CUTIVATE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019957/001.

Names and composition

"CUTIVATE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE.
It belongs to the class Potent steroids and is used in Inflammatory skin conditions (Skin)

Answered questions

Does cutivate work for dermatitis?
well ive recently got dermatits on the palm of my hand its swelled up, itchy, dry and it hurts a bit when you touch it or press on it and im wondering if cutivate helps it and what causes it? how long will i have to keep using this cream Asked by Irma Swagerty 5 months ago.

Cutivate Cream is a type of steroid prescribed to treat a variety of skin problems, including psoriasis, dermatitis, and eczema. The cream is usually applied to the affected areas of the skin once or twice a day. It is approved for use in adults and children as young as three months old. Itching, dryness, and burning are possible side effects of this medicine. Some general considerations to keep in mind during treatment with Cutivate Cream include the following: - This medication is usually applied to the affected area(s) of the skin once or twice a day. - Apply the medication sparingly and gently rub in. More is not better; only a thin film is necessary. - Do not cover the medication with a dressing or bandage, as this increases the risk for side effects. - For the medication to work properly, it must be used as prescribed. Answered by Jeromy Marmie 5 months ago.


Cutivate lotion 0.05 good for acne?
i have a good supply of cutivate lotion and was wondering if it is good to fight off acne. Asked by Bee Clankscales 5 months ago.

NO. Cutivate is a topical steroid. It is an anti inflammatory agent. It is for eczema, psoriasis, allergic reactions and so on. Although it may minimize the inflammation of pimples in the short term (for example we inject similar steroid into pimples sometimes), in the long run it can worsen acne. It is not worth the long term problems. Chronic use can also lead to thinning of the skin. Answered by Reinaldo Waidelich 5 months ago.

Cutivate Lotion Answered by Cory Borich 5 months ago.

I have had moderate acne problems since I was an early teenager, and I am now 24. I have only RECENTLY started to use lotions on my face, and overall, when used carefully and not over-used, it really helps the overall COMPLEXION, although it does increase likelihood of my skin developing acne. I use cocoa butter now, on my face, and like I say, it does improve my overall complexion. I have used oatmeal lotion in the past, also, and it works well too. I grew up in, and still live in a very dry and used to live in a very cold climate, and I have concluded that skin dryness and exposure cold has been the leading cause of imperfect complexion, especially damaged is the tip of my nose, which is more often cold than other parts of my face because of lack of blood flow, even though, I almost NEVER had acne on the tip of my nose. I sometimes wrap a shirt around my face and tie it behind my head for several hours to protect the skin on my face and it improves the quality and moisture of my skin very noticeably in that short amount of time. Most people have better complexions on the skin that their clothes cover. Lotion protects and repairs from the ELEMENTS. When your skin is weak and damaged / dry, even small acne will leave scars and bigger marks. It is better to have healthy, moisture rich skin that will HEAL quickly than dried out, damaged skin that will break and scar because of the slightest blemish. I have concluded that skin needs a variety of things and to have those things in moderation and in good balance for a good complexion. Both dryness and moisture is important. Oil seems to increase wrinkles. Over-moisture leads to acne. Cleanliness dries your skin. Oil is important. Sun is important for coloration, but too much will give you sunspots. I really believe the best way to improve your complexion is to use lotion, and then to wipe off excess oil and keep your skin dry after that, to keep infected areas VERY Clean, and to keep a shirt wrapped around your face. Blood flow / circulation is also important to fast healing. I heard about a plant root that does this without any negative side effects called Maca. It is supposed to be very healthy, improve energy levels, etc. It might also help, or increased amount of exercise will also improve your circulation. Answered by Eldon Aldridge 5 months ago.


Cutivate...Sunlight?
I am using Cutivate (a topical steroid) to get rid of damage done by a strong acne medication (differin)...which left parts of my face very dry and irritated. Should I stay out of the sunlight while using Cutivate, or does it not matter? Advice from a doctor/nurse/pharmacist please! Thanks! Asked by Renata Drafton 5 months ago.

I am not familiar with this one but your medicine should have come with a description of possible side effects and things to avoid. You can always call your pharmacy and see wht they say!! Drugists are very knowledgable about the effects of the medicines and prescriptions that they fill. If all else fails put a call in to your doctor and ask - they should answer it by phone!! You might also try searching the internet for information on this Cutivate - there is usually a web site for everything!! Good Luck!! Answered by Tabetha Hoek 5 months ago.


Is it safe to use Cutivate cream on face for a 3months baby?
i have a 3months baby that have a rash in her face,i took her to dermatologist and he told me that she has aczema,and he gave me a cream called Cutivate and dropns called fenistil as an antipruritic,antiallergic. i applied the cream once on her face but now i'm not really sure about it, i tried to google about... Asked by Dorothy Malett 5 months ago.

i have a 3months baby that have a rash in her face,i took her to dermatologist and he told me that she has aczema,and he gave me a cream called Cutivate and dropns called fenistil as an antipruritic,antiallergic. i applied the cream once on her face but now i'm not really sure about it, i tried to google about it but i couldn't find anything useful,can anybody help me and tel me is it safe to use it for a little baby or should stop using it?!?! Answered by Annita Wah 5 months ago.

For periods no longer than 2 weeks, you can use the Cutivate cream on your baby. However, if the problem is around the eye area, I'd not use it in that location. (As an aside, Eucerin, as mentioned by the other poster, has NO antiinflammatory action, so would not help to treat the eczema other than to simply moisturize it). If you are unsure as to whether to use the Cutivate, then why not go as "safely" as you can, and use simply the over-the-counter hydrocortisone creams that are available. These are non-fluorinated chemicals, and have much less chance of doing any damage whatsoever. Answered by Lawrence Ribbink 5 months ago.

In the United States, "the safety of Cutivate cream on infants has not been fully established" according to my latest pharmacology book (I'm acquiring my practitioner's licensing)... SO, I don't think I would continue using it. There are safe and effective over-the-counter creams like Eucerin that you could use on your baby's eczema. Eucerin is VERY thick so use it on dampened skin...it will take an effort to rub it in but it is 100% safe and effective. I am the mom of 6 and I used it on my children. :0) Answered by Cleveland Cozza 5 months ago.

Cutivate Cream Answered by Karan Mcgrue 5 months ago.

if the doctor prescribed it then im sure its safe as he wouldnt prescribe anything that wouldnt be suitable just keep an eye on the rash if it gets worse then do stop using it Answered by Stevie Hachette 5 months ago.


What works faster on eczema?
Cutivate or hydrocortizone? Do either of them burn or sting? Asked by Scott Wrisley 5 months ago.

Cutivate (also known as fluticasone propionate) will inhibit the formation of arachadonic acid around the site of the eczema. Arachadonic acid is a prostaglandin that excites an inflamatory response. Hydrocortisone is also an anti-inflammatory, but it has the lowest effectiveness of any anti-inflammatory topical corticosteriod. Cutivate, though it may be considerably more expensive, is the clear choice for eczema. Answered by Alverta Spalinger 5 months ago.

not sure, but i know bag balm works well with some. ( you can get it at stores like Walmarts ) Answered by Johnna Ramaswamy 5 months ago.


PLEASE help me!?
I have this cream called Cutivate cream. I want to know if it's for scabies or prickly heat rashes? Asked by Jovan Konig 5 months ago.

Cutivate Cream Manufacturer: GlaxoSmithKline DESCRIPTION CUTIVATE (fluticasone propionate cream) Cream, 0.05% contains fluticasone propionate [(6(alpha),11(beta),16 (alpha),17 (alpha))-6,9,-difluoro-11-hydroxy-16-met... acid, S-fluoromethyl ester], a synthetic fluorinated corticosteroid, for topical dermatologic use. The topical corticosteroids constitute a class of primarily synthetic steroids used as anti-inflammatory and antipruritic agents. Chemically, fluticasone propionate is C 25 H 31 F 3 O 5 S. Fluticasone propionate has a molecular weight of 500.6. It is a white to off-white powder and is insoluble in water. Each gram of CUTIVATE Cream contains fluticasone propionate 0.5 mg in a base of propylene glycol, mineral oil, cetostearyl alcohol, Ceteth-20, isopropyl myristate, dibasic sodium phosphate, citric acid, purified water, and imidurea as preservative. CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY Like other topical corticosteroids, fluticasone propionate has anti-inflammatory, antipruritic, and vasoconstrictive properties. The mechanism of the anti-inflammatory activity of the topical steroids, in general, is unclear. However, corticosteroids are thought to act by the induction of phospholipase A 2 inhibitory proteins, collectively called lipocortins. It is postulated that these proteins control the biosynthesis of potent mediators of inflammation such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes by inhibiting the release of their common precursor, arachidonic acid. Arachidonic acid is released from membrane phospholipids by phospholipase A 2 . Fluticasone propionate is lipophilic and has a strong affinity for the glucocorticoid receptor. It has weak affinity for the progesterone receptor, and virtually no affinity for the mineralocorticoid, estrogen, or androgen receptors. The therapeutic potency of glucocorticoids is related to the half-life of the glucocorticoid-receptor complex. The half-life of the fluticasone propionate-glucocorticoid receptor complex is approximately 10 hours. Studies performed with CUTIVATE Cream indicate that it is in the medium range of potency as compared with other topical corticosteroids. Pharmacokinetics: Absorption: The activity of CUTIVATE is due to the parent drug, fluticasone propionate. The extent of percutaneous absorption of topical corticosteroids is determined by many factors, including the vehicle and the integrity of the epidermal barrier. Occlusive dressing enhances penetration. Topical corticosteroids can be absorbed from normal intact skin. Inflammation and/or other disease processes in the skin increase percutaneous absorption. In a human study of 12 healthy males receiving 12.5 g of 0.05% fluticasone propionate cream twice daily for 3 weeks, plasma levels were generally below the level of quantification (0.05 ng/mL). In another study of 6 healthy males administered 25 g of 0.05% fluticasone propionate cream under occlusion for 5 days, plasma levels of fluticasone ranged from 0.07 to 0.39 ng/mL. In an animal study using radiolabeled 0.05% fluticasone propionate cream and ointment preparations, rats received a topical dose of 1 g/kg for a 24-hour period. Total recovery of radioactivity was approximately 80% at the end of 7 days. The majority of the dose (73%) was recovered from the surface of the application site. Less than 1% of the dose was recovered in the skin at the application site. Approximately 5% of the dose was absorbed systemically through the skin. Absorption from the skin continued for the duration of the study (7 days), indicating a long retention time at the application site. Distribution: Following intravenous administration of 1 mg fluticasone propionate in healthy volunteers, the initial disposition phase for fluticasone propionate was rapid and consistent with its high lipid solubility and tissue binding. The apparent volume of distribution averaged 4.2 L/kg (range, 2.3 to 16.7 L/kg). The percentage of fluticasone propionate bound to human plasma proteins averaged 91%. Fluticasone propionate is weakly and reversibly bound to erythrocytes. Fluticasone propionate is not significantly bound to human transcortin. Metabolism: No metabolites of fluticasone propionate were detected in an in vitro study of radiolabeled fluticasone propionate incubated in a human skin homogenate. The total blood clearance of systemically absorbed fluticasone propionate averages 1,093 mL/min (range, 618 to 1,702 mL/min) after a 1-mg intravenous dose, with renal clearance accounting for less than 0.02% of the total. Fluticasone propionate is metabolized in the liver by cytochrome P450 3A4-mediated hydrolysis of the 5-fluoromethyl carbothioate grouping. This transformation occurs in 1 metabolic step to produce the inactive 17-(beta)-carboxylic acid metabolite, the only known metabolite detected in man. This metabolite has approximately 2,000 times less affinity than the parent drug for the glucocorticoid receptor of human lung cytosol in vitro and negligible pharmacological activity in animal studies. Other metabolites detected in vitro using cultured human hepatoma cells have not been detected in man. Excretion: Following intravenous dose of 1 mg in healthy volunteers, fluticasone propionate showed polyexponential kinetics and had an average terminal half-life of 7.2 hours (range, 3.2 to 11.2 hours). INDICATIONS AND USAGE CUTIVATE Cream is a medium potency corticosteroid indicated for the relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses. CUTIVATE Cream may be used with caution in pediatric patients 3 months of age or older. The safety and efficacy of drug use for longer than 4 weeks in this population have not been established. The safety and efficacy of CUTIVATE Cream in pediatric patients below 3 months of age have not been established. CONTRAINDICATIONS CUTIVATE Cream is contraindicated in those patients with a history of hypersensitivity to any of the components in the preparation. PRECAUTIONS General: Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids can produce reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression with the potential for glucocorticosteroid insufficiency after withdrawal from treatment. Manifestations of Cushing's syndrome, hyperglycemia, and glucosuria can also be produced in some patients by systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids while on treatment. Patients applying a potent topical steroid to a large surface area or to areas under occlusion should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression. This may be done by using the ACTH stimulation, A.M. plasma cortisol, and urinary free cortisol tests. If HPA axis suppression is noted, an attempt should be made to withdraw the drug, to reduce the frequency of application, or to substitute a less potent steroid. Recovery of HPA axis function is generally prompt upon discontinuation of topical corticosteroids. Infrequently, signs and symptoms of glucocorticosteroid insufficiency may occur requiring supplemental systemic corticosteroids. For information on systemic supplementation, see prescribing information for those products. Fluticasone propionate cream, 0.05% caused depression of A.M. plasma cortisol levels in 1 of 6 adult patients when used daily for 7 days in patients with psoriasis or eczema involving at least 30% of the body surface. After 2 days of treatment, this patient developed a 60% decrease from pretreatment values in the A.M. plasma cortisol level. There was some evidence of corresponding decrease in the 24-hour urinary free cortisol levels. The A.M. plasma cortisol level remained slightly depressed for 48 hours but recovered by day 6 of treatment. Fluticasone propionate cream, 0.05%, caused HPA axis suppression in 2 of 43 pediatric patients, ages 2 and 5 years old, who were treated for 4 weeks covering at least 35% of the body surface area. Follow-up testing 12 days after treatment discontinuation, available for 1 of the 2 subjects, demonstrated a normally responsive HPA axis (see PRECAUTIONS : Pediatric Use ). Pediatric patients may be more susceptible to systemic toxicity from equivalent doses due to their larger skin surface to body mass ratios (see PRECAUTIONS : Pediatric Use ). Fluticasone propionate cream, 0.05% may cause local cutaneous adverse reactions (see ADVERSE REACTIONS ). If irritation develops, CUTIVATE Cream should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted. Allergic contact dermatitis with corticosteroids is usually diagnosed by observing failure to heal rather than noting a clinical exacerbation as with most topical products not containing corticosteroids. Such an observation should be corroborated with appropriate diagnostic patch testing. If concomitant skin infections are present or develop, an appropriate antifungal or antibacterial agent should be used. If a favorable response does not occur promptly, use of CUTIVATE Cream should be discontinued until the infection has been adequately controlled. CUTIVATE Cream should not be used in the presence of preexisting skin atrophy and should not be used where infection is present at the treatment site. CUTIVATE Cream should not be used in the treatment of rosacea and perioral dermatitis. Information for Patients: Patients using topical corticosteroids should receive the following information and instructions: This medication is to be used as directed by the physician. It is for external use only. Avoid contact with the eyes. This medication should not be used for any disorder other than that for which it was prescribed. The treated skin area should not be bandaged or otherwise covered or wrapped so as to be occlusive unless directed by the physician. Patients should report to their physician any signs of local adverse reactions. Parents of pediatric patients should be advised not to use this medication in the treatment of diaper dermatitis. CUTIVATE Cream should not be applied in the diaper areas as diapers or plastic pants may constitute occlusive dressing (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION ). This medication should not be used on the face, underarms, or groin areas unless directed by a physician. As with other corticosteroids, therapy should be discontinued when control is achieved. If no improvement is seen within 2 weeks, contact the physician. Answered by Ernest Dandrow 5 months ago.

I am willing to tell you a little about my religion. First of all, I am a christian and am a member of the Church of Christ. The Church of Christ is a non-denominational church (meaning that there is only one church). The reason that we believe this is because that is what the bible tell us Ephesians 4:4 ( there is one body...) Colossians 1:18 ( He is the head of the body, the church). I was baptized when I was 13yrs old and I really understood what I was doing. Before being baptized I had been molested by my mother's boyfriend, and a close family friend. I couldn't talk to my mother about it because I felt she wouldn't do anything ( since my oldest sister told her what was going on and she did nothing). Needless to say I was at a point where I was highly depressed and not only contemplating sucucied but actually attempted suicide twice. Over that weekend I went to my grandparent's house and they ALWAYS went to church on Sundays. To be honest I really don't remember what the sermon was about I just remember that I was actually listening, it was for me and I couldn't just stand there and not give my life to God. Shortly after that I went to live with my grandparents and I can't say that everything in my 30yrs of living was perfect. What I will tell you is that everything that you go through has a reason and all though you may not see it now.... I posted this little quote of mine on my fb account not too long ago:" The importance of life's lessons may not become clear until later.They may help you to understand, accept, and appreciate the things that are soon to come. This is where our strength to endure comes from..." It is not for me to tell you exactly what to do. Just wanted to share a little info with you because I know how it feels to have an empty feeling. What I will do is pray that you will find the Substance that you need to make you whole. Answered by Reid Eismann 5 months ago.

well ya ! it is good , but why don't you try something in AYurveda for skin, It is safe and without side effects. Chek planetayurveda.com Answered by Janie Martel 5 months ago.


Cutivate/ketokonazole cream?
I got a presription for the above a few years ago and it works great for the redness around my nose. i put it on in the am and the redness is gone for the day. i am running out though and the Rx is now very expensive because it is considered a compound. The rx would be over $50, but if I get a tube of cutivate... Asked by Virgil Wilkison 5 months ago.

I got a presription for the above a few years ago and it works great for the redness around my nose. i put it on in the am and the redness is gone for the day. i am running out though and the Rx is now very expensive because it is considered a compound. The rx would be over $50, but if I get a tube of cutivate and a tube of ketokonazole and mix it myself it would be only $20. The problem is I don't know what proportion to mix them in. If there are any pharmacists or doctors out there who can direct me to the right place. is it just a 50/50% mix that i can do myself? I know there is a handbook for Rx's that i can probably get online, but I need the name of the book. thanks. Answered by Penny Zilk 5 months ago.

That isn't how it is made. A pharmacist would normally get ketoconazole power or tablets, and levigate it into Cutivate ointment. You won't find how to compound online. Answered by Yee Kushlan 5 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019957/001 CUTIVATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.005%
019958/001 CUTIVATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.05% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
021152/001 CUTIVATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE LOTION/TOPICAL 0.05%

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019957/001 CUTIVATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.005%
019958/001 CUTIVATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.05% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020121/001 FLONASE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 0.05MG per SPRAY **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020548/001 FLOVENT FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE AEROSOL, METERED/INHALATION 0.044MG per INH
020548/002 FLOVENT FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE AEROSOL, METERED/INHALATION 0.11MG per INH
020548/003 FLOVENT FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE AEROSOL, METERED/INHALATION 0.22MG per INH
020549/001 FLOVENT FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE POWDER/INHALATION 0.044MG per INH
020549/002 FLOVENT FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE POWDER/INHALATION 0.088MG per INH
020549/003 FLOVENT FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE POWDER/INHALATION 0.22MG per INH
020833/001 FLOVENT DISKUS 50 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE POWDER/INHALATION 0.05MG per INH
020833/002 FLOVENT DISKUS 100 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE POWDER/INHALATION 0.1MG per INH
020833/003 FLOVENT DISKUS 250 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE POWDER/INHALATION 0.25MG per INH
021152/001 CUTIVATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE LOTION/TOPICAL 0.05%
021433/001 FLOVENT HFA FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE AEROSOL, METERED/INHALATION 0.22MG per INH
021433/002 FLOVENT HFA FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE AEROSOL, METERED/INHALATION 0.11MG per INH
021433/003 FLOVENT HFA FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE AEROSOL, METERED/INHALATION 0.044MG per INH
076300/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.005%
076451/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.05%
076504/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 0.05MG per SPRAY
076633/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.05%
076668/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.005%
076793/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.05%
076865/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.05%
077055/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.05%
077145/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.005%
077168/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.005%
077538/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 0.05MG per SPRAY
077570/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 0.05MG per SPRAY
078492/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 0.05MG per SPRAY
090759/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE LOTION/TOPICAL 0.05%
091553/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE LOTION/TOPICAL 0.05%
205434/001 FLONASE ALLERGY RELIEF FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 0.05MG per SPRAY
207957/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 0.05MG per SPRAY
208150/001 FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 0.05MG per SPRAY
208798/001 ARMONAIR RESPICLICK FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE POWDER/INHALATION 0.055MG per INH
208798/002 ARMONAIR RESPICLICK FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE POWDER/INHALATION 0.113MG per INH
208798/003 ARMONAIR RESPICLICK FLUTICASONE PROPIONATE POWDER/INHALATION 0.232MG per INH

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
GlaxoSmithKline

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