez 3 months ago.

A friend of mine had chemo for stomach cancer and never lost his hair. He also never got really sick from the chemo, so perhaps his body just tolerated it better than some people do. Answered by Ricki Bonapart 3 months ago.

It's true. There are plenty of chemo agents that don't result in ANY hair loss at all. Sorry, but mom just may be telling the truth. Answered by Yaeko Liberti 3 months ago.

I have only ever know of one person who did not lose hair during chemo. In that case, the chemo did not work, and the person died of cancer. That said, sometimes it takes a while for someone to lose hair from chemo, and depending on the type of chemo, the hairloss may not be as noticeable. If you know what meds your mother takes, you can research on your own what they are for. Go to the website rxlist.com. Also, if your mother gives permission, you could talk to her doctors. Answered by Maira Buchanon 3 months ago.

Yes, my grandmother has had breast cancer since 1999 and undergoes chemo almost weekly, and she still has her hair. Yet, it is very thin but she has had thin hair all of her life. It also depends on how intense the chemo is. Answered by Earlean Shekarchi 3 months ago.

Not all chemotherapy causes hair loss. It is just like any medication & every medication has different side effects. Well, every chemotherapy drug has different side effects and not every one causes hair loss. So, yes, it is very possible to have chemotherapy and not lose your hair. (Also, it has nothing to do with the intensity of the chemotherapy, it is all about which chemotherapeutic drugs are used!) Answered by Alysa Fego 3 months ago.

Depending on what type of chemo she would be on, which varies on the type of cancer, she could well have her hair. Answered by Quentin Caires 3 months ago.


Anyone have personal experience with ABVD Chemo therapy?
My wife has been diagnosed with Hodgkins Lymphoma and will start ABVD chemo this week. We have a trip planned to Florida the following week. does anyone have any experience with this? should we cancel our trip? get conflicting answeres from Dr's and nurses. we can get some money back now, but next week we will... Asked by Karima Madarang 3 months ago.

My wife has been diagnosed with Hodgkins Lymphoma and will start ABVD chemo this week. We have a trip planned to Florida the following week. does anyone have any experience with this? should we cancel our trip? get conflicting answeres from Dr's and nurses. we can get some money back now, but next week we will be S.O.L. Answered by Paulina Buchauer 3 months ago.

...I did work in an oncology/hematology office for 4 years, so I have seen many people go through this. As far as getting conflicting information from the doctors and nurses, I'm guessing they are only telling you what their experience has shown them, and every patient is different. ABVD is actually 4 different medications: adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine. These medications act on rapidly growing cells, however, cancer cells are not the only rapidly growing cells in your body. The lining of your stomach has a high cell turnover rate, and therefore, these medicines affect those cells, too, causing nausea/vomiting and loss of appetite. Your hair may begin to fall out. It affects your bone marrow (what makes your white and red blood cells) and you may become anemic or less able to fight infection (but there are medicines to help with that.) I noticed people started to experience the side effects of chemotherapy in about 3-6 days. Some would just feel a bit tired and have less energy but could still function (you'd never know they were even receiving chemotherapy); others needed to be hospitalized because they were so weak, constantly vomiting, and blood counts were so low they needed medical attention. What would I do? If it was my first time receiving chemotherapy, I would postpone my trip, because I have no idea how it is going to affect me. I want to be able to rest if I need to, and not worry about traveling and all of its hassles. Whatever you choose to do, I wish you and your wife the best, and I hope you are able to get through this together. Answered by Deandre Wayner 3 months ago.

Well, i am a survivor of Hodgkins lymphoma, i didn't have ABVD but i had ABVE-PC, a slightly different regimen. I do know a lot about ABVD though. So to be honest, since ABVD is given every two weeks, and since she is starting it just now, i wouldn't go to Florida. Usually the oncologists will take blood twice a week to monitor white blood cell count and hemoglobin. If her white blood cell count drops, she could be at major risk of infection and since she doesn't have hardly any white blood cells after chemotherapy, the infection can kill you. Also she needs to be on the right Antiemitic or anti nausea drug, often they will use Zofran, or if you have good insurance ask for Palonosetron. The doxorubicin and especially the Dacarbazine can cause severe nausea, so she shouldn't be out walking around after chemo, resting is better. Another reason its good to stay close to your docs is because they may need to check on her heart to make sure she does not have an allergy to Doxorubicin which can cause Myocarditis, or inflammation of the heart muscle. I wish you the best of luck! Answered by Eldridge Walborn 3 months ago.

Its a relativley mild form of chemo, but still can have some drastic side effects. I would think early on in the treatment, most people would be suitable to travel. When blood counts do drop, its typically later in the treatment. Few if any doctors would advise travel after a few treatments, but after one is a dfiferent story. The real question for you is if you want your wife to be in a new place, away from her comfort zone when she will be going through a tramatic event. How she will react to the chemo is a crap shoot. Some people tolerate their first treatment very well, others get terribly sick. Basically if you do go, just prepare yourself for the fact that she might end up inside wanting to sleep for most of the trip. Answered by Deon Shutter 3 months ago.

I have cancer and just finished chemo for this cycle. I have radiation next, then chemo again in January. My infusion is a different protocol than your wife; however, they carry pretty much the same side effects. I don't know what stage she is, so I don't know how flexible the doctor would be to postponing a treatment. Some doctors will change a treatment to accomodate family plans. My doctor really tries to avoid doing this because he feels that staying on a rigid pattern of treatments. Me, I just want them out of the way, so I didn't request any changes. I'm assuming that she will have a port cath (makes life so much easier!) for the infusion treatments, this really cuts down on some of the sensitivity of the drugs as they go in. For me, it takes about 3 full days to rebound from the treatment, but you must understand that everyone is different and I'm currently being treated for 3 different kinds of cancer. Something that she should discuss with the person administering the treatments is how the drugs feel going in, some drugs cause a pretty irritating burning feeling, usually they will slow down the meds to conteract that feelings. Also, chemo makes you cold. (most people) I would never have thought that it would, but sometimes I feel that I have ice going through my veins. Again, talk to the nurse, they will provide her with blankets to help her warm up. The thing about traveling you need to consider is how fatigued she is, you have no way of knowing right now how she will feel. Some people, after their first treatment are surprised that they don't feel that bad; however, the next day they feel worse. My best friend went shopping after her treatment, I hung out in the bathroom and became close, personal friends with the toilet. Also, when you travel, you are exposed to more germs and her system is already weak, but again, nothing may affect her, again, my best friend never ran a temp, never got sick while (colds/flu) she was going through treatments. Germs are everywhere though, so this alone might not be a deterrent. If she is fatigued, even a long car ride could be painful at times for her. You will need to stop probably a little more than usual to let her get out of the position. Say you are going to disney, she may find that walking around is just too much for her, of course there are wheelchairs that you could use to help out combat fatigue. You will need to plan on breaks throughout your trip and if she is tired, she needs to rest. The last thing you want to do is compound the fatigue. Food can get tricky too. Some of my favorite foods are things that I cannot eat right now. I have a lot of foods that have a metallic taste when I each them, so be prepared if you are out with her to help her find foods that she knows taste ok to her. Again, this being her first treatment, she may not have this yet. Also, several small meals a day helps. If her doctor is ok with her traveling, then I would be more apt to go on the trip; however, if it's the doctor that is hesitant and the nurses are ok with it, I'd still lean more towards the doctor's opinion. He may be trying to keep her from exposing her to unnecessary germs and keeping her from really wearing herself out. Also, unrelated to her, please understand that yes, she has cancer, but it will impact on your life as well. My husband experiences guilt. He feels bad that I am sick and he is not. He worries about the fact that he cannot fix me. Don't think that way, just be understanding, but know that you might have trouble dealing with it at times. We have 2 children and he has taken more of the mom and dad role this year. He does the grocery shopping, the shuttling kids around and is maintaining his job. If you need a break at times, take it, otherwise you may run the risk of being resentful and that's a wasted emotion to me. I am going to put a book on my recommendations list, Crazy, Sexy, Cancer, by Kris Carr. If anyone can put this whole sucky thing in perspective, it's her. She has an untreatable cancer. Chemo and radiation ARE experimental in her cass. As sorry as I was feeling for myself, she made me appreciate my life more and reminded me that I have control over this disease. Best of luck to you and your wife and I will keep her in my thoughts. Answered by Syble Bruni 3 months ago.

It relies upon on what style of chemotherapy you get, and different aspects which at the instant are not on your administration. often, getting chemo isn't the painful area. i'm recent technique chemo applicable now for breast maximum cancers, and that i will inform you first hand, it sucks. i think of of it as a hangover, rolled up with the flu. every person has their own journey (i'm additionally a widespread practitioner and have polled my sufferers who've gotten chemo). i'm hoping that is greater advantageous for you than that is been for me. the information that ought to count for you remember on the type you do with area effects. My information could be - shrink hair short early, be arranged to unlike each and every of the meals you always like, and not tolerate the meals you always like. save on with the mouth care information (you will see them online) asap. don't be shocked if constipation, diarrhea, nostril bleeds, on a regular basis issues, take over your life. remember, it is going to end--it is going to end-- it is going to end. Answered by Cathleen Santana 3 months ago.


Hodgkins Lymphoma Help?
My friend has Hodgkins Lymphoma... I know it's a lot to ask, but does anyone know how to cure it, or any medicines that will help besides prednisone? Asked by Cari Frerichs 3 months ago.

Standard chemotherapy for Hodgkins Lymphoma typaically consists of ABVD (Adriamycin, Bleomycin, Viznblastine, Dacarbazine). This is usually the cure, but if it's a stubborn case of Hodgkins, they may try a stem cell transplant and/or radiation. I had all three of these treatments (chemo, stem cell, and radiation) and radiation is the one that finally worked for me. They like to use radiation as a last resort because of the long term effects on the organs near the lymph nodes. For some, it's a short road to curing it. For others, they may need to try a few treatments before finding the right one. The most important thing is to have a good oncologist caring for the person, so that you can trust their judgment. I wish the best for you and your friend. Answered by Georgine Wiltberger 3 months ago.

Hodgkins lymphoma is treated either with radiotherapy (if localised) or combined chemotherapy (MOPP used to be the standard but there are other combinations now) Answered by Francina Hurtubise 3 months ago.


What to take for pain during Chemotherapy?
Please report fragems answer so it gets deleted. so horrible how people can act so nasty online. Asked by Britta Lusane 3 months ago.

My boyfriend has Hodgkin's Lymphoma and has had 2 treatments of ABVD (Adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) He is having aches mostly in his bones and joints which is a common effect, and headaches. We know he can not have Ibuprofen because of the asprin etc. I know he can have tylenol. His doc said he needs to switch between tylenol and another pain killer, (to keep juat the one from stopping working) I forgot if it was aleve or advil. and we want to make sure he's not just letting his body get used to the one. Also he likes having an option besides tylenol. Thank you. Answered by Dale Bastain 3 months ago.

Most often prescribed would be Lortab/Vicodin. Which is Hydrocodone and Acetaminophen. Aka: Tylenol. Just over the counter -- if you are picking between Aleve or Advil -- then you are thinking of Aleve. Advil *is* Ibuprofen. Advil = Ibuprofen Aleve = Naproxen Sodium Tylenol = Acetominophen Answered by Jackeline Etulain 3 months ago.


How long after my fiance finishes chemo would i have to wait before becoming pregnant?
my fiance was dignosed with secondary liver cancer 7 months ago and received 2 different chemotherapy combinations. i am not sure exactly which but i know cisplatin was used and so was dacarbazine. 6 weeks ago we were told that they were not going to continue with chemo as it had not been effective. He has been... Asked by Inga Nesbitt 3 months ago.

my fiance was dignosed with secondary liver cancer 7 months ago and received 2 different chemotherapy combinations. i am not sure exactly which but i know cisplatin was used and so was dacarbazine. 6 weeks ago we were told that they were not going to continue with chemo as it had not been effective. He has been given a matter of months to live but i have always wanted a child with him. we were due to get married but had to cancel. i want to know how much of a risk we would be taking if we were to start trying now. we obviously don't have years to wait but if there is a substantial risk of abnormalities then we won't try but if the risk is very small we will definitely consider it. if any one knows much about this i would really appreciate some advice. Thank you Clare Answered by Pedro Samona 3 months ago.

I would wait about 6 weeks to start trying, just to make sure the chemo is out of his system. Chemo can cause infertility, but it doesn't always. If time is of the essence, he can get his sperm count checked. I would say there is not a substantial risk for fetal abnormalities, but infertility there is a chance. Answered by Fermin Oyama 3 months ago.

Unfortunately, many chemotherapeutic drugs are anti-mitotics, that is, they are effective against cells that are dividing. Since sperm cells are derived from cells that are dividing, they are generally damaged severely by the administration of chemo. It would not be unusual for the patient to be sterile as a result of the treatment. Sometimes, sperm counts can recover after chemotherapy but not terribly often or terribly quickly. Answered by Leigh Serisky 3 months ago.

You do know chemo can make you unable to have children right? I would speak to his doctors and see if there is even a possibility and then you can collect a sample to be stored if it is viable. God Bless and good luck Answered by Dorsey Fleckles 3 months ago.


Alternative methods to treating Hodgkin's Lymphoma patients who respond negatively to AVBD treatment?
Another point for clarification: The doctors are particularly interested in finding a way to block bleomycin induced lung toxicity. Asked by Adria Pilette 3 months ago.

Here's the situation: A friend was received diagnosed with Stage 2b Hodgkin's and put on AVBD treatment, and has now developed pulmonary toxicity/interstitial lung disease, thus far we think no pulmonary fibrosis but that needs to be prevented. Treatment for this side effect is usually high dose corticosteroids, but she is not responding as well as she could, and is currently in ICU. Doctors are asking for any possible drug treatment, even if its experimental from animal models of this problem. Are there any medical professionals or family members of patients on here that have experience with this and can offer advice, and/or refer me to articles/studies that show alternative methods of treatment.... any possible treatment (clinical trial, case study, animal model/study) of blocking bleomycin induced lung toxicity/pulmonary toxicity/pulmonary fibrosis and Any basic research papers on the signal transduction pathways for this reaction would also be useful. There are a group of us that are working to find resources to compile to give to her doctors right now. They are willing to try anything, even things that were only tested on animals, as her condition is very serious at this point. Any help would be appreciated. If you're not sure if your information would be useful, please send it anyway. Thank you!! Answered by Lucien Whyms 3 months ago.

I live in Michigan and University of MIchigan Hospital is known for using new and experimental practices to help people. Maybe you could check out their website and the research they are doing. Answered by Carleen Boken 3 months ago.

You'd have nothing to lose with a 50,000mg IV shot of Vitamin C. Answered by Adrianne Firestone 3 months ago.


Chemotheraphy contents?
what chemicals are in chemotherapy ??? Asked by Lorena Swinerton 3 months ago.

Chemotherapy drugs are divided into several groups based on how they affect specific chemical substances within cancer cells, which cellular activities or processes the drug interferes with, and which specific phases of the cell cycle the drug affects. Knowing this helps oncologists decide which drugs are likely to work well together and, if more than one drug will be used, plan exactly when each of the drugs should be given (in which order and how often). Alkylating Agents Alkylating agents directly damage DNA to prevent the cancer cell from reproducing. As a class of drugs, these agents are not phase-specific (in other words, they work in all phases of the cell cycle). These drugs are active against chronic leukemias, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin disease, multiple myeloma, and lung, breast, ovarian, and certain other cancers. Some examples of alkylating agents include busulfan, cisplatin, carboplatin, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, dacarbazine, mechlorethamine (nitrogen mustard), melphalan, and temozolomide. Nitrosoureas Nitrosoureas act in a similar way to alkylating agents. They interfere with enzymes that help copy and repair DNA. They, too, are not phase specific. Unlike many other drugs, these agents are able to travel from the blood to the brain, so they are often used to treat brain tumors. They may also be used to treat Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, multiple myeloma, and malignant melanoma. Examples of nitrosoureas include streptozocin, carmustine, and lomustine. Antimetabolites Antimetabolites are a class of drugs that interfere with DNA and RNA growth. These agents damage cells during the S phase and are commonly used to treat leukemias, tumors of the breast, ovary, and the gastrointestinal tract, as well as other cancers. Examples of antimetabolites include 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, 6-mercaptopurine, methotrexate, gemcitabine, cytarabine, fludarabine, and pemetrexed. Anthracyclines and Related Drugs Anthracyclines are anti-tumor antibiotics that interfere with enzymes involved in DNA replication. These agents work in all phases of the cell cycle. Thus, they are widely used for a variety of cancers. A major consideration when giving these drugs is the toxic effects they can have on heart muscle. For this reason, life time dose limitations are often placed on these drugs. Examples include daunorubicin, doxorubicin, epirubicin, idarubicin, and mitoxantrone. Topoisomerase Inhibitors These drugs interfere with enzymes called topoisomerases, which are important in accurate DNA replication. They are used to treat certain leukemias, as well as lung, ovarian, gastrointestinal, and other cancers. Examples of topoisomerase I inhibitors include topotecan and irinotecan. Examples of topoisomerase II inhibitors include etoposide and teniposide. Mitotic Inhibitors Mitotic inhibitors are plant alkaloids and other compounds derived from natural products. They can stop mitosis or inhibit enzymes from making proteins needed for reproduction of the cell. These work primarily during the M phase of the cell cycle but can cause cellular damage in all phases. They are used to treat many different types of cancer including breast, lung, myelomas, lymphomas, and leukemias. These drugs are known for their potential to cause peripheral nerve damage, which can be a dose-limiting side effect. Examples of mitotic inhibitors include the taxanes (paclitaxel, docetaxel) and the vinca alkaloids (vinblastine, vincristine, and vinorelbine). Corticosteroid Hormones Steroids are natural hormones and hormone-like drugs that are useful in treating some types of cancer (lymphoma, leukemias, and multiple myeloma) as well as other illnesses. When these drugs are used to kill cancer cells or slow their growth, they are considered chemotherapy drugs. They are often combined with other types of chemotherapy drugs to increase their effectiveness. Examples include prednisone, solumedrol, and dexamethasone. Miscellaneous Chemotherapy Drugs Some chemotherapy drugs act in slightly different ways and do not fit well into any of the other categories. Examples include such drugs as L-asparaginase, hydroxyurea, dactinomycin, thalidomide, and tretinoin. Other Types of Cancer Drug Therapies Some other drugs and biological treatments are used to treat cancer but are not usually considered to be "chemotherapy." While chemotherapy drugs take advantage of the fact that cancer cells divide rapidly, these other drugs target different properties that set cancer cells apart from normal cells. They often have less serious side effects than those commonly caused by chemotherapy drugs because they are targeted to work primarily on cancer cells, not normal, healthy cells. Many are used in combination with chemotherapy. Targeted therapies: As researchers have come to learn more about the inner workings of cancer cells in recent years, they have begun to create new drugs that attack cancer cells more specifically than traditional chemotherapy drugs can. Most attack cells with mutant versions of certain genes, or cells that express too many copies of a particular gene. These drugs can be used as part of primary treatment or after treatment to maintain remission or decrease recurrence. Only a handful of these drugs are available at this time. Examples include imatinib, gefitinib, erlotinib, and bortezomib. Targeted therapies are a huge research focus and there will likely many more developed in the future. Sex hormones: Sex hormones, or hormone-like drugs, alter the action or production of female or male hormones. They are used to slow the growth of breast, prostate, and endometrial (uterine) cancers, which normally grow in response to natural hormone levels in the body. These hormones do not work in the same ways as standard chemotherapy drugs, but rather by preventing the cancer cell from using the hormone it needs to grow, or by preventing the body from making the hormones. Examples include anti-estrogens (tamoxifen, fulvestrant), aromatase inhibitors (anastrozole, exemestane, letrozole), progestins (megestrol acetate), anti-androgens (bicalutamide, flutamide), and LHRH agonists (leuprolide, goserelin). Immunotherapy: Some drugs are given to people with cancer to stimulate their natural immune systems to more effectively recognize and attack cancer cells. These drugs offer a unique method of treatment, and are often considered to be separate from "chemotherapy." Compared to other forms of cancer treatment, such as surgery, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy, immunotherapy is still relatively new. There are different types of immunotherapy. Active immunotherapies stimulate the body’s own immune system to fight the disease. Passive immunotherapies do not rely on the body to attack the disease; instead, they use immune system components (such as antibodies) created outside of the body. Types of immunotherapies include: cancer vaccines (active specific immunotherapies) monoclonal antibody therapy (passive immunotherapies) non-specific immunotherapies and adjuvants (other substances or cells that boost the immune response) For more specific information on these types of drugs see the American Cancer Society’s document, " Immunotherapy." You can get this document by calling 1-800-ACS-3456. Answered by Vi Senatore 3 months ago.

I sympathize with your situation. I think it would depend on the stage of the ailment, and on your financial status. If it is in the early stages and the medical community advised chemo, and you can afford it, it is my considered opinion you should go for it and hope your body responds well to this treatment. There is also no harm in doing a parallel run with herbal medicines. If you can't afford it, approach your relatives and community leaders/institutions for help, and still go for the cheaper herbal methods. Also, you have to change your lifestyle. No more junk foods or too much meat, and go for veggies. Sweat more and drink more water. And stay off devices that might give off radiation, like this computer screen. What am I doing, anyway, answering this when you should not be reading it ? Answered by Shirleen Manney 3 months ago.


Does Chemotherapy always result in total hair loss?
Asked by Theda Sgambati 3 months ago.

No. There are over 150 different kinds of chemotherapy and some cause hair loss and some do not. Much depends on the dosage and length of time a patient will take chemotherapy. My son lost his hair on high dose chemo, it grew back, he than started a targeted therapy drug that turned his hair white. Answered by Jazmine Jinenez 3 months ago.

No, not always. I had etopocide, bleomycin, ifosmamide, cisplatin, vinblastine and a few others. I was as bald as a plum for 5 years. But some folks didn't lose all their hair. I don't know what types of cancer they had or what treatment regimens & such, though. I remember one dude would lose most of the hair on his head but always kept his facial hair. So no, it's not necessarily a given. Oh, also, each time my hair would grow back it was always a different texture and colour. The very last time it happened to grow back the original blonde. And so I still am. =) Answered by Anneliese Petka 3 months ago.

I had been suffering from hair loss for 5 years, they had been lost in group, I even had had no confidence to go out or meet anyone. But now, I'm a very confident man, I can approach any girl I want. Beautiful strong hair is my secret. Read more: Answered by Dean Bocchieri 3 months ago.

No matter how fast a person hair grows, If the oldest hair at the tips is not healthy, it will continue to come out. When hair is damaged, as new hair grows in, damaged hair comes out, making seem as if your hair is not growing. Make sure you have a diet rich in protein (protein is the building blocks of hair) and condition your hair on a regular basis. There are some effective ways to help your hair regrow and be healthy. Read here: Answered by Glinda Pennachio 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
070821/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE Injectable/ Injection 100MG per VIAL
070822/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE Injectable/ Injection 200MG per VIAL
070962/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per VIAL
070990/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 200MG per VIAL
071563/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE Injectable/ Injection 500MG per VIAL
075259/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
075259/002 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 200MG per VIAL
075371/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per VIAL
075371/002 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 200MG per VIAL
075812/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 200MG per VIAL
075812/002 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
075940/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 200MG per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017575/001 DTIC-DOME DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per VIAL
017575/002 DTIC-DOME DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 200MG per VIAL
070821/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE Injectable/ Injection 100MG per VIAL
070822/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE Injectable/ Injection 200MG per VIAL
070962/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per VIAL
070990/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 200MG per VIAL
071563/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE Injectable/ Injection 500MG per VIAL
075259/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
075259/002 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 200MG per VIAL
075371/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per VIAL
075371/002 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 200MG per VIAL
075812/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 200MG per VIAL
075812/002 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per VIAL
075940/001 DACARBAZINE DACARBAZINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 200MG per VIAL

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