Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 007085/002.

Names and composition

"CYANOCOBALAMIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CYANOCOBALAMIN.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
007085/002 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
040451/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080510/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
080510/002 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080510/003 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.03MG per ML
080515/002 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080554/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
080554/002 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080557/002 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
080564/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080573/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080573/002 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
080668/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.03MG per ML
080689/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.03MG per ML
080689/002 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
080689/003 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080737/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
083075/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
083120/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
083120/002 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
084264/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN TABLET/ORAL 1MG
087551/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
087969/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
204829/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
206503/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
006668/010 REDISOL CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
006798/001 BERUBIGEN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
006799/002 RUBRAMIN PC CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
006799/004 RUBRAMIN PC CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
006799/010 RUBRAMIN PC CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007012/002 VI-TWEL CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
007085/002 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
010791/001 RUBIVITE CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.05MG per ML
010791/002 RUBIVITE CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
010791/003 RUBIVITE CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
010791/004 RUBIVITE CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.03MG per ML
010791/005 RUBIVITE CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.12MG per ML
019722/001 NASCOBAL CYANOCOBALAMIN GEL, METERED/NASAL 0.5MG per INH
021642/001 NASCOBAL CYANOCOBALAMIN SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 0.5MG per SPRAY
022102/001 CALOMIST CYANOCOBALAMIN SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 25MCG per SPRAY
040451/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080510/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
080510/002 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080510/003 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.03MG per ML
080515/002 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080554/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
080554/002 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080557/002 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
080557/003 VIBISONE CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080564/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080570/002 RUVITE CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080573/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080573/002 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
080668/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.03MG per ML
080689/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.03MG per ML
080689/002 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
080689/003 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080737/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
080855/001 BETALIN 12 CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
080855/002 BETALIN 12 CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
083013/001 COBAVITE CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
083022/001 DODEX CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
083064/001 COBAVITE CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
083075/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
083120/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
083120/002 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
084264/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN TABLET/ORAL 1MG
087551/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
087969/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
204829/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
206503/001 CYANOCOBALAMIN CYANOCOBALAMIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

GENERIC NAME: CYANOCOBALAMIN - INJECTION or Vitamin B12?
is this what doctors inject for weight loss? how come it costs so much? How does it help in loosing weight? what does this compound consist of? I know this question is a little hard, I am much obligue for your answer. Is this available in Germany? is so, under what name? the U.S military hospitals do not have this... Asked by Shera Gumz 1 year ago.

is this what doctors inject for weight loss? how come it costs so much? How does it help in loosing weight? what does this compound consist of? I know this question is a little hard, I am much obligue for your answer. Is this available in Germany? is so, under what name? the U.S military hospitals do not have this available here but maybe in the German economy? Thank you in advance. Answered by Robbi Taggert 1 year ago.

Cyanocobalamin is vitamin B12. Vegans can take oral B12, people with pernicious anemia or some who've undergone bariatric surgery need injections, but its main use in others is that it's a pretty, red-colored placebo. I can't imagine that it isn't on the formulary of the larger military hospitals in Germany, but they're not going to use it as a placebo like some doctors in private weight-loss practices do. Answered by Valrie Portera 1 year ago.

I doubt very much that you need worry about anything. I, too, suffer from B12 deficiency from time to time, and what they do for me is have me take the pills, and it comes back up. The reason you have to have an injection is because some people don't process the pills very well--many people get more benefit from the shots. Many doctors, when they find that someone needs B12, will start with an injection and then have the person take pills as a follow up. They then retest in 4-6 weeks, and if your B12 levels are coming up okay, then they just have you take the pills. Some people have a hard time getting enough B12 from the pills, and in that case, they do the injections. I have had B12 deficiency more than once, and I have never had to have an injection--it comes back up on its own with the pills. The reason I keep getting the deficiency is because I get lazy and stop taking my vitamins from time to time, but so far everything has been fine. There are a lot of other factors which contribute to leukemia--B12 deficiency is a minor contributor. Don't worry too much about it, as most people don't have the contributing factors, and you should be fine once you start the injections and supplements. Just be sure to stick with the regimen. As for calcium and Vitamin D, you can take supplements for those, as well, or you can either drink more milk or eat more dairy products--all are a rich source of both calcium and Vitamin D. Also, being out in the sun for a bit each day will help with the Vitamin D. As with anything, just try to make sure you are getting a balanced diet. You should be fine. As I said before, the chances of you developing leukemia are slim from simply having a B12 deficiency. You might consider talking to your doctor about adding a multivitamin to your daily diet. There are a lot of trace minerals and vitamins which are hard to get completely from food alone. Don't worry too much. Sleep well tonight, and then tomorrow, ask the doctor any questions you may have. I am sure everything will be fine. And let us, you and I, make a pact right now that we will take our supplements as we are supposed to. It will keep us both healthy. Be well. Answered by Pasquale Hubl 1 year ago.

No...B-12 injections (also known as Cyanocabalamin) are given for B-12 deficiency. Period. I do not know why this would be given for weight loss. Try checking out prescriptionpoint.com. There is some useful info on their website. Answered by Priscilla Adrid 1 year ago.

The only use for vitamen B12 is treatment of pernicious anemia. Answered by Randal Rideaux 1 year ago.

My wife could tell you, she cant absorb b-12 and has to take shots, and also may be getting gastro surgery, email me and i will have her reply tonight. Answered by Tashina Margraf 1 year ago.


What is cyanocobalamin better known as?
Asked by Kenyetta Kryzak 1 year ago.

Cyanocobalamin is a compound that is metabolized to a vitamin in the B complex commonly known as vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 is important for the normal functioning of the brain and nervous system and for the formation of blood. It is involved in the metabolism of every cell of the body, especially affecting the DNA synthesis and regulation but also fatty acid synthesis and energy production. Answered by Hilario Reimund 1 year ago.

Vitamin B12 Answered by Alessandra Barganier 1 year ago.

Vitamin B12. Answered by Prince Knows 1 year ago.

Cyanocobalamin is derived of ( or produced using ) CYANIDE, which makes this NOT ( in my oipinion and other s as well ) something I would want to ingest. This, as usual, is one way nutritional companies keep their costs down. It might be a bit more expensive to use the 100% natural form, but, in my opinion, it s worth paying extra for. Methycobalamin IS 100% Natural Form of Vit. B-12 and does NOT contain nor is it made using CYANIDE - hence the "Cyan" - which is POISON . Read your labels on your vites and choose whether you d rather ingest cyanide b-12 or natural , methylated b-12. But at all costs, KNOW what you are ingesting. Answered by Phil Eller 1 year ago.

It's synthetic vitamin B12 Answered by Shelli Deigado 1 year ago.

It is Vitamin B12 Answered by Kellye Weatherington 1 year ago.

It's a vitamin. I forgot which one... Answered by Melodie Psuty 1 year ago.


Chemistry - please help. It involves molar mass and compound composition of cyanocobalamin, or vitamin B12.?
Cyanocobalamin, or vitamin B12, contains 4.34% cobalt by mass. Calculate the molar mass of cyanocobalamin, assuming that there is one atom of cobalt in every molecule of cyanocobalamin.By the way, I don't know if it matters or not, but the formula for cyanocobalamin is C63 H88 Co N14 O14 P. So 63 carbons, 88... Asked by Tessa Malinovsky 1 year ago.

Cyanocobalamin, or vitamin B12, contains 4.34% cobalt by mass. Calculate the molar mass of cyanocobalamin, assuming that there is one atom of cobalt in every molecule of cyanocobalamin. By the way, I don't know if it matters or not, but the formula for cyanocobalamin is C63 H88 Co N14 O14 P. So 63 carbons, 88 hydrogens, 1 cobalt atom, 14 of nitrogen and oxygen, and 1 atom of phosphorous. I've been stuck on this one forever, and would love if someone could help me get this. Answered by Man Alpheaus 1 year ago.

You can calculate the molar mass with just the information given in the problem and the atomic mass of cobalt. You don't need the periodic table. You don't need the entire formula for cyanocobalamin. mass of cobalt = mass of B12 * 4.34/100 now let's assume we have 1 mole of B12. We know that each mole of B12 contains 1 mole of cobalt. This fact is given n the question. i atomic mass of cobalt = Molecular Mass of B12 * 4.34/100 From the periodic table atomic mass of cobalt = 58.93 g/mole 58.9 g/mole * 100/4.34 = 1357 g/mole This is very close to the actual molecular mass of cyanocobalamin which is 1355 g/mole. If we stick with 3 sig figures the result is the same. Answered by Cruz Lenning 1 year ago.

For molar mass, all you have to do is add up the masses of the atoms as the molecule exists...So: One mole of carbon has a mass of 12.011g One mole of hydrogen has a mass of 1.0079g One mole of cobalt has a mass of 58.93g One mole of nitrogen has a mass of 14.007g One mole of oxygen has a mass of 16.00g One mole of phosphorus has a mass of 30.974g So, in a [C-63 H-88 Co N-14 O-14 P] molecule, you can look at it as though there are 63 moles of carbon, 88 moles of hydrogen, and so on. Thus, you can take the mass of one mole each element and multiply it by the number of atoms there are in one molecule of cyanocobalamin. Then add these values: 12.011 x 63 1.0079 x 88 58.93 x 1 14.007 x 14 16.00 x 14 + 30.974 x 1 and you get: 1355.3902g, but it should be 1355.39g because of the sig digs on oxygen... Hope this helps... Answered by Collette Crayne 1 year ago.

Cobalt Molar Mass Answered by Clayton Philman 1 year ago.


Is cyanocobalamin a lipid carbohydrate protein or nucleic acid?
Asked by Elba Sharkey 1 year ago.

Assuming you forgot to put commas between "lipid, carbohydrate, protein, or nucleic acid"... Cyanocobalamin is none of these. Though it does play a role in the biosynthesis of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids and in the metabolism of carbohydrates, it does this as an enzyme cofactor that promotes the reactions that form them but does not become part of the final product. Answered by Sonny Susong 1 year ago.


HELP! Vitamin B12, cyanocobalamin, is essential for human nutrition. It is concentrated in animal tissue but..?
Please show your work! Asked by Rosette Wever 1 year ago.

not in higher plants. Although nutritional requirements for the vitamin are quite low, people who abstain completely from animal products may develop a deficiency anemia. Cyanocobalamin is the form used in vitamin supplements. It contains 4.34% cobalt by mass. Calculate the molar mass of cyanocobalamin, assuming that there is one atom of cobalt in every molecule of cyanocobalamin. ___________________g/mol Answered by Ngoc Mckale 1 year ago.

So if 4.34% of cyanocobalamin is cobalt then 4.34g out of 100g is cobalt. You want 58.93 g to be cobalt [1 atomic mass] so must scale up by 58.93/4.34 =13.578834 so 100 x 13.578834 = 1358 Answered by Margene Goodyear 1 year ago.


Why Vitamin B12 uses cyanide in the form of cyanocobalamin?
Here it is why? I have studied the Vitamin B12 issue thoroughly, and have learned that biochemists, neutraceutical scientists, and many writers mistakenly use the term Vitamin B12 for cyanocobalamin, THAT IS NOT USABLE BY THE BODY BUT which is in all vitamin B12 supplements. When speaking of Vitamin B12 they are... Asked by Aundrea Nocek 1 year ago.

Here it is why? I have studied the Vitamin B12 issue thoroughly, and have learned that biochemists, neutraceutical scientists, and many writers mistakenly use the term Vitamin B12 for cyanocobalamin, THAT IS NOT USABLE BY THE BODY BUT which is in all vitamin B12 supplements. When speaking of Vitamin B12 they are referring to the semisynthetic Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) that initially was contaminated with poisonous cyanide during its chemical extraction from animal tissues. Carbon columns are used during the extraction process and the carbon combines with nitrogen from the medium forming the poisonous cyanocobalamin, that scientists insist on calling Vitamin B12. The original method used to extract Vitamin B 12 from its sources included heating the medium in a weak acid, the addition of cyanide ion, and exposure to light. In this process the co-enzymes were converted to cyanocobalamin, yet this was over looked. (Review of Physiological Chemistry, Harper, Harold A., Lange Medical Publications, New York, 1977, page l81. Also refer to Cobalamin: Biochemistry and Pathophysiology, Wiley. N. and F. Sicuteri, New York, 1972.) MOREOVER, in the manufacture of vitamin supplements, cyanide is added to the medium because the carbon and nitrogen are needed to form large molecules as are found in vitamins; and IN ADDITION they need it to extract the B12 from fermentation liquors and liver homogenates. Carbon is needed in great quantities when making vitamins or any other manufactured vitamin or substance that mimics the natural vitamin that normally contains a lot of carbon. Cyanocobalamin is in every vitamin B12 supplement known because it is stable and less costly to manufacture. But it is not usable in the body. If the body has sufficient energy it may be able to offload the cyanide and benefit from the useful component. Mainly, what people experience after taking cyanocobalamin supplements is stimulation. The toxic effect of the cyanide triggers a rush of energy as the body works hard to excrete the poison, and this fools people into believing that the supplement has “worked” to heal them. Meanwhile, if their blood tests show an increase in B12, it mainly reflects the amount of the CYANOCOBALAMIN in the blood stream. The usable forms are carried into the cells and can’t be discovered by testing the blood as is the current practice. Blood tests are often inaccurate and, as previously stated, in the case of cyanocobalamin supplementation and B12 injections, about 90% of it has been eliminated from the body in 24 hours. Looking at it Hygienically, no Vitamin B12 therapy can cause a recovery from any so-called deficiency disease. It may only hide the symptoms and cannot give an individual health. When people report that their apparent B12 deficiency symptoms have been relieved by cyanocobalamin supplementation, they are mistaken. They are not getting usable Vitamin B12 co-enzymes, and their bodies are forced to convert the cyanide form into the active forms, methylcobalamin, and adenosylcobalamin. This extra function stimulates but wastes nerve energy, and they are are actually getting worse, not better. They have not addressed the cause of their troubles. Answered by Larhonda Gorczynski 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Why Vitamin B12 uses cyanide in the form of cyanocobalamin? Here it is why? I have studied the Vitamin B12 issue thoroughly, and have learned that biochemists, neutraceutical scientists, and many writers mistakenly use the term Vitamin B12 for cyanocobalamin, THAT IS NOT USABLE BY THE BODY BUT which is in all vitamin B12 supplements. When speaking of... Answered by Loura Lepisto 1 year ago.

Cyanocobalamin Uses Answered by Caterina Jaso 1 year ago.


Vitamin B12, cyanocobalamin, is essential for human nutrition. It's concentrated in animal tissue but not in
higher plants. People who abstain completely from animal products may develop anemia so cyanocobalanim is used in vitamin supplements. It contains 7.83% cobalt by mass. Calculate the molar mass of cyanocobalamin assuming there is one cobalt per molecule. Asked by Antonia Schimler 1 year ago.

That is just a math problem. 58.93 grams per mole is 7.83 % of the molecular weight of cyanocobalamin. Let x = the molecular weight of cyanocobalamin 58.93 = 7.83 % x 58.93 = 0.0783 x 58.93/0.0783 = x Answered by Donnie Levan 1 year ago.


GENERIC NAME: CYANOCOBALAMIN - INJECTION or Vitamin B12?
is this what doctors inject for weight loss? how come it costs so much? How does it help in loosing weight? what does this compound consist of? I know this question is a little hard, I am much obligue for your answer. Is this available in Germany? is so, under what name? the U.S military hospitals do not have this... Asked by Brendon Rabelo 1 year ago.

is this what doctors inject for weight loss? how come it costs so much? How does it help in loosing weight? what does this compound consist of? I know this question is a little hard, I am much obligue for your answer. Is this available in Germany? is so, under what name? the U.S military hospitals do not have this available here but maybe in the German economy? Thank you in advance. Answered by Lorene Cunniffe 1 year ago.

Cyanocobalamin is vitamin B12. Vegans can take oral B12, people with pernicious anemia or some who've undergone bariatric surgery need injections, but its main use in others is that it's a pretty, red-colored placebo. I can't imagine that it isn't on the formulary of the larger military hospitals in Germany, but they're not going to use it as a placebo like some doctors in private weight-loss practices do. Answered by Curt Tetro 1 year ago.

I doubt very much that you need worry about anything. I, too, suffer from B12 deficiency from time to time, and what they do for me is have me take the pills, and it comes back up. The reason you have to have an injection is because some people don't process the pills very well--many people get more benefit from the shots. Many doctors, when they find that someone needs B12, will start with an injection and then have the person take pills as a follow up. They then retest in 4-6 weeks, and if your B12 levels are coming up okay, then they just have you take the pills. Some people have a hard time getting enough B12 from the pills, and in that case, they do the injections. I have had B12 deficiency more than once, and I have never had to have an injection--it comes back up on its own with the pills. The reason I keep getting the deficiency is because I get lazy and stop taking my vitamins from time to time, but so far everything has been fine. There are a lot of other factors which contribute to leukemia--B12 deficiency is a minor contributor. Don't worry too much about it, as most people don't have the contributing factors, and you should be fine once you start the injections and supplements. Just be sure to stick with the regimen. As for calcium and Vitamin D, you can take supplements for those, as well, or you can either drink more milk or eat more dairy products--all are a rich source of both calcium and Vitamin D. Also, being out in the sun for a bit each day will help with the Vitamin D. As with anything, just try to make sure you are getting a balanced diet. You should be fine. As I said before, the chances of you developing leukemia are slim from simply having a B12 deficiency. You might consider talking to your doctor about adding a multivitamin to your daily diet. There are a lot of trace minerals and vitamins which are hard to get completely from food alone. Don't worry too much. Sleep well tonight, and then tomorrow, ask the doctor any questions you may have. I am sure everything will be fine. And let us, you and I, make a pact right now that we will take our supplements as we are supposed to. It will keep us both healthy. Be well. Answered by Diann Appleyard 1 year ago.

No...B-12 injections (also known as Cyanocabalamin) are given for B-12 deficiency. Period. I do not know why this would be given for weight loss. Try checking out prescriptionpoint.com. There is some useful info on their website. Answered by Missy Allendorf 1 year ago.

The only use for vitamen B12 is treatment of pernicious anemia. Answered by Irwin Koski 1 year ago.

My wife could tell you, she cant absorb b-12 and has to take shots, and also may be getting gastro surgery, email me and i will have her reply tonight. Answered by Fredia Pye 1 year ago.


What is cyanocobalamin better known as?
Asked by Leeanne Daer 1 year ago.

Cyanocobalamin is a compound that is metabolized to a vitamin in the B complex commonly known as vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 is important for the normal functioning of the brain and nervous system and for the formation of blood. It is involved in the metabolism of every cell of the body, especially affecting the DNA synthesis and regulation but also fatty acid synthesis and energy production. Answered by Marti Pumarejo 1 year ago.

Vitamin B12 Answered by Ebony Puccia 1 year ago.

Vitamin B12. Answered by Elenora Blasko 1 year ago.

Cyanocobalamin is derived of ( or produced using ) CYANIDE, which makes this NOT ( in my oipinion and other s as well ) something I would want to ingest. This, as usual, is one way nutritional companies keep their costs down. It might be a bit more expensive to use the 100% natural form, but, in my opinion, it s worth paying extra for. Methycobalamin IS 100% Natural Form of Vit. B-12 and does NOT contain nor is it made using CYANIDE - hence the "Cyan" - which is POISON . Read your labels on your vites and choose whether you d rather ingest cyanide b-12 or natural , methylated b-12. But at all costs, KNOW what you are ingesting. Answered by Alvina Palazzolo 1 year ago.

It's synthetic vitamin B12 Answered by Keitha Stripling 1 year ago.

It is Vitamin B12 Answered by Hilton Breines 1 year ago.

It's a vitamin. I forgot which one... Answered by Carlena Schulder 1 year ago.


Chemistry - please help. It involves molar mass and compound composition of cyanocobalamin, or vitamin B12.?
Cyanocobalamin, or vitamin B12, contains 4.34% cobalt by mass. Calculate the molar mass of cyanocobalamin, assuming that there is one atom of cobalt in every molecule of cyanocobalamin.By the way, I don't know if it matters or not, but the formula for cyanocobalamin is C63 H88 Co N14 O14 P. So 63 carbons, 88... Asked by Avery Duck 1 year ago.

Cyanocobalamin, or vitamin B12, contains 4.34% cobalt by mass. Calculate the molar mass of cyanocobalamin, assuming that there is one atom of cobalt in every molecule of cyanocobalamin. By the way, I don't know if it matters or not, but the formula for cyanocobalamin is C63 H88 Co N14 O14 P. So 63 carbons, 88 hydrogens, 1 cobalt atom, 14 of nitrogen and oxygen, and 1 atom of phosphorous. I've been stuck on this one forever, and would love if someone could help me get this. Answered by Victoria Groszkiewicz 1 year ago.

You can calculate the molar mass with just the information given in the problem and the atomic mass of cobalt. You don't need the periodic table. You don't need the entire formula for cyanocobalamin. mass of cobalt = mass of B12 * 4.34/100 now let's assume we have 1 mole of B12. We know that each mole of B12 contains 1 mole of cobalt. This fact is given n the question. i atomic mass of cobalt = Molecular Mass of B12 * 4.34/100 From the periodic table atomic mass of cobalt = 58.93 g/mole 58.9 g/mole * 100/4.34 = 1357 g/mole This is very close to the actual molecular mass of cyanocobalamin which is 1355 g/mole. If we stick with 3 sig figures the result is the same. Answered by Sharolyn Regina 1 year ago.

For molar mass, all you have to do is add up the masses of the atoms as the molecule exists...So: One mole of carbon has a mass of 12.011g One mole of hydrogen has a mass of 1.0079g One mole of cobalt has a mass of 58.93g One mole of nitrogen has a mass of 14.007g One mole of oxygen has a mass of 16.00g One mole of phosphorus has a mass of 30.974g So, in a [C-63 H-88 Co N-14 O-14 P] molecule, you can look at it as though there are 63 moles of carbon, 88 moles of hydrogen, and so on. Thus, you can take the mass of one mole each element and multiply it by the number of atoms there are in one molecule of cyanocobalamin. Then add these values: 12.011 x 63 1.0079 x 88 58.93 x 1 14.007 x 14 16.00 x 14 + 30.974 x 1 and you get: 1355.3902g, but it should be 1355.39g because of the sig digs on oxygen... Hope this helps... Answered by Petrina Stofko 1 year ago.

Cobalt Molar Mass Answered by Meryl Husar 1 year ago.


Is cyanocobalamin a lipid carbohydrate protein or nucleic acid?
Asked by Lou Square 1 year ago.

Assuming you forgot to put commas between "lipid, carbohydrate, protein, or nucleic acid"... Cyanocobalamin is none of these. Though it does play a role in the biosynthesis of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids and in the metabolism of carbohydrates, it does this as an enzyme cofactor that promotes the reactions that form them but does not become part of the final product. Answered by Amalia Arnet 1 year ago.


HELP! Vitamin B12, cyanocobalamin, is essential for human nutrition. It is concentrated in animal tissue but..?
Please show your work! Asked by Dreama Wages 1 year ago.

not in higher plants. Although nutritional requirements for the vitamin are quite low, people who abstain completely from animal products may develop a deficiency anemia. Cyanocobalamin is the form used in vitamin supplements. It contains 4.34% cobalt by mass. Calculate the molar mass of cyanocobalamin, assuming that there is one atom of cobalt in every molecule of cyanocobalamin. ___________________g/mol Answered by Sindy Amirian 1 year ago.

So if 4.34% of cyanocobalamin is cobalt then 4.34g out of 100g is cobalt. You want 58.93 g to be cobalt [1 atomic mass] so must scale up by 58.93/4.34 =13.578834 so 100 x 13.578834 = 1358 Answered by Delores Yelle 1 year ago.


Why Vitamin B12 uses cyanide in the form of cyanocobalamin?
Here it is why? I have studied the Vitamin B12 issue thoroughly, and have learned that biochemists, neutraceutical scientists, and many writers mistakenly use the term Vitamin B12 for cyanocobalamin, THAT IS NOT USABLE BY THE BODY BUT which is in all vitamin B12 supplements. When speaking of Vitamin B12 they are... Asked by Kacey Kynaston 1 year ago.

Here it is why? I have studied the Vitamin B12 issue thoroughly, and have learned that biochemists, neutraceutical scientists, and many writers mistakenly use the term Vitamin B12 for cyanocobalamin, THAT IS NOT USABLE BY THE BODY BUT which is in all vitamin B12 supplements. When speaking of Vitamin B12 they are referring to the semisynthetic Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) that initially was contaminated with poisonous cyanide during its chemical extraction from animal tissues. Carbon columns are used during the extraction process and the carbon combines with nitrogen from the medium forming the poisonous cyanocobalamin, that scientists insist on calling Vitamin B12. The original method used to extract Vitamin B 12 from its sources included heating the medium in a weak acid, the addition of cyanide ion, and exposure to light. In this process the co-enzymes were converted to cyanocobalamin, yet this was over looked. (Review of Physiological Chemistry, Harper, Harold A., Lange Medical Publications, New York, 1977, page l81. Also refer to Cobalamin: Biochemistry and Pathophysiology, Wiley. N. and F. Sicuteri, New York, 1972.) MOREOVER, in the manufacture of vitamin supplements, cyanide is added to the medium because the carbon and nitrogen are needed to form large molecules as are found in vitamins; and IN ADDITION they need it to extract the B12 from fermentation liquors and liver homogenates. Carbon is needed in great quantities when making vitamins or any other manufactured vitamin or substance that mimics the natural vitamin that normally contains a lot of carbon. Cyanocobalamin is in every vitamin B12 supplement known because it is stable and less costly to manufacture. But it is not usable in the body. If the body has sufficient energy it may be able to offload the cyanide and benefit from the useful component. Mainly, what people experience after taking cyanocobalamin supplements is stimulation. The toxic effect of the cyanide triggers a rush of energy as the body works hard to excrete the poison, and this fools people into believing that the supplement has “worked” to heal them. Meanwhile, if their blood tests show an increase in B12, it mainly reflects the amount of the CYANOCOBALAMIN in the blood stream. The usable forms are carried into the cells and can’t be discovered by testing the blood as is the current practice. Blood tests are often inaccurate and, as previously stated, in the case of cyanocobalamin supplementation and B12 injections, about 90% of it has been eliminated from the body in 24 hours. Looking at it Hygienically, no Vitamin B12 therapy can cause a recovery from any so-called deficiency disease. It may only hide the symptoms and cannot give an individual health. When people report that their apparent B12 deficiency symptoms have been relieved by cyanocobalamin supplementation, they are mistaken. They are not getting usable Vitamin B12 co-enzymes, and their bodies are forced to convert the cyanide form into the active forms, methylcobalamin, and adenosylcobalamin. This extra function stimulates but wastes nerve energy, and they are are actually getting worse, not better. They have not addressed the cause of their troubles. Answered by Chas Madlock 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Why Vitamin B12 uses cyanide in the form of cyanocobalamin? Here it is why? I have studied the Vitamin B12 issue thoroughly, and have learned that biochemists, neutraceutical scientists, and many writers mistakenly use the term Vitamin B12 for cyanocobalamin, THAT IS NOT USABLE BY THE BODY BUT which is in all vitamin B12 supplements. When speaking of... Answered by Venetta Dewolf 1 year ago.

Cyanocobalamin Uses Answered by Vanessa Fouty 1 year ago.


Vitamin B12, cyanocobalamin, is essential for human nutrition. It's concentrated in animal tissue but not in
higher plants. People who abstain completely from animal products may develop anemia so cyanocobalanim is used in vitamin supplements. It contains 7.83% cobalt by mass. Calculate the molar mass of cyanocobalamin assuming there is one cobalt per molecule. Asked by Ben Buchberger 1 year ago.

That is just a math problem. 58.93 grams per mole is 7.83 % of the molecular weight of cyanocobalamin. Let x = the molecular weight of cyanocobalamin 58.93 = 7.83 % x 58.93 = 0.0783 x 58.93/0.0783 = x Answered by Mariela Linahan 1 year ago.


Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - All rights reserved