Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 009218/005.

Names and composition

"COUMADIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of WARFARIN SODIUM.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009218/005 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
009218/007 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
009218/012 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 75MG per VIAL
009218/013 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
009218/016 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
009218/018 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
009218/020 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per VIAL
009218/022 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
009218/023 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
009218/024 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per VIAL
009218/025 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
009218/026 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009218/005 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
009218/007 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
009218/012 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 75MG per VIAL
009218/013 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
009218/016 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
009218/018 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
009218/020 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per VIAL
009218/022 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
009218/023 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
009218/024 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per VIAL
009218/025 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
009218/026 COUMADIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
011771/001 ATHROMBIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 25MG
011771/002 ATHROMBIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
011771/003 ATHROMBIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
017020/001 PANWARFIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
017020/002 PANWARFIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
017020/003 PANWARFIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
017020/004 PANWARFIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
017020/005 PANWARFIN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040145/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040145/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040145/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040145/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
040145/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040145/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
040145/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040145/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
040145/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
040196/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040196/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040196/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040196/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
040196/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040196/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
040196/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040196/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
040196/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
040301/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040301/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040301/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040301/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040301/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
040301/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
040301/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040301/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
040301/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
040415/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040415/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040415/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040415/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
040415/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
040415/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040415/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
040415/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
040415/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040416/001 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040416/002 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040416/003 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040416/004 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
040416/005 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
040416/006 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040416/007 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
040416/008 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
040416/009 JANTOVEN WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040616/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040616/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040616/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
040616/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
040616/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040616/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
040616/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
040616/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040616/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040663/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040663/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040663/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040663/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
040663/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
040663/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040663/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
040663/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
040663/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086118/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
086119/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
086120/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
086122/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086123/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
088719/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
088720/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
088721/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
090935/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
090935/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
090935/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
090935/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
090935/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
090935/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
090935/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
090935/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
090935/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
200104/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
200104/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
200104/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
200104/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
200104/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
200104/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
200104/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
200104/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
200104/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG
202202/001 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 1MG
202202/002 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2MG
202202/003 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
202202/004 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 3MG
202202/005 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 4MG
202202/006 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 5MG
202202/007 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 6MG
202202/008 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
202202/009 WARFARIN SODIUM WARFARIN SODIUM TABLET/ORAL 10MG

Ask a doctor

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Answered questions

What is the usual dose of coumadin?
The doctor always gives me the results ,they just take ages to arrive at his office. Asked by Lyndsay Millender 2 years ago.

I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find out how much I have. Are there any other drugs I can take which would be less hassle and just as safe if not better? P.S. most people I know who are older and have had worse problems than me are on a much lower dose than I am. I dont feel I can talk to my doctor like I used to and am wondering if I should try a new specialist or get a second opinion. Answered by Mira Bruington 2 years ago.

The dose of Coumadin varies and is determined by lab tests known as the protime (PT) and INR. PT/INR is a blood test that evaluate how thin blood is. The average dose of Coumadin in my experience is around 5 mg daily. I have seen doses as high as 30 mg and as low as 0.5 mg. The variation in dosing is related to differences in metabolism and intake of Vitamin K. A dose of 7 mg is actually very common and nothing to worry about. Do not be concerned with the doses of others you know, because everyone is different. You just need a higher dose than them to get you in the right PT/INR range. As a patient you have the right to access the results of your lab tests. I would recommend that you ask your doctor or clinic nurse for the results directly. Most doctors are happy to provide this information. I personally would have no problem providing this information to my patients. Just for your information, the INR should be 2-3 for most indications. In regards to alternative medications, it depends on your indication for Coumadin. Currently there is no oral medication that is similar to Coumadin. The medications that are similar to Coumadin that are currently available are available only IV or by subcutaneous injection once or twice daily. Most people are not interested in taking a subcutaneous injection and would prefer to stick with Coumadin. The alternative medications are also more expensive. These alternatives include Lovenox and Fondaparinux. There is an oral medication like Coumadin that is awaiting FDA approval, but it will only be approved for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It will likely have further indications like Coumadin, but it will likely take years to be approved. If you would like to have a second opinion, then you have the right to this. I am not sure of what your indication is for using Coumadin. If you could provide this information, then I would be able to answer your question better. It sounds like your doctor is taking appropriate care of you unless I am missing something. Good luck. Answered by Walton Samayoa 2 years ago.

There is no "usual" dose of Coumadin. Coumadin must be carefully monitored and titrated to each individual. Depending upon why you are on the Coumadin in the first place, your INR should be anywhere from 2.0 - 3.5. Again, this depends on the condition. There is no reason you cannot see the results of your blood tests. Your doctor can and should be sharing this information with you. Ask. You have the right to see your test results. If your doctor, for whatever reason, won't show you your INR result, then you need to consider finding a new healthcare provider! Unfortunately, there is no good substitute for Coumadin at this time. By the way, although there is no "usual" dose of Coumadin, I do see a lot of patients who take it and 7 mg is fairly average - I've seen people on much higher doses. Answered by Sibyl Schneeberger 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dose Answered by Janene Farrand 2 years ago.

RE: What is the usual dose of coumadin? I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find... Answered by Magda Roxas 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dosage Answered by Shawanda Mroz 2 years ago.

Just to give you some hope... there are a couple drugs approved in other countries right now that are being worked on for approval here in the US that would not require the monitoring that Coumadin does. Yay! Answered by Cherly Franzen 2 years ago.

Second Opinion! Answered by Kiara Boyett 2 years ago.

Depends on your protime. Answered by Renea Hamamoto 2 years ago.


Those who take COUMADIN, what kind of Diet should have?
Asked by Maisie Alvarez 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood-thinning medication that helps treat and prevent blood clots. Certain foods can impair its effects. For this reason, it's important to pay attention to your diet while taking this medication. The main dietary concern related to taking Coumadin has to do with the amount of vitamin K in your diet. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Coumadin works to reduce clotting by diminishing the activity of vitamin K. Eating large amounts of vitamin K can counteract the benefits of this drug. Some doctors recommend a low-vitamin K diet for people taking Coumadin. But the key is to be consistent about how much vitamin K you consume on a daily basis. Limit or avoid foods that are high in vitamin K, such as: Kale Spinach Broccoli Turnip greens Collards Swiss chard Parsley Mustard greens Soybean & Cannola Oils (limit) The following is a partial list of foods that contain medium (M) to high (H) levels of vitamin K: FATS AND DRESSINGS Margarine M Mayonnaise H Soybean, canola, and salad oils H Olive oil M VEGETABLES Asparagus M Avocado M Broccoli H Brussels sprouts H Cabbage H Cabbage, red M Collard greens H Endive (raw) H Green scallion (raw) H Kale leaf (raw) H Lettuce, bibb, red leaf (raw) H Lettuce, iceberg (raw) M Mustard greens (raw) H Parsley H Peas, green (cooked) M Spinach leaf (raw) H Turning greens (raw) H Watercress (raw) H CONDIMENT Dill pickle M In addition to foods containing vitamin K, certain beverages can increase the effect of Coumadin, leading to bleeding problems: Cranberry juice Alcohol If you take Coumadin, eat a sensible diet. Talk to your doctor before making any major changes in your diet. If you are unable to eat for several days or have persistent stomach upset, diarrhea or fever, consult your doctor. He or she may need to adjust your dose. In addition, several medications and dietary supplements can affect the way Coumadin works in your body. For example, there's evidence that vitamin E has blood-thinning effects and may increase your risk of bleeding. Tell your doctor before taking any new medications, including herbal supplements and over-the-counter remedies. Other supplements and herbal medications known to affect Coumadin include: Arnica Bilberry Butcher's broom Cat's claw Dong quai Feverfew Forskolin Garlic Ginger Ginkgo Horse chestnut Inositol Licorice Melilot (sweet clover) Pau d'arco Red clover St. John's wort Sweet woodruff Turmeric Willow bark Wheatgrass Additional supplements that can interact with Coumadin:: Fish oil and omega-3 supplements Vitamin K Bromelains Coenzyme Q10 (ubidecarenone) Cranberry extracts Danshen Ginseng Also, you should avoid taking aspirin and frequent or high doses of acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), which can increase the effects of Coumadin and cause bleeding problems. Certain antibiotics also can interfere with the effect of this drug, so be sure to check with your doctor before starting a new antibiotic. Drugs that can interact with Coumadin include: Aspirin or aspirin-containing products Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve) Tylenol or acetaminophen-containing products, especially when the dose of acetaminophen exceeds 1,500 milligrams a day Many antibiotics Heparin Cold or allergy medicines Birth control pills Medications that treat abnormal heart rhythms, such as amiodarone Hope this info helps answer your question. My grandmother takes this and has not had any problems. Always doublecheck any medicines you take while on Coumadin with both your doctor & Pharmacist to be safest. I would also advise wearing a medical ID bracelet or carry info in your wallet about the fact that you are on this drug, in case of an emergency. Answered by Mabelle Flythe 2 years ago.

coumadin kind diet Answered by Towanda Engelhardt 2 years ago.

If you are going to eat salad, then eat the same sized salad every day. Don't skip a day and make sure it's the same size each day. Don't take supplements with vitamin k. Answered by Beth Caguimbal 2 years ago.

i dk. but be careful. my grandfather used to take coumadin it thinned out his bood sooooo much. it was unbelivable how much he bled and how often he bled. Answered by Bertram Magistrale 2 years ago.

what about purple cabbage, yellow, or green peppers, sunflower oil, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, olives, and Echinacea drops on a base of alcohol? thank you for your answers. Answered by Erlene Claypoole 2 years ago.


Coumadin????
alright, so i dont take another test until this wednesday, one day? that would effect my test results? Asked by Tuyet Bialke 2 years ago.

Coumadin reaches full therapeutic impact fairly quickly. By inhibiting vitamin K-mediated clotting, if you stop taking the drug then its effect disappear as it is removed from you body (as opposed to actual blood thinners). How long it takes to get out of your system depends on the dose you were taking. Generally, levels drop below theraputic concentrations within 3-4 days for normal people. Drinking more water and having a healthy liver increase this rate. Missing one dose is not likely to have a serious impact on the drug efficacy. You SHOULD NOT take a double dose the next time and keep your normal schedule. The hospital and your doctor should be advised that you are on this medication. Small internal hemorrhages from your accident may be difficult to control while on coumadin. If your belly become painful, swollen, or you notice large patches of blue/black skin, you should seek medical attention. I hope this answers your question. Answered by Karl Conca 2 years ago.

If you are saying that you got into a car accident while you were taking Coumadin, you should have told anyone who treated you after that accident that you were on it. If the danger of bleeding is greater than the danger of whatever it is that you're taking the Coumadin for, they would have stopped it (and checked you for bleeding). If you were in a car accident, are on Coumadin, and you have NOT been seen by a medical professional, you need to see one immediately. Please. You should neither assume that everything is all right nor stop taking your anticoagulants without medical advice. Answered by Elenore Penister 2 years ago.

you need to make sure to stay on and take what the doctor said. as it affects how the tests read. Answered by Viki Kleinsasser 2 years ago.


Is anyone familiar with coumadin?
I'm on coumadin for Pulmonary Emboli and I've been loosing a lot of hair only I was also diagnosed with lupus but the doctors weren't 100 % sure if I really have lupus could my losing my hair be from the medication or the lupus? Asked by Cameron Jephson 2 years ago.

coumadin is an anticoagulant, that is "blood thinner" for people that don't speak fluent doctor. The close monitoring of a person taking it is critical as the blood becomes thin so does your ability to not clot, which could cause a domino of other problems if you had an injury or needed emergency surgery. Prothombin times should be done weekly or more to evaluate your bloods clotting factor. The effects of the coumadin or its treatment does not consider the Lupus. Lupus, or mixed conective tissue disease is usually associated with a person that has RA, Rheumatoid Arthritis, your hair loss may be a side effect of the medicatons, stress, or even the illness you experienced or are currently experiencing. The best thing that you can do to heal your body would be a diet high protien and vitamin C these two things combined heal our bodies. The fact that you are recovering from such an ordeal would indicate that you need very high level because your not only compensating for the illness you need to maintain your normal levels. When I had a significant injury and surgery, I started to drink protien drinks which contained 20-24 grams of protien each, I drank 4-6 a day. I also would take 3-4 oranges and squeeze them in a juicer, this would give me a fairly large glass of juice which is like liquid sunshine, I felt better in a shorter amount of time and I maintain the practice to this day, not as much but everyday! Good luck and I hope you feel better! Answered by Kelsey Pellegrin 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood thinner and will not cause your hair to fall out. The Lupus however does cause unusual hair loss. www.niams.noh.gov Answered by Cleveland Montis 2 years ago.

coumadin helps to thin the blood to avoid blood clots from the two sites I quickly read, it sounds like the lupus and the coumadin could be a cause. Take care and get well Answered by Margarite Popelka 2 years ago.

coumadin is a blood thinner, and I've never heard of someone losing their hair from it.. with lupus i guess it could attack your hair follicles but I've never seen it (my aunt has lupus so I've tried to research it a little) in all honesty, it's probably stress.. it's very common to lose hair when you are overly stress, or when you have had a surgery/long hospital stay (injury stresses the body, it's still stress, even if it's not mental stress) Answered by Staci Schuette 2 years ago.

Lupus is an autoimmune disorder, one of many. Another one is a low thyroid condition called Hashimoto's thyroiditis. I would have your doctor check for that as they often appear together but the latter gets overlooked because lupus is a bigger focus. Low thyroid will cause hair loss; in fact it's usually one of the first signs. Answered by Irving Borling 2 years ago.

Warfarin (also known under the brand names of Coumadin®, Jantoven®, Marevan®, and Waran®) is an anticoagulant medication that is administered orally or, very rarely, by injection. It is used for the prophylaxis of thrombosis and embolism in many disorders. Its activity has to be monitored by frequent blood testing for the international normalized ratio (INR). It is named for the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. Warfarin is a synthetic derivative of coumarin, a chemical found naturally in many plants, notably woodruff (Galium odoratum, Rubiaceae), and at lower levels in licorice, lavender and various other species. Warfarin was originally developed as a rat poison, but it is no longer used for that purpose as modern poisons are much more potent and toxic (e.g. brodifacoum). However, warfarin and contemporary rodenticides belong to the same class of drugs (coumarins) and both decrease blood coagulation by interfering with vitamin K metabolism. Just be careful of using this drug and take a second openion. Answered by Milton Presto 2 years ago.

Probably the Lupus but you need to see your Dr. right away. Answered by Lowell Daddio 2 years ago.

u would lose your hair if u were not eating right Answered by Rosette Kochanek 2 years ago.


What do I need to know about Coumadin and Lovenox?
I'm having a pulmonary vein isolation/ablation procedure in early March. I have never taken either of these. I am looking for personal accounts or advice that people who take or have taken either of these. I will be taking them for atrial fibrillation. Thank you. Asked by Iesha Duenwald 2 years ago.

Coumadin and Lovenox are types of blood thinners commonly used in cases of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation can lead to blood clots forming in her heart which later can cause strokes so preventing these clots from forming is very important. Coumadin is an oral medicine which you will likely need to take every day. Your doctors, especially in the beginning, will need to check labs on you on a regular basis (your INR) and adjust the dose as necessary (an INR that's too high could put you at increased risk for bleeding complications, while if it's too low, it won't protect you from blood clots). Since it may take time before the correct dosage is achieved, many doctors will "bridge" patients with Lovenox until the INR level is therapeutic. Lovenox is a form of heparin that thins the blood immediately and thus protects you from blood clots while the coumadin dose is being adjusted to the proper dose. It has to be taken as a subcutaneous shot twice a day. Either you or a family member will be instructed on how to give these shots before you get discharged or visiting nurse services can be arranged to help you with them. Lovenox is temporary and will be stopped once the coumadin dosage is established. This is just a general overview and you should ask your doctor about how this will specifically apply to you. Good luck. Answered by Zola Weyer 2 years ago.

You should also expect some diet restrictions and changes, but the above answer is just about as good as its gonna get on here! great advice!! Answered by Minerva Novack 2 years ago.


What is the equivalency of asprin to coumadin?
Im currently taking Coumadin 4mg a day ans was wondering. Also if I was to run out of my Coumadin before getting a refill or another prescription for more. Asked by Penny Prchlik 2 years ago.

Coumadin does not need prescription.,,and its strongly recommended NOT to substitute it with other platelet inhibitor, such as aspirin, because they work in very different manners,....coumadin works at liver level, blocking the synthesis of prothrombine and antagonizing the effects of carboxylations of vitamin "K" which is the proper antidote against excessive dose (tablets normally contain 5 miligrans of Coumadin (Warfarin sodium)...and they can be obtained from your local pharmacist...without prescription. Aspirin wont help you, and will only compound matters, making your bleeding time longer,and working in a different manner. There is no real EQUIVALENCE of aspirin, as substitute for coumadin,,, Its my opinion that you should be checked and followed in your coumadin doses, by proper weekly or bi-weekly chacks on your prothrombine time (PT) which is the best guide to calculate your daily needs of coumadin... Good luck Answered by Eladia Bateman 2 years ago.

Coumadin thins your blood, you can only get with a prescription, so if the doctor put u in this med u shouldn't run out. Give the doc a call..........aspirin can b used 4 a lot of things. Answered by Senaida Collie 2 years ago.

If your doctor has prescribed Coumadin, its really important to take this as directed and to have you PT / INR checked weekly... You do not want your blood too thick or too thin - make sure you have this checked out. I would not subsitute with Asprin, its not as strong as Coumadin. Answered by Shirl Wilfong 2 years ago.

there is no drug the same as coumidin.it is a rat poisin used in humans to improve circulation in the veins by thinning and keeping the blood flowing. it is very possible to bleed a lot during an injury while taking this medecine,be very careful with it Answered by Vita Barufaldi 2 years ago.


Lovenox vs. Coumadin?
Well I was on birth control only because it was required in order to take accunate which caused it. Asked by Cleo Perrilloux 2 years ago.

Coumadin is an oral pill as previously mentioned however the clotting levels (INR) need to be monitored frequently to ensure that you are taking the proper dose. This requires frequent clinic visits for blood tests. Lovenox is an injection however it does not require strict monitoring like coumadin does. You need to sit down with your doctor and have him/her explain the risks and benefits of each drug so that you can make an informed decision. Since you are a minor your parents should be there and help you figure it out. Just curious as to what caused the blood clot as you are very young to have such a diagnosis. Answered by Chere Delosier 2 years ago.

lovenox has to be injected, means poking yourself every day. coumadin is probably your better choice, it's a pill. Answered by Effie Petersen 2 years ago.


Coumadin....?
I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his... Asked by Cristi Suares 2 years ago.

I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his blood. Could the discoloration be from the coumadin? Im worried about him, but I live in New york state and he lives in Florida. I cant have my husband talk to him, because my husband is deployed to Iraq... Does anyone know anything about this med? Answered by Codi Hartman 2 years ago.

the coumadin can cause bruising and I would assume the discloration you are speaking of is possibly bleeding under the skin... he needs to be seen by his medical doctor so they can do a PT with INR (prothrombin time) on him to make sure that the coumadin dose is the proper one... if his PT is high, he may need to be readjusted... Has he recently changed his diet in any way... if so, it could have affected the way the medication is absorbing into his body...If he has any kind of home health agency seeing him, tell him to call them, and they can get an order to go to his house and draw blood, if not, he needs to call the doc asap for an appointment or either go to the ER if the discolorations become worse or seems to be getting larger... the feet being bright red could also be a circulation problem, among other things... good luck Answered by Tamera Rumpel 2 years ago.

He should head for the ER ASAP. I do not believe it is from the coumadin, this is not one of the listed side effects, but there is something brewing. Answered by Roxana Azahar 2 years ago.


I don't want to take coumadin anymore, and I'm looking for an herbal/natural supplement?
Yeah, I was reading that ginger, garlic, feverfew and tree ear mushrooms can reduce the amount of coumadin needed. And to the person that said depression......I said depressed where exactly? Asked by Tobie Callens 2 years ago.

What is Coumadin? Coumadin (warfarin) is an anticoagulant (blood thinner). Coumadin reduces the formation of blood clots by blocking the formation of certain clotting factors. Coumadin is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and blood clots in veins and arteries. Coumadin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Important information about Coumadin: Coumadin can cause birth defects or fatal bleeding in an unborn baby. Do not use Coumadin if you are pregnant. Never take a double dose of this medication or take it together with other products that contain warfarin or coumarin. You should not take Coumadin if you have a bleeding or blood cell disorder, blood in your urine or stools, an infection of the lining of your heart, stomach bleeding, bleeding in the brain, recent or upcoming surgery, or if you need a spinal tap or spinal anesthesia (epidural). Coumadin may cause you to bleed more easily, especially if you have: a history of bleeding problems, high blood pressure or severe heart disease, kidney disease, cancer, surgery or a medical emergency, a disease affecting the blood vessels in your brain, a history of stomach or intestinal bleeding, if you are 65 or older, or if you are severely ill or debilitated. Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Any doctor, dentist, surgeon, or other medical care provider who treats you should know that you are taking Coumadin. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor What should I avoid while taking Coumadin? Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. This includes acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin, celecoxib (Celebrex), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Do not eat large amounts of foods high in vitamin K (such as liver, leafy green vegetables or vegetable oils). Vitamin K can make Coumadin less effective. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor. Avoid eating cranberries, drinking cranberry juice, or taking cranberry herbal products. Avoid herbal teas that contain tonka beans, sweet clover, or sweet woodruff. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Coumadin What other drugs will affect Coumadin? Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Coumadin can interact with certain herbal (botanical) products, which can increase your risk of bleeding. Do not use any of the following products without first asking your doctor: bromelains; coenzyme Q10; cranberry; danshen; dong quai; garlic; ginkgo biloba; ginseng; or St. John's wort. This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with Coumadin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you...... more With all said, Don't take herbs while coumadin is still in your system! Once you've been free of it and you withdrawed safely then it might be safe for you. Answered by Alaina Reagor 2 years ago.

The problem with "natural" remedies is that they're not given the same oversight by the FDA that drugs are. Strength levels can vary widely, active ingredients may or may not be what is advertised on the container, and even the advertised benefits may or may not be real. If given a choice between natural remedies like herbal supplements and drugs, the drugs are actually far more likely to be effective. If I were you, I'd go to your doctor or your pharmacist to find out what possible alternatives are out there for you. Coumadin isn't a med you can just stop, significant and sometimes severe health implications can result. Answered by Daniele Pirre 2 years ago.

Ok. No one really likes to take Rat Poison on a regular basis. But in your case you have little choice. There is a reason you are on it, and no doctor just puts a person on coumadin for fun. Yes it sucks, and yes I know. Just do it. And see someone about the depression if you need to, 'cause it's the real issue. Answered by Elicia Kellar 2 years ago.

Hi It can be done but it MUST be done in conjunction with your physician and a qualified natural health practitioner ... a qualified and experienced medical herbalist would actually be the best bet. There are some herbs that can help but I am not going to mention the names as I do not want anyone (not necessarily you) rushing off and trying this without proper supervision as their are risks involved in commencing one, and gradually weaning off the other and bearing in mind your monitoring of blood levels. I know this isn't probably what you wanted to hear, but I really do not think this is something that can be safely addressed at home, by the lay person without medical support. Answered by Israel Miska 2 years ago.

Just take the bloody Coumadin, unless you want your blood to turn solid Answered by Dean Syddall 2 years ago.

I am not a girly girl and I dress modestly and behave with morals and kindness. I am a jeans and t-shirt kinda girl. My mother tried to make me wear skirts and stuff but I always hated it, so it wasn't her that made me who I am today. I was always a tom boy and always will be. Wearing a dress, stocking, and high heels make me so uncomfortable. If it makes you feel good about yourself then go for it. Answered by Louise Bayard 2 years ago.

I bet you are blood type A.Type A is the thickest blood.Eat for your blood type.Eating animal protein makes the blood thicker.Ginko biloba and garlic are natural blood thinners.Vit K clots the blood,should you cut yourself or have uncontrolable bleeding. Answered by Travis Dominowski 2 years ago.


What is the usual dose of coumadin?
The doctor always gives me the results ,they just take ages to arrive at his office. Asked by Stacee Doljac 2 years ago.

I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find out how much I have. Are there any other drugs I can take which would be less hassle and just as safe if not better? P.S. most people I know who are older and have had worse problems than me are on a much lower dose than I am. I dont feel I can talk to my doctor like I used to and am wondering if I should try a new specialist or get a second opinion. Answered by Britt Julitz 2 years ago.

The dose of Coumadin varies and is determined by lab tests known as the protime (PT) and INR. PT/INR is a blood test that evaluate how thin blood is. The average dose of Coumadin in my experience is around 5 mg daily. I have seen doses as high as 30 mg and as low as 0.5 mg. The variation in dosing is related to differences in metabolism and intake of Vitamin K. A dose of 7 mg is actually very common and nothing to worry about. Do not be concerned with the doses of others you know, because everyone is different. You just need a higher dose than them to get you in the right PT/INR range. As a patient you have the right to access the results of your lab tests. I would recommend that you ask your doctor or clinic nurse for the results directly. Most doctors are happy to provide this information. I personally would have no problem providing this information to my patients. Just for your information, the INR should be 2-3 for most indications. In regards to alternative medications, it depends on your indication for Coumadin. Currently there is no oral medication that is similar to Coumadin. The medications that are similar to Coumadin that are currently available are available only IV or by subcutaneous injection once or twice daily. Most people are not interested in taking a subcutaneous injection and would prefer to stick with Coumadin. The alternative medications are also more expensive. These alternatives include Lovenox and Fondaparinux. There is an oral medication like Coumadin that is awaiting FDA approval, but it will only be approved for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It will likely have further indications like Coumadin, but it will likely take years to be approved. If you would like to have a second opinion, then you have the right to this. I am not sure of what your indication is for using Coumadin. If you could provide this information, then I would be able to answer your question better. It sounds like your doctor is taking appropriate care of you unless I am missing something. Good luck. Answered by Wei Schoepp 2 years ago.

There is no "usual" dose of Coumadin. Coumadin must be carefully monitored and titrated to each individual. Depending upon why you are on the Coumadin in the first place, your INR should be anywhere from 2.0 - 3.5. Again, this depends on the condition. There is no reason you cannot see the results of your blood tests. Your doctor can and should be sharing this information with you. Ask. You have the right to see your test results. If your doctor, for whatever reason, won't show you your INR result, then you need to consider finding a new healthcare provider! Unfortunately, there is no good substitute for Coumadin at this time. By the way, although there is no "usual" dose of Coumadin, I do see a lot of patients who take it and 7 mg is fairly average - I've seen people on much higher doses. Answered by Christiana Franeo 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dose Answered by Liane Raterman 2 years ago.

RE: What is the usual dose of coumadin? I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find... Answered by Louie Lazzara 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dosage Answered by Stephen Thorton 2 years ago.

Just to give you some hope... there are a couple drugs approved in other countries right now that are being worked on for approval here in the US that would not require the monitoring that Coumadin does. Yay! Answered by Delilah Garsjo 2 years ago.

Second Opinion! Answered by Katrina Wolters 2 years ago.

Depends on your protime. Answered by Annamae Catlin 2 years ago.


Those who take COUMADIN, what kind of Diet should have?
Asked by Flo Llarenas 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood-thinning medication that helps treat and prevent blood clots. Certain foods can impair its effects. For this reason, it's important to pay attention to your diet while taking this medication. The main dietary concern related to taking Coumadin has to do with the amount of vitamin K in your diet. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Coumadin works to reduce clotting by diminishing the activity of vitamin K. Eating large amounts of vitamin K can counteract the benefits of this drug. Some doctors recommend a low-vitamin K diet for people taking Coumadin. But the key is to be consistent about how much vitamin K you consume on a daily basis. Limit or avoid foods that are high in vitamin K, such as: Kale Spinach Broccoli Turnip greens Collards Swiss chard Parsley Mustard greens Soybean & Cannola Oils (limit) The following is a partial list of foods that contain medium (M) to high (H) levels of vitamin K: FATS AND DRESSINGS Margarine M Mayonnaise H Soybean, canola, and salad oils H Olive oil M VEGETABLES Asparagus M Avocado M Broccoli H Brussels sprouts H Cabbage H Cabbage, red M Collard greens H Endive (raw) H Green scallion (raw) H Kale leaf (raw) H Lettuce, bibb, red leaf (raw) H Lettuce, iceberg (raw) M Mustard greens (raw) H Parsley H Peas, green (cooked) M Spinach leaf (raw) H Turning greens (raw) H Watercress (raw) H CONDIMENT Dill pickle M In addition to foods containing vitamin K, certain beverages can increase the effect of Coumadin, leading to bleeding problems: Cranberry juice Alcohol If you take Coumadin, eat a sensible diet. Talk to your doctor before making any major changes in your diet. If you are unable to eat for several days or have persistent stomach upset, diarrhea or fever, consult your doctor. He or she may need to adjust your dose. In addition, several medications and dietary supplements can affect the way Coumadin works in your body. For example, there's evidence that vitamin E has blood-thinning effects and may increase your risk of bleeding. Tell your doctor before taking any new medications, including herbal supplements and over-the-counter remedies. Other supplements and herbal medications known to affect Coumadin include: Arnica Bilberry Butcher's broom Cat's claw Dong quai Feverfew Forskolin Garlic Ginger Ginkgo Horse chestnut Inositol Licorice Melilot (sweet clover) Pau d'arco Red clover St. John's wort Sweet woodruff Turmeric Willow bark Wheatgrass Additional supplements that can interact with Coumadin:: Fish oil and omega-3 supplements Vitamin K Bromelains Coenzyme Q10 (ubidecarenone) Cranberry extracts Danshen Ginseng Also, you should avoid taking aspirin and frequent or high doses of acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), which can increase the effects of Coumadin and cause bleeding problems. Certain antibiotics also can interfere with the effect of this drug, so be sure to check with your doctor before starting a new antibiotic. Drugs that can interact with Coumadin include: Aspirin or aspirin-containing products Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve) Tylenol or acetaminophen-containing products, especially when the dose of acetaminophen exceeds 1,500 milligrams a day Many antibiotics Heparin Cold or allergy medicines Birth control pills Medications that treat abnormal heart rhythms, such as amiodarone Hope this info helps answer your question. My grandmother takes this and has not had any problems. Always doublecheck any medicines you take while on Coumadin with both your doctor & Pharmacist to be safest. I would also advise wearing a medical ID bracelet or carry info in your wallet about the fact that you are on this drug, in case of an emergency. Answered by Britney Graap 2 years ago.

coumadin kind diet Answered by Mitzie Garnsey 2 years ago.

If you are going to eat salad, then eat the same sized salad every day. Don't skip a day and make sure it's the same size each day. Don't take supplements with vitamin k. Answered by Maire Kreusch 2 years ago.

i dk. but be careful. my grandfather used to take coumadin it thinned out his bood sooooo much. it was unbelivable how much he bled and how often he bled. Answered by Loraine Batta 2 years ago.

what about purple cabbage, yellow, or green peppers, sunflower oil, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, olives, and Echinacea drops on a base of alcohol? thank you for your answers. Answered by Jina Norfolk 2 years ago.


Coumadin????
alright, so i dont take another test until this wednesday, one day? that would effect my test results? Asked by Aide Conneely 2 years ago.

Coumadin reaches full therapeutic impact fairly quickly. By inhibiting vitamin K-mediated clotting, if you stop taking the drug then its effect disappear as it is removed from you body (as opposed to actual blood thinners). How long it takes to get out of your system depends on the dose you were taking. Generally, levels drop below theraputic concentrations within 3-4 days for normal people. Drinking more water and having a healthy liver increase this rate. Missing one dose is not likely to have a serious impact on the drug efficacy. You SHOULD NOT take a double dose the next time and keep your normal schedule. The hospital and your doctor should be advised that you are on this medication. Small internal hemorrhages from your accident may be difficult to control while on coumadin. If your belly become painful, swollen, or you notice large patches of blue/black skin, you should seek medical attention. I hope this answers your question. Answered by Bryon Roghair 2 years ago.

If you are saying that you got into a car accident while you were taking Coumadin, you should have told anyone who treated you after that accident that you were on it. If the danger of bleeding is greater than the danger of whatever it is that you're taking the Coumadin for, they would have stopped it (and checked you for bleeding). If you were in a car accident, are on Coumadin, and you have NOT been seen by a medical professional, you need to see one immediately. Please. You should neither assume that everything is all right nor stop taking your anticoagulants without medical advice. Answered by Marty Dyers 2 years ago.

you need to make sure to stay on and take what the doctor said. as it affects how the tests read. Answered by Roseline Fragman 2 years ago.


Is anyone familiar with coumadin?
I'm on coumadin for Pulmonary Emboli and I've been loosing a lot of hair only I was also diagnosed with lupus but the doctors weren't 100 % sure if I really have lupus could my losing my hair be from the medication or the lupus? Asked by Maryellen Liederbach 2 years ago.

coumadin is an anticoagulant, that is "blood thinner" for people that don't speak fluent doctor. The close monitoring of a person taking it is critical as the blood becomes thin so does your ability to not clot, which could cause a domino of other problems if you had an injury or needed emergency surgery. Prothombin times should be done weekly or more to evaluate your bloods clotting factor. The effects of the coumadin or its treatment does not consider the Lupus. Lupus, or mixed conective tissue disease is usually associated with a person that has RA, Rheumatoid Arthritis, your hair loss may be a side effect of the medicatons, stress, or even the illness you experienced or are currently experiencing. The best thing that you can do to heal your body would be a diet high protien and vitamin C these two things combined heal our bodies. The fact that you are recovering from such an ordeal would indicate that you need very high level because your not only compensating for the illness you need to maintain your normal levels. When I had a significant injury and surgery, I started to drink protien drinks which contained 20-24 grams of protien each, I drank 4-6 a day. I also would take 3-4 oranges and squeeze them in a juicer, this would give me a fairly large glass of juice which is like liquid sunshine, I felt better in a shorter amount of time and I maintain the practice to this day, not as much but everyday! Good luck and I hope you feel better! Answered by Jeanette Ferrarotti 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood thinner and will not cause your hair to fall out. The Lupus however does cause unusual hair loss. www.niams.noh.gov Answered by Emely Wolfing 2 years ago.

coumadin helps to thin the blood to avoid blood clots from the two sites I quickly read, it sounds like the lupus and the coumadin could be a cause. Take care and get well Answered by Tyesha Melot 2 years ago.

coumadin is a blood thinner, and I've never heard of someone losing their hair from it.. with lupus i guess it could attack your hair follicles but I've never seen it (my aunt has lupus so I've tried to research it a little) in all honesty, it's probably stress.. it's very common to lose hair when you are overly stress, or when you have had a surgery/long hospital stay (injury stresses the body, it's still stress, even if it's not mental stress) Answered by Tamesha Costales 2 years ago.

Lupus is an autoimmune disorder, one of many. Another one is a low thyroid condition called Hashimoto's thyroiditis. I would have your doctor check for that as they often appear together but the latter gets overlooked because lupus is a bigger focus. Low thyroid will cause hair loss; in fact it's usually one of the first signs. Answered by Livia Muzzey 2 years ago.

Warfarin (also known under the brand names of Coumadin®, Jantoven®, Marevan®, and Waran®) is an anticoagulant medication that is administered orally or, very rarely, by injection. It is used for the prophylaxis of thrombosis and embolism in many disorders. Its activity has to be monitored by frequent blood testing for the international normalized ratio (INR). It is named for the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. Warfarin is a synthetic derivative of coumarin, a chemical found naturally in many plants, notably woodruff (Galium odoratum, Rubiaceae), and at lower levels in licorice, lavender and various other species. Warfarin was originally developed as a rat poison, but it is no longer used for that purpose as modern poisons are much more potent and toxic (e.g. brodifacoum). However, warfarin and contemporary rodenticides belong to the same class of drugs (coumarins) and both decrease blood coagulation by interfering with vitamin K metabolism. Just be careful of using this drug and take a second openion. Answered by Rebeca Warder 2 years ago.

Probably the Lupus but you need to see your Dr. right away. Answered by Shirlee Benzie 2 years ago.

u would lose your hair if u were not eating right Answered by Ehtel Public 2 years ago.


What do I need to know about Coumadin and Lovenox?
I'm having a pulmonary vein isolation/ablation procedure in early March. I have never taken either of these. I am looking for personal accounts or advice that people who take or have taken either of these. I will be taking them for atrial fibrillation. Thank you. Asked by Cameron Galardo 2 years ago.

Coumadin and Lovenox are types of blood thinners commonly used in cases of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation can lead to blood clots forming in her heart which later can cause strokes so preventing these clots from forming is very important. Coumadin is an oral medicine which you will likely need to take every day. Your doctors, especially in the beginning, will need to check labs on you on a regular basis (your INR) and adjust the dose as necessary (an INR that's too high could put you at increased risk for bleeding complications, while if it's too low, it won't protect you from blood clots). Since it may take time before the correct dosage is achieved, many doctors will "bridge" patients with Lovenox until the INR level is therapeutic. Lovenox is a form of heparin that thins the blood immediately and thus protects you from blood clots while the coumadin dose is being adjusted to the proper dose. It has to be taken as a subcutaneous shot twice a day. Either you or a family member will be instructed on how to give these shots before you get discharged or visiting nurse services can be arranged to help you with them. Lovenox is temporary and will be stopped once the coumadin dosage is established. This is just a general overview and you should ask your doctor about how this will specifically apply to you. Good luck. Answered by Gwyneth Papagni 2 years ago.

You should also expect some diet restrictions and changes, but the above answer is just about as good as its gonna get on here! great advice!! Answered by Willena Katen 2 years ago.


What is the equivalency of asprin to coumadin?
Im currently taking Coumadin 4mg a day ans was wondering. Also if I was to run out of my Coumadin before getting a refill or another prescription for more. Asked by Cathern Jezewski 2 years ago.

Coumadin does not need prescription.,,and its strongly recommended NOT to substitute it with other platelet inhibitor, such as aspirin, because they work in very different manners,....coumadin works at liver level, blocking the synthesis of prothrombine and antagonizing the effects of carboxylations of vitamin "K" which is the proper antidote against excessive dose (tablets normally contain 5 miligrans of Coumadin (Warfarin sodium)...and they can be obtained from your local pharmacist...without prescription. Aspirin wont help you, and will only compound matters, making your bleeding time longer,and working in a different manner. There is no real EQUIVALENCE of aspirin, as substitute for coumadin,,, Its my opinion that you should be checked and followed in your coumadin doses, by proper weekly or bi-weekly chacks on your prothrombine time (PT) which is the best guide to calculate your daily needs of coumadin... Good luck Answered by Alecia Mcday 2 years ago.

Coumadin thins your blood, you can only get with a prescription, so if the doctor put u in this med u shouldn't run out. Give the doc a call..........aspirin can b used 4 a lot of things. Answered by Christal Dokken 2 years ago.

If your doctor has prescribed Coumadin, its really important to take this as directed and to have you PT / INR checked weekly... You do not want your blood too thick or too thin - make sure you have this checked out. I would not subsitute with Asprin, its not as strong as Coumadin. Answered by Macie Hykes 2 years ago.

there is no drug the same as coumidin.it is a rat poisin used in humans to improve circulation in the veins by thinning and keeping the blood flowing. it is very possible to bleed a lot during an injury while taking this medecine,be very careful with it Answered by Denny Haran 2 years ago.


Lovenox vs. Coumadin?
Well I was on birth control only because it was required in order to take accunate which caused it. Asked by Christin Pian 2 years ago.

Coumadin is an oral pill as previously mentioned however the clotting levels (INR) need to be monitored frequently to ensure that you are taking the proper dose. This requires frequent clinic visits for blood tests. Lovenox is an injection however it does not require strict monitoring like coumadin does. You need to sit down with your doctor and have him/her explain the risks and benefits of each drug so that you can make an informed decision. Since you are a minor your parents should be there and help you figure it out. Just curious as to what caused the blood clot as you are very young to have such a diagnosis. Answered by Alita Vanbibber 2 years ago.

lovenox has to be injected, means poking yourself every day. coumadin is probably your better choice, it's a pill. Answered by Kendra Gianni 2 years ago.


Coumadin....?
I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his... Asked by Andree Willets 2 years ago.

I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his blood. Could the discoloration be from the coumadin? Im worried about him, but I live in New york state and he lives in Florida. I cant have my husband talk to him, because my husband is deployed to Iraq... Does anyone know anything about this med? Answered by Johnson Panchana 2 years ago.

the coumadin can cause bruising and I would assume the discloration you are speaking of is possibly bleeding under the skin... he needs to be seen by his medical doctor so they can do a PT with INR (prothrombin time) on him to make sure that the coumadin dose is the proper one... if his PT is high, he may need to be readjusted... Has he recently changed his diet in any way... if so, it could have affected the way the medication is absorbing into his body...If he has any kind of home health agency seeing him, tell him to call them, and they can get an order to go to his house and draw blood, if not, he needs to call the doc asap for an appointment or either go to the ER if the discolorations become worse or seems to be getting larger... the feet being bright red could also be a circulation problem, among other things... good luck Answered by Myron Schlabs 2 years ago.

He should head for the ER ASAP. I do not believe it is from the coumadin, this is not one of the listed side effects, but there is something brewing. Answered by Alaina Sempek 2 years ago.


I don't want to take coumadin anymore, and I'm looking for an herbal/natural supplement?
Yeah, I was reading that ginger, garlic, feverfew and tree ear mushrooms can reduce the amount of coumadin needed. And to the person that said depression......I said depressed where exactly? Asked by Ashley Sessin 2 years ago.

What is Coumadin? Coumadin (warfarin) is an anticoagulant (blood thinner). Coumadin reduces the formation of blood clots by blocking the formation of certain clotting factors. Coumadin is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and blood clots in veins and arteries. Coumadin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Important information about Coumadin: Coumadin can cause birth defects or fatal bleeding in an unborn baby. Do not use Coumadin if you are pregnant. Never take a double dose of this medication or take it together with other products that contain warfarin or coumarin. You should not take Coumadin if you have a bleeding or blood cell disorder, blood in your urine or stools, an infection of the lining of your heart, stomach bleeding, bleeding in the brain, recent or upcoming surgery, or if you need a spinal tap or spinal anesthesia (epidural). Coumadin may cause you to bleed more easily, especially if you have: a history of bleeding problems, high blood pressure or severe heart disease, kidney disease, cancer, surgery or a medical emergency, a disease affecting the blood vessels in your brain, a history of stomach or intestinal bleeding, if you are 65 or older, or if you are severely ill or debilitated. Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Any doctor, dentist, surgeon, or other medical care provider who treats you should know that you are taking Coumadin. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor What should I avoid while taking Coumadin? Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. This includes acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin, celecoxib (Celebrex), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Do not eat large amounts of foods high in vitamin K (such as liver, leafy green vegetables or vegetable oils). Vitamin K can make Coumadin less effective. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor. Avoid eating cranberries, drinking cranberry juice, or taking cranberry herbal products. Avoid herbal teas that contain tonka beans, sweet clover, or sweet woodruff. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Coumadin What other drugs will affect Coumadin? Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Coumadin can interact with certain herbal (botanical) products, which can increase your risk of bleeding. Do not use any of the following products without first asking your doctor: bromelains; coenzyme Q10; cranberry; danshen; dong quai; garlic; ginkgo biloba; ginseng; or St. John's wort. This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with Coumadin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you...... more With all said, Don't take herbs while coumadin is still in your system! Once you've been free of it and you withdrawed safely then it might be safe for you. Answered by Lorette Mcelhenney 2 years ago.

The problem with "natural" remedies is that they're not given the same oversight by the FDA that drugs are. Strength levels can vary widely, active ingredients may or may not be what is advertised on the container, and even the advertised benefits may or may not be real. If given a choice between natural remedies like herbal supplements and drugs, the drugs are actually far more likely to be effective. If I were you, I'd go to your doctor or your pharmacist to find out what possible alternatives are out there for you. Coumadin isn't a med you can just stop, significant and sometimes severe health implications can result. Answered by Meredith Sheidler 2 years ago.

Ok. No one really likes to take Rat Poison on a regular basis. But in your case you have little choice. There is a reason you are on it, and no doctor just puts a person on coumadin for fun. Yes it sucks, and yes I know. Just do it. And see someone about the depression if you need to, 'cause it's the real issue. Answered by Nicky Waugh 2 years ago.

Hi It can be done but it MUST be done in conjunction with your physician and a qualified natural health practitioner ... a qualified and experienced medical herbalist would actually be the best bet. There are some herbs that can help but I am not going to mention the names as I do not want anyone (not necessarily you) rushing off and trying this without proper supervision as their are risks involved in commencing one, and gradually weaning off the other and bearing in mind your monitoring of blood levels. I know this isn't probably what you wanted to hear, but I really do not think this is something that can be safely addressed at home, by the lay person without medical support. Answered by Alene Woolery 2 years ago.

Just take the bloody Coumadin, unless you want your blood to turn solid Answered by Kieth Kronk 2 years ago.

I am not a girly girl and I dress modestly and behave with morals and kindness. I am a jeans and t-shirt kinda girl. My mother tried to make me wear skirts and stuff but I always hated it, so it wasn't her that made me who I am today. I was always a tom boy and always will be. Wearing a dress, stocking, and high heels make me so uncomfortable. If it makes you feel good about yourself then go for it. Answered by Bobbie Nuckolls 2 years ago.

I bet you are blood type A.Type A is the thickest blood.Eat for your blood type.Eating animal protein makes the blood thicker.Ginko biloba and garlic are natural blood thinners.Vit K clots the blood,should you cut yourself or have uncontrolable bleeding. Answered by Gonzalo Breutzmann 2 years ago.


What is the usual dose of coumadin?
The doctor always gives me the results ,they just take ages to arrive at his office. Asked by Johna Thie 2 years ago.

I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find out how much I have. Are there any other drugs I can take which would be less hassle and just as safe if not better? P.S. most people I know who are older and have had worse problems than me are on a much lower dose than I am. I dont feel I can talk to my doctor like I used to and am wondering if I should try a new specialist or get a second opinion. Answered by Bernardine Shur 2 years ago.

The dose of Coumadin varies and is determined by lab tests known as the protime (PT) and INR. PT/INR is a blood test that evaluate how thin blood is. The average dose of Coumadin in my experience is around 5 mg daily. I have seen doses as high as 30 mg and as low as 0.5 mg. The variation in dosing is related to differences in metabolism and intake of Vitamin K. A dose of 7 mg is actually very common and nothing to worry about. Do not be concerned with the doses of others you know, because everyone is different. You just need a higher dose than them to get you in the right PT/INR range. As a patient you have the right to access the results of your lab tests. I would recommend that you ask your doctor or clinic nurse for the results directly. Most doctors are happy to provide this information. I personally would have no problem providing this information to my patients. Just for your information, the INR should be 2-3 for most indications. In regards to alternative medications, it depends on your indication for Coumadin. Currently there is no oral medication that is similar to Coumadin. The medications that are similar to Coumadin that are currently available are available only IV or by subcutaneous injection once or twice daily. Most people are not interested in taking a subcutaneous injection and would prefer to stick with Coumadin. The alternative medications are also more expensive. These alternatives include Lovenox and Fondaparinux. There is an oral medication like Coumadin that is awaiting FDA approval, but it will only be approved for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It will likely have further indications like Coumadin, but it will likely take years to be approved. If you would like to have a second opinion, then you have the right to this. I am not sure of what your indication is for using Coumadin. If you could provide this information, then I would be able to answer your question better. It sounds like your doctor is taking appropriate care of you unless I am missing something. Good luck. Answered by Minerva Stipp 2 years ago.

There is no "usual" dose of Coumadin. Coumadin must be carefully monitored and titrated to each individual. Depending upon why you are on the Coumadin in the first place, your INR should be anywhere from 2.0 - 3.5. Again, this depends on the condition. There is no reason you cannot see the results of your blood tests. Your doctor can and should be sharing this information with you. Ask. You have the right to see your test results. If your doctor, for whatever reason, won't show you your INR result, then you need to consider finding a new healthcare provider! Unfortunately, there is no good substitute for Coumadin at this time. By the way, although there is no "usual" dose of Coumadin, I do see a lot of patients who take it and 7 mg is fairly average - I've seen people on much higher doses. Answered by Kristofer Kazimi 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dose Answered by Regena Bunyea 2 years ago.

RE: What is the usual dose of coumadin? I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find... Answered by Isis Sonne 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dosage Answered by Josefa Stendeback 2 years ago.

Just to give you some hope... there are a couple drugs approved in other countries right now that are being worked on for approval here in the US that would not require the monitoring that Coumadin does. Yay! Answered by Joannie Hanacek 2 years ago.

Second Opinion! Answered by Rae Klinnert 2 years ago.

Depends on your protime. Answered by Rebbecca Simmering 2 years ago.


Those who take COUMADIN, what kind of Diet should have?
Asked by Lane Slanker 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood-thinning medication that helps treat and prevent blood clots. Certain foods can impair its effects. For this reason, it's important to pay attention to your diet while taking this medication. The main dietary concern related to taking Coumadin has to do with the amount of vitamin K in your diet. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Coumadin works to reduce clotting by diminishing the activity of vitamin K. Eating large amounts of vitamin K can counteract the benefits of this drug. Some doctors recommend a low-vitamin K diet for people taking Coumadin. But the key is to be consistent about how much vitamin K you consume on a daily basis. Limit or avoid foods that are high in vitamin K, such as: Kale Spinach Broccoli Turnip greens Collards Swiss chard Parsley Mustard greens Soybean & Cannola Oils (limit) The following is a partial list of foods that contain medium (M) to high (H) levels of vitamin K: FATS AND DRESSINGS Margarine M Mayonnaise H Soybean, canola, and salad oils H Olive oil M VEGETABLES Asparagus M Avocado M Broccoli H Brussels sprouts H Cabbage H Cabbage, red M Collard greens H Endive (raw) H Green scallion (raw) H Kale leaf (raw) H Lettuce, bibb, red leaf (raw) H Lettuce, iceberg (raw) M Mustard greens (raw) H Parsley H Peas, green (cooked) M Spinach leaf (raw) H Turning greens (raw) H Watercress (raw) H CONDIMENT Dill pickle M In addition to foods containing vitamin K, certain beverages can increase the effect of Coumadin, leading to bleeding problems: Cranberry juice Alcohol If you take Coumadin, eat a sensible diet. Talk to your doctor before making any major changes in your diet. If you are unable to eat for several days or have persistent stomach upset, diarrhea or fever, consult your doctor. He or she may need to adjust your dose. In addition, several medications and dietary supplements can affect the way Coumadin works in your body. For example, there's evidence that vitamin E has blood-thinning effects and may increase your risk of bleeding. Tell your doctor before taking any new medications, including herbal supplements and over-the-counter remedies. Other supplements and herbal medications known to affect Coumadin include: Arnica Bilberry Butcher's broom Cat's claw Dong quai Feverfew Forskolin Garlic Ginger Ginkgo Horse chestnut Inositol Licorice Melilot (sweet clover) Pau d'arco Red clover St. John's wort Sweet woodruff Turmeric Willow bark Wheatgrass Additional supplements that can interact with Coumadin:: Fish oil and omega-3 supplements Vitamin K Bromelains Coenzyme Q10 (ubidecarenone) Cranberry extracts Danshen Ginseng Also, you should avoid taking aspirin and frequent or high doses of acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), which can increase the effects of Coumadin and cause bleeding problems. Certain antibiotics also can interfere with the effect of this drug, so be sure to check with your doctor before starting a new antibiotic. Drugs that can interact with Coumadin include: Aspirin or aspirin-containing products Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve) Tylenol or acetaminophen-containing products, especially when the dose of acetaminophen exceeds 1,500 milligrams a day Many antibiotics Heparin Cold or allergy medicines Birth control pills Medications that treat abnormal heart rhythms, such as amiodarone Hope this info helps answer your question. My grandmother takes this and has not had any problems. Always doublecheck any medicines you take while on Coumadin with both your doctor & Pharmacist to be safest. I would also advise wearing a medical ID bracelet or carry info in your wallet about the fact that you are on this drug, in case of an emergency. Answered by Tomi Wordsworth 2 years ago.

coumadin kind diet Answered by Danita Owusu 2 years ago.

If you are going to eat salad, then eat the same sized salad every day. Don't skip a day and make sure it's the same size each day. Don't take supplements with vitamin k. Answered by Johnette Cromartie 2 years ago.

i dk. but be careful. my grandfather used to take coumadin it thinned out his bood sooooo much. it was unbelivable how much he bled and how often he bled. Answered by Elvin Whittiker 2 years ago.

what about purple cabbage, yellow, or green peppers, sunflower oil, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, olives, and Echinacea drops on a base of alcohol? thank you for your answers. Answered by Tory Hammett 2 years ago.


Coumadin????
alright, so i dont take another test until this wednesday, one day? that would effect my test results? Asked by Nellie Fassino 2 years ago.

Coumadin reaches full therapeutic impact fairly quickly. By inhibiting vitamin K-mediated clotting, if you stop taking the drug then its effect disappear as it is removed from you body (as opposed to actual blood thinners). How long it takes to get out of your system depends on the dose you were taking. Generally, levels drop below theraputic concentrations within 3-4 days for normal people. Drinking more water and having a healthy liver increase this rate. Missing one dose is not likely to have a serious impact on the drug efficacy. You SHOULD NOT take a double dose the next time and keep your normal schedule. The hospital and your doctor should be advised that you are on this medication. Small internal hemorrhages from your accident may be difficult to control while on coumadin. If your belly become painful, swollen, or you notice large patches of blue/black skin, you should seek medical attention. I hope this answers your question. Answered by Bruce Fenchel 2 years ago.

If you are saying that you got into a car accident while you were taking Coumadin, you should have told anyone who treated you after that accident that you were on it. If the danger of bleeding is greater than the danger of whatever it is that you're taking the Coumadin for, they would have stopped it (and checked you for bleeding). If you were in a car accident, are on Coumadin, and you have NOT been seen by a medical professional, you need to see one immediately. Please. You should neither assume that everything is all right nor stop taking your anticoagulants without medical advice. Answered by Clementine Barkdoll 2 years ago.

you need to make sure to stay on and take what the doctor said. as it affects how the tests read. Answered by Sydney Siddiqi 2 years ago.


Is anyone familiar with coumadin?
I'm on coumadin for Pulmonary Emboli and I've been loosing a lot of hair only I was also diagnosed with lupus but the doctors weren't 100 % sure if I really have lupus could my losing my hair be from the medication or the lupus? Asked by Jenee Scribner 2 years ago.

coumadin is an anticoagulant, that is "blood thinner" for people that don't speak fluent doctor. The close monitoring of a person taking it is critical as the blood becomes thin so does your ability to not clot, which could cause a domino of other problems if you had an injury or needed emergency surgery. Prothombin times should be done weekly or more to evaluate your bloods clotting factor. The effects of the coumadin or its treatment does not consider the Lupus. Lupus, or mixed conective tissue disease is usually associated with a person that has RA, Rheumatoid Arthritis, your hair loss may be a side effect of the medicatons, stress, or even the illness you experienced or are currently experiencing. The best thing that you can do to heal your body would be a diet high protien and vitamin C these two things combined heal our bodies. The fact that you are recovering from such an ordeal would indicate that you need very high level because your not only compensating for the illness you need to maintain your normal levels. When I had a significant injury and surgery, I started to drink protien drinks which contained 20-24 grams of protien each, I drank 4-6 a day. I also would take 3-4 oranges and squeeze them in a juicer, this would give me a fairly large glass of juice which is like liquid sunshine, I felt better in a shorter amount of time and I maintain the practice to this day, not as much but everyday! Good luck and I hope you feel better! Answered by Geoffrey Deardurff 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood thinner and will not cause your hair to fall out. The Lupus however does cause unusual hair loss. www.niams.noh.gov Answered by Rolf Hovard 2 years ago.

coumadin helps to thin the blood to avoid blood clots from the two sites I quickly read, it sounds like the lupus and the coumadin could be a cause. Take care and get well Answered by Britt Struebing 2 years ago.

coumadin is a blood thinner, and I've never heard of someone losing their hair from it.. with lupus i guess it could attack your hair follicles but I've never seen it (my aunt has lupus so I've tried to research it a little) in all honesty, it's probably stress.. it's very common to lose hair when you are overly stress, or when you have had a surgery/long hospital stay (injury stresses the body, it's still stress, even if it's not mental stress) Answered by Sommer Chauvette 2 years ago.

Lupus is an autoimmune disorder, one of many. Another one is a low thyroid condition called Hashimoto's thyroiditis. I would have your doctor check for that as they often appear together but the latter gets overlooked because lupus is a bigger focus. Low thyroid will cause hair loss; in fact it's usually one of the first signs. Answered by Phyliss Boening 2 years ago.

Warfarin (also known under the brand names of Coumadin®, Jantoven®, Marevan®, and Waran®) is an anticoagulant medication that is administered orally or, very rarely, by injection. It is used for the prophylaxis of thrombosis and embolism in many disorders. Its activity has to be monitored by frequent blood testing for the international normalized ratio (INR). It is named for the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. Warfarin is a synthetic derivative of coumarin, a chemical found naturally in many plants, notably woodruff (Galium odoratum, Rubiaceae), and at lower levels in licorice, lavender and various other species. Warfarin was originally developed as a rat poison, but it is no longer used for that purpose as modern poisons are much more potent and toxic (e.g. brodifacoum). However, warfarin and contemporary rodenticides belong to the same class of drugs (coumarins) and both decrease blood coagulation by interfering with vitamin K metabolism. Just be careful of using this drug and take a second openion. Answered by Kareen Morock 2 years ago.

Probably the Lupus but you need to see your Dr. right away. Answered by Art Reali 2 years ago.

u would lose your hair if u were not eating right Answered by Alecia Triece 2 years ago.


What do I need to know about Coumadin and Lovenox?
I'm having a pulmonary vein isolation/ablation procedure in early March. I have never taken either of these. I am looking for personal accounts or advice that people who take or have taken either of these. I will be taking them for atrial fibrillation. Thank you. Asked by Bernard Vilardi 2 years ago.

Coumadin and Lovenox are types of blood thinners commonly used in cases of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation can lead to blood clots forming in her heart which later can cause strokes so preventing these clots from forming is very important. Coumadin is an oral medicine which you will likely need to take every day. Your doctors, especially in the beginning, will need to check labs on you on a regular basis (your INR) and adjust the dose as necessary (an INR that's too high could put you at increased risk for bleeding complications, while if it's too low, it won't protect you from blood clots). Since it may take time before the correct dosage is achieved, many doctors will "bridge" patients with Lovenox until the INR level is therapeutic. Lovenox is a form of heparin that thins the blood immediately and thus protects you from blood clots while the coumadin dose is being adjusted to the proper dose. It has to be taken as a subcutaneous shot twice a day. Either you or a family member will be instructed on how to give these shots before you get discharged or visiting nurse services can be arranged to help you with them. Lovenox is temporary and will be stopped once the coumadin dosage is established. This is just a general overview and you should ask your doctor about how this will specifically apply to you. Good luck. Answered by Marianna Hettes 2 years ago.

You should also expect some diet restrictions and changes, but the above answer is just about as good as its gonna get on here! great advice!! Answered by Ulysses Swaner 2 years ago.


What is the equivalency of asprin to coumadin?
Im currently taking Coumadin 4mg a day ans was wondering. Also if I was to run out of my Coumadin before getting a refill or another prescription for more. Asked by Marcelina Siefkes 2 years ago.

Coumadin does not need prescription.,,and its strongly recommended NOT to substitute it with other platelet inhibitor, such as aspirin, because they work in very different manners,....coumadin works at liver level, blocking the synthesis of prothrombine and antagonizing the effects of carboxylations of vitamin "K" which is the proper antidote against excessive dose (tablets normally contain 5 miligrans of Coumadin (Warfarin sodium)...and they can be obtained from your local pharmacist...without prescription. Aspirin wont help you, and will only compound matters, making your bleeding time longer,and working in a different manner. There is no real EQUIVALENCE of aspirin, as substitute for coumadin,,, Its my opinion that you should be checked and followed in your coumadin doses, by proper weekly or bi-weekly chacks on your prothrombine time (PT) which is the best guide to calculate your daily needs of coumadin... Good luck Answered by Khadijah Weather 2 years ago.

Coumadin thins your blood, you can only get with a prescription, so if the doctor put u in this med u shouldn't run out. Give the doc a call..........aspirin can b used 4 a lot of things. Answered by Winfred Herby 2 years ago.

If your doctor has prescribed Coumadin, its really important to take this as directed and to have you PT / INR checked weekly... You do not want your blood too thick or too thin - make sure you have this checked out. I would not subsitute with Asprin, its not as strong as Coumadin. Answered by Elicia Berrospe 2 years ago.

there is no drug the same as coumidin.it is a rat poisin used in humans to improve circulation in the veins by thinning and keeping the blood flowing. it is very possible to bleed a lot during an injury while taking this medecine,be very careful with it Answered by Shaunda Tedrick 2 years ago.


Lovenox vs. Coumadin?
Well I was on birth control only because it was required in order to take accunate which caused it. Asked by Bennie Sweetwood 2 years ago.

Coumadin is an oral pill as previously mentioned however the clotting levels (INR) need to be monitored frequently to ensure that you are taking the proper dose. This requires frequent clinic visits for blood tests. Lovenox is an injection however it does not require strict monitoring like coumadin does. You need to sit down with your doctor and have him/her explain the risks and benefits of each drug so that you can make an informed decision. Since you are a minor your parents should be there and help you figure it out. Just curious as to what caused the blood clot as you are very young to have such a diagnosis. Answered by Russell Lynady 2 years ago.

lovenox has to be injected, means poking yourself every day. coumadin is probably your better choice, it's a pill. Answered by Son Dowey 2 years ago.


Coumadin....?
I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his... Asked by Kristopher Hobstetter 2 years ago.

I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his blood. Could the discoloration be from the coumadin? Im worried about him, but I live in New york state and he lives in Florida. I cant have my husband talk to him, because my husband is deployed to Iraq... Does anyone know anything about this med? Answered by Hong Sibilia 2 years ago.

the coumadin can cause bruising and I would assume the discloration you are speaking of is possibly bleeding under the skin... he needs to be seen by his medical doctor so they can do a PT with INR (prothrombin time) on him to make sure that the coumadin dose is the proper one... if his PT is high, he may need to be readjusted... Has he recently changed his diet in any way... if so, it could have affected the way the medication is absorbing into his body...If he has any kind of home health agency seeing him, tell him to call them, and they can get an order to go to his house and draw blood, if not, he needs to call the doc asap for an appointment or either go to the ER if the discolorations become worse or seems to be getting larger... the feet being bright red could also be a circulation problem, among other things... good luck Answered by Eugenia Treichel 2 years ago.

He should head for the ER ASAP. I do not believe it is from the coumadin, this is not one of the listed side effects, but there is something brewing. Answered by Vernon Husni 2 years ago.


I don't want to take coumadin anymore, and I'm looking for an herbal/natural supplement?
Yeah, I was reading that ginger, garlic, feverfew and tree ear mushrooms can reduce the amount of coumadin needed. And to the person that said depression......I said depressed where exactly? Asked by Ashlea Molzahn 2 years ago.

What is Coumadin? Coumadin (warfarin) is an anticoagulant (blood thinner). Coumadin reduces the formation of blood clots by blocking the formation of certain clotting factors. Coumadin is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and blood clots in veins and arteries. Coumadin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Important information about Coumadin: Coumadin can cause birth defects or fatal bleeding in an unborn baby. Do not use Coumadin if you are pregnant. Never take a double dose of this medication or take it together with other products that contain warfarin or coumarin. You should not take Coumadin if you have a bleeding or blood cell disorder, blood in your urine or stools, an infection of the lining of your heart, stomach bleeding, bleeding in the brain, recent or upcoming surgery, or if you need a spinal tap or spinal anesthesia (epidural). Coumadin may cause you to bleed more easily, especially if you have: a history of bleeding problems, high blood pressure or severe heart disease, kidney disease, cancer, surgery or a medical emergency, a disease affecting the blood vessels in your brain, a history of stomach or intestinal bleeding, if you are 65 or older, or if you are severely ill or debilitated. Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Any doctor, dentist, surgeon, or other medical care provider who treats you should know that you are taking Coumadin. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor What should I avoid while taking Coumadin? Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. This includes acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin, celecoxib (Celebrex), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Do not eat large amounts of foods high in vitamin K (such as liver, leafy green vegetables or vegetable oils). Vitamin K can make Coumadin less effective. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor. Avoid eating cranberries, drinking cranberry juice, or taking cranberry herbal products. Avoid herbal teas that contain tonka beans, sweet clover, or sweet woodruff. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Coumadin What other drugs will affect Coumadin? Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Coumadin can interact with certain herbal (botanical) products, which can increase your risk of bleeding. Do not use any of the following products without first asking your doctor: bromelains; coenzyme Q10; cranberry; danshen; dong quai; garlic; ginkgo biloba; ginseng; or St. John's wort. This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with Coumadin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you...... more With all said, Don't take herbs while coumadin is still in your system! Once you've been free of it and you withdrawed safely then it might be safe for you. Answered by Sung Pascarelli 2 years ago.

The problem with "natural" remedies is that they're not given the same oversight by the FDA that drugs are. Strength levels can vary widely, active ingredients may or may not be what is advertised on the container, and even the advertised benefits may or may not be real. If given a choice between natural remedies like herbal supplements and drugs, the drugs are actually far more likely to be effective. If I were you, I'd go to your doctor or your pharmacist to find out what possible alternatives are out there for you. Coumadin isn't a med you can just stop, significant and sometimes severe health implications can result. Answered by Rachal Lindenmuth 2 years ago.

Ok. No one really likes to take Rat Poison on a regular basis. But in your case you have little choice. There is a reason you are on it, and no doctor just puts a person on coumadin for fun. Yes it sucks, and yes I know. Just do it. And see someone about the depression if you need to, 'cause it's the real issue. Answered by Keenan Ceruantes 2 years ago.

Hi It can be done but it MUST be done in conjunction with your physician and a qualified natural health practitioner ... a qualified and experienced medical herbalist would actually be the best bet. There are some herbs that can help but I am not going to mention the names as I do not want anyone (not necessarily you) rushing off and trying this without proper supervision as their are risks involved in commencing one, and gradually weaning off the other and bearing in mind your monitoring of blood levels. I know this isn't probably what you wanted to hear, but I really do not think this is something that can be safely addressed at home, by the lay person without medical support. Answered by Susanna Wiant 2 years ago.

Just take the bloody Coumadin, unless you want your blood to turn solid Answered by Andy Solivan 2 years ago.

I am not a girly girl and I dress modestly and behave with morals and kindness. I am a jeans and t-shirt kinda girl. My mother tried to make me wear skirts and stuff but I always hated it, so it wasn't her that made me who I am today. I was always a tom boy and always will be. Wearing a dress, stocking, and high heels make me so uncomfortable. If it makes you feel good about yourself then go for it. Answered by Sarita Vaksman 2 years ago.

I bet you are blood type A.Type A is the thickest blood.Eat for your blood type.Eating animal protein makes the blood thicker.Ginko biloba and garlic are natural blood thinners.Vit K clots the blood,should you cut yourself or have uncontrolable bleeding. Answered by Ai Fuster 2 years ago.


What is the usual dose of coumadin?
The doctor always gives me the results ,they just take ages to arrive at his office. Asked by Charlsie Billings 2 years ago.

I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find out how much I have. Are there any other drugs I can take which would be less hassle and just as safe if not better? P.S. most people I know who are older and have had worse problems than me are on a much lower dose than I am. I dont feel I can talk to my doctor like I used to and am wondering if I should try a new specialist or get a second opinion. Answered by Arminda Maver 2 years ago.

The dose of Coumadin varies and is determined by lab tests known as the protime (PT) and INR. PT/INR is a blood test that evaluate how thin blood is. The average dose of Coumadin in my experience is around 5 mg daily. I have seen doses as high as 30 mg and as low as 0.5 mg. The variation in dosing is related to differences in metabolism and intake of Vitamin K. A dose of 7 mg is actually very common and nothing to worry about. Do not be concerned with the doses of others you know, because everyone is different. You just need a higher dose than them to get you in the right PT/INR range. As a patient you have the right to access the results of your lab tests. I would recommend that you ask your doctor or clinic nurse for the results directly. Most doctors are happy to provide this information. I personally would have no problem providing this information to my patients. Just for your information, the INR should be 2-3 for most indications. In regards to alternative medications, it depends on your indication for Coumadin. Currently there is no oral medication that is similar to Coumadin. The medications that are similar to Coumadin that are currently available are available only IV or by subcutaneous injection once or twice daily. Most people are not interested in taking a subcutaneous injection and would prefer to stick with Coumadin. The alternative medications are also more expensive. These alternatives include Lovenox and Fondaparinux. There is an oral medication like Coumadin that is awaiting FDA approval, but it will only be approved for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It will likely have further indications like Coumadin, but it will likely take years to be approved. If you would like to have a second opinion, then you have the right to this. I am not sure of what your indication is for using Coumadin. If you could provide this information, then I would be able to answer your question better. It sounds like your doctor is taking appropriate care of you unless I am missing something. Good luck. Answered by Alda Borowicz 2 years ago.

There is no "usual" dose of Coumadin. Coumadin must be carefully monitored and titrated to each individual. Depending upon why you are on the Coumadin in the first place, your INR should be anywhere from 2.0 - 3.5. Again, this depends on the condition. There is no reason you cannot see the results of your blood tests. Your doctor can and should be sharing this information with you. Ask. You have the right to see your test results. If your doctor, for whatever reason, won't show you your INR result, then you need to consider finding a new healthcare provider! Unfortunately, there is no good substitute for Coumadin at this time. By the way, although there is no "usual" dose of Coumadin, I do see a lot of patients who take it and 7 mg is fairly average - I've seen people on much higher doses. Answered by Glennis Wronski 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dose Answered by Randi Rideau 2 years ago.

RE: What is the usual dose of coumadin? I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find... Answered by Asley Dubon 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dosage Answered by Corrina Calle 2 years ago.

Just to give you some hope... there are a couple drugs approved in other countries right now that are being worked on for approval here in the US that would not require the monitoring that Coumadin does. Yay! Answered by Sherie Colman 2 years ago.

Second Opinion! Answered by Rachele Abbott 2 years ago.

Depends on your protime. Answered by Lavern Alderman 2 years ago.


Those who take COUMADIN, what kind of Diet should have?
Asked by Christena Luckenbaugh 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood-thinning medication that helps treat and prevent blood clots. Certain foods can impair its effects. For this reason, it's important to pay attention to your diet while taking this medication. The main dietary concern related to taking Coumadin has to do with the amount of vitamin K in your diet. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Coumadin works to reduce clotting by diminishing the activity of vitamin K. Eating large amounts of vitamin K can counteract the benefits of this drug. Some doctors recommend a low-vitamin K diet for people taking Coumadin. But the key is to be consistent about how much vitamin K you consume on a daily basis. Limit or avoid foods that are high in vitamin K, such as: Kale Spinach Broccoli Turnip greens Collards Swiss chard Parsley Mustard greens Soybean & Cannola Oils (limit) The following is a partial list of foods that contain medium (M) to high (H) levels of vitamin K: FATS AND DRESSINGS Margarine M Mayonnaise H Soybean, canola, and salad oils H Olive oil M VEGETABLES Asparagus M Avocado M Broccoli H Brussels sprouts H Cabbage H Cabbage, red M Collard greens H Endive (raw) H Green scallion (raw) H Kale leaf (raw) H Lettuce, bibb, red leaf (raw) H Lettuce, iceberg (raw) M Mustard greens (raw) H Parsley H Peas, green (cooked) M Spinach leaf (raw) H Turning greens (raw) H Watercress (raw) H CONDIMENT Dill pickle M In addition to foods containing vitamin K, certain beverages can increase the effect of Coumadin, leading to bleeding problems: Cranberry juice Alcohol If you take Coumadin, eat a sensible diet. Talk to your doctor before making any major changes in your diet. If you are unable to eat for several days or have persistent stomach upset, diarrhea or fever, consult your doctor. He or she may need to adjust your dose. In addition, several medications and dietary supplements can affect the way Coumadin works in your body. For example, there's evidence that vitamin E has blood-thinning effects and may increase your risk of bleeding. Tell your doctor before taking any new medications, including herbal supplements and over-the-counter remedies. Other supplements and herbal medications known to affect Coumadin include: Arnica Bilberry Butcher's broom Cat's claw Dong quai Feverfew Forskolin Garlic Ginger Ginkgo Horse chestnut Inositol Licorice Melilot (sweet clover) Pau d'arco Red clover St. John's wort Sweet woodruff Turmeric Willow bark Wheatgrass Additional supplements that can interact with Coumadin:: Fish oil and omega-3 supplements Vitamin K Bromelains Coenzyme Q10 (ubidecarenone) Cranberry extracts Danshen Ginseng Also, you should avoid taking aspirin and frequent or high doses of acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), which can increase the effects of Coumadin and cause bleeding problems. Certain antibiotics also can interfere with the effect of this drug, so be sure to check with your doctor before starting a new antibiotic. Drugs that can interact with Coumadin include: Aspirin or aspirin-containing products Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve) Tylenol or acetaminophen-containing products, especially when the dose of acetaminophen exceeds 1,500 milligrams a day Many antibiotics Heparin Cold or allergy medicines Birth control pills Medications that treat abnormal heart rhythms, such as amiodarone Hope this info helps answer your question. My grandmother takes this and has not had any problems. Always doublecheck any medicines you take while on Coumadin with both your doctor & Pharmacist to be safest. I would also advise wearing a medical ID bracelet or carry info in your wallet about the fact that you are on this drug, in case of an emergency. Answered by Melinda Careaga 2 years ago.

coumadin kind diet Answered by Lucinda Chasey 2 years ago.

If you are going to eat salad, then eat the same sized salad every day. Don't skip a day and make sure it's the same size each day. Don't take supplements with vitamin k. Answered by Toya Ledgerwood 2 years ago.

i dk. but be careful. my grandfather used to take coumadin it thinned out his bood sooooo much. it was unbelivable how much he bled and how often he bled. Answered by Tyler Feely 2 years ago.

what about purple cabbage, yellow, or green peppers, sunflower oil, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, olives, and Echinacea drops on a base of alcohol? thank you for your answers. Answered by Kaleigh Greenrose 2 years ago.


Coumadin????
alright, so i dont take another test until this wednesday, one day? that would effect my test results? Asked by Jewell Stours 2 years ago.

Coumadin reaches full therapeutic impact fairly quickly. By inhibiting vitamin K-mediated clotting, if you stop taking the drug then its effect disappear as it is removed from you body (as opposed to actual blood thinners). How long it takes to get out of your system depends on the dose you were taking. Generally, levels drop below theraputic concentrations within 3-4 days for normal people. Drinking more water and having a healthy liver increase this rate. Missing one dose is not likely to have a serious impact on the drug efficacy. You SHOULD NOT take a double dose the next time and keep your normal schedule. The hospital and your doctor should be advised that you are on this medication. Small internal hemorrhages from your accident may be difficult to control while on coumadin. If your belly become painful, swollen, or you notice large patches of blue/black skin, you should seek medical attention. I hope this answers your question. Answered by Ruthie Himebaugh 2 years ago.

If you are saying that you got into a car accident while you were taking Coumadin, you should have told anyone who treated you after that accident that you were on it. If the danger of bleeding is greater than the danger of whatever it is that you're taking the Coumadin for, they would have stopped it (and checked you for bleeding). If you were in a car accident, are on Coumadin, and you have NOT been seen by a medical professional, you need to see one immediately. Please. You should neither assume that everything is all right nor stop taking your anticoagulants without medical advice. Answered by Eva Cianciolo 2 years ago.

you need to make sure to stay on and take what the doctor said. as it affects how the tests read. Answered by Ninfa Pouncey 2 years ago.


Is anyone familiar with coumadin?
I'm on coumadin for Pulmonary Emboli and I've been loosing a lot of hair only I was also diagnosed with lupus but the doctors weren't 100 % sure if I really have lupus could my losing my hair be from the medication or the lupus? Asked by Aurelia Lanfair 2 years ago.

coumadin is an anticoagulant, that is "blood thinner" for people that don't speak fluent doctor. The close monitoring of a person taking it is critical as the blood becomes thin so does your ability to not clot, which could cause a domino of other problems if you had an injury or needed emergency surgery. Prothombin times should be done weekly or more to evaluate your bloods clotting factor. The effects of the coumadin or its treatment does not consider the Lupus. Lupus, or mixed conective tissue disease is usually associated with a person that has RA, Rheumatoid Arthritis, your hair loss may be a side effect of the medicatons, stress, or even the illness you experienced or are currently experiencing. The best thing that you can do to heal your body would be a diet high protien and vitamin C these two things combined heal our bodies. The fact that you are recovering from such an ordeal would indicate that you need very high level because your not only compensating for the illness you need to maintain your normal levels. When I had a significant injury and surgery, I started to drink protien drinks which contained 20-24 grams of protien each, I drank 4-6 a day. I also would take 3-4 oranges and squeeze them in a juicer, this would give me a fairly large glass of juice which is like liquid sunshine, I felt better in a shorter amount of time and I maintain the practice to this day, not as much but everyday! Good luck and I hope you feel better! Answered by Rhett Loggin 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood thinner and will not cause your hair to fall out. The Lupus however does cause unusual hair loss. www.niams.noh.gov Answered by Monika Calleo 2 years ago.

coumadin helps to thin the blood to avoid blood clots from the two sites I quickly read, it sounds like the lupus and the coumadin could be a cause. Take care and get well Answered by Myron Benthin 2 years ago.

coumadin is a blood thinner, and I've never heard of someone losing their hair from it.. with lupus i guess it could attack your hair follicles but I've never seen it (my aunt has lupus so I've tried to research it a little) in all honesty, it's probably stress.. it's very common to lose hair when you are overly stress, or when you have had a surgery/long hospital stay (injury stresses the body, it's still stress, even if it's not mental stress) Answered by Mireille Alberthal 2 years ago.

Lupus is an autoimmune disorder, one of many. Another one is a low thyroid condition called Hashimoto's thyroiditis. I would have your doctor check for that as they often appear together but the latter gets overlooked because lupus is a bigger focus. Low thyroid will cause hair loss; in fact it's usually one of the first signs. Answered by Janiece Kulwicki 2 years ago.

Warfarin (also known under the brand names of Coumadin®, Jantoven®, Marevan®, and Waran®) is an anticoagulant medication that is administered orally or, very rarely, by injection. It is used for the prophylaxis of thrombosis and embolism in many disorders. Its activity has to be monitored by frequent blood testing for the international normalized ratio (INR). It is named for the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. Warfarin is a synthetic derivative of coumarin, a chemical found naturally in many plants, notably woodruff (Galium odoratum, Rubiaceae), and at lower levels in licorice, lavender and various other species. Warfarin was originally developed as a rat poison, but it is no longer used for that purpose as modern poisons are much more potent and toxic (e.g. brodifacoum). However, warfarin and contemporary rodenticides belong to the same class of drugs (coumarins) and both decrease blood coagulation by interfering with vitamin K metabolism. Just be careful of using this drug and take a second openion. Answered by Irish Obradovich 2 years ago.

Probably the Lupus but you need to see your Dr. right away. Answered by Kerry Kneip 2 years ago.

u would lose your hair if u were not eating right Answered by Robbi Sammet 2 years ago.


What do I need to know about Coumadin and Lovenox?
I'm having a pulmonary vein isolation/ablation procedure in early March. I have never taken either of these. I am looking for personal accounts or advice that people who take or have taken either of these. I will be taking them for atrial fibrillation. Thank you. Asked by Mindi Castillero 2 years ago.

Coumadin and Lovenox are types of blood thinners commonly used in cases of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation can lead to blood clots forming in her heart which later can cause strokes so preventing these clots from forming is very important. Coumadin is an oral medicine which you will likely need to take every day. Your doctors, especially in the beginning, will need to check labs on you on a regular basis (your INR) and adjust the dose as necessary (an INR that's too high could put you at increased risk for bleeding complications, while if it's too low, it won't protect you from blood clots). Since it may take time before the correct dosage is achieved, many doctors will "bridge" patients with Lovenox until the INR level is therapeutic. Lovenox is a form of heparin that thins the blood immediately and thus protects you from blood clots while the coumadin dose is being adjusted to the proper dose. It has to be taken as a subcutaneous shot twice a day. Either you or a family member will be instructed on how to give these shots before you get discharged or visiting nurse services can be arranged to help you with them. Lovenox is temporary and will be stopped once the coumadin dosage is established. This is just a general overview and you should ask your doctor about how this will specifically apply to you. Good luck. Answered by Lashaun Dosch 2 years ago.

You should also expect some diet restrictions and changes, but the above answer is just about as good as its gonna get on here! great advice!! Answered by Genia Nelmark 2 years ago.


What is the equivalency of asprin to coumadin?
Im currently taking Coumadin 4mg a day ans was wondering. Also if I was to run out of my Coumadin before getting a refill or another prescription for more. Asked by Jeff Grossen 2 years ago.

Coumadin does not need prescription.,,and its strongly recommended NOT to substitute it with other platelet inhibitor, such as aspirin, because they work in very different manners,....coumadin works at liver level, blocking the synthesis of prothrombine and antagonizing the effects of carboxylations of vitamin "K" which is the proper antidote against excessive dose (tablets normally contain 5 miligrans of Coumadin (Warfarin sodium)...and they can be obtained from your local pharmacist...without prescription. Aspirin wont help you, and will only compound matters, making your bleeding time longer,and working in a different manner. There is no real EQUIVALENCE of aspirin, as substitute for coumadin,,, Its my opinion that you should be checked and followed in your coumadin doses, by proper weekly or bi-weekly chacks on your prothrombine time (PT) which is the best guide to calculate your daily needs of coumadin... Good luck Answered by Jazmine Vereb 2 years ago.

Coumadin thins your blood, you can only get with a prescription, so if the doctor put u in this med u shouldn't run out. Give the doc a call..........aspirin can b used 4 a lot of things. Answered by Frederica Alam 2 years ago.

If your doctor has prescribed Coumadin, its really important to take this as directed and to have you PT / INR checked weekly... You do not want your blood too thick or too thin - make sure you have this checked out. I would not subsitute with Asprin, its not as strong as Coumadin. Answered by Un Harrel 2 years ago.

there is no drug the same as coumidin.it is a rat poisin used in humans to improve circulation in the veins by thinning and keeping the blood flowing. it is very possible to bleed a lot during an injury while taking this medecine,be very careful with it Answered by Janna Brihon 2 years ago.


Lovenox vs. Coumadin?
Well I was on birth control only because it was required in order to take accunate which caused it. Asked by Zula Talerico 2 years ago.

Coumadin is an oral pill as previously mentioned however the clotting levels (INR) need to be monitored frequently to ensure that you are taking the proper dose. This requires frequent clinic visits for blood tests. Lovenox is an injection however it does not require strict monitoring like coumadin does. You need to sit down with your doctor and have him/her explain the risks and benefits of each drug so that you can make an informed decision. Since you are a minor your parents should be there and help you figure it out. Just curious as to what caused the blood clot as you are very young to have such a diagnosis. Answered by Lilli Ellman 2 years ago.

lovenox has to be injected, means poking yourself every day. coumadin is probably your better choice, it's a pill. Answered by Ressie Goughnour 2 years ago.


Coumadin....?
I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his... Asked by Kathrine Pancoast 2 years ago.

I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his blood. Could the discoloration be from the coumadin? Im worried about him, but I live in New york state and he lives in Florida. I cant have my husband talk to him, because my husband is deployed to Iraq... Does anyone know anything about this med? Answered by Nam Deyette 2 years ago.

the coumadin can cause bruising and I would assume the discloration you are speaking of is possibly bleeding under the skin... he needs to be seen by his medical doctor so they can do a PT with INR (prothrombin time) on him to make sure that the coumadin dose is the proper one... if his PT is high, he may need to be readjusted... Has he recently changed his diet in any way... if so, it could have affected the way the medication is absorbing into his body...If he has any kind of home health agency seeing him, tell him to call them, and they can get an order to go to his house and draw blood, if not, he needs to call the doc asap for an appointment or either go to the ER if the discolorations become worse or seems to be getting larger... the feet being bright red could also be a circulation problem, among other things... good luck Answered by Arminda Tromp 2 years ago.

He should head for the ER ASAP. I do not believe it is from the coumadin, this is not one of the listed side effects, but there is something brewing. Answered by Suzy Gonseth 2 years ago.


I don't want to take coumadin anymore, and I'm looking for an herbal/natural supplement?
Yeah, I was reading that ginger, garlic, feverfew and tree ear mushrooms can reduce the amount of coumadin needed. And to the person that said depression......I said depressed where exactly? Asked by Larry Mendivel 2 years ago.

What is Coumadin? Coumadin (warfarin) is an anticoagulant (blood thinner). Coumadin reduces the formation of blood clots by blocking the formation of certain clotting factors. Coumadin is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and blood clots in veins and arteries. Coumadin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Important information about Coumadin: Coumadin can cause birth defects or fatal bleeding in an unborn baby. Do not use Coumadin if you are pregnant. Never take a double dose of this medication or take it together with other products that contain warfarin or coumarin. You should not take Coumadin if you have a bleeding or blood cell disorder, blood in your urine or stools, an infection of the lining of your heart, stomach bleeding, bleeding in the brain, recent or upcoming surgery, or if you need a spinal tap or spinal anesthesia (epidural). Coumadin may cause you to bleed more easily, especially if you have: a history of bleeding problems, high blood pressure or severe heart disease, kidney disease, cancer, surgery or a medical emergency, a disease affecting the blood vessels in your brain, a history of stomach or intestinal bleeding, if you are 65 or older, or if you are severely ill or debilitated. Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Any doctor, dentist, surgeon, or other medical care provider who treats you should know that you are taking Coumadin. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor What should I avoid while taking Coumadin? Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. This includes acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin, celecoxib (Celebrex), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Do not eat large amounts of foods high in vitamin K (such as liver, leafy green vegetables or vegetable oils). Vitamin K can make Coumadin less effective. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor. Avoid eating cranberries, drinking cranberry juice, or taking cranberry herbal products. Avoid herbal teas that contain tonka beans, sweet clover, or sweet woodruff. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Coumadin What other drugs will affect Coumadin? Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Coumadin can interact with certain herbal (botanical) products, which can increase your risk of bleeding. Do not use any of the following products without first asking your doctor: bromelains; coenzyme Q10; cranberry; danshen; dong quai; garlic; ginkgo biloba; ginseng; or St. John's wort. This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with Coumadin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you...... more With all said, Don't take herbs while coumadin is still in your system! Once you've been free of it and you withdrawed safely then it might be safe for you. Answered by Luann Monz 2 years ago.

The problem with "natural" remedies is that they're not given the same oversight by the FDA that drugs are. Strength levels can vary widely, active ingredients may or may not be what is advertised on the container, and even the advertised benefits may or may not be real. If given a choice between natural remedies like herbal supplements and drugs, the drugs are actually far more likely to be effective. If I were you, I'd go to your doctor or your pharmacist to find out what possible alternatives are out there for you. Coumadin isn't a med you can just stop, significant and sometimes severe health implications can result. Answered by Marlys Bailor 2 years ago.

Ok. No one really likes to take Rat Poison on a regular basis. But in your case you have little choice. There is a reason you are on it, and no doctor just puts a person on coumadin for fun. Yes it sucks, and yes I know. Just do it. And see someone about the depression if you need to, 'cause it's the real issue. Answered by Jaunita Koizumi 2 years ago.

Hi It can be done but it MUST be done in conjunction with your physician and a qualified natural health practitioner ... a qualified and experienced medical herbalist would actually be the best bet. There are some herbs that can help but I am not going to mention the names as I do not want anyone (not necessarily you) rushing off and trying this without proper supervision as their are risks involved in commencing one, and gradually weaning off the other and bearing in mind your monitoring of blood levels. I know this isn't probably what you wanted to hear, but I really do not think this is something that can be safely addressed at home, by the lay person without medical support. Answered by Margo Bardis 2 years ago.

Just take the bloody Coumadin, unless you want your blood to turn solid Answered by Viviana Sitzman 2 years ago.

I am not a girly girl and I dress modestly and behave with morals and kindness. I am a jeans and t-shirt kinda girl. My mother tried to make me wear skirts and stuff but I always hated it, so it wasn't her that made me who I am today. I was always a tom boy and always will be. Wearing a dress, stocking, and high heels make me so uncomfortable. If it makes you feel good about yourself then go for it. Answered by Camelia Siske 2 years ago.

I bet you are blood type A.Type A is the thickest blood.Eat for your blood type.Eating animal protein makes the blood thicker.Ginko biloba and garlic are natural blood thinners.Vit K clots the blood,should you cut yourself or have uncontrolable bleeding. Answered by Kesha Longbotham 2 years ago.


What is the usual dose of coumadin?
The doctor always gives me the results ,they just take ages to arrive at his office. Asked by Sumiko Huggins 2 years ago.

I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find out how much I have. Are there any other drugs I can take which would be less hassle and just as safe if not better? P.S. most people I know who are older and have had worse problems than me are on a much lower dose than I am. I dont feel I can talk to my doctor like I used to and am wondering if I should try a new specialist or get a second opinion. Answered by Neil Kuch 2 years ago.

The dose of Coumadin varies and is determined by lab tests known as the protime (PT) and INR. PT/INR is a blood test that evaluate how thin blood is. The average dose of Coumadin in my experience is around 5 mg daily. I have seen doses as high as 30 mg and as low as 0.5 mg. The variation in dosing is related to differences in metabolism and intake of Vitamin K. A dose of 7 mg is actually very common and nothing to worry about. Do not be concerned with the doses of others you know, because everyone is different. You just need a higher dose than them to get you in the right PT/INR range. As a patient you have the right to access the results of your lab tests. I would recommend that you ask your doctor or clinic nurse for the results directly. Most doctors are happy to provide this information. I personally would have no problem providing this information to my patients. Just for your information, the INR should be 2-3 for most indications. In regards to alternative medications, it depends on your indication for Coumadin. Currently there is no oral medication that is similar to Coumadin. The medications that are similar to Coumadin that are currently available are available only IV or by subcutaneous injection once or twice daily. Most people are not interested in taking a subcutaneous injection and would prefer to stick with Coumadin. The alternative medications are also more expensive. These alternatives include Lovenox and Fondaparinux. There is an oral medication like Coumadin that is awaiting FDA approval, but it will only be approved for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It will likely have further indications like Coumadin, but it will likely take years to be approved. If you would like to have a second opinion, then you have the right to this. I am not sure of what your indication is for using Coumadin. If you could provide this information, then I would be able to answer your question better. It sounds like your doctor is taking appropriate care of you unless I am missing something. Good luck. Answered by Samira World 2 years ago.

There is no "usual" dose of Coumadin. Coumadin must be carefully monitored and titrated to each individual. Depending upon why you are on the Coumadin in the first place, your INR should be anywhere from 2.0 - 3.5. Again, this depends on the condition. There is no reason you cannot see the results of your blood tests. Your doctor can and should be sharing this information with you. Ask. You have the right to see your test results. If your doctor, for whatever reason, won't show you your INR result, then you need to consider finding a new healthcare provider! Unfortunately, there is no good substitute for Coumadin at this time. By the way, although there is no "usual" dose of Coumadin, I do see a lot of patients who take it and 7 mg is fairly average - I've seen people on much higher doses. Answered by Tu Mcclatchey 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dose Answered by Jenell Devoy 2 years ago.

RE: What is the usual dose of coumadin? I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find... Answered by Andera Nussey 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dosage Answered by Zachariah Feret 2 years ago.

Just to give you some hope... there are a couple drugs approved in other countries right now that are being worked on for approval here in the US that would not require the monitoring that Coumadin does. Yay! Answered by Darlena Dutton 2 years ago.

Second Opinion! Answered by Reagan Handcock 2 years ago.

Depends on your protime. Answered by Dean Sydnor 2 years ago.


Those who take COUMADIN, what kind of Diet should have?
Asked by Chloe Guerette 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood-thinning medication that helps treat and prevent blood clots. Certain foods can impair its effects. For this reason, it's important to pay attention to your diet while taking this medication. The main dietary concern related to taking Coumadin has to do with the amount of vitamin K in your diet. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Coumadin works to reduce clotting by diminishing the activity of vitamin K. Eating large amounts of vitamin K can counteract the benefits of this drug. Some doctors recommend a low-vitamin K diet for people taking Coumadin. But the key is to be consistent about how much vitamin K you consume on a daily basis. Limit or avoid foods that are high in vitamin K, such as: Kale Spinach Broccoli Turnip greens Collards Swiss chard Parsley Mustard greens Soybean & Cannola Oils (limit) The following is a partial list of foods that contain medium (M) to high (H) levels of vitamin K: FATS AND DRESSINGS Margarine M Mayonnaise H Soybean, canola, and salad oils H Olive oil M VEGETABLES Asparagus M Avocado M Broccoli H Brussels sprouts H Cabbage H Cabbage, red M Collard greens H Endive (raw) H Green scallion (raw) H Kale leaf (raw) H Lettuce, bibb, red leaf (raw) H Lettuce, iceberg (raw) M Mustard greens (raw) H Parsley H Peas, green (cooked) M Spinach leaf (raw) H Turning greens (raw) H Watercress (raw) H CONDIMENT Dill pickle M In addition to foods containing vitamin K, certain beverages can increase the effect of Coumadin, leading to bleeding problems: Cranberry juice Alcohol If you take Coumadin, eat a sensible diet. Talk to your doctor before making any major changes in your diet. If you are unable to eat for several days or have persistent stomach upset, diarrhea or fever, consult your doctor. He or she may need to adjust your dose. In addition, several medications and dietary supplements can affect the way Coumadin works in your body. For example, there's evidence that vitamin E has blood-thinning effects and may increase your risk of bleeding. Tell your doctor before taking any new medications, including herbal supplements and over-the-counter remedies. Other supplements and herbal medications known to affect Coumadin include: Arnica Bilberry Butcher's broom Cat's claw Dong quai Feverfew Forskolin Garlic Ginger Ginkgo Horse chestnut Inositol Licorice Melilot (sweet clover) Pau d'arco Red clover St. John's wort Sweet woodruff Turmeric Willow bark Wheatgrass Additional supplements that can interact with Coumadin:: Fish oil and omega-3 supplements Vitamin K Bromelains Coenzyme Q10 (ubidecarenone) Cranberry extracts Danshen Ginseng Also, you should avoid taking aspirin and frequent or high doses of acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), which can increase the effects of Coumadin and cause bleeding problems. Certain antibiotics also can interfere with the effect of this drug, so be sure to check with your doctor before starting a new antibiotic. Drugs that can interact with Coumadin include: Aspirin or aspirin-containing products Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve) Tylenol or acetaminophen-containing products, especially when the dose of acetaminophen exceeds 1,500 milligrams a day Many antibiotics Heparin Cold or allergy medicines Birth control pills Medications that treat abnormal heart rhythms, such as amiodarone Hope this info helps answer your question. My grandmother takes this and has not had any problems. Always doublecheck any medicines you take while on Coumadin with both your doctor & Pharmacist to be safest. I would also advise wearing a medical ID bracelet or carry info in your wallet about the fact that you are on this drug, in case of an emergency. Answered by Josiah Bustamante 2 years ago.

coumadin kind diet Answered by Hortense Waisman 2 years ago.

If you are going to eat salad, then eat the same sized salad every day. Don't skip a day and make sure it's the same size each day. Don't take supplements with vitamin k. Answered by Willia Terazes 2 years ago.

i dk. but be careful. my grandfather used to take coumadin it thinned out his bood sooooo much. it was unbelivable how much he bled and how often he bled. Answered by Corey Gerber 2 years ago.

what about purple cabbage, yellow, or green peppers, sunflower oil, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, olives, and Echinacea drops on a base of alcohol? thank you for your answers. Answered by Jeramy Habel 2 years ago.


Coumadin????
alright, so i dont take another test until this wednesday, one day? that would effect my test results? Asked by Tim Kanzenbach 2 years ago.

Coumadin reaches full therapeutic impact fairly quickly. By inhibiting vitamin K-mediated clotting, if you stop taking the drug then its effect disappear as it is removed from you body (as opposed to actual blood thinners). How long it takes to get out of your system depends on the dose you were taking. Generally, levels drop below theraputic concentrations within 3-4 days for normal people. Drinking more water and having a healthy liver increase this rate. Missing one dose is not likely to have a serious impact on the drug efficacy. You SHOULD NOT take a double dose the next time and keep your normal schedule. The hospital and your doctor should be advised that you are on this medication. Small internal hemorrhages from your accident may be difficult to control while on coumadin. If your belly become painful, swollen, or you notice large patches of blue/black skin, you should seek medical attention. I hope this answers your question. Answered by Toshiko Massei 2 years ago.

If you are saying that you got into a car accident while you were taking Coumadin, you should have told anyone who treated you after that accident that you were on it. If the danger of bleeding is greater than the danger of whatever it is that you're taking the Coumadin for, they would have stopped it (and checked you for bleeding). If you were in a car accident, are on Coumadin, and you have NOT been seen by a medical professional, you need to see one immediately. Please. You should neither assume that everything is all right nor stop taking your anticoagulants without medical advice. Answered by Lane Goren 2 years ago.

you need to make sure to stay on and take what the doctor said. as it affects how the tests read. Answered by Vicky Mante 2 years ago.


Is anyone familiar with coumadin?
I'm on coumadin for Pulmonary Emboli and I've been loosing a lot of hair only I was also diagnosed with lupus but the doctors weren't 100 % sure if I really have lupus could my losing my hair be from the medication or the lupus? Asked by Luther Lacher 2 years ago.

coumadin is an anticoagulant, that is "blood thinner" for people that don't speak fluent doctor. The close monitoring of a person taking it is critical as the blood becomes thin so does your ability to not clot, which could cause a domino of other problems if you had an injury or needed emergency surgery. Prothombin times should be done weekly or more to evaluate your bloods clotting factor. The effects of the coumadin or its treatment does not consider the Lupus. Lupus, or mixed conective tissue disease is usually associated with a person that has RA, Rheumatoid Arthritis, your hair loss may be a side effect of the medicatons, stress, or even the illness you experienced or are currently experiencing. The best thing that you can do to heal your body would be a diet high protien and vitamin C these two things combined heal our bodies. The fact that you are recovering from such an ordeal would indicate that you need very high level because your not only compensating for the illness you need to maintain your normal levels. When I had a significant injury and surgery, I started to drink protien drinks which contained 20-24 grams of protien each, I drank 4-6 a day. I also would take 3-4 oranges and squeeze them in a juicer, this would give me a fairly large glass of juice which is like liquid sunshine, I felt better in a shorter amount of time and I maintain the practice to this day, not as much but everyday! Good luck and I hope you feel better! Answered by Kandis Trites 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood thinner and will not cause your hair to fall out. The Lupus however does cause unusual hair loss. www.niams.noh.gov Answered by Kyle Fornerod 2 years ago.

coumadin helps to thin the blood to avoid blood clots from the two sites I quickly read, it sounds like the lupus and the coumadin could be a cause. Take care and get well Answered by Laverne Fama 2 years ago.

coumadin is a blood thinner, and I've never heard of someone losing their hair from it.. with lupus i guess it could attack your hair follicles but I've never seen it (my aunt has lupus so I've tried to research it a little) in all honesty, it's probably stress.. it's very common to lose hair when you are overly stress, or when you have had a surgery/long hospital stay (injury stresses the body, it's still stress, even if it's not mental stress) Answered by Charisse Kistle 2 years ago.

Lupus is an autoimmune disorder, one of many. Another one is a low thyroid condition called Hashimoto's thyroiditis. I would have your doctor check for that as they often appear together but the latter gets overlooked because lupus is a bigger focus. Low thyroid will cause hair loss; in fact it's usually one of the first signs. Answered by Wilfred Tooke 2 years ago.

Warfarin (also known under the brand names of Coumadin®, Jantoven®, Marevan®, and Waran®) is an anticoagulant medication that is administered orally or, very rarely, by injection. It is used for the prophylaxis of thrombosis and embolism in many disorders. Its activity has to be monitored by frequent blood testing for the international normalized ratio (INR). It is named for the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. Warfarin is a synthetic derivative of coumarin, a chemical found naturally in many plants, notably woodruff (Galium odoratum, Rubiaceae), and at lower levels in licorice, lavender and various other species. Warfarin was originally developed as a rat poison, but it is no longer used for that purpose as modern poisons are much more potent and toxic (e.g. brodifacoum). However, warfarin and contemporary rodenticides belong to the same class of drugs (coumarins) and both decrease blood coagulation by interfering with vitamin K metabolism. Just be careful of using this drug and take a second openion. Answered by Joellen Benkert 2 years ago.

Probably the Lupus but you need to see your Dr. right away. Answered by Darrin Zsadanyi 2 years ago.

u would lose your hair if u were not eating right Answered by Delena Loeurm 2 years ago.


What do I need to know about Coumadin and Lovenox?
I'm having a pulmonary vein isolation/ablation procedure in early March. I have never taken either of these. I am looking for personal accounts or advice that people who take or have taken either of these. I will be taking them for atrial fibrillation. Thank you. Asked by Moira Ruddy 2 years ago.

Coumadin and Lovenox are types of blood thinners commonly used in cases of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation can lead to blood clots forming in her heart which later can cause strokes so preventing these clots from forming is very important. Coumadin is an oral medicine which you will likely need to take every day. Your doctors, especially in the beginning, will need to check labs on you on a regular basis (your INR) and adjust the dose as necessary (an INR that's too high could put you at increased risk for bleeding complications, while if it's too low, it won't protect you from blood clots). Since it may take time before the correct dosage is achieved, many doctors will "bridge" patients with Lovenox until the INR level is therapeutic. Lovenox is a form of heparin that thins the blood immediately and thus protects you from blood clots while the coumadin dose is being adjusted to the proper dose. It has to be taken as a subcutaneous shot twice a day. Either you or a family member will be instructed on how to give these shots before you get discharged or visiting nurse services can be arranged to help you with them. Lovenox is temporary and will be stopped once the coumadin dosage is established. This is just a general overview and you should ask your doctor about how this will specifically apply to you. Good luck. Answered by Minh Boudoin 2 years ago.

You should also expect some diet restrictions and changes, but the above answer is just about as good as its gonna get on here! great advice!! Answered by Alanna Magsayo 2 years ago.


What is the equivalency of asprin to coumadin?
Im currently taking Coumadin 4mg a day ans was wondering. Also if I was to run out of my Coumadin before getting a refill or another prescription for more. Asked by Roberto Glanton 2 years ago.

Coumadin does not need prescription.,,and its strongly recommended NOT to substitute it with other platelet inhibitor, such as aspirin, because they work in very different manners,....coumadin works at liver level, blocking the synthesis of prothrombine and antagonizing the effects of carboxylations of vitamin "K" which is the proper antidote against excessive dose (tablets normally contain 5 miligrans of Coumadin (Warfarin sodium)...and they can be obtained from your local pharmacist...without prescription. Aspirin wont help you, and will only compound matters, making your bleeding time longer,and working in a different manner. There is no real EQUIVALENCE of aspirin, as substitute for coumadin,,, Its my opinion that you should be checked and followed in your coumadin doses, by proper weekly or bi-weekly chacks on your prothrombine time (PT) which is the best guide to calculate your daily needs of coumadin... Good luck Answered by Tyrone Zacchini 2 years ago.

Coumadin thins your blood, you can only get with a prescription, so if the doctor put u in this med u shouldn't run out. Give the doc a call..........aspirin can b used 4 a lot of things. Answered by Laronda Mellado 2 years ago.

If your doctor has prescribed Coumadin, its really important to take this as directed and to have you PT / INR checked weekly... You do not want your blood too thick or too thin - make sure you have this checked out. I would not subsitute with Asprin, its not as strong as Coumadin. Answered by Minnie Kiener 2 years ago.

there is no drug the same as coumidin.it is a rat poisin used in humans to improve circulation in the veins by thinning and keeping the blood flowing. it is very possible to bleed a lot during an injury while taking this medecine,be very careful with it Answered by Elouise Zien 2 years ago.


Lovenox vs. Coumadin?
Well I was on birth control only because it was required in order to take accunate which caused it. Asked by Debi Sleaford 2 years ago.

Coumadin is an oral pill as previously mentioned however the clotting levels (INR) need to be monitored frequently to ensure that you are taking the proper dose. This requires frequent clinic visits for blood tests. Lovenox is an injection however it does not require strict monitoring like coumadin does. You need to sit down with your doctor and have him/her explain the risks and benefits of each drug so that you can make an informed decision. Since you are a minor your parents should be there and help you figure it out. Just curious as to what caused the blood clot as you are very young to have such a diagnosis. Answered by Lovie Hynum 2 years ago.

lovenox has to be injected, means poking yourself every day. coumadin is probably your better choice, it's a pill. Answered by Mia Cassada 2 years ago.


Coumadin....?
I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his... Asked by Odis Angus 2 years ago.

I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his blood. Could the discoloration be from the coumadin? Im worried about him, but I live in New york state and he lives in Florida. I cant have my husband talk to him, because my husband is deployed to Iraq... Does anyone know anything about this med? Answered by Melba Speroni 2 years ago.

the coumadin can cause bruising and I would assume the discloration you are speaking of is possibly bleeding under the skin... he needs to be seen by his medical doctor so they can do a PT with INR (prothrombin time) on him to make sure that the coumadin dose is the proper one... if his PT is high, he may need to be readjusted... Has he recently changed his diet in any way... if so, it could have affected the way the medication is absorbing into his body...If he has any kind of home health agency seeing him, tell him to call them, and they can get an order to go to his house and draw blood, if not, he needs to call the doc asap for an appointment or either go to the ER if the discolorations become worse or seems to be getting larger... the feet being bright red could also be a circulation problem, among other things... good luck Answered by Clinton Luckie 2 years ago.

He should head for the ER ASAP. I do not believe it is from the coumadin, this is not one of the listed side effects, but there is something brewing. Answered by Mirian Kruczek 2 years ago.


I don't want to take coumadin anymore, and I'm looking for an herbal/natural supplement?
Yeah, I was reading that ginger, garlic, feverfew and tree ear mushrooms can reduce the amount of coumadin needed. And to the person that said depression......I said depressed where exactly? Asked by Horacio Bursik 2 years ago.

What is Coumadin? Coumadin (warfarin) is an anticoagulant (blood thinner). Coumadin reduces the formation of blood clots by blocking the formation of certain clotting factors. Coumadin is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and blood clots in veins and arteries. Coumadin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Important information about Coumadin: Coumadin can cause birth defects or fatal bleeding in an unborn baby. Do not use Coumadin if you are pregnant. Never take a double dose of this medication or take it together with other products that contain warfarin or coumarin. You should not take Coumadin if you have a bleeding or blood cell disorder, blood in your urine or stools, an infection of the lining of your heart, stomach bleeding, bleeding in the brain, recent or upcoming surgery, or if you need a spinal tap or spinal anesthesia (epidural). Coumadin may cause you to bleed more easily, especially if you have: a history of bleeding problems, high blood pressure or severe heart disease, kidney disease, cancer, surgery or a medical emergency, a disease affecting the blood vessels in your brain, a history of stomach or intestinal bleeding, if you are 65 or older, or if you are severely ill or debilitated. Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Any doctor, dentist, surgeon, or other medical care provider who treats you should know that you are taking Coumadin. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor What should I avoid while taking Coumadin? Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. This includes acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin, celecoxib (Celebrex), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Do not eat large amounts of foods high in vitamin K (such as liver, leafy green vegetables or vegetable oils). Vitamin K can make Coumadin less effective. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor. Avoid eating cranberries, drinking cranberry juice, or taking cranberry herbal products. Avoid herbal teas that contain tonka beans, sweet clover, or sweet woodruff. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Coumadin What other drugs will affect Coumadin? Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Coumadin can interact with certain herbal (botanical) products, which can increase your risk of bleeding. Do not use any of the following products without first asking your doctor: bromelains; coenzyme Q10; cranberry; danshen; dong quai; garlic; ginkgo biloba; ginseng; or St. John's wort. This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with Coumadin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you...... more With all said, Don't take herbs while coumadin is still in your system! Once you've been free of it and you withdrawed safely then it might be safe for you. Answered by Edith Postin 2 years ago.

The problem with "natural" remedies is that they're not given the same oversight by the FDA that drugs are. Strength levels can vary widely, active ingredients may or may not be what is advertised on the container, and even the advertised benefits may or may not be real. If given a choice between natural remedies like herbal supplements and drugs, the drugs are actually far more likely to be effective. If I were you, I'd go to your doctor or your pharmacist to find out what possible alternatives are out there for you. Coumadin isn't a med you can just stop, significant and sometimes severe health implications can result. Answered by Davina Zelkin 2 years ago.

Ok. No one really likes to take Rat Poison on a regular basis. But in your case you have little choice. There is a reason you are on it, and no doctor just puts a person on coumadin for fun. Yes it sucks, and yes I know. Just do it. And see someone about the depression if you need to, 'cause it's the real issue. Answered by Arline Scappaticci 2 years ago.

Hi It can be done but it MUST be done in conjunction with your physician and a qualified natural health practitioner ... a qualified and experienced medical herbalist would actually be the best bet. There are some herbs that can help but I am not going to mention the names as I do not want anyone (not necessarily you) rushing off and trying this without proper supervision as their are risks involved in commencing one, and gradually weaning off the other and bearing in mind your monitoring of blood levels. I know this isn't probably what you wanted to hear, but I really do not think this is something that can be safely addressed at home, by the lay person without medical support. Answered by Francisco Hedegore 2 years ago.

Just take the bloody Coumadin, unless you want your blood to turn solid Answered by Leroy Beddia 2 years ago.

I am not a girly girl and I dress modestly and behave with morals and kindness. I am a jeans and t-shirt kinda girl. My mother tried to make me wear skirts and stuff but I always hated it, so it wasn't her that made me who I am today. I was always a tom boy and always will be. Wearing a dress, stocking, and high heels make me so uncomfortable. If it makes you feel good about yourself then go for it. Answered by Tina Faust 2 years ago.

I bet you are blood type A.Type A is the thickest blood.Eat for your blood type.Eating animal protein makes the blood thicker.Ginko biloba and garlic are natural blood thinners.Vit K clots the blood,should you cut yourself or have uncontrolable bleeding. Answered by Herta Voss 2 years ago.


What is the usual dose of coumadin?
The doctor always gives me the results ,they just take ages to arrive at his office. Asked by Dian Papalia 2 years ago.

I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find out how much I have. Are there any other drugs I can take which would be less hassle and just as safe if not better? P.S. most people I know who are older and have had worse problems than me are on a much lower dose than I am. I dont feel I can talk to my doctor like I used to and am wondering if I should try a new specialist or get a second opinion. Answered by Cher Shelhorse 2 years ago.

The dose of Coumadin varies and is determined by lab tests known as the protime (PT) and INR. PT/INR is a blood test that evaluate how thin blood is. The average dose of Coumadin in my experience is around 5 mg daily. I have seen doses as high as 30 mg and as low as 0.5 mg. The variation in dosing is related to differences in metabolism and intake of Vitamin K. A dose of 7 mg is actually very common and nothing to worry about. Do not be concerned with the doses of others you know, because everyone is different. You just need a higher dose than them to get you in the right PT/INR range. As a patient you have the right to access the results of your lab tests. I would recommend that you ask your doctor or clinic nurse for the results directly. Most doctors are happy to provide this information. I personally would have no problem providing this information to my patients. Just for your information, the INR should be 2-3 for most indications. In regards to alternative medications, it depends on your indication for Coumadin. Currently there is no oral medication that is similar to Coumadin. The medications that are similar to Coumadin that are currently available are available only IV or by subcutaneous injection once or twice daily. Most people are not interested in taking a subcutaneous injection and would prefer to stick with Coumadin. The alternative medications are also more expensive. These alternatives include Lovenox and Fondaparinux. There is an oral medication like Coumadin that is awaiting FDA approval, but it will only be approved for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It will likely have further indications like Coumadin, but it will likely take years to be approved. If you would like to have a second opinion, then you have the right to this. I am not sure of what your indication is for using Coumadin. If you could provide this information, then I would be able to answer your question better. It sounds like your doctor is taking appropriate care of you unless I am missing something. Good luck. Answered by Thersa Machowski 2 years ago.

There is no "usual" dose of Coumadin. Coumadin must be carefully monitored and titrated to each individual. Depending upon why you are on the Coumadin in the first place, your INR should be anywhere from 2.0 - 3.5. Again, this depends on the condition. There is no reason you cannot see the results of your blood tests. Your doctor can and should be sharing this information with you. Ask. You have the right to see your test results. If your doctor, for whatever reason, won't show you your INR result, then you need to consider finding a new healthcare provider! Unfortunately, there is no good substitute for Coumadin at this time. By the way, although there is no "usual" dose of Coumadin, I do see a lot of patients who take it and 7 mg is fairly average - I've seen people on much higher doses. Answered by Elease Shanholtzer 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dose Answered by Bernardine Arnerich 2 years ago.

RE: What is the usual dose of coumadin? I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find... Answered by Tamesha Bolden 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dosage Answered by Andy Husky 2 years ago.

Just to give you some hope... there are a couple drugs approved in other countries right now that are being worked on for approval here in the US that would not require the monitoring that Coumadin does. Yay! Answered by Lula Yap 2 years ago.

Second Opinion! Answered by Exie Treib 2 years ago.

Depends on your protime. Answered by Sheena Filley 2 years ago.


Those who take COUMADIN, what kind of Diet should have?
Asked by Dana Bandemer 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood-thinning medication that helps treat and prevent blood clots. Certain foods can impair its effects. For this reason, it's important to pay attention to your diet while taking this medication. The main dietary concern related to taking Coumadin has to do with the amount of vitamin K in your diet. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Coumadin works to reduce clotting by diminishing the activity of vitamin K. Eating large amounts of vitamin K can counteract the benefits of this drug. Some doctors recommend a low-vitamin K diet for people taking Coumadin. But the key is to be consistent about how much vitamin K you consume on a daily basis. Limit or avoid foods that are high in vitamin K, such as: Kale Spinach Broccoli Turnip greens Collards Swiss chard Parsley Mustard greens Soybean & Cannola Oils (limit) The following is a partial list of foods that contain medium (M) to high (H) levels of vitamin K: FATS AND DRESSINGS Margarine M Mayonnaise H Soybean, canola, and salad oils H Olive oil M VEGETABLES Asparagus M Avocado M Broccoli H Brussels sprouts H Cabbage H Cabbage, red M Collard greens H Endive (raw) H Green scallion (raw) H Kale leaf (raw) H Lettuce, bibb, red leaf (raw) H Lettuce, iceberg (raw) M Mustard greens (raw) H Parsley H Peas, green (cooked) M Spinach leaf (raw) H Turning greens (raw) H Watercress (raw) H CONDIMENT Dill pickle M In addition to foods containing vitamin K, certain beverages can increase the effect of Coumadin, leading to bleeding problems: Cranberry juice Alcohol If you take Coumadin, eat a sensible diet. Talk to your doctor before making any major changes in your diet. If you are unable to eat for several days or have persistent stomach upset, diarrhea or fever, consult your doctor. He or she may need to adjust your dose. In addition, several medications and dietary supplements can affect the way Coumadin works in your body. For example, there's evidence that vitamin E has blood-thinning effects and may increase your risk of bleeding. Tell your doctor before taking any new medications, including herbal supplements and over-the-counter remedies. Other supplements and herbal medications known to affect Coumadin include: Arnica Bilberry Butcher's broom Cat's claw Dong quai Feverfew Forskolin Garlic Ginger Ginkgo Horse chestnut Inositol Licorice Melilot (sweet clover) Pau d'arco Red clover St. John's wort Sweet woodruff Turmeric Willow bark Wheatgrass Additional supplements that can interact with Coumadin:: Fish oil and omega-3 supplements Vitamin K Bromelains Coenzyme Q10 (ubidecarenone) Cranberry extracts Danshen Ginseng Also, you should avoid taking aspirin and frequent or high doses of acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), which can increase the effects of Coumadin and cause bleeding problems. Certain antibiotics also can interfere with the effect of this drug, so be sure to check with your doctor before starting a new antibiotic. Drugs that can interact with Coumadin include: Aspirin or aspirin-containing products Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve) Tylenol or acetaminophen-containing products, especially when the dose of acetaminophen exceeds 1,500 milligrams a day Many antibiotics Heparin Cold or allergy medicines Birth control pills Medications that treat abnormal heart rhythms, such as amiodarone Hope this info helps answer your question. My grandmother takes this and has not had any problems. Always doublecheck any medicines you take while on Coumadin with both your doctor & Pharmacist to be safest. I would also advise wearing a medical ID bracelet or carry info in your wallet about the fact that you are on this drug, in case of an emergency. Answered by Christian Skelly 2 years ago.

coumadin kind diet Answered by Lily Rinauro 2 years ago.

If you are going to eat salad, then eat the same sized salad every day. Don't skip a day and make sure it's the same size each day. Don't take supplements with vitamin k. Answered by Adrianna Angstadt 2 years ago.

i dk. but be careful. my grandfather used to take coumadin it thinned out his bood sooooo much. it was unbelivable how much he bled and how often he bled. Answered by Chandra Brewer 2 years ago.

what about purple cabbage, yellow, or green peppers, sunflower oil, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, olives, and Echinacea drops on a base of alcohol? thank you for your answers. Answered by Elly Adjei 2 years ago.


Coumadin????
alright, so i dont take another test until this wednesday, one day? that would effect my test results? Asked by Bev Baseler 2 years ago.

Coumadin reaches full therapeutic impact fairly quickly. By inhibiting vitamin K-mediated clotting, if you stop taking the drug then its effect disappear as it is removed from you body (as opposed to actual blood thinners). How long it takes to get out of your system depends on the dose you were taking. Generally, levels drop below theraputic concentrations within 3-4 days for normal people. Drinking more water and having a healthy liver increase this rate. Missing one dose is not likely to have a serious impact on the drug efficacy. You SHOULD NOT take a double dose the next time and keep your normal schedule. The hospital and your doctor should be advised that you are on this medication. Small internal hemorrhages from your accident may be difficult to control while on coumadin. If your belly become painful, swollen, or you notice large patches of blue/black skin, you should seek medical attention. I hope this answers your question. Answered by Kenneth Northam 2 years ago.

If you are saying that you got into a car accident while you were taking Coumadin, you should have told anyone who treated you after that accident that you were on it. If the danger of bleeding is greater than the danger of whatever it is that you're taking the Coumadin for, they would have stopped it (and checked you for bleeding). If you were in a car accident, are on Coumadin, and you have NOT been seen by a medical professional, you need to see one immediately. Please. You should neither assume that everything is all right nor stop taking your anticoagulants without medical advice. Answered by Sierra Wendelboe 2 years ago.

you need to make sure to stay on and take what the doctor said. as it affects how the tests read. Answered by Kenyetta Shappy 2 years ago.


Is anyone familiar with coumadin?
I'm on coumadin for Pulmonary Emboli and I've been loosing a lot of hair only I was also diagnosed with lupus but the doctors weren't 100 % sure if I really have lupus could my losing my hair be from the medication or the lupus? Asked by George Gallentine 2 years ago.

coumadin is an anticoagulant, that is "blood thinner" for people that don't speak fluent doctor. The close monitoring of a person taking it is critical as the blood becomes thin so does your ability to not clot, which could cause a domino of other problems if you had an injury or needed emergency surgery. Prothombin times should be done weekly or more to evaluate your bloods clotting factor. The effects of the coumadin or its treatment does not consider the Lupus. Lupus, or mixed conective tissue disease is usually associated with a person that has RA, Rheumatoid Arthritis, your hair loss may be a side effect of the medicatons, stress, or even the illness you experienced or are currently experiencing. The best thing that you can do to heal your body would be a diet high protien and vitamin C these two things combined heal our bodies. The fact that you are recovering from such an ordeal would indicate that you need very high level because your not only compensating for the illness you need to maintain your normal levels. When I had a significant injury and surgery, I started to drink protien drinks which contained 20-24 grams of protien each, I drank 4-6 a day. I also would take 3-4 oranges and squeeze them in a juicer, this would give me a fairly large glass of juice which is like liquid sunshine, I felt better in a shorter amount of time and I maintain the practice to this day, not as much but everyday! Good luck and I hope you feel better! Answered by Rosario Denault 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood thinner and will not cause your hair to fall out. The Lupus however does cause unusual hair loss. www.niams.noh.gov Answered by Fransisca Schlueter 2 years ago.

coumadin helps to thin the blood to avoid blood clots from the two sites I quickly read, it sounds like the lupus and the coumadin could be a cause. Take care and get well Answered by Isis Schwindt 2 years ago.

coumadin is a blood thinner, and I've never heard of someone losing their hair from it.. with lupus i guess it could attack your hair follicles but I've never seen it (my aunt has lupus so I've tried to research it a little) in all honesty, it's probably stress.. it's very common to lose hair when you are overly stress, or when you have had a surgery/long hospital stay (injury stresses the body, it's still stress, even if it's not mental stress) Answered by Elwanda Waddle 2 years ago.

Lupus is an autoimmune disorder, one of many. Another one is a low thyroid condition called Hashimoto's thyroiditis. I would have your doctor check for that as they often appear together but the latter gets overlooked because lupus is a bigger focus. Low thyroid will cause hair loss; in fact it's usually one of the first signs. Answered by Dalia Dimpson 2 years ago.

Warfarin (also known under the brand names of Coumadin®, Jantoven®, Marevan®, and Waran®) is an anticoagulant medication that is administered orally or, very rarely, by injection. It is used for the prophylaxis of thrombosis and embolism in many disorders. Its activity has to be monitored by frequent blood testing for the international normalized ratio (INR). It is named for the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. Warfarin is a synthetic derivative of coumarin, a chemical found naturally in many plants, notably woodruff (Galium odoratum, Rubiaceae), and at lower levels in licorice, lavender and various other species. Warfarin was originally developed as a rat poison, but it is no longer used for that purpose as modern poisons are much more potent and toxic (e.g. brodifacoum). However, warfarin and contemporary rodenticides belong to the same class of drugs (coumarins) and both decrease blood coagulation by interfering with vitamin K metabolism. Just be careful of using this drug and take a second openion. Answered by Danae Jeffreys 2 years ago.

Probably the Lupus but you need to see your Dr. right away. Answered by Maragaret Vicioso 2 years ago.

u would lose your hair if u were not eating right Answered by Alva Sekula 2 years ago.


What do I need to know about Coumadin and Lovenox?
I'm having a pulmonary vein isolation/ablation procedure in early March. I have never taken either of these. I am looking for personal accounts or advice that people who take or have taken either of these. I will be taking them for atrial fibrillation. Thank you. Asked by Arianna Eisenhart 2 years ago.

Coumadin and Lovenox are types of blood thinners commonly used in cases of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation can lead to blood clots forming in her heart which later can cause strokes so preventing these clots from forming is very important. Coumadin is an oral medicine which you will likely need to take every day. Your doctors, especially in the beginning, will need to check labs on you on a regular basis (your INR) and adjust the dose as necessary (an INR that's too high could put you at increased risk for bleeding complications, while if it's too low, it won't protect you from blood clots). Since it may take time before the correct dosage is achieved, many doctors will "bridge" patients with Lovenox until the INR level is therapeutic. Lovenox is a form of heparin that thins the blood immediately and thus protects you from blood clots while the coumadin dose is being adjusted to the proper dose. It has to be taken as a subcutaneous shot twice a day. Either you or a family member will be instructed on how to give these shots before you get discharged or visiting nurse services can be arranged to help you with them. Lovenox is temporary and will be stopped once the coumadin dosage is established. This is just a general overview and you should ask your doctor about how this will specifically apply to you. Good luck. Answered by Andrea Jarocki 2 years ago.

You should also expect some diet restrictions and changes, but the above answer is just about as good as its gonna get on here! great advice!! Answered by Allen Naschke 2 years ago.


What is the equivalency of asprin to coumadin?
Im currently taking Coumadin 4mg a day ans was wondering. Also if I was to run out of my Coumadin before getting a refill or another prescription for more. Asked by Ariel Bynes 2 years ago.

Coumadin does not need prescription.,,and its strongly recommended NOT to substitute it with other platelet inhibitor, such as aspirin, because they work in very different manners,....coumadin works at liver level, blocking the synthesis of prothrombine and antagonizing the effects of carboxylations of vitamin "K" which is the proper antidote against excessive dose (tablets normally contain 5 miligrans of Coumadin (Warfarin sodium)...and they can be obtained from your local pharmacist...without prescription. Aspirin wont help you, and will only compound matters, making your bleeding time longer,and working in a different manner. There is no real EQUIVALENCE of aspirin, as substitute for coumadin,,, Its my opinion that you should be checked and followed in your coumadin doses, by proper weekly or bi-weekly chacks on your prothrombine time (PT) which is the best guide to calculate your daily needs of coumadin... Good luck Answered by Oscar Finkler 2 years ago.

Coumadin thins your blood, you can only get with a prescription, so if the doctor put u in this med u shouldn't run out. Give the doc a call..........aspirin can b used 4 a lot of things. Answered by Herschel Nannini 2 years ago.

If your doctor has prescribed Coumadin, its really important to take this as directed and to have you PT / INR checked weekly... You do not want your blood too thick or too thin - make sure you have this checked out. I would not subsitute with Asprin, its not as strong as Coumadin. Answered by See Mccown 2 years ago.

there is no drug the same as coumidin.it is a rat poisin used in humans to improve circulation in the veins by thinning and keeping the blood flowing. it is very possible to bleed a lot during an injury while taking this medecine,be very careful with it Answered by Garnet Scritchfield 2 years ago.


Lovenox vs. Coumadin?
Well I was on birth control only because it was required in order to take accunate which caused it. Asked by Chana Holford 2 years ago.

Coumadin is an oral pill as previously mentioned however the clotting levels (INR) need to be monitored frequently to ensure that you are taking the proper dose. This requires frequent clinic visits for blood tests. Lovenox is an injection however it does not require strict monitoring like coumadin does. You need to sit down with your doctor and have him/her explain the risks and benefits of each drug so that you can make an informed decision. Since you are a minor your parents should be there and help you figure it out. Just curious as to what caused the blood clot as you are very young to have such a diagnosis. Answered by Lila Gabeline 2 years ago.

lovenox has to be injected, means poking yourself every day. coumadin is probably your better choice, it's a pill. Answered by Sunni Hajek 2 years ago.


Coumadin....?
I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his... Asked by Berniece Milota 2 years ago.

I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his blood. Could the discoloration be from the coumadin? Im worried about him, but I live in New york state and he lives in Florida. I cant have my husband talk to him, because my husband is deployed to Iraq... Does anyone know anything about this med? Answered by Marie Jaquith 2 years ago.

the coumadin can cause bruising and I would assume the discloration you are speaking of is possibly bleeding under the skin... he needs to be seen by his medical doctor so they can do a PT with INR (prothrombin time) on him to make sure that the coumadin dose is the proper one... if his PT is high, he may need to be readjusted... Has he recently changed his diet in any way... if so, it could have affected the way the medication is absorbing into his body...If he has any kind of home health agency seeing him, tell him to call them, and they can get an order to go to his house and draw blood, if not, he needs to call the doc asap for an appointment or either go to the ER if the discolorations become worse or seems to be getting larger... the feet being bright red could also be a circulation problem, among other things... good luck Answered by Lenita Kunstlinger 2 years ago.

He should head for the ER ASAP. I do not believe it is from the coumadin, this is not one of the listed side effects, but there is something brewing. Answered by Janie Dietzel 2 years ago.


I don't want to take coumadin anymore, and I'm looking for an herbal/natural supplement?
Yeah, I was reading that ginger, garlic, feverfew and tree ear mushrooms can reduce the amount of coumadin needed. And to the person that said depression......I said depressed where exactly? Asked by Mia Newbauer 2 years ago.

What is Coumadin? Coumadin (warfarin) is an anticoagulant (blood thinner). Coumadin reduces the formation of blood clots by blocking the formation of certain clotting factors. Coumadin is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and blood clots in veins and arteries. Coumadin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Important information about Coumadin: Coumadin can cause birth defects or fatal bleeding in an unborn baby. Do not use Coumadin if you are pregnant. Never take a double dose of this medication or take it together with other products that contain warfarin or coumarin. You should not take Coumadin if you have a bleeding or blood cell disorder, blood in your urine or stools, an infection of the lining of your heart, stomach bleeding, bleeding in the brain, recent or upcoming surgery, or if you need a spinal tap or spinal anesthesia (epidural). Coumadin may cause you to bleed more easily, especially if you have: a history of bleeding problems, high blood pressure or severe heart disease, kidney disease, cancer, surgery or a medical emergency, a disease affecting the blood vessels in your brain, a history of stomach or intestinal bleeding, if you are 65 or older, or if you are severely ill or debilitated. Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Any doctor, dentist, surgeon, or other medical care provider who treats you should know that you are taking Coumadin. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor What should I avoid while taking Coumadin? Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. This includes acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin, celecoxib (Celebrex), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Do not eat large amounts of foods high in vitamin K (such as liver, leafy green vegetables or vegetable oils). Vitamin K can make Coumadin less effective. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor. Avoid eating cranberries, drinking cranberry juice, or taking cranberry herbal products. Avoid herbal teas that contain tonka beans, sweet clover, or sweet woodruff. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Coumadin What other drugs will affect Coumadin? Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Coumadin can interact with certain herbal (botanical) products, which can increase your risk of bleeding. Do not use any of the following products without first asking your doctor: bromelains; coenzyme Q10; cranberry; danshen; dong quai; garlic; ginkgo biloba; ginseng; or St. John's wort. This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with Coumadin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you...... more With all said, Don't take herbs while coumadin is still in your system! Once you've been free of it and you withdrawed safely then it might be safe for you. Answered by Ashli Jui 2 years ago.

The problem with "natural" remedies is that they're not given the same oversight by the FDA that drugs are. Strength levels can vary widely, active ingredients may or may not be what is advertised on the container, and even the advertised benefits may or may not be real. If given a choice between natural remedies like herbal supplements and drugs, the drugs are actually far more likely to be effective. If I were you, I'd go to your doctor or your pharmacist to find out what possible alternatives are out there for you. Coumadin isn't a med you can just stop, significant and sometimes severe health implications can result. Answered by Joe Saltourides 2 years ago.

Ok. No one really likes to take Rat Poison on a regular basis. But in your case you have little choice. There is a reason you are on it, and no doctor just puts a person on coumadin for fun. Yes it sucks, and yes I know. Just do it. And see someone about the depression if you need to, 'cause it's the real issue. Answered by Ann Smeltzer 2 years ago.

Hi It can be done but it MUST be done in conjunction with your physician and a qualified natural health practitioner ... a qualified and experienced medical herbalist would actually be the best bet. There are some herbs that can help but I am not going to mention the names as I do not want anyone (not necessarily you) rushing off and trying this without proper supervision as their are risks involved in commencing one, and gradually weaning off the other and bearing in mind your monitoring of blood levels. I know this isn't probably what you wanted to hear, but I really do not think this is something that can be safely addressed at home, by the lay person without medical support. Answered by Cole Hooghkirk 2 years ago.

Just take the bloody Coumadin, unless you want your blood to turn solid Answered by Dulce Fogarty 2 years ago.

I am not a girly girl and I dress modestly and behave with morals and kindness. I am a jeans and t-shirt kinda girl. My mother tried to make me wear skirts and stuff but I always hated it, so it wasn't her that made me who I am today. I was always a tom boy and always will be. Wearing a dress, stocking, and high heels make me so uncomfortable. If it makes you feel good about yourself then go for it. Answered by Leroy Kalafarski 2 years ago.

I bet you are blood type A.Type A is the thickest blood.Eat for your blood type.Eating animal protein makes the blood thicker.Ginko biloba and garlic are natural blood thinners.Vit K clots the blood,should you cut yourself or have uncontrolable bleeding. Answered by Etta Bitto 2 years ago.


What is the usual dose of coumadin?
The doctor always gives me the results ,they just take ages to arrive at his office. Asked by Noah Pletsch 2 years ago.

I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find out how much I have. Are there any other drugs I can take which would be less hassle and just as safe if not better? P.S. most people I know who are older and have had worse problems than me are on a much lower dose than I am. I dont feel I can talk to my doctor like I used to and am wondering if I should try a new specialist or get a second opinion. Answered by Eusebia Belinski 2 years ago.

The dose of Coumadin varies and is determined by lab tests known as the protime (PT) and INR. PT/INR is a blood test that evaluate how thin blood is. The average dose of Coumadin in my experience is around 5 mg daily. I have seen doses as high as 30 mg and as low as 0.5 mg. The variation in dosing is related to differences in metabolism and intake of Vitamin K. A dose of 7 mg is actually very common and nothing to worry about. Do not be concerned with the doses of others you know, because everyone is different. You just need a higher dose than them to get you in the right PT/INR range. As a patient you have the right to access the results of your lab tests. I would recommend that you ask your doctor or clinic nurse for the results directly. Most doctors are happy to provide this information. I personally would have no problem providing this information to my patients. Just for your information, the INR should be 2-3 for most indications. In regards to alternative medications, it depends on your indication for Coumadin. Currently there is no oral medication that is similar to Coumadin. The medications that are similar to Coumadin that are currently available are available only IV or by subcutaneous injection once or twice daily. Most people are not interested in taking a subcutaneous injection and would prefer to stick with Coumadin. The alternative medications are also more expensive. These alternatives include Lovenox and Fondaparinux. There is an oral medication like Coumadin that is awaiting FDA approval, but it will only be approved for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It will likely have further indications like Coumadin, but it will likely take years to be approved. If you would like to have a second opinion, then you have the right to this. I am not sure of what your indication is for using Coumadin. If you could provide this information, then I would be able to answer your question better. It sounds like your doctor is taking appropriate care of you unless I am missing something. Good luck. Answered by Delma Centano 2 years ago.

There is no "usual" dose of Coumadin. Coumadin must be carefully monitored and titrated to each individual. Depending upon why you are on the Coumadin in the first place, your INR should be anywhere from 2.0 - 3.5. Again, this depends on the condition. There is no reason you cannot see the results of your blood tests. Your doctor can and should be sharing this information with you. Ask. You have the right to see your test results. If your doctor, for whatever reason, won't show you your INR result, then you need to consider finding a new healthcare provider! Unfortunately, there is no good substitute for Coumadin at this time. By the way, although there is no "usual" dose of Coumadin, I do see a lot of patients who take it and 7 mg is fairly average - I've seen people on much higher doses. Answered by Rena Denhartog 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dose Answered by Terra Paganini 2 years ago.

RE: What is the usual dose of coumadin? I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find... Answered by Sharen Provine 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dosage Answered by Taylor Tillie 2 years ago.

Just to give you some hope... there are a couple drugs approved in other countries right now that are being worked on for approval here in the US that would not require the monitoring that Coumadin does. Yay! Answered by Elicia Chegwidden 2 years ago.

Second Opinion! Answered by Alaine Quiles 2 years ago.

Depends on your protime. Answered by Charlesetta Areias 2 years ago.


Those who take COUMADIN, what kind of Diet should have?
Asked by Genevie Pascascio 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood-thinning medication that helps treat and prevent blood clots. Certain foods can impair its effects. For this reason, it's important to pay attention to your diet while taking this medication. The main dietary concern related to taking Coumadin has to do with the amount of vitamin K in your diet. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Coumadin works to reduce clotting by diminishing the activity of vitamin K. Eating large amounts of vitamin K can counteract the benefits of this drug. Some doctors recommend a low-vitamin K diet for people taking Coumadin. But the key is to be consistent about how much vitamin K you consume on a daily basis. Limit or avoid foods that are high in vitamin K, such as: Kale Spinach Broccoli Turnip greens Collards Swiss chard Parsley Mustard greens Soybean & Cannola Oils (limit) The following is a partial list of foods that contain medium (M) to high (H) levels of vitamin K: FATS AND DRESSINGS Margarine M Mayonnaise H Soybean, canola, and salad oils H Olive oil M VEGETABLES Asparagus M Avocado M Broccoli H Brussels sprouts H Cabbage H Cabbage, red M Collard greens H Endive (raw) H Green scallion (raw) H Kale leaf (raw) H Lettuce, bibb, red leaf (raw) H Lettuce, iceberg (raw) M Mustard greens (raw) H Parsley H Peas, green (cooked) M Spinach leaf (raw) H Turning greens (raw) H Watercress (raw) H CONDIMENT Dill pickle M In addition to foods containing vitamin K, certain beverages can increase the effect of Coumadin, leading to bleeding problems: Cranberry juice Alcohol If you take Coumadin, eat a sensible diet. Talk to your doctor before making any major changes in your diet. If you are unable to eat for several days or have persistent stomach upset, diarrhea or fever, consult your doctor. He or she may need to adjust your dose. In addition, several medications and dietary supplements can affect the way Coumadin works in your body. For example, there's evidence that vitamin E has blood-thinning effects and may increase your risk of bleeding. Tell your doctor before taking any new medications, including herbal supplements and over-the-counter remedies. Other supplements and herbal medications known to affect Coumadin include: Arnica Bilberry Butcher's broom Cat's claw Dong quai Feverfew Forskolin Garlic Ginger Ginkgo Horse chestnut Inositol Licorice Melilot (sweet clover) Pau d'arco Red clover St. John's wort Sweet woodruff Turmeric Willow bark Wheatgrass Additional supplements that can interact with Coumadin:: Fish oil and omega-3 supplements Vitamin K Bromelains Coenzyme Q10 (ubidecarenone) Cranberry extracts Danshen Ginseng Also, you should avoid taking aspirin and frequent or high doses of acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), which can increase the effects of Coumadin and cause bleeding problems. Certain antibiotics also can interfere with the effect of this drug, so be sure to check with your doctor before starting a new antibiotic. Drugs that can interact with Coumadin include: Aspirin or aspirin-containing products Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve) Tylenol or acetaminophen-containing products, especially when the dose of acetaminophen exceeds 1,500 milligrams a day Many antibiotics Heparin Cold or allergy medicines Birth control pills Medications that treat abnormal heart rhythms, such as amiodarone Hope this info helps answer your question. My grandmother takes this and has not had any problems. Always doublecheck any medicines you take while on Coumadin with both your doctor & Pharmacist to be safest. I would also advise wearing a medical ID bracelet or carry info in your wallet about the fact that you are on this drug, in case of an emergency. Answered by Retha Albe 2 years ago.

coumadin kind diet Answered by Athena Donahey 2 years ago.

If you are going to eat salad, then eat the same sized salad every day. Don't skip a day and make sure it's the same size each day. Don't take supplements with vitamin k. Answered by Victoria Alvarran 2 years ago.

i dk. but be careful. my grandfather used to take coumadin it thinned out his bood sooooo much. it was unbelivable how much he bled and how often he bled. Answered by Emory Vandergriend 2 years ago.

what about purple cabbage, yellow, or green peppers, sunflower oil, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, olives, and Echinacea drops on a base of alcohol? thank you for your answers. Answered by Isabel Sabota 2 years ago.


Coumadin????
alright, so i dont take another test until this wednesday, one day? that would effect my test results? Asked by Loreen Sonstroem 2 years ago.

Coumadin reaches full therapeutic impact fairly quickly. By inhibiting vitamin K-mediated clotting, if you stop taking the drug then its effect disappear as it is removed from you body (as opposed to actual blood thinners). How long it takes to get out of your system depends on the dose you were taking. Generally, levels drop below theraputic concentrations within 3-4 days for normal people. Drinking more water and having a healthy liver increase this rate. Missing one dose is not likely to have a serious impact on the drug efficacy. You SHOULD NOT take a double dose the next time and keep your normal schedule. The hospital and your doctor should be advised that you are on this medication. Small internal hemorrhages from your accident may be difficult to control while on coumadin. If your belly become painful, swollen, or you notice large patches of blue/black skin, you should seek medical attention. I hope this answers your question. Answered by Mitchel Warner 2 years ago.

If you are saying that you got into a car accident while you were taking Coumadin, you should have told anyone who treated you after that accident that you were on it. If the danger of bleeding is greater than the danger of whatever it is that you're taking the Coumadin for, they would have stopped it (and checked you for bleeding). If you were in a car accident, are on Coumadin, and you have NOT been seen by a medical professional, you need to see one immediately. Please. You should neither assume that everything is all right nor stop taking your anticoagulants without medical advice. Answered by Gala Whitely 2 years ago.

you need to make sure to stay on and take what the doctor said. as it affects how the tests read. Answered by Janiece Buch 2 years ago.


Is anyone familiar with coumadin?
I'm on coumadin for Pulmonary Emboli and I've been loosing a lot of hair only I was also diagnosed with lupus but the doctors weren't 100 % sure if I really have lupus could my losing my hair be from the medication or the lupus? Asked by Malena Cardelli 2 years ago.

coumadin is an anticoagulant, that is "blood thinner" for people that don't speak fluent doctor. The close monitoring of a person taking it is critical as the blood becomes thin so does your ability to not clot, which could cause a domino of other problems if you had an injury or needed emergency surgery. Prothombin times should be done weekly or more to evaluate your bloods clotting factor. The effects of the coumadin or its treatment does not consider the Lupus. Lupus, or mixed conective tissue disease is usually associated with a person that has RA, Rheumatoid Arthritis, your hair loss may be a side effect of the medicatons, stress, or even the illness you experienced or are currently experiencing. The best thing that you can do to heal your body would be a diet high protien and vitamin C these two things combined heal our bodies. The fact that you are recovering from such an ordeal would indicate that you need very high level because your not only compensating for the illness you need to maintain your normal levels. When I had a significant injury and surgery, I started to drink protien drinks which contained 20-24 grams of protien each, I drank 4-6 a day. I also would take 3-4 oranges and squeeze them in a juicer, this would give me a fairly large glass of juice which is like liquid sunshine, I felt better in a shorter amount of time and I maintain the practice to this day, not as much but everyday! Good luck and I hope you feel better! Answered by Ileen Moulder 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood thinner and will not cause your hair to fall out. The Lupus however does cause unusual hair loss. www.niams.noh.gov Answered by Dwight Pezzuti 2 years ago.

coumadin helps to thin the blood to avoid blood clots from the two sites I quickly read, it sounds like the lupus and the coumadin could be a cause. Take care and get well Answered by Elisabeth Odermott 2 years ago.

coumadin is a blood thinner, and I've never heard of someone losing their hair from it.. with lupus i guess it could attack your hair follicles but I've never seen it (my aunt has lupus so I've tried to research it a little) in all honesty, it's probably stress.. it's very common to lose hair when you are overly stress, or when you have had a surgery/long hospital stay (injury stresses the body, it's still stress, even if it's not mental stress) Answered by Kim Wadden 2 years ago.

Lupus is an autoimmune disorder, one of many. Another one is a low thyroid condition called Hashimoto's thyroiditis. I would have your doctor check for that as they often appear together but the latter gets overlooked because lupus is a bigger focus. Low thyroid will cause hair loss; in fact it's usually one of the first signs. Answered by Jamey Graue 2 years ago.

Warfarin (also known under the brand names of Coumadin®, Jantoven®, Marevan®, and Waran®) is an anticoagulant medication that is administered orally or, very rarely, by injection. It is used for the prophylaxis of thrombosis and embolism in many disorders. Its activity has to be monitored by frequent blood testing for the international normalized ratio (INR). It is named for the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. Warfarin is a synthetic derivative of coumarin, a chemical found naturally in many plants, notably woodruff (Galium odoratum, Rubiaceae), and at lower levels in licorice, lavender and various other species. Warfarin was originally developed as a rat poison, but it is no longer used for that purpose as modern poisons are much more potent and toxic (e.g. brodifacoum). However, warfarin and contemporary rodenticides belong to the same class of drugs (coumarins) and both decrease blood coagulation by interfering with vitamin K metabolism. Just be careful of using this drug and take a second openion. Answered by Amira Petiet 2 years ago.

Probably the Lupus but you need to see your Dr. right away. Answered by Layne Heathershaw 2 years ago.

u would lose your hair if u were not eating right Answered by Delfina Pudlinski 2 years ago.


What do I need to know about Coumadin and Lovenox?
I'm having a pulmonary vein isolation/ablation procedure in early March. I have never taken either of these. I am looking for personal accounts or advice that people who take or have taken either of these. I will be taking them for atrial fibrillation. Thank you. Asked by Cristen Compeau 2 years ago.

Coumadin and Lovenox are types of blood thinners commonly used in cases of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation can lead to blood clots forming in her heart which later can cause strokes so preventing these clots from forming is very important. Coumadin is an oral medicine which you will likely need to take every day. Your doctors, especially in the beginning, will need to check labs on you on a regular basis (your INR) and adjust the dose as necessary (an INR that's too high could put you at increased risk for bleeding complications, while if it's too low, it won't protect you from blood clots). Since it may take time before the correct dosage is achieved, many doctors will "bridge" patients with Lovenox until the INR level is therapeutic. Lovenox is a form of heparin that thins the blood immediately and thus protects you from blood clots while the coumadin dose is being adjusted to the proper dose. It has to be taken as a subcutaneous shot twice a day. Either you or a family member will be instructed on how to give these shots before you get discharged or visiting nurse services can be arranged to help you with them. Lovenox is temporary and will be stopped once the coumadin dosage is established. This is just a general overview and you should ask your doctor about how this will specifically apply to you. Good luck. Answered by Gisele Mckesson 2 years ago.

You should also expect some diet restrictions and changes, but the above answer is just about as good as its gonna get on here! great advice!! Answered by Jeni Moschetti 2 years ago.


What is the equivalency of asprin to coumadin?
Im currently taking Coumadin 4mg a day ans was wondering. Also if I was to run out of my Coumadin before getting a refill or another prescription for more. Asked by Eddy Leehy 2 years ago.

Coumadin does not need prescription.,,and its strongly recommended NOT to substitute it with other platelet inhibitor, such as aspirin, because they work in very different manners,....coumadin works at liver level, blocking the synthesis of prothrombine and antagonizing the effects of carboxylations of vitamin "K" which is the proper antidote against excessive dose (tablets normally contain 5 miligrans of Coumadin (Warfarin sodium)...and they can be obtained from your local pharmacist...without prescription. Aspirin wont help you, and will only compound matters, making your bleeding time longer,and working in a different manner. There is no real EQUIVALENCE of aspirin, as substitute for coumadin,,, Its my opinion that you should be checked and followed in your coumadin doses, by proper weekly or bi-weekly chacks on your prothrombine time (PT) which is the best guide to calculate your daily needs of coumadin... Good luck Answered by Tawny Hird 2 years ago.

Coumadin thins your blood, you can only get with a prescription, so if the doctor put u in this med u shouldn't run out. Give the doc a call..........aspirin can b used 4 a lot of things. Answered by Lita Amr 2 years ago.

If your doctor has prescribed Coumadin, its really important to take this as directed and to have you PT / INR checked weekly... You do not want your blood too thick or too thin - make sure you have this checked out. I would not subsitute with Asprin, its not as strong as Coumadin. Answered by Heide Beauford 2 years ago.

there is no drug the same as coumidin.it is a rat poisin used in humans to improve circulation in the veins by thinning and keeping the blood flowing. it is very possible to bleed a lot during an injury while taking this medecine,be very careful with it Answered by Agatha Depperschmidt 2 years ago.


Lovenox vs. Coumadin?
Well I was on birth control only because it was required in order to take accunate which caused it. Asked by Gus Matson 2 years ago.

Coumadin is an oral pill as previously mentioned however the clotting levels (INR) need to be monitored frequently to ensure that you are taking the proper dose. This requires frequent clinic visits for blood tests. Lovenox is an injection however it does not require strict monitoring like coumadin does. You need to sit down with your doctor and have him/her explain the risks and benefits of each drug so that you can make an informed decision. Since you are a minor your parents should be there and help you figure it out. Just curious as to what caused the blood clot as you are very young to have such a diagnosis. Answered by Darrell Colonna 2 years ago.

lovenox has to be injected, means poking yourself every day. coumadin is probably your better choice, it's a pill. Answered by Russell Demro 2 years ago.


Coumadin....?
I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his... Asked by Keli Peppers 2 years ago.

I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his blood. Could the discoloration be from the coumadin? Im worried about him, but I live in New york state and he lives in Florida. I cant have my husband talk to him, because my husband is deployed to Iraq... Does anyone know anything about this med? Answered by Earle Aguiler 2 years ago.

the coumadin can cause bruising and I would assume the discloration you are speaking of is possibly bleeding under the skin... he needs to be seen by his medical doctor so they can do a PT with INR (prothrombin time) on him to make sure that the coumadin dose is the proper one... if his PT is high, he may need to be readjusted... Has he recently changed his diet in any way... if so, it could have affected the way the medication is absorbing into his body...If he has any kind of home health agency seeing him, tell him to call them, and they can get an order to go to his house and draw blood, if not, he needs to call the doc asap for an appointment or either go to the ER if the discolorations become worse or seems to be getting larger... the feet being bright red could also be a circulation problem, among other things... good luck Answered by Shaun Danella 2 years ago.

He should head for the ER ASAP. I do not believe it is from the coumadin, this is not one of the listed side effects, but there is something brewing. Answered by Rusty Brazler 2 years ago.


I don't want to take coumadin anymore, and I'm looking for an herbal/natural supplement?
Yeah, I was reading that ginger, garlic, feverfew and tree ear mushrooms can reduce the amount of coumadin needed. And to the person that said depression......I said depressed where exactly? Asked by Nu Smitty 2 years ago.

What is Coumadin? Coumadin (warfarin) is an anticoagulant (blood thinner). Coumadin reduces the formation of blood clots by blocking the formation of certain clotting factors. Coumadin is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and blood clots in veins and arteries. Coumadin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Important information about Coumadin: Coumadin can cause birth defects or fatal bleeding in an unborn baby. Do not use Coumadin if you are pregnant. Never take a double dose of this medication or take it together with other products that contain warfarin or coumarin. You should not take Coumadin if you have a bleeding or blood cell disorder, blood in your urine or stools, an infection of the lining of your heart, stomach bleeding, bleeding in the brain, recent or upcoming surgery, or if you need a spinal tap or spinal anesthesia (epidural). Coumadin may cause you to bleed more easily, especially if you have: a history of bleeding problems, high blood pressure or severe heart disease, kidney disease, cancer, surgery or a medical emergency, a disease affecting the blood vessels in your brain, a history of stomach or intestinal bleeding, if you are 65 or older, or if you are severely ill or debilitated. Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Any doctor, dentist, surgeon, or other medical care provider who treats you should know that you are taking Coumadin. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor What should I avoid while taking Coumadin? Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. This includes acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin, celecoxib (Celebrex), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Do not eat large amounts of foods high in vitamin K (such as liver, leafy green vegetables or vegetable oils). Vitamin K can make Coumadin less effective. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor. Avoid eating cranberries, drinking cranberry juice, or taking cranberry herbal products. Avoid herbal teas that contain tonka beans, sweet clover, or sweet woodruff. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Coumadin What other drugs will affect Coumadin? Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Coumadin can interact with certain herbal (botanical) products, which can increase your risk of bleeding. Do not use any of the following products without first asking your doctor: bromelains; coenzyme Q10; cranberry; danshen; dong quai; garlic; ginkgo biloba; ginseng; or St. John's wort. This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with Coumadin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you...... more With all said, Don't take herbs while coumadin is still in your system! Once you've been free of it and you withdrawed safely then it might be safe for you. Answered by Floy Beidler 2 years ago.

The problem with "natural" remedies is that they're not given the same oversight by the FDA that drugs are. Strength levels can vary widely, active ingredients may or may not be what is advertised on the container, and even the advertised benefits may or may not be real. If given a choice between natural remedies like herbal supplements and drugs, the drugs are actually far more likely to be effective. If I were you, I'd go to your doctor or your pharmacist to find out what possible alternatives are out there for you. Coumadin isn't a med you can just stop, significant and sometimes severe health implications can result. Answered by Sparkle Bernacki 2 years ago.

Ok. No one really likes to take Rat Poison on a regular basis. But in your case you have little choice. There is a reason you are on it, and no doctor just puts a person on coumadin for fun. Yes it sucks, and yes I know. Just do it. And see someone about the depression if you need to, 'cause it's the real issue. Answered by Laurence Gladle 2 years ago.

Hi It can be done but it MUST be done in conjunction with your physician and a qualified natural health practitioner ... a qualified and experienced medical herbalist would actually be the best bet. There are some herbs that can help but I am not going to mention the names as I do not want anyone (not necessarily you) rushing off and trying this without proper supervision as their are risks involved in commencing one, and gradually weaning off the other and bearing in mind your monitoring of blood levels. I know this isn't probably what you wanted to hear, but I really do not think this is something that can be safely addressed at home, by the lay person without medical support. Answered by Lourie Machon 2 years ago.

Just take the bloody Coumadin, unless you want your blood to turn solid Answered by Ethan Gyatso 2 years ago.

I am not a girly girl and I dress modestly and behave with morals and kindness. I am a jeans and t-shirt kinda girl. My mother tried to make me wear skirts and stuff but I always hated it, so it wasn't her that made me who I am today. I was always a tom boy and always will be. Wearing a dress, stocking, and high heels make me so uncomfortable. If it makes you feel good about yourself then go for it. Answered by Codi Raisley 2 years ago.

I bet you are blood type A.Type A is the thickest blood.Eat for your blood type.Eating animal protein makes the blood thicker.Ginko biloba and garlic are natural blood thinners.Vit K clots the blood,should you cut yourself or have uncontrolable bleeding. Answered by Mark Yorio 2 years ago.


What is the usual dose of coumadin?
The doctor always gives me the results ,they just take ages to arrive at his office. Asked by Rossana Greening 2 years ago.

I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find out how much I have. Are there any other drugs I can take which would be less hassle and just as safe if not better? P.S. most people I know who are older and have had worse problems than me are on a much lower dose than I am. I dont feel I can talk to my doctor like I used to and am wondering if I should try a new specialist or get a second opinion. Answered by Yasmine Nute 2 years ago.

The dose of Coumadin varies and is determined by lab tests known as the protime (PT) and INR. PT/INR is a blood test that evaluate how thin blood is. The average dose of Coumadin in my experience is around 5 mg daily. I have seen doses as high as 30 mg and as low as 0.5 mg. The variation in dosing is related to differences in metabolism and intake of Vitamin K. A dose of 7 mg is actually very common and nothing to worry about. Do not be concerned with the doses of others you know, because everyone is different. You just need a higher dose than them to get you in the right PT/INR range. As a patient you have the right to access the results of your lab tests. I would recommend that you ask your doctor or clinic nurse for the results directly. Most doctors are happy to provide this information. I personally would have no problem providing this information to my patients. Just for your information, the INR should be 2-3 for most indications. In regards to alternative medications, it depends on your indication for Coumadin. Currently there is no oral medication that is similar to Coumadin. The medications that are similar to Coumadin that are currently available are available only IV or by subcutaneous injection once or twice daily. Most people are not interested in taking a subcutaneous injection and would prefer to stick with Coumadin. The alternative medications are also more expensive. These alternatives include Lovenox and Fondaparinux. There is an oral medication like Coumadin that is awaiting FDA approval, but it will only be approved for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It will likely have further indications like Coumadin, but it will likely take years to be approved. If you would like to have a second opinion, then you have the right to this. I am not sure of what your indication is for using Coumadin. If you could provide this information, then I would be able to answer your question better. It sounds like your doctor is taking appropriate care of you unless I am missing something. Good luck. Answered by Marla Chaddick 2 years ago.

There is no "usual" dose of Coumadin. Coumadin must be carefully monitored and titrated to each individual. Depending upon why you are on the Coumadin in the first place, your INR should be anywhere from 2.0 - 3.5. Again, this depends on the condition. There is no reason you cannot see the results of your blood tests. Your doctor can and should be sharing this information with you. Ask. You have the right to see your test results. If your doctor, for whatever reason, won't show you your INR result, then you need to consider finding a new healthcare provider! Unfortunately, there is no good substitute for Coumadin at this time. By the way, although there is no "usual" dose of Coumadin, I do see a lot of patients who take it and 7 mg is fairly average - I've seen people on much higher doses. Answered by Fernando Kornman 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dose Answered by Antonia Grisso 2 years ago.

RE: What is the usual dose of coumadin? I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find... Answered by Adele Timbs 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dosage Answered by Joya Lacovara 2 years ago.

Just to give you some hope... there are a couple drugs approved in other countries right now that are being worked on for approval here in the US that would not require the monitoring that Coumadin does. Yay! Answered by Brandon Schrecengost 2 years ago.

Second Opinion! Answered by Verena Wodskow 2 years ago.

Depends on your protime. Answered by Herta Mormino 2 years ago.


Those who take COUMADIN, what kind of Diet should have?
Asked by Kim Sigworth 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood-thinning medication that helps treat and prevent blood clots. Certain foods can impair its effects. For this reason, it's important to pay attention to your diet while taking this medication. The main dietary concern related to taking Coumadin has to do with the amount of vitamin K in your diet. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Coumadin works to reduce clotting by diminishing the activity of vitamin K. Eating large amounts of vitamin K can counteract the benefits of this drug. Some doctors recommend a low-vitamin K diet for people taking Coumadin. But the key is to be consistent about how much vitamin K you consume on a daily basis. Limit or avoid foods that are high in vitamin K, such as: Kale Spinach Broccoli Turnip greens Collards Swiss chard Parsley Mustard greens Soybean & Cannola Oils (limit) The following is a partial list of foods that contain medium (M) to high (H) levels of vitamin K: FATS AND DRESSINGS Margarine M Mayonnaise H Soybean, canola, and salad oils H Olive oil M VEGETABLES Asparagus M Avocado M Broccoli H Brussels sprouts H Cabbage H Cabbage, red M Collard greens H Endive (raw) H Green scallion (raw) H Kale leaf (raw) H Lettuce, bibb, red leaf (raw) H Lettuce, iceberg (raw) M Mustard greens (raw) H Parsley H Peas, green (cooked) M Spinach leaf (raw) H Turning greens (raw) H Watercress (raw) H CONDIMENT Dill pickle M In addition to foods containing vitamin K, certain beverages can increase the effect of Coumadin, leading to bleeding problems: Cranberry juice Alcohol If you take Coumadin, eat a sensible diet. Talk to your doctor before making any major changes in your diet. If you are unable to eat for several days or have persistent stomach upset, diarrhea or fever, consult your doctor. He or she may need to adjust your dose. In addition, several medications and dietary supplements can affect the way Coumadin works in your body. For example, there's evidence that vitamin E has blood-thinning effects and may increase your risk of bleeding. Tell your doctor before taking any new medications, including herbal supplements and over-the-counter remedies. Other supplements and herbal medications known to affect Coumadin include: Arnica Bilberry Butcher's broom Cat's claw Dong quai Feverfew Forskolin Garlic Ginger Ginkgo Horse chestnut Inositol Licorice Melilot (sweet clover) Pau d'arco Red clover St. John's wort Sweet woodruff Turmeric Willow bark Wheatgrass Additional supplements that can interact with Coumadin:: Fish oil and omega-3 supplements Vitamin K Bromelains Coenzyme Q10 (ubidecarenone) Cranberry extracts Danshen Ginseng Also, you should avoid taking aspirin and frequent or high doses of acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), which can increase the effects of Coumadin and cause bleeding problems. Certain antibiotics also can interfere with the effect of this drug, so be sure to check with your doctor before starting a new antibiotic. Drugs that can interact with Coumadin include: Aspirin or aspirin-containing products Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve) Tylenol or acetaminophen-containing products, especially when the dose of acetaminophen exceeds 1,500 milligrams a day Many antibiotics Heparin Cold or allergy medicines Birth control pills Medications that treat abnormal heart rhythms, such as amiodarone Hope this info helps answer your question. My grandmother takes this and has not had any problems. Always doublecheck any medicines you take while on Coumadin with both your doctor & Pharmacist to be safest. I would also advise wearing a medical ID bracelet or carry info in your wallet about the fact that you are on this drug, in case of an emergency. Answered by Jere Go 2 years ago.

coumadin kind diet Answered by Claude Worman 2 years ago.

If you are going to eat salad, then eat the same sized salad every day. Don't skip a day and make sure it's the same size each day. Don't take supplements with vitamin k. Answered by Louvenia Frandsen 2 years ago.

i dk. but be careful. my grandfather used to take coumadin it thinned out his bood sooooo much. it was unbelivable how much he bled and how often he bled. Answered by Barb Groetken 2 years ago.

what about purple cabbage, yellow, or green peppers, sunflower oil, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, olives, and Echinacea drops on a base of alcohol? thank you for your answers. Answered by Marco Guethle 2 years ago.


Coumadin????
alright, so i dont take another test until this wednesday, one day? that would effect my test results? Asked by Polly Betterley 2 years ago.

Coumadin reaches full therapeutic impact fairly quickly. By inhibiting vitamin K-mediated clotting, if you stop taking the drug then its effect disappear as it is removed from you body (as opposed to actual blood thinners). How long it takes to get out of your system depends on the dose you were taking. Generally, levels drop below theraputic concentrations within 3-4 days for normal people. Drinking more water and having a healthy liver increase this rate. Missing one dose is not likely to have a serious impact on the drug efficacy. You SHOULD NOT take a double dose the next time and keep your normal schedule. The hospital and your doctor should be advised that you are on this medication. Small internal hemorrhages from your accident may be difficult to control while on coumadin. If your belly become painful, swollen, or you notice large patches of blue/black skin, you should seek medical attention. I hope this answers your question. Answered by Twila Vanderwyk 2 years ago.

If you are saying that you got into a car accident while you were taking Coumadin, you should have told anyone who treated you after that accident that you were on it. If the danger of bleeding is greater than the danger of whatever it is that you're taking the Coumadin for, they would have stopped it (and checked you for bleeding). If you were in a car accident, are on Coumadin, and you have NOT been seen by a medical professional, you need to see one immediately. Please. You should neither assume that everything is all right nor stop taking your anticoagulants without medical advice. Answered by Ollie Tannenbaum 2 years ago.

you need to make sure to stay on and take what the doctor said. as it affects how the tests read. Answered by Dorie Emilio 2 years ago.


Is anyone familiar with coumadin?
I'm on coumadin for Pulmonary Emboli and I've been loosing a lot of hair only I was also diagnosed with lupus but the doctors weren't 100 % sure if I really have lupus could my losing my hair be from the medication or the lupus? Asked by Gisela Jahnke 2 years ago.

coumadin is an anticoagulant, that is "blood thinner" for people that don't speak fluent doctor. The close monitoring of a person taking it is critical as the blood becomes thin so does your ability to not clot, which could cause a domino of other problems if you had an injury or needed emergency surgery. Prothombin times should be done weekly or more to evaluate your bloods clotting factor. The effects of the coumadin or its treatment does not consider the Lupus. Lupus, or mixed conective tissue disease is usually associated with a person that has RA, Rheumatoid Arthritis, your hair loss may be a side effect of the medicatons, stress, or even the illness you experienced or are currently experiencing. The best thing that you can do to heal your body would be a diet high protien and vitamin C these two things combined heal our bodies. The fact that you are recovering from such an ordeal would indicate that you need very high level because your not only compensating for the illness you need to maintain your normal levels. When I had a significant injury and surgery, I started to drink protien drinks which contained 20-24 grams of protien each, I drank 4-6 a day. I also would take 3-4 oranges and squeeze them in a juicer, this would give me a fairly large glass of juice which is like liquid sunshine, I felt better in a shorter amount of time and I maintain the practice to this day, not as much but everyday! Good luck and I hope you feel better! Answered by Bonny Lechner 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood thinner and will not cause your hair to fall out. The Lupus however does cause unusual hair loss. www.niams.noh.gov Answered by Betty Penman 2 years ago.

coumadin helps to thin the blood to avoid blood clots from the two sites I quickly read, it sounds like the lupus and the coumadin could be a cause. Take care and get well Answered by Desmond Feger 2 years ago.

coumadin is a blood thinner, and I've never heard of someone losing their hair from it.. with lupus i guess it could attack your hair follicles but I've never seen it (my aunt has lupus so I've tried to research it a little) in all honesty, it's probably stress.. it's very common to lose hair when you are overly stress, or when you have had a surgery/long hospital stay (injury stresses the body, it's still stress, even if it's not mental stress) Answered by Shena Guitierrez 2 years ago.

Lupus is an autoimmune disorder, one of many. Another one is a low thyroid condition called Hashimoto's thyroiditis. I would have your doctor check for that as they often appear together but the latter gets overlooked because lupus is a bigger focus. Low thyroid will cause hair loss; in fact it's usually one of the first signs. Answered by Sari Yerkes 2 years ago.

Warfarin (also known under the brand names of Coumadin®, Jantoven®, Marevan®, and Waran®) is an anticoagulant medication that is administered orally or, very rarely, by injection. It is used for the prophylaxis of thrombosis and embolism in many disorders. Its activity has to be monitored by frequent blood testing for the international normalized ratio (INR). It is named for the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. Warfarin is a synthetic derivative of coumarin, a chemical found naturally in many plants, notably woodruff (Galium odoratum, Rubiaceae), and at lower levels in licorice, lavender and various other species. Warfarin was originally developed as a rat poison, but it is no longer used for that purpose as modern poisons are much more potent and toxic (e.g. brodifacoum). However, warfarin and contemporary rodenticides belong to the same class of drugs (coumarins) and both decrease blood coagulation by interfering with vitamin K metabolism. Just be careful of using this drug and take a second openion. Answered by Moriah Lancour 2 years ago.

Probably the Lupus but you need to see your Dr. right away. Answered by Arlena Kadis 2 years ago.

u would lose your hair if u were not eating right Answered by Deanne Connerley 2 years ago.


What do I need to know about Coumadin and Lovenox?
I'm having a pulmonary vein isolation/ablation procedure in early March. I have never taken either of these. I am looking for personal accounts or advice that people who take or have taken either of these. I will be taking them for atrial fibrillation. Thank you. Asked by Lawanda Beaumont 2 years ago.

Coumadin and Lovenox are types of blood thinners commonly used in cases of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation can lead to blood clots forming in her heart which later can cause strokes so preventing these clots from forming is very important. Coumadin is an oral medicine which you will likely need to take every day. Your doctors, especially in the beginning, will need to check labs on you on a regular basis (your INR) and adjust the dose as necessary (an INR that's too high could put you at increased risk for bleeding complications, while if it's too low, it won't protect you from blood clots). Since it may take time before the correct dosage is achieved, many doctors will "bridge" patients with Lovenox until the INR level is therapeutic. Lovenox is a form of heparin that thins the blood immediately and thus protects you from blood clots while the coumadin dose is being adjusted to the proper dose. It has to be taken as a subcutaneous shot twice a day. Either you or a family member will be instructed on how to give these shots before you get discharged or visiting nurse services can be arranged to help you with them. Lovenox is temporary and will be stopped once the coumadin dosage is established. This is just a general overview and you should ask your doctor about how this will specifically apply to you. Good luck. Answered by Signe Fraint 2 years ago.

You should also expect some diet restrictions and changes, but the above answer is just about as good as its gonna get on here! great advice!! Answered by Erin Zirkind 2 years ago.


What is the equivalency of asprin to coumadin?
Im currently taking Coumadin 4mg a day ans was wondering. Also if I was to run out of my Coumadin before getting a refill or another prescription for more. Asked by Jerald Minder 2 years ago.

Coumadin does not need prescription.,,and its strongly recommended NOT to substitute it with other platelet inhibitor, such as aspirin, because they work in very different manners,....coumadin works at liver level, blocking the synthesis of prothrombine and antagonizing the effects of carboxylations of vitamin "K" which is the proper antidote against excessive dose (tablets normally contain 5 miligrans of Coumadin (Warfarin sodium)...and they can be obtained from your local pharmacist...without prescription. Aspirin wont help you, and will only compound matters, making your bleeding time longer,and working in a different manner. There is no real EQUIVALENCE of aspirin, as substitute for coumadin,,, Its my opinion that you should be checked and followed in your coumadin doses, by proper weekly or bi-weekly chacks on your prothrombine time (PT) which is the best guide to calculate your daily needs of coumadin... Good luck Answered by Olga Faraone 2 years ago.

Coumadin thins your blood, you can only get with a prescription, so if the doctor put u in this med u shouldn't run out. Give the doc a call..........aspirin can b used 4 a lot of things. Answered by Ronald Myking 2 years ago.

If your doctor has prescribed Coumadin, its really important to take this as directed and to have you PT / INR checked weekly... You do not want your blood too thick or too thin - make sure you have this checked out. I would not subsitute with Asprin, its not as strong as Coumadin. Answered by Carlita Renegar 2 years ago.

there is no drug the same as coumidin.it is a rat poisin used in humans to improve circulation in the veins by thinning and keeping the blood flowing. it is very possible to bleed a lot during an injury while taking this medecine,be very careful with it Answered by Lacresha Waser 2 years ago.


Lovenox vs. Coumadin?
Well I was on birth control only because it was required in order to take accunate which caused it. Asked by Chan Gorence 2 years ago.

Coumadin is an oral pill as previously mentioned however the clotting levels (INR) need to be monitored frequently to ensure that you are taking the proper dose. This requires frequent clinic visits for blood tests. Lovenox is an injection however it does not require strict monitoring like coumadin does. You need to sit down with your doctor and have him/her explain the risks and benefits of each drug so that you can make an informed decision. Since you are a minor your parents should be there and help you figure it out. Just curious as to what caused the blood clot as you are very young to have such a diagnosis. Answered by Ami Payseur 2 years ago.

lovenox has to be injected, means poking yourself every day. coumadin is probably your better choice, it's a pill. Answered by Terrell Konrad 2 years ago.


Coumadin....?
I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his... Asked by Lonna Quirarte 2 years ago.

I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his blood. Could the discoloration be from the coumadin? Im worried about him, but I live in New york state and he lives in Florida. I cant have my husband talk to him, because my husband is deployed to Iraq... Does anyone know anything about this med? Answered by Hanna Neubecker 2 years ago.

the coumadin can cause bruising and I would assume the discloration you are speaking of is possibly bleeding under the skin... he needs to be seen by his medical doctor so they can do a PT with INR (prothrombin time) on him to make sure that the coumadin dose is the proper one... if his PT is high, he may need to be readjusted... Has he recently changed his diet in any way... if so, it could have affected the way the medication is absorbing into his body...If he has any kind of home health agency seeing him, tell him to call them, and they can get an order to go to his house and draw blood, if not, he needs to call the doc asap for an appointment or either go to the ER if the discolorations become worse or seems to be getting larger... the feet being bright red could also be a circulation problem, among other things... good luck Answered by Bert Crowin 2 years ago.

He should head for the ER ASAP. I do not believe it is from the coumadin, this is not one of the listed side effects, but there is something brewing. Answered by Donnie Vaidya 2 years ago.


I don't want to take coumadin anymore, and I'm looking for an herbal/natural supplement?
Yeah, I was reading that ginger, garlic, feverfew and tree ear mushrooms can reduce the amount of coumadin needed. And to the person that said depression......I said depressed where exactly? Asked by Britt Hallisey 2 years ago.

What is Coumadin? Coumadin (warfarin) is an anticoagulant (blood thinner). Coumadin reduces the formation of blood clots by blocking the formation of certain clotting factors. Coumadin is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and blood clots in veins and arteries. Coumadin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Important information about Coumadin: Coumadin can cause birth defects or fatal bleeding in an unborn baby. Do not use Coumadin if you are pregnant. Never take a double dose of this medication or take it together with other products that contain warfarin or coumarin. You should not take Coumadin if you have a bleeding or blood cell disorder, blood in your urine or stools, an infection of the lining of your heart, stomach bleeding, bleeding in the brain, recent or upcoming surgery, or if you need a spinal tap or spinal anesthesia (epidural). Coumadin may cause you to bleed more easily, especially if you have: a history of bleeding problems, high blood pressure or severe heart disease, kidney disease, cancer, surgery or a medical emergency, a disease affecting the blood vessels in your brain, a history of stomach or intestinal bleeding, if you are 65 or older, or if you are severely ill or debilitated. Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Any doctor, dentist, surgeon, or other medical care provider who treats you should know that you are taking Coumadin. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor What should I avoid while taking Coumadin? Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. This includes acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin, celecoxib (Celebrex), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Do not eat large amounts of foods high in vitamin K (such as liver, leafy green vegetables or vegetable oils). Vitamin K can make Coumadin less effective. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor. Avoid eating cranberries, drinking cranberry juice, or taking cranberry herbal products. Avoid herbal teas that contain tonka beans, sweet clover, or sweet woodruff. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Coumadin What other drugs will affect Coumadin? Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Coumadin can interact with certain herbal (botanical) products, which can increase your risk of bleeding. Do not use any of the following products without first asking your doctor: bromelains; coenzyme Q10; cranberry; danshen; dong quai; garlic; ginkgo biloba; ginseng; or St. John's wort. This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with Coumadin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you...... more With all said, Don't take herbs while coumadin is still in your system! Once you've been free of it and you withdrawed safely then it might be safe for you. Answered by Gertrud Stacker 2 years ago.

The problem with "natural" remedies is that they're not given the same oversight by the FDA that drugs are. Strength levels can vary widely, active ingredients may or may not be what is advertised on the container, and even the advertised benefits may or may not be real. If given a choice between natural remedies like herbal supplements and drugs, the drugs are actually far more likely to be effective. If I were you, I'd go to your doctor or your pharmacist to find out what possible alternatives are out there for you. Coumadin isn't a med you can just stop, significant and sometimes severe health implications can result. Answered by Estela Haskovec 2 years ago.

Ok. No one really likes to take Rat Poison on a regular basis. But in your case you have little choice. There is a reason you are on it, and no doctor just puts a person on coumadin for fun. Yes it sucks, and yes I know. Just do it. And see someone about the depression if you need to, 'cause it's the real issue. Answered by Latia Shellum 2 years ago.

Hi It can be done but it MUST be done in conjunction with your physician and a qualified natural health practitioner ... a qualified and experienced medical herbalist would actually be the best bet. There are some herbs that can help but I am not going to mention the names as I do not want anyone (not necessarily you) rushing off and trying this without proper supervision as their are risks involved in commencing one, and gradually weaning off the other and bearing in mind your monitoring of blood levels. I know this isn't probably what you wanted to hear, but I really do not think this is something that can be safely addressed at home, by the lay person without medical support. Answered by Chester Stagnitta 2 years ago.

Just take the bloody Coumadin, unless you want your blood to turn solid Answered by India Rotton 2 years ago.

I am not a girly girl and I dress modestly and behave with morals and kindness. I am a jeans and t-shirt kinda girl. My mother tried to make me wear skirts and stuff but I always hated it, so it wasn't her that made me who I am today. I was always a tom boy and always will be. Wearing a dress, stocking, and high heels make me so uncomfortable. If it makes you feel good about yourself then go for it. Answered by Bradford Trento 2 years ago.

I bet you are blood type A.Type A is the thickest blood.Eat for your blood type.Eating animal protein makes the blood thicker.Ginko biloba and garlic are natural blood thinners.Vit K clots the blood,should you cut yourself or have uncontrolable bleeding. Answered by Briana Fass 2 years ago.


What is the usual dose of coumadin?
The doctor always gives me the results ,they just take ages to arrive at his office. Asked by Marquetta Escajeda 2 years ago.

I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find out how much I have. Are there any other drugs I can take which would be less hassle and just as safe if not better? P.S. most people I know who are older and have had worse problems than me are on a much lower dose than I am. I dont feel I can talk to my doctor like I used to and am wondering if I should try a new specialist or get a second opinion. Answered by Cindi Montague 2 years ago.

The dose of Coumadin varies and is determined by lab tests known as the protime (PT) and INR. PT/INR is a blood test that evaluate how thin blood is. The average dose of Coumadin in my experience is around 5 mg daily. I have seen doses as high as 30 mg and as low as 0.5 mg. The variation in dosing is related to differences in metabolism and intake of Vitamin K. A dose of 7 mg is actually very common and nothing to worry about. Do not be concerned with the doses of others you know, because everyone is different. You just need a higher dose than them to get you in the right PT/INR range. As a patient you have the right to access the results of your lab tests. I would recommend that you ask your doctor or clinic nurse for the results directly. Most doctors are happy to provide this information. I personally would have no problem providing this information to my patients. Just for your information, the INR should be 2-3 for most indications. In regards to alternative medications, it depends on your indication for Coumadin. Currently there is no oral medication that is similar to Coumadin. The medications that are similar to Coumadin that are currently available are available only IV or by subcutaneous injection once or twice daily. Most people are not interested in taking a subcutaneous injection and would prefer to stick with Coumadin. The alternative medications are also more expensive. These alternatives include Lovenox and Fondaparinux. There is an oral medication like Coumadin that is awaiting FDA approval, but it will only be approved for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It will likely have further indications like Coumadin, but it will likely take years to be approved. If you would like to have a second opinion, then you have the right to this. I am not sure of what your indication is for using Coumadin. If you could provide this information, then I would be able to answer your question better. It sounds like your doctor is taking appropriate care of you unless I am missing something. Good luck. Answered by Kenny Darden 2 years ago.

There is no "usual" dose of Coumadin. Coumadin must be carefully monitored and titrated to each individual. Depending upon why you are on the Coumadin in the first place, your INR should be anywhere from 2.0 - 3.5. Again, this depends on the condition. There is no reason you cannot see the results of your blood tests. Your doctor can and should be sharing this information with you. Ask. You have the right to see your test results. If your doctor, for whatever reason, won't show you your INR result, then you need to consider finding a new healthcare provider! Unfortunately, there is no good substitute for Coumadin at this time. By the way, although there is no "usual" dose of Coumadin, I do see a lot of patients who take it and 7 mg is fairly average - I've seen people on much higher doses. Answered by Julieta Mahoe 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dose Answered by Clyde Startz 2 years ago.

RE: What is the usual dose of coumadin? I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find... Answered by Shaniqua Hibshman 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dosage Answered by Brice Maliska 2 years ago.

Just to give you some hope... there are a couple drugs approved in other countries right now that are being worked on for approval here in the US that would not require the monitoring that Coumadin does. Yay! Answered by Arcelia Walkinshaw 2 years ago.

Second Opinion! Answered by Kala Barton 2 years ago.

Depends on your protime. Answered by Divina Chilinskas 2 years ago.


Those who take COUMADIN, what kind of Diet should have?
Asked by Shannon Lyon 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood-thinning medication that helps treat and prevent blood clots. Certain foods can impair its effects. For this reason, it's important to pay attention to your diet while taking this medication. The main dietary concern related to taking Coumadin has to do with the amount of vitamin K in your diet. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Coumadin works to reduce clotting by diminishing the activity of vitamin K. Eating large amounts of vitamin K can counteract the benefits of this drug. Some doctors recommend a low-vitamin K diet for people taking Coumadin. But the key is to be consistent about how much vitamin K you consume on a daily basis. Limit or avoid foods that are high in vitamin K, such as: Kale Spinach Broccoli Turnip greens Collards Swiss chard Parsley Mustard greens Soybean & Cannola Oils (limit) The following is a partial list of foods that contain medium (M) to high (H) levels of vitamin K: FATS AND DRESSINGS Margarine M Mayonnaise H Soybean, canola, and salad oils H Olive oil M VEGETABLES Asparagus M Avocado M Broccoli H Brussels sprouts H Cabbage H Cabbage, red M Collard greens H Endive (raw) H Green scallion (raw) H Kale leaf (raw) H Lettuce, bibb, red leaf (raw) H Lettuce, iceberg (raw) M Mustard greens (raw) H Parsley H Peas, green (cooked) M Spinach leaf (raw) H Turning greens (raw) H Watercress (raw) H CONDIMENT Dill pickle M In addition to foods containing vitamin K, certain beverages can increase the effect of Coumadin, leading to bleeding problems: Cranberry juice Alcohol If you take Coumadin, eat a sensible diet. Talk to your doctor before making any major changes in your diet. If you are unable to eat for several days or have persistent stomach upset, diarrhea or fever, consult your doctor. He or she may need to adjust your dose. In addition, several medications and dietary supplements can affect the way Coumadin works in your body. For example, there's evidence that vitamin E has blood-thinning effects and may increase your risk of bleeding. Tell your doctor before taking any new medications, including herbal supplements and over-the-counter remedies. Other supplements and herbal medications known to affect Coumadin include: Arnica Bilberry Butcher's broom Cat's claw Dong quai Feverfew Forskolin Garlic Ginger Ginkgo Horse chestnut Inositol Licorice Melilot (sweet clover) Pau d'arco Red clover St. John's wort Sweet woodruff Turmeric Willow bark Wheatgrass Additional supplements that can interact with Coumadin:: Fish oil and omega-3 supplements Vitamin K Bromelains Coenzyme Q10 (ubidecarenone) Cranberry extracts Danshen Ginseng Also, you should avoid taking aspirin and frequent or high doses of acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), which can increase the effects of Coumadin and cause bleeding problems. Certain antibiotics also can interfere with the effect of this drug, so be sure to check with your doctor before starting a new antibiotic. Drugs that can interact with Coumadin include: Aspirin or aspirin-containing products Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve) Tylenol or acetaminophen-containing products, especially when the dose of acetaminophen exceeds 1,500 milligrams a day Many antibiotics Heparin Cold or allergy medicines Birth control pills Medications that treat abnormal heart rhythms, such as amiodarone Hope this info helps answer your question. My grandmother takes this and has not had any problems. Always doublecheck any medicines you take while on Coumadin with both your doctor & Pharmacist to be safest. I would also advise wearing a medical ID bracelet or carry info in your wallet about the fact that you are on this drug, in case of an emergency. Answered by Dion Joslyn 2 years ago.

coumadin kind diet Answered by Princess Voelkerding 2 years ago.

If you are going to eat salad, then eat the same sized salad every day. Don't skip a day and make sure it's the same size each day. Don't take supplements with vitamin k. Answered by Abraham Hunckler 2 years ago.

i dk. but be careful. my grandfather used to take coumadin it thinned out his bood sooooo much. it was unbelivable how much he bled and how often he bled. Answered by Bettina Menne 2 years ago.

what about purple cabbage, yellow, or green peppers, sunflower oil, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, olives, and Echinacea drops on a base of alcohol? thank you for your answers. Answered by Lela Jorge 2 years ago.


Coumadin????
alright, so i dont take another test until this wednesday, one day? that would effect my test results? Asked by Pearlie Wiler 2 years ago.

Coumadin reaches full therapeutic impact fairly quickly. By inhibiting vitamin K-mediated clotting, if you stop taking the drug then its effect disappear as it is removed from you body (as opposed to actual blood thinners). How long it takes to get out of your system depends on the dose you were taking. Generally, levels drop below theraputic concentrations within 3-4 days for normal people. Drinking more water and having a healthy liver increase this rate. Missing one dose is not likely to have a serious impact on the drug efficacy. You SHOULD NOT take a double dose the next time and keep your normal schedule. The hospital and your doctor should be advised that you are on this medication. Small internal hemorrhages from your accident may be difficult to control while on coumadin. If your belly become painful, swollen, or you notice large patches of blue/black skin, you should seek medical attention. I hope this answers your question. Answered by Wendolyn Metelus 2 years ago.

If you are saying that you got into a car accident while you were taking Coumadin, you should have told anyone who treated you after that accident that you were on it. If the danger of bleeding is greater than the danger of whatever it is that you're taking the Coumadin for, they would have stopped it (and checked you for bleeding). If you were in a car accident, are on Coumadin, and you have NOT been seen by a medical professional, you need to see one immediately. Please. You should neither assume that everything is all right nor stop taking your anticoagulants without medical advice. Answered by Signe Birtwell 2 years ago.

you need to make sure to stay on and take what the doctor said. as it affects how the tests read. Answered by Melonie Gehron 2 years ago.


Is anyone familiar with coumadin?
I'm on coumadin for Pulmonary Emboli and I've been loosing a lot of hair only I was also diagnosed with lupus but the doctors weren't 100 % sure if I really have lupus could my losing my hair be from the medication or the lupus? Asked by Sunday Wolansky 2 years ago.

coumadin is an anticoagulant, that is "blood thinner" for people that don't speak fluent doctor. The close monitoring of a person taking it is critical as the blood becomes thin so does your ability to not clot, which could cause a domino of other problems if you had an injury or needed emergency surgery. Prothombin times should be done weekly or more to evaluate your bloods clotting factor. The effects of the coumadin or its treatment does not consider the Lupus. Lupus, or mixed conective tissue disease is usually associated with a person that has RA, Rheumatoid Arthritis, your hair loss may be a side effect of the medicatons, stress, or even the illness you experienced or are currently experiencing. The best thing that you can do to heal your body would be a diet high protien and vitamin C these two things combined heal our bodies. The fact that you are recovering from such an ordeal would indicate that you need very high level because your not only compensating for the illness you need to maintain your normal levels. When I had a significant injury and surgery, I started to drink protien drinks which contained 20-24 grams of protien each, I drank 4-6 a day. I also would take 3-4 oranges and squeeze them in a juicer, this would give me a fairly large glass of juice which is like liquid sunshine, I felt better in a shorter amount of time and I maintain the practice to this day, not as much but everyday! Good luck and I hope you feel better! Answered by Cythia Delaune 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood thinner and will not cause your hair to fall out. The Lupus however does cause unusual hair loss. www.niams.noh.gov Answered by Earlene Winesberry 2 years ago.

coumadin helps to thin the blood to avoid blood clots from the two sites I quickly read, it sounds like the lupus and the coumadin could be a cause. Take care and get well Answered by Lacie Wirt 2 years ago.

coumadin is a blood thinner, and I've never heard of someone losing their hair from it.. with lupus i guess it could attack your hair follicles but I've never seen it (my aunt has lupus so I've tried to research it a little) in all honesty, it's probably stress.. it's very common to lose hair when you are overly stress, or when you have had a surgery/long hospital stay (injury stresses the body, it's still stress, even if it's not mental stress) Answered by Geoffrey Benway 2 years ago.

Lupus is an autoimmune disorder, one of many. Another one is a low thyroid condition called Hashimoto's thyroiditis. I would have your doctor check for that as they often appear together but the latter gets overlooked because lupus is a bigger focus. Low thyroid will cause hair loss; in fact it's usually one of the first signs. Answered by Alberta Mukherjee 2 years ago.

Warfarin (also known under the brand names of Coumadin®, Jantoven®, Marevan®, and Waran®) is an anticoagulant medication that is administered orally or, very rarely, by injection. It is used for the prophylaxis of thrombosis and embolism in many disorders. Its activity has to be monitored by frequent blood testing for the international normalized ratio (INR). It is named for the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. Warfarin is a synthetic derivative of coumarin, a chemical found naturally in many plants, notably woodruff (Galium odoratum, Rubiaceae), and at lower levels in licorice, lavender and various other species. Warfarin was originally developed as a rat poison, but it is no longer used for that purpose as modern poisons are much more potent and toxic (e.g. brodifacoum). However, warfarin and contemporary rodenticides belong to the same class of drugs (coumarins) and both decrease blood coagulation by interfering with vitamin K metabolism. Just be careful of using this drug and take a second openion. Answered by Barbie Klemp 2 years ago.

Probably the Lupus but you need to see your Dr. right away. Answered by Morgan Justesen 2 years ago.

u would lose your hair if u were not eating right Answered by Edmond Fuleki 2 years ago.


What do I need to know about Coumadin and Lovenox?
I'm having a pulmonary vein isolation/ablation procedure in early March. I have never taken either of these. I am looking for personal accounts or advice that people who take or have taken either of these. I will be taking them for atrial fibrillation. Thank you. Asked by Danelle Sprole 2 years ago.

Coumadin and Lovenox are types of blood thinners commonly used in cases of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation can lead to blood clots forming in her heart which later can cause strokes so preventing these clots from forming is very important. Coumadin is an oral medicine which you will likely need to take every day. Your doctors, especially in the beginning, will need to check labs on you on a regular basis (your INR) and adjust the dose as necessary (an INR that's too high could put you at increased risk for bleeding complications, while if it's too low, it won't protect you from blood clots). Since it may take time before the correct dosage is achieved, many doctors will "bridge" patients with Lovenox until the INR level is therapeutic. Lovenox is a form of heparin that thins the blood immediately and thus protects you from blood clots while the coumadin dose is being adjusted to the proper dose. It has to be taken as a subcutaneous shot twice a day. Either you or a family member will be instructed on how to give these shots before you get discharged or visiting nurse services can be arranged to help you with them. Lovenox is temporary and will be stopped once the coumadin dosage is established. This is just a general overview and you should ask your doctor about how this will specifically apply to you. Good luck. Answered by Taunya Bey 2 years ago.

You should also expect some diet restrictions and changes, but the above answer is just about as good as its gonna get on here! great advice!! Answered by Renetta Cervantes 2 years ago.


What is the equivalency of asprin to coumadin?
Im currently taking Coumadin 4mg a day ans was wondering. Also if I was to run out of my Coumadin before getting a refill or another prescription for more. Asked by Patricia Maschio 2 years ago.

Coumadin does not need prescription.,,and its strongly recommended NOT to substitute it with other platelet inhibitor, such as aspirin, because they work in very different manners,....coumadin works at liver level, blocking the synthesis of prothrombine and antagonizing the effects of carboxylations of vitamin "K" which is the proper antidote against excessive dose (tablets normally contain 5 miligrans of Coumadin (Warfarin sodium)...and they can be obtained from your local pharmacist...without prescription. Aspirin wont help you, and will only compound matters, making your bleeding time longer,and working in a different manner. There is no real EQUIVALENCE of aspirin, as substitute for coumadin,,, Its my opinion that you should be checked and followed in your coumadin doses, by proper weekly or bi-weekly chacks on your prothrombine time (PT) which is the best guide to calculate your daily needs of coumadin... Good luck Answered by Delinda Broxson 2 years ago.

Coumadin thins your blood, you can only get with a prescription, so if the doctor put u in this med u shouldn't run out. Give the doc a call..........aspirin can b used 4 a lot of things. Answered by Francesca Abad 2 years ago.

If your doctor has prescribed Coumadin, its really important to take this as directed and to have you PT / INR checked weekly... You do not want your blood too thick or too thin - make sure you have this checked out. I would not subsitute with Asprin, its not as strong as Coumadin. Answered by Pauline Ostenberg 2 years ago.

there is no drug the same as coumidin.it is a rat poisin used in humans to improve circulation in the veins by thinning and keeping the blood flowing. it is very possible to bleed a lot during an injury while taking this medecine,be very careful with it Answered by Cayla Harrier 2 years ago.


Lovenox vs. Coumadin?
Well I was on birth control only because it was required in order to take accunate which caused it. Asked by Kathlene Malkasian 2 years ago.

Coumadin is an oral pill as previously mentioned however the clotting levels (INR) need to be monitored frequently to ensure that you are taking the proper dose. This requires frequent clinic visits for blood tests. Lovenox is an injection however it does not require strict monitoring like coumadin does. You need to sit down with your doctor and have him/her explain the risks and benefits of each drug so that you can make an informed decision. Since you are a minor your parents should be there and help you figure it out. Just curious as to what caused the blood clot as you are very young to have such a diagnosis. Answered by Florida Creselious 2 years ago.

lovenox has to be injected, means poking yourself every day. coumadin is probably your better choice, it's a pill. Answered by Sparkle Nutley 2 years ago.


Coumadin....?
I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his... Asked by Anthony Bonsell 2 years ago.

I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his blood. Could the discoloration be from the coumadin? Im worried about him, but I live in New york state and he lives in Florida. I cant have my husband talk to him, because my husband is deployed to Iraq... Does anyone know anything about this med? Answered by Onie Gochnour 2 years ago.

the coumadin can cause bruising and I would assume the discloration you are speaking of is possibly bleeding under the skin... he needs to be seen by his medical doctor so they can do a PT with INR (prothrombin time) on him to make sure that the coumadin dose is the proper one... if his PT is high, he may need to be readjusted... Has he recently changed his diet in any way... if so, it could have affected the way the medication is absorbing into his body...If he has any kind of home health agency seeing him, tell him to call them, and they can get an order to go to his house and draw blood, if not, he needs to call the doc asap for an appointment or either go to the ER if the discolorations become worse or seems to be getting larger... the feet being bright red could also be a circulation problem, among other things... good luck Answered by Jesusita Luckman 2 years ago.

He should head for the ER ASAP. I do not believe it is from the coumadin, this is not one of the listed side effects, but there is something brewing. Answered by Louise Ruffins 2 years ago.


I don't want to take coumadin anymore, and I'm looking for an herbal/natural supplement?
Yeah, I was reading that ginger, garlic, feverfew and tree ear mushrooms can reduce the amount of coumadin needed. And to the person that said depression......I said depressed where exactly? Asked by Jocelyn Mims 2 years ago.

What is Coumadin? Coumadin (warfarin) is an anticoagulant (blood thinner). Coumadin reduces the formation of blood clots by blocking the formation of certain clotting factors. Coumadin is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and blood clots in veins and arteries. Coumadin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Important information about Coumadin: Coumadin can cause birth defects or fatal bleeding in an unborn baby. Do not use Coumadin if you are pregnant. Never take a double dose of this medication or take it together with other products that contain warfarin or coumarin. You should not take Coumadin if you have a bleeding or blood cell disorder, blood in your urine or stools, an infection of the lining of your heart, stomach bleeding, bleeding in the brain, recent or upcoming surgery, or if you need a spinal tap or spinal anesthesia (epidural). Coumadin may cause you to bleed more easily, especially if you have: a history of bleeding problems, high blood pressure or severe heart disease, kidney disease, cancer, surgery or a medical emergency, a disease affecting the blood vessels in your brain, a history of stomach or intestinal bleeding, if you are 65 or older, or if you are severely ill or debilitated. Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Any doctor, dentist, surgeon, or other medical care provider who treats you should know that you are taking Coumadin. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor What should I avoid while taking Coumadin? Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. This includes acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin, celecoxib (Celebrex), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Do not eat large amounts of foods high in vitamin K (such as liver, leafy green vegetables or vegetable oils). Vitamin K can make Coumadin less effective. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor. Avoid eating cranberries, drinking cranberry juice, or taking cranberry herbal products. Avoid herbal teas that contain tonka beans, sweet clover, or sweet woodruff. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Coumadin What other drugs will affect Coumadin? Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Coumadin can interact with certain herbal (botanical) products, which can increase your risk of bleeding. Do not use any of the following products without first asking your doctor: bromelains; coenzyme Q10; cranberry; danshen; dong quai; garlic; ginkgo biloba; ginseng; or St. John's wort. This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with Coumadin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you...... more With all said, Don't take herbs while coumadin is still in your system! Once you've been free of it and you withdrawed safely then it might be safe for you. Answered by Karl Sovak 2 years ago.

The problem with "natural" remedies is that they're not given the same oversight by the FDA that drugs are. Strength levels can vary widely, active ingredients may or may not be what is advertised on the container, and even the advertised benefits may or may not be real. If given a choice between natural remedies like herbal supplements and drugs, the drugs are actually far more likely to be effective. If I were you, I'd go to your doctor or your pharmacist to find out what possible alternatives are out there for you. Coumadin isn't a med you can just stop, significant and sometimes severe health implications can result. Answered by Marlo Yazdani 2 years ago.

Ok. No one really likes to take Rat Poison on a regular basis. But in your case you have little choice. There is a reason you are on it, and no doctor just puts a person on coumadin for fun. Yes it sucks, and yes I know. Just do it. And see someone about the depression if you need to, 'cause it's the real issue. Answered by Olive Rawe 2 years ago.

Hi It can be done but it MUST be done in conjunction with your physician and a qualified natural health practitioner ... a qualified and experienced medical herbalist would actually be the best bet. There are some herbs that can help but I am not going to mention the names as I do not want anyone (not necessarily you) rushing off and trying this without proper supervision as their are risks involved in commencing one, and gradually weaning off the other and bearing in mind your monitoring of blood levels. I know this isn't probably what you wanted to hear, but I really do not think this is something that can be safely addressed at home, by the lay person without medical support. Answered by Aileen Be 2 years ago.

Just take the bloody Coumadin, unless you want your blood to turn solid Answered by Ada Varady 2 years ago.

I am not a girly girl and I dress modestly and behave with morals and kindness. I am a jeans and t-shirt kinda girl. My mother tried to make me wear skirts and stuff but I always hated it, so it wasn't her that made me who I am today. I was always a tom boy and always will be. Wearing a dress, stocking, and high heels make me so uncomfortable. If it makes you feel good about yourself then go for it. Answered by Antonia Irick 2 years ago.

I bet you are blood type A.Type A is the thickest blood.Eat for your blood type.Eating animal protein makes the blood thicker.Ginko biloba and garlic are natural blood thinners.Vit K clots the blood,should you cut yourself or have uncontrolable bleeding. Answered by Clemente Chrosniak 2 years ago.


What is the usual dose of coumadin?
The doctor always gives me the results ,they just take ages to arrive at his office. Asked by Lorri Setlock 2 years ago.

I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find out how much I have. Are there any other drugs I can take which would be less hassle and just as safe if not better? P.S. most people I know who are older and have had worse problems than me are on a much lower dose than I am. I dont feel I can talk to my doctor like I used to and am wondering if I should try a new specialist or get a second opinion. Answered by Lilian Dapvaala 2 years ago.

The dose of Coumadin varies and is determined by lab tests known as the protime (PT) and INR. PT/INR is a blood test that evaluate how thin blood is. The average dose of Coumadin in my experience is around 5 mg daily. I have seen doses as high as 30 mg and as low as 0.5 mg. The variation in dosing is related to differences in metabolism and intake of Vitamin K. A dose of 7 mg is actually very common and nothing to worry about. Do not be concerned with the doses of others you know, because everyone is different. You just need a higher dose than them to get you in the right PT/INR range. As a patient you have the right to access the results of your lab tests. I would recommend that you ask your doctor or clinic nurse for the results directly. Most doctors are happy to provide this information. I personally would have no problem providing this information to my patients. Just for your information, the INR should be 2-3 for most indications. In regards to alternative medications, it depends on your indication for Coumadin. Currently there is no oral medication that is similar to Coumadin. The medications that are similar to Coumadin that are currently available are available only IV or by subcutaneous injection once or twice daily. Most people are not interested in taking a subcutaneous injection and would prefer to stick with Coumadin. The alternative medications are also more expensive. These alternatives include Lovenox and Fondaparinux. There is an oral medication like Coumadin that is awaiting FDA approval, but it will only be approved for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It will likely have further indications like Coumadin, but it will likely take years to be approved. If you would like to have a second opinion, then you have the right to this. I am not sure of what your indication is for using Coumadin. If you could provide this information, then I would be able to answer your question better. It sounds like your doctor is taking appropriate care of you unless I am missing something. Good luck. Answered by Roxie Eanes 2 years ago.

There is no "usual" dose of Coumadin. Coumadin must be carefully monitored and titrated to each individual. Depending upon why you are on the Coumadin in the first place, your INR should be anywhere from 2.0 - 3.5. Again, this depends on the condition. There is no reason you cannot see the results of your blood tests. Your doctor can and should be sharing this information with you. Ask. You have the right to see your test results. If your doctor, for whatever reason, won't show you your INR result, then you need to consider finding a new healthcare provider! Unfortunately, there is no good substitute for Coumadin at this time. By the way, although there is no "usual" dose of Coumadin, I do see a lot of patients who take it and 7 mg is fairly average - I've seen people on much higher doses. Answered by Annamae Reichler 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dose Answered by Van Heffler 2 years ago.

RE: What is the usual dose of coumadin? I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find... Answered by Delinda Bubak 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dosage Answered by Audie Buttry 2 years ago.

Just to give you some hope... there are a couple drugs approved in other countries right now that are being worked on for approval here in the US that would not require the monitoring that Coumadin does. Yay! Answered by Boris Cacho 2 years ago.

Second Opinion! Answered by Reta Cotroneo 2 years ago.

Depends on your protime. Answered by Alex Gulley 2 years ago.


Those who take COUMADIN, what kind of Diet should have?
Asked by Morgan Kuiz 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood-thinning medication that helps treat and prevent blood clots. Certain foods can impair its effects. For this reason, it's important to pay attention to your diet while taking this medication. The main dietary concern related to taking Coumadin has to do with the amount of vitamin K in your diet. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Coumadin works to reduce clotting by diminishing the activity of vitamin K. Eating large amounts of vitamin K can counteract the benefits of this drug. Some doctors recommend a low-vitamin K diet for people taking Coumadin. But the key is to be consistent about how much vitamin K you consume on a daily basis. Limit or avoid foods that are high in vitamin K, such as: Kale Spinach Broccoli Turnip greens Collards Swiss chard Parsley Mustard greens Soybean & Cannola Oils (limit) The following is a partial list of foods that contain medium (M) to high (H) levels of vitamin K: FATS AND DRESSINGS Margarine M Mayonnaise H Soybean, canola, and salad oils H Olive oil M VEGETABLES Asparagus M Avocado M Broccoli H Brussels sprouts H Cabbage H Cabbage, red M Collard greens H Endive (raw) H Green scallion (raw) H Kale leaf (raw) H Lettuce, bibb, red leaf (raw) H Lettuce, iceberg (raw) M Mustard greens (raw) H Parsley H Peas, green (cooked) M Spinach leaf (raw) H Turning greens (raw) H Watercress (raw) H CONDIMENT Dill pickle M In addition to foods containing vitamin K, certain beverages can increase the effect of Coumadin, leading to bleeding problems: Cranberry juice Alcohol If you take Coumadin, eat a sensible diet. Talk to your doctor before making any major changes in your diet. If you are unable to eat for several days or have persistent stomach upset, diarrhea or fever, consult your doctor. He or she may need to adjust your dose. In addition, several medications and dietary supplements can affect the way Coumadin works in your body. For example, there's evidence that vitamin E has blood-thinning effects and may increase your risk of bleeding. Tell your doctor before taking any new medications, including herbal supplements and over-the-counter remedies. Other supplements and herbal medications known to affect Coumadin include: Arnica Bilberry Butcher's broom Cat's claw Dong quai Feverfew Forskolin Garlic Ginger Ginkgo Horse chestnut Inositol Licorice Melilot (sweet clover) Pau d'arco Red clover St. John's wort Sweet woodruff Turmeric Willow bark Wheatgrass Additional supplements that can interact with Coumadin:: Fish oil and omega-3 supplements Vitamin K Bromelains Coenzyme Q10 (ubidecarenone) Cranberry extracts Danshen Ginseng Also, you should avoid taking aspirin and frequent or high doses of acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), which can increase the effects of Coumadin and cause bleeding problems. Certain antibiotics also can interfere with the effect of this drug, so be sure to check with your doctor before starting a new antibiotic. Drugs that can interact with Coumadin include: Aspirin or aspirin-containing products Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve) Tylenol or acetaminophen-containing products, especially when the dose of acetaminophen exceeds 1,500 milligrams a day Many antibiotics Heparin Cold or allergy medicines Birth control pills Medications that treat abnormal heart rhythms, such as amiodarone Hope this info helps answer your question. My grandmother takes this and has not had any problems. Always doublecheck any medicines you take while on Coumadin with both your doctor & Pharmacist to be safest. I would also advise wearing a medical ID bracelet or carry info in your wallet about the fact that you are on this drug, in case of an emergency. Answered by Nakisha Hegwood 2 years ago.

coumadin kind diet Answered by Lloyd Curenton 2 years ago.

If you are going to eat salad, then eat the same sized salad every day. Don't skip a day and make sure it's the same size each day. Don't take supplements with vitamin k. Answered by Leandro Dressel 2 years ago.

i dk. but be careful. my grandfather used to take coumadin it thinned out his bood sooooo much. it was unbelivable how much he bled and how often he bled. Answered by Hallie Cubit 2 years ago.

what about purple cabbage, yellow, or green peppers, sunflower oil, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, olives, and Echinacea drops on a base of alcohol? thank you for your answers. Answered by Christinia Hurme 2 years ago.


Coumadin????
alright, so i dont take another test until this wednesday, one day? that would effect my test results? Asked by Shawnna Woytowich 2 years ago.

Coumadin reaches full therapeutic impact fairly quickly. By inhibiting vitamin K-mediated clotting, if you stop taking the drug then its effect disappear as it is removed from you body (as opposed to actual blood thinners). How long it takes to get out of your system depends on the dose you were taking. Generally, levels drop below theraputic concentrations within 3-4 days for normal people. Drinking more water and having a healthy liver increase this rate. Missing one dose is not likely to have a serious impact on the drug efficacy. You SHOULD NOT take a double dose the next time and keep your normal schedule. The hospital and your doctor should be advised that you are on this medication. Small internal hemorrhages from your accident may be difficult to control while on coumadin. If your belly become painful, swollen, or you notice large patches of blue/black skin, you should seek medical attention. I hope this answers your question. Answered by Eloise Mcmulen 2 years ago.

If you are saying that you got into a car accident while you were taking Coumadin, you should have told anyone who treated you after that accident that you were on it. If the danger of bleeding is greater than the danger of whatever it is that you're taking the Coumadin for, they would have stopped it (and checked you for bleeding). If you were in a car accident, are on Coumadin, and you have NOT been seen by a medical professional, you need to see one immediately. Please. You should neither assume that everything is all right nor stop taking your anticoagulants without medical advice. Answered by Rosann Hanmer 2 years ago.

you need to make sure to stay on and take what the doctor said. as it affects how the tests read. Answered by Patrica Henningsen 2 years ago.


Is anyone familiar with coumadin?
I'm on coumadin for Pulmonary Emboli and I've been loosing a lot of hair only I was also diagnosed with lupus but the doctors weren't 100 % sure if I really have lupus could my losing my hair be from the medication or the lupus? Asked by Dottie Tejera 2 years ago.

coumadin is an anticoagulant, that is "blood thinner" for people that don't speak fluent doctor. The close monitoring of a person taking it is critical as the blood becomes thin so does your ability to not clot, which could cause a domino of other problems if you had an injury or needed emergency surgery. Prothombin times should be done weekly or more to evaluate your bloods clotting factor. The effects of the coumadin or its treatment does not consider the Lupus. Lupus, or mixed conective tissue disease is usually associated with a person that has RA, Rheumatoid Arthritis, your hair loss may be a side effect of the medicatons, stress, or even the illness you experienced or are currently experiencing. The best thing that you can do to heal your body would be a diet high protien and vitamin C these two things combined heal our bodies. The fact that you are recovering from such an ordeal would indicate that you need very high level because your not only compensating for the illness you need to maintain your normal levels. When I had a significant injury and surgery, I started to drink protien drinks which contained 20-24 grams of protien each, I drank 4-6 a day. I also would take 3-4 oranges and squeeze them in a juicer, this would give me a fairly large glass of juice which is like liquid sunshine, I felt better in a shorter amount of time and I maintain the practice to this day, not as much but everyday! Good luck and I hope you feel better! Answered by Leola Penn 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood thinner and will not cause your hair to fall out. The Lupus however does cause unusual hair loss. www.niams.noh.gov Answered by Julius Eschenbrenner 2 years ago.

coumadin helps to thin the blood to avoid blood clots from the two sites I quickly read, it sounds like the lupus and the coumadin could be a cause. Take care and get well Answered by Mariko Sibayan 2 years ago.

coumadin is a blood thinner, and I've never heard of someone losing their hair from it.. with lupus i guess it could attack your hair follicles but I've never seen it (my aunt has lupus so I've tried to research it a little) in all honesty, it's probably stress.. it's very common to lose hair when you are overly stress, or when you have had a surgery/long hospital stay (injury stresses the body, it's still stress, even if it's not mental stress) Answered by Latashia Cronwell 2 years ago.

Lupus is an autoimmune disorder, one of many. Another one is a low thyroid condition called Hashimoto's thyroiditis. I would have your doctor check for that as they often appear together but the latter gets overlooked because lupus is a bigger focus. Low thyroid will cause hair loss; in fact it's usually one of the first signs. Answered by Sanjuana Guedesse 2 years ago.

Warfarin (also known under the brand names of Coumadin®, Jantoven®, Marevan®, and Waran®) is an anticoagulant medication that is administered orally or, very rarely, by injection. It is used for the prophylaxis of thrombosis and embolism in many disorders. Its activity has to be monitored by frequent blood testing for the international normalized ratio (INR). It is named for the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. Warfarin is a synthetic derivative of coumarin, a chemical found naturally in many plants, notably woodruff (Galium odoratum, Rubiaceae), and at lower levels in licorice, lavender and various other species. Warfarin was originally developed as a rat poison, but it is no longer used for that purpose as modern poisons are much more potent and toxic (e.g. brodifacoum). However, warfarin and contemporary rodenticides belong to the same class of drugs (coumarins) and both decrease blood coagulation by interfering with vitamin K metabolism. Just be careful of using this drug and take a second openion. Answered by Delmer Batterton 2 years ago.

Probably the Lupus but you need to see your Dr. right away. Answered by Phoebe Goldenstein 2 years ago.

u would lose your hair if u were not eating right Answered by Jame Carovski 2 years ago.


What do I need to know about Coumadin and Lovenox?
I'm having a pulmonary vein isolation/ablation procedure in early March. I have never taken either of these. I am looking for personal accounts or advice that people who take or have taken either of these. I will be taking them for atrial fibrillation. Thank you. Asked by Maurine Rubano 2 years ago.

Coumadin and Lovenox are types of blood thinners commonly used in cases of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation can lead to blood clots forming in her heart which later can cause strokes so preventing these clots from forming is very important. Coumadin is an oral medicine which you will likely need to take every day. Your doctors, especially in the beginning, will need to check labs on you on a regular basis (your INR) and adjust the dose as necessary (an INR that's too high could put you at increased risk for bleeding complications, while if it's too low, it won't protect you from blood clots). Since it may take time before the correct dosage is achieved, many doctors will "bridge" patients with Lovenox until the INR level is therapeutic. Lovenox is a form of heparin that thins the blood immediately and thus protects you from blood clots while the coumadin dose is being adjusted to the proper dose. It has to be taken as a subcutaneous shot twice a day. Either you or a family member will be instructed on how to give these shots before you get discharged or visiting nurse services can be arranged to help you with them. Lovenox is temporary and will be stopped once the coumadin dosage is established. This is just a general overview and you should ask your doctor about how this will specifically apply to you. Good luck. Answered by Enrique Sanville 2 years ago.

You should also expect some diet restrictions and changes, but the above answer is just about as good as its gonna get on here! great advice!! Answered by Olin Aines 2 years ago.


What is the equivalency of asprin to coumadin?
Im currently taking Coumadin 4mg a day ans was wondering. Also if I was to run out of my Coumadin before getting a refill or another prescription for more. Asked by Kymberly Delettre 2 years ago.

Coumadin does not need prescription.,,and its strongly recommended NOT to substitute it with other platelet inhibitor, such as aspirin, because they work in very different manners,....coumadin works at liver level, blocking the synthesis of prothrombine and antagonizing the effects of carboxylations of vitamin "K" which is the proper antidote against excessive dose (tablets normally contain 5 miligrans of Coumadin (Warfarin sodium)...and they can be obtained from your local pharmacist...without prescription. Aspirin wont help you, and will only compound matters, making your bleeding time longer,and working in a different manner. There is no real EQUIVALENCE of aspirin, as substitute for coumadin,,, Its my opinion that you should be checked and followed in your coumadin doses, by proper weekly or bi-weekly chacks on your prothrombine time (PT) which is the best guide to calculate your daily needs of coumadin... Good luck Answered by Claud Cordy 2 years ago.

Coumadin thins your blood, you can only get with a prescription, so if the doctor put u in this med u shouldn't run out. Give the doc a call..........aspirin can b used 4 a lot of things. Answered by Arianna Jeudy 2 years ago.

If your doctor has prescribed Coumadin, its really important to take this as directed and to have you PT / INR checked weekly... You do not want your blood too thick or too thin - make sure you have this checked out. I would not subsitute with Asprin, its not as strong as Coumadin. Answered by Frederica Terra 2 years ago.

there is no drug the same as coumidin.it is a rat poisin used in humans to improve circulation in the veins by thinning and keeping the blood flowing. it is very possible to bleed a lot during an injury while taking this medecine,be very careful with it Answered by Lonny Grupe 2 years ago.


Lovenox vs. Coumadin?
Well I was on birth control only because it was required in order to take accunate which caused it. Asked by Wilson Dibiasi 2 years ago.

Coumadin is an oral pill as previously mentioned however the clotting levels (INR) need to be monitored frequently to ensure that you are taking the proper dose. This requires frequent clinic visits for blood tests. Lovenox is an injection however it does not require strict monitoring like coumadin does. You need to sit down with your doctor and have him/her explain the risks and benefits of each drug so that you can make an informed decision. Since you are a minor your parents should be there and help you figure it out. Just curious as to what caused the blood clot as you are very young to have such a diagnosis. Answered by Olevia Olberding 2 years ago.

lovenox has to be injected, means poking yourself every day. coumadin is probably your better choice, it's a pill. Answered by Queenie Vansyckle 2 years ago.


Coumadin....?
I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his... Asked by Dylan Stanberry 2 years ago.

I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his blood. Could the discoloration be from the coumadin? Im worried about him, but I live in New york state and he lives in Florida. I cant have my husband talk to him, because my husband is deployed to Iraq... Does anyone know anything about this med? Answered by Leeanne Weitze 2 years ago.

the coumadin can cause bruising and I would assume the discloration you are speaking of is possibly bleeding under the skin... he needs to be seen by his medical doctor so they can do a PT with INR (prothrombin time) on him to make sure that the coumadin dose is the proper one... if his PT is high, he may need to be readjusted... Has he recently changed his diet in any way... if so, it could have affected the way the medication is absorbing into his body...If he has any kind of home health agency seeing him, tell him to call them, and they can get an order to go to his house and draw blood, if not, he needs to call the doc asap for an appointment or either go to the ER if the discolorations become worse or seems to be getting larger... the feet being bright red could also be a circulation problem, among other things... good luck Answered by Connie Mordino 2 years ago.

He should head for the ER ASAP. I do not believe it is from the coumadin, this is not one of the listed side effects, but there is something brewing. Answered by Charles Schmider 2 years ago.


I don't want to take coumadin anymore, and I'm looking for an herbal/natural supplement?
Yeah, I was reading that ginger, garlic, feverfew and tree ear mushrooms can reduce the amount of coumadin needed. And to the person that said depression......I said depressed where exactly? Asked by Coleen Leforge 2 years ago.

What is Coumadin? Coumadin (warfarin) is an anticoagulant (blood thinner). Coumadin reduces the formation of blood clots by blocking the formation of certain clotting factors. Coumadin is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and blood clots in veins and arteries. Coumadin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Important information about Coumadin: Coumadin can cause birth defects or fatal bleeding in an unborn baby. Do not use Coumadin if you are pregnant. Never take a double dose of this medication or take it together with other products that contain warfarin or coumarin. You should not take Coumadin if you have a bleeding or blood cell disorder, blood in your urine or stools, an infection of the lining of your heart, stomach bleeding, bleeding in the brain, recent or upcoming surgery, or if you need a spinal tap or spinal anesthesia (epidural). Coumadin may cause you to bleed more easily, especially if you have: a history of bleeding problems, high blood pressure or severe heart disease, kidney disease, cancer, surgery or a medical emergency, a disease affecting the blood vessels in your brain, a history of stomach or intestinal bleeding, if you are 65 or older, or if you are severely ill or debilitated. Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Any doctor, dentist, surgeon, or other medical care provider who treats you should know that you are taking Coumadin. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor What should I avoid while taking Coumadin? Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. This includes acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin, celecoxib (Celebrex), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Do not eat large amounts of foods high in vitamin K (such as liver, leafy green vegetables or vegetable oils). Vitamin K can make Coumadin less effective. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor. Avoid eating cranberries, drinking cranberry juice, or taking cranberry herbal products. Avoid herbal teas that contain tonka beans, sweet clover, or sweet woodruff. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Coumadin What other drugs will affect Coumadin? Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Coumadin can interact with certain herbal (botanical) products, which can increase your risk of bleeding. Do not use any of the following products without first asking your doctor: bromelains; coenzyme Q10; cranberry; danshen; dong quai; garlic; ginkgo biloba; ginseng; or St. John's wort. This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with Coumadin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you...... more With all said, Don't take herbs while coumadin is still in your system! Once you've been free of it and you withdrawed safely then it might be safe for you. Answered by Drew Counterman 2 years ago.

The problem with "natural" remedies is that they're not given the same oversight by the FDA that drugs are. Strength levels can vary widely, active ingredients may or may not be what is advertised on the container, and even the advertised benefits may or may not be real. If given a choice between natural remedies like herbal supplements and drugs, the drugs are actually far more likely to be effective. If I were you, I'd go to your doctor or your pharmacist to find out what possible alternatives are out there for you. Coumadin isn't a med you can just stop, significant and sometimes severe health implications can result. Answered by Yuonne Ruybal 2 years ago.

Ok. No one really likes to take Rat Poison on a regular basis. But in your case you have little choice. There is a reason you are on it, and no doctor just puts a person on coumadin for fun. Yes it sucks, and yes I know. Just do it. And see someone about the depression if you need to, 'cause it's the real issue. Answered by Althea Foister 2 years ago.

Hi It can be done but it MUST be done in conjunction with your physician and a qualified natural health practitioner ... a qualified and experienced medical herbalist would actually be the best bet. There are some herbs that can help but I am not going to mention the names as I do not want anyone (not necessarily you) rushing off and trying this without proper supervision as their are risks involved in commencing one, and gradually weaning off the other and bearing in mind your monitoring of blood levels. I know this isn't probably what you wanted to hear, but I really do not think this is something that can be safely addressed at home, by the lay person without medical support. Answered by Shantae Armour 2 years ago.

Just take the bloody Coumadin, unless you want your blood to turn solid Answered by Ashton Schiavone 2 years ago.

I am not a girly girl and I dress modestly and behave with morals and kindness. I am a jeans and t-shirt kinda girl. My mother tried to make me wear skirts and stuff but I always hated it, so it wasn't her that made me who I am today. I was always a tom boy and always will be. Wearing a dress, stocking, and high heels make me so uncomfortable. If it makes you feel good about yourself then go for it. Answered by Donnie Sables 2 years ago.

I bet you are blood type A.Type A is the thickest blood.Eat for your blood type.Eating animal protein makes the blood thicker.Ginko biloba and garlic are natural blood thinners.Vit K clots the blood,should you cut yourself or have uncontrolable bleeding. Answered by Darleen Giacchino 2 years ago.


What is the usual dose of coumadin?
The doctor always gives me the results ,they just take ages to arrive at his office. Asked by Sherie Rorer 2 years ago.

I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find out how much I have. Are there any other drugs I can take which would be less hassle and just as safe if not better? P.S. most people I know who are older and have had worse problems than me are on a much lower dose than I am. I dont feel I can talk to my doctor like I used to and am wondering if I should try a new specialist or get a second opinion. Answered by Thea Osterland 2 years ago.

The dose of Coumadin varies and is determined by lab tests known as the protime (PT) and INR. PT/INR is a blood test that evaluate how thin blood is. The average dose of Coumadin in my experience is around 5 mg daily. I have seen doses as high as 30 mg and as low as 0.5 mg. The variation in dosing is related to differences in metabolism and intake of Vitamin K. A dose of 7 mg is actually very common and nothing to worry about. Do not be concerned with the doses of others you know, because everyone is different. You just need a higher dose than them to get you in the right PT/INR range. As a patient you have the right to access the results of your lab tests. I would recommend that you ask your doctor or clinic nurse for the results directly. Most doctors are happy to provide this information. I personally would have no problem providing this information to my patients. Just for your information, the INR should be 2-3 for most indications. In regards to alternative medications, it depends on your indication for Coumadin. Currently there is no oral medication that is similar to Coumadin. The medications that are similar to Coumadin that are currently available are available only IV or by subcutaneous injection once or twice daily. Most people are not interested in taking a subcutaneous injection and would prefer to stick with Coumadin. The alternative medications are also more expensive. These alternatives include Lovenox and Fondaparinux. There is an oral medication like Coumadin that is awaiting FDA approval, but it will only be approved for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It will likely have further indications like Coumadin, but it will likely take years to be approved. If you would like to have a second opinion, then you have the right to this. I am not sure of what your indication is for using Coumadin. If you could provide this information, then I would be able to answer your question better. It sounds like your doctor is taking appropriate care of you unless I am missing something. Good luck. Answered by Saran Valrey 2 years ago.

There is no "usual" dose of Coumadin. Coumadin must be carefully monitored and titrated to each individual. Depending upon why you are on the Coumadin in the first place, your INR should be anywhere from 2.0 - 3.5. Again, this depends on the condition. There is no reason you cannot see the results of your blood tests. Your doctor can and should be sharing this information with you. Ask. You have the right to see your test results. If your doctor, for whatever reason, won't show you your INR result, then you need to consider finding a new healthcare provider! Unfortunately, there is no good substitute for Coumadin at this time. By the way, although there is no "usual" dose of Coumadin, I do see a lot of patients who take it and 7 mg is fairly average - I've seen people on much higher doses. Answered by Claudia Councilman 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dose Answered by Jade Conte 2 years ago.

RE: What is the usual dose of coumadin? I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find... Answered by Adelaide Debelak 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dosage Answered by Rosita Bargmann 2 years ago.

Just to give you some hope... there are a couple drugs approved in other countries right now that are being worked on for approval here in the US that would not require the monitoring that Coumadin does. Yay! Answered by Elaina Brunette 2 years ago.

Second Opinion! Answered by Mayme Haisley 2 years ago.

Depends on your protime. Answered by Ellen Mccathran 2 years ago.


Those who take COUMADIN, what kind of Diet should have?
Asked by Reynalda Tolbent 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood-thinning medication that helps treat and prevent blood clots. Certain foods can impair its effects. For this reason, it's important to pay attention to your diet while taking this medication. The main dietary concern related to taking Coumadin has to do with the amount of vitamin K in your diet. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Coumadin works to reduce clotting by diminishing the activity of vitamin K. Eating large amounts of vitamin K can counteract the benefits of this drug. Some doctors recommend a low-vitamin K diet for people taking Coumadin. But the key is to be consistent about how much vitamin K you consume on a daily basis. Limit or avoid foods that are high in vitamin K, such as: Kale Spinach Broccoli Turnip greens Collards Swiss chard Parsley Mustard greens Soybean & Cannola Oils (limit) The following is a partial list of foods that contain medium (M) to high (H) levels of vitamin K: FATS AND DRESSINGS Margarine M Mayonnaise H Soybean, canola, and salad oils H Olive oil M VEGETABLES Asparagus M Avocado M Broccoli H Brussels sprouts H Cabbage H Cabbage, red M Collard greens H Endive (raw) H Green scallion (raw) H Kale leaf (raw) H Lettuce, bibb, red leaf (raw) H Lettuce, iceberg (raw) M Mustard greens (raw) H Parsley H Peas, green (cooked) M Spinach leaf (raw) H Turning greens (raw) H Watercress (raw) H CONDIMENT Dill pickle M In addition to foods containing vitamin K, certain beverages can increase the effect of Coumadin, leading to bleeding problems: Cranberry juice Alcohol If you take Coumadin, eat a sensible diet. Talk to your doctor before making any major changes in your diet. If you are unable to eat for several days or have persistent stomach upset, diarrhea or fever, consult your doctor. He or she may need to adjust your dose. In addition, several medications and dietary supplements can affect the way Coumadin works in your body. For example, there's evidence that vitamin E has blood-thinning effects and may increase your risk of bleeding. Tell your doctor before taking any new medications, including herbal supplements and over-the-counter remedies. Other supplements and herbal medications known to affect Coumadin include: Arnica Bilberry Butcher's broom Cat's claw Dong quai Feverfew Forskolin Garlic Ginger Ginkgo Horse chestnut Inositol Licorice Melilot (sweet clover) Pau d'arco Red clover St. John's wort Sweet woodruff Turmeric Willow bark Wheatgrass Additional supplements that can interact with Coumadin:: Fish oil and omega-3 supplements Vitamin K Bromelains Coenzyme Q10 (ubidecarenone) Cranberry extracts Danshen Ginseng Also, you should avoid taking aspirin and frequent or high doses of acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), which can increase the effects of Coumadin and cause bleeding problems. Certain antibiotics also can interfere with the effect of this drug, so be sure to check with your doctor before starting a new antibiotic. Drugs that can interact with Coumadin include: Aspirin or aspirin-containing products Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve) Tylenol or acetaminophen-containing products, especially when the dose of acetaminophen exceeds 1,500 milligrams a day Many antibiotics Heparin Cold or allergy medicines Birth control pills Medications that treat abnormal heart rhythms, such as amiodarone Hope this info helps answer your question. My grandmother takes this and has not had any problems. Always doublecheck any medicines you take while on Coumadin with both your doctor & Pharmacist to be safest. I would also advise wearing a medical ID bracelet or carry info in your wallet about the fact that you are on this drug, in case of an emergency. Answered by Antonio Pappas 2 years ago.

coumadin kind diet Answered by Angelika Lapin 2 years ago.

If you are going to eat salad, then eat the same sized salad every day. Don't skip a day and make sure it's the same size each day. Don't take supplements with vitamin k. Answered by Stephenie Parvin 2 years ago.

i dk. but be careful. my grandfather used to take coumadin it thinned out his bood sooooo much. it was unbelivable how much he bled and how often he bled. Answered by Tawny Bohall 2 years ago.

what about purple cabbage, yellow, or green peppers, sunflower oil, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, olives, and Echinacea drops on a base of alcohol? thank you for your answers. Answered by Mora Bonney 2 years ago.


Coumadin????
alright, so i dont take another test until this wednesday, one day? that would effect my test results? Asked by Karen Winbush 2 years ago.

Coumadin reaches full therapeutic impact fairly quickly. By inhibiting vitamin K-mediated clotting, if you stop taking the drug then its effect disappear as it is removed from you body (as opposed to actual blood thinners). How long it takes to get out of your system depends on the dose you were taking. Generally, levels drop below theraputic concentrations within 3-4 days for normal people. Drinking more water and having a healthy liver increase this rate. Missing one dose is not likely to have a serious impact on the drug efficacy. You SHOULD NOT take a double dose the next time and keep your normal schedule. The hospital and your doctor should be advised that you are on this medication. Small internal hemorrhages from your accident may be difficult to control while on coumadin. If your belly become painful, swollen, or you notice large patches of blue/black skin, you should seek medical attention. I hope this answers your question. Answered by Tammie Colcord 2 years ago.

If you are saying that you got into a car accident while you were taking Coumadin, you should have told anyone who treated you after that accident that you were on it. If the danger of bleeding is greater than the danger of whatever it is that you're taking the Coumadin for, they would have stopped it (and checked you for bleeding). If you were in a car accident, are on Coumadin, and you have NOT been seen by a medical professional, you need to see one immediately. Please. You should neither assume that everything is all right nor stop taking your anticoagulants without medical advice. Answered by Rosann Slovick 2 years ago.

you need to make sure to stay on and take what the doctor said. as it affects how the tests read. Answered by Kallie Brubach 2 years ago.


Is anyone familiar with coumadin?
I'm on coumadin for Pulmonary Emboli and I've been loosing a lot of hair only I was also diagnosed with lupus but the doctors weren't 100 % sure if I really have lupus could my losing my hair be from the medication or the lupus? Asked by Jonelle Lenius 2 years ago.

coumadin is an anticoagulant, that is "blood thinner" for people that don't speak fluent doctor. The close monitoring of a person taking it is critical as the blood becomes thin so does your ability to not clot, which could cause a domino of other problems if you had an injury or needed emergency surgery. Prothombin times should be done weekly or more to evaluate your bloods clotting factor. The effects of the coumadin or its treatment does not consider the Lupus. Lupus, or mixed conective tissue disease is usually associated with a person that has RA, Rheumatoid Arthritis, your hair loss may be a side effect of the medicatons, stress, or even the illness you experienced or are currently experiencing. The best thing that you can do to heal your body would be a diet high protien and vitamin C these two things combined heal our bodies. The fact that you are recovering from such an ordeal would indicate that you need very high level because your not only compensating for the illness you need to maintain your normal levels. When I had a significant injury and surgery, I started to drink protien drinks which contained 20-24 grams of protien each, I drank 4-6 a day. I also would take 3-4 oranges and squeeze them in a juicer, this would give me a fairly large glass of juice which is like liquid sunshine, I felt better in a shorter amount of time and I maintain the practice to this day, not as much but everyday! Good luck and I hope you feel better! Answered by Zoe Ardis 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood thinner and will not cause your hair to fall out. The Lupus however does cause unusual hair loss. www.niams.noh.gov Answered by Cletus Bergquist 2 years ago.

coumadin helps to thin the blood to avoid blood clots from the two sites I quickly read, it sounds like the lupus and the coumadin could be a cause. Take care and get well Answered by Elois Walkins 2 years ago.

coumadin is a blood thinner, and I've never heard of someone losing their hair from it.. with lupus i guess it could attack your hair follicles but I've never seen it (my aunt has lupus so I've tried to research it a little) in all honesty, it's probably stress.. it's very common to lose hair when you are overly stress, or when you have had a surgery/long hospital stay (injury stresses the body, it's still stress, even if it's not mental stress) Answered by Ligia Stedman 2 years ago.

Lupus is an autoimmune disorder, one of many. Another one is a low thyroid condition called Hashimoto's thyroiditis. I would have your doctor check for that as they often appear together but the latter gets overlooked because lupus is a bigger focus. Low thyroid will cause hair loss; in fact it's usually one of the first signs. Answered by Andera Maiava 2 years ago.

Warfarin (also known under the brand names of Coumadin®, Jantoven®, Marevan®, and Waran®) is an anticoagulant medication that is administered orally or, very rarely, by injection. It is used for the prophylaxis of thrombosis and embolism in many disorders. Its activity has to be monitored by frequent blood testing for the international normalized ratio (INR). It is named for the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. Warfarin is a synthetic derivative of coumarin, a chemical found naturally in many plants, notably woodruff (Galium odoratum, Rubiaceae), and at lower levels in licorice, lavender and various other species. Warfarin was originally developed as a rat poison, but it is no longer used for that purpose as modern poisons are much more potent and toxic (e.g. brodifacoum). However, warfarin and contemporary rodenticides belong to the same class of drugs (coumarins) and both decrease blood coagulation by interfering with vitamin K metabolism. Just be careful of using this drug and take a second openion. Answered by Nathan Gmernicki 2 years ago.

Probably the Lupus but you need to see your Dr. right away. Answered by Jayme Doi 2 years ago.

u would lose your hair if u were not eating right Answered by Earleen Babel 2 years ago.


What do I need to know about Coumadin and Lovenox?
I'm having a pulmonary vein isolation/ablation procedure in early March. I have never taken either of these. I am looking for personal accounts or advice that people who take or have taken either of these. I will be taking them for atrial fibrillation. Thank you. Asked by Lovella Debarr 2 years ago.

Coumadin and Lovenox are types of blood thinners commonly used in cases of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation can lead to blood clots forming in her heart which later can cause strokes so preventing these clots from forming is very important. Coumadin is an oral medicine which you will likely need to take every day. Your doctors, especially in the beginning, will need to check labs on you on a regular basis (your INR) and adjust the dose as necessary (an INR that's too high could put you at increased risk for bleeding complications, while if it's too low, it won't protect you from blood clots). Since it may take time before the correct dosage is achieved, many doctors will "bridge" patients with Lovenox until the INR level is therapeutic. Lovenox is a form of heparin that thins the blood immediately and thus protects you from blood clots while the coumadin dose is being adjusted to the proper dose. It has to be taken as a subcutaneous shot twice a day. Either you or a family member will be instructed on how to give these shots before you get discharged or visiting nurse services can be arranged to help you with them. Lovenox is temporary and will be stopped once the coumadin dosage is established. This is just a general overview and you should ask your doctor about how this will specifically apply to you. Good luck. Answered by Leigh Berstler 2 years ago.

You should also expect some diet restrictions and changes, but the above answer is just about as good as its gonna get on here! great advice!! Answered by Carletta Sandstrom 2 years ago.


What is the equivalency of asprin to coumadin?
Im currently taking Coumadin 4mg a day ans was wondering. Also if I was to run out of my Coumadin before getting a refill or another prescription for more. Asked by Jin Urrey 2 years ago.

Coumadin does not need prescription.,,and its strongly recommended NOT to substitute it with other platelet inhibitor, such as aspirin, because they work in very different manners,....coumadin works at liver level, blocking the synthesis of prothrombine and antagonizing the effects of carboxylations of vitamin "K" which is the proper antidote against excessive dose (tablets normally contain 5 miligrans of Coumadin (Warfarin sodium)...and they can be obtained from your local pharmacist...without prescription. Aspirin wont help you, and will only compound matters, making your bleeding time longer,and working in a different manner. There is no real EQUIVALENCE of aspirin, as substitute for coumadin,,, Its my opinion that you should be checked and followed in your coumadin doses, by proper weekly or bi-weekly chacks on your prothrombine time (PT) which is the best guide to calculate your daily needs of coumadin... Good luck Answered by Devin Klipp 2 years ago.

Coumadin thins your blood, you can only get with a prescription, so if the doctor put u in this med u shouldn't run out. Give the doc a call..........aspirin can b used 4 a lot of things. Answered by Neil Vangilder 2 years ago.

If your doctor has prescribed Coumadin, its really important to take this as directed and to have you PT / INR checked weekly... You do not want your blood too thick or too thin - make sure you have this checked out. I would not subsitute with Asprin, its not as strong as Coumadin. Answered by Eryn Cliatt 2 years ago.

there is no drug the same as coumidin.it is a rat poisin used in humans to improve circulation in the veins by thinning and keeping the blood flowing. it is very possible to bleed a lot during an injury while taking this medecine,be very careful with it Answered by Sheryl Vilchis 2 years ago.


Lovenox vs. Coumadin?
Well I was on birth control only because it was required in order to take accunate which caused it. Asked by Christin Eckstrom 2 years ago.

Coumadin is an oral pill as previously mentioned however the clotting levels (INR) need to be monitored frequently to ensure that you are taking the proper dose. This requires frequent clinic visits for blood tests. Lovenox is an injection however it does not require strict monitoring like coumadin does. You need to sit down with your doctor and have him/her explain the risks and benefits of each drug so that you can make an informed decision. Since you are a minor your parents should be there and help you figure it out. Just curious as to what caused the blood clot as you are very young to have such a diagnosis. Answered by Branden Monsegur 2 years ago.

lovenox has to be injected, means poking yourself every day. coumadin is probably your better choice, it's a pill. Answered by Napoleon Pilley 2 years ago.


Coumadin....?
I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his... Asked by Ninfa Valgren 2 years ago.

I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his blood. Could the discoloration be from the coumadin? Im worried about him, but I live in New york state and he lives in Florida. I cant have my husband talk to him, because my husband is deployed to Iraq... Does anyone know anything about this med? Answered by Clemmie Heafey 2 years ago.

the coumadin can cause bruising and I would assume the discloration you are speaking of is possibly bleeding under the skin... he needs to be seen by his medical doctor so they can do a PT with INR (prothrombin time) on him to make sure that the coumadin dose is the proper one... if his PT is high, he may need to be readjusted... Has he recently changed his diet in any way... if so, it could have affected the way the medication is absorbing into his body...If he has any kind of home health agency seeing him, tell him to call them, and they can get an order to go to his house and draw blood, if not, he needs to call the doc asap for an appointment or either go to the ER if the discolorations become worse or seems to be getting larger... the feet being bright red could also be a circulation problem, among other things... good luck Answered by Krystina Wohld 2 years ago.

He should head for the ER ASAP. I do not believe it is from the coumadin, this is not one of the listed side effects, but there is something brewing. Answered by Breanna Dellen 2 years ago.


I don't want to take coumadin anymore, and I'm looking for an herbal/natural supplement?
Yeah, I was reading that ginger, garlic, feverfew and tree ear mushrooms can reduce the amount of coumadin needed. And to the person that said depression......I said depressed where exactly? Asked by Katrice Delanoche 2 years ago.

What is Coumadin? Coumadin (warfarin) is an anticoagulant (blood thinner). Coumadin reduces the formation of blood clots by blocking the formation of certain clotting factors. Coumadin is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and blood clots in veins and arteries. Coumadin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Important information about Coumadin: Coumadin can cause birth defects or fatal bleeding in an unborn baby. Do not use Coumadin if you are pregnant. Never take a double dose of this medication or take it together with other products that contain warfarin or coumarin. You should not take Coumadin if you have a bleeding or blood cell disorder, blood in your urine or stools, an infection of the lining of your heart, stomach bleeding, bleeding in the brain, recent or upcoming surgery, or if you need a spinal tap or spinal anesthesia (epidural). Coumadin may cause you to bleed more easily, especially if you have: a history of bleeding problems, high blood pressure or severe heart disease, kidney disease, cancer, surgery or a medical emergency, a disease affecting the blood vessels in your brain, a history of stomach or intestinal bleeding, if you are 65 or older, or if you are severely ill or debilitated. Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Any doctor, dentist, surgeon, or other medical care provider who treats you should know that you are taking Coumadin. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor What should I avoid while taking Coumadin? Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. This includes acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin, celecoxib (Celebrex), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Do not eat large amounts of foods high in vitamin K (such as liver, leafy green vegetables or vegetable oils). Vitamin K can make Coumadin less effective. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor. Avoid eating cranberries, drinking cranberry juice, or taking cranberry herbal products. Avoid herbal teas that contain tonka beans, sweet clover, or sweet woodruff. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Coumadin What other drugs will affect Coumadin? Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Coumadin can interact with certain herbal (botanical) products, which can increase your risk of bleeding. Do not use any of the following products without first asking your doctor: bromelains; coenzyme Q10; cranberry; danshen; dong quai; garlic; ginkgo biloba; ginseng; or St. John's wort. This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with Coumadin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you...... more With all said, Don't take herbs while coumadin is still in your system! Once you've been free of it and you withdrawed safely then it might be safe for you. Answered by Sheri Diamond 2 years ago.

The problem with "natural" remedies is that they're not given the same oversight by the FDA that drugs are. Strength levels can vary widely, active ingredients may or may not be what is advertised on the container, and even the advertised benefits may or may not be real. If given a choice between natural remedies like herbal supplements and drugs, the drugs are actually far more likely to be effective. If I were you, I'd go to your doctor or your pharmacist to find out what possible alternatives are out there for you. Coumadin isn't a med you can just stop, significant and sometimes severe health implications can result. Answered by Yong Bodkin 2 years ago.

Ok. No one really likes to take Rat Poison on a regular basis. But in your case you have little choice. There is a reason you are on it, and no doctor just puts a person on coumadin for fun. Yes it sucks, and yes I know. Just do it. And see someone about the depression if you need to, 'cause it's the real issue. Answered by Cammy Loreto 2 years ago.

Hi It can be done but it MUST be done in conjunction with your physician and a qualified natural health practitioner ... a qualified and experienced medical herbalist would actually be the best bet. There are some herbs that can help but I am not going to mention the names as I do not want anyone (not necessarily you) rushing off and trying this without proper supervision as their are risks involved in commencing one, and gradually weaning off the other and bearing in mind your monitoring of blood levels. I know this isn't probably what you wanted to hear, but I really do not think this is something that can be safely addressed at home, by the lay person without medical support. Answered by Jarvis Nelmes 2 years ago.

Just take the bloody Coumadin, unless you want your blood to turn solid Answered by Corinne Grabner 2 years ago.

I am not a girly girl and I dress modestly and behave with morals and kindness. I am a jeans and t-shirt kinda girl. My mother tried to make me wear skirts and stuff but I always hated it, so it wasn't her that made me who I am today. I was always a tom boy and always will be. Wearing a dress, stocking, and high heels make me so uncomfortable. If it makes you feel good about yourself then go for it. Answered by Yaeko Leclair 2 years ago.

I bet you are blood type A.Type A is the thickest blood.Eat for your blood type.Eating animal protein makes the blood thicker.Ginko biloba and garlic are natural blood thinners.Vit K clots the blood,should you cut yourself or have uncontrolable bleeding. Answered by Shay Perrez 2 years ago.


What is the usual dose of coumadin?
The doctor always gives me the results ,they just take ages to arrive at his office. Asked by Keila Wasinger 2 years ago.

I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find out how much I have. Are there any other drugs I can take which would be less hassle and just as safe if not better? P.S. most people I know who are older and have had worse problems than me are on a much lower dose than I am. I dont feel I can talk to my doctor like I used to and am wondering if I should try a new specialist or get a second opinion. Answered by Georgianna Gardella 2 years ago.

The dose of Coumadin varies and is determined by lab tests known as the protime (PT) and INR. PT/INR is a blood test that evaluate how thin blood is. The average dose of Coumadin in my experience is around 5 mg daily. I have seen doses as high as 30 mg and as low as 0.5 mg. The variation in dosing is related to differences in metabolism and intake of Vitamin K. A dose of 7 mg is actually very common and nothing to worry about. Do not be concerned with the doses of others you know, because everyone is different. You just need a higher dose than them to get you in the right PT/INR range. As a patient you have the right to access the results of your lab tests. I would recommend that you ask your doctor or clinic nurse for the results directly. Most doctors are happy to provide this information. I personally would have no problem providing this information to my patients. Just for your information, the INR should be 2-3 for most indications. In regards to alternative medications, it depends on your indication for Coumadin. Currently there is no oral medication that is similar to Coumadin. The medications that are similar to Coumadin that are currently available are available only IV or by subcutaneous injection once or twice daily. Most people are not interested in taking a subcutaneous injection and would prefer to stick with Coumadin. The alternative medications are also more expensive. These alternatives include Lovenox and Fondaparinux. There is an oral medication like Coumadin that is awaiting FDA approval, but it will only be approved for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It will likely have further indications like Coumadin, but it will likely take years to be approved. If you would like to have a second opinion, then you have the right to this. I am not sure of what your indication is for using Coumadin. If you could provide this information, then I would be able to answer your question better. It sounds like your doctor is taking appropriate care of you unless I am missing something. Good luck. Answered by Meagan Bachus 2 years ago.

There is no "usual" dose of Coumadin. Coumadin must be carefully monitored and titrated to each individual. Depending upon why you are on the Coumadin in the first place, your INR should be anywhere from 2.0 - 3.5. Again, this depends on the condition. There is no reason you cannot see the results of your blood tests. Your doctor can and should be sharing this information with you. Ask. You have the right to see your test results. If your doctor, for whatever reason, won't show you your INR result, then you need to consider finding a new healthcare provider! Unfortunately, there is no good substitute for Coumadin at this time. By the way, although there is no "usual" dose of Coumadin, I do see a lot of patients who take it and 7 mg is fairly average - I've seen people on much higher doses. Answered by Teresita Thu 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dose Answered by Floretta Tatton 2 years ago.

RE: What is the usual dose of coumadin? I have been on 7mg Warfarin for about 14 years now.I was just wondering why I would have to be on such a high dose.I am 45 and feel that I should have more energy than I do.Also it seems pointless to be on a measurable medication when I can never get the results when I get the blood test to find... Answered by Micaela Aguallo 2 years ago.

Coumadin Dosage Answered by Vasiliki Javor 2 years ago.

Just to give you some hope... there are a couple drugs approved in other countries right now that are being worked on for approval here in the US that would not require the monitoring that Coumadin does. Yay! Answered by Sharan Mortis 2 years ago.

Second Opinion! Answered by Jeannine Minacci 2 years ago.

Depends on your protime. Answered by Eli Kicklighter 2 years ago.


Those who take COUMADIN, what kind of Diet should have?
Asked by Shelton Simpelo 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood-thinning medication that helps treat and prevent blood clots. Certain foods can impair its effects. For this reason, it's important to pay attention to your diet while taking this medication. The main dietary concern related to taking Coumadin has to do with the amount of vitamin K in your diet. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Coumadin works to reduce clotting by diminishing the activity of vitamin K. Eating large amounts of vitamin K can counteract the benefits of this drug. Some doctors recommend a low-vitamin K diet for people taking Coumadin. But the key is to be consistent about how much vitamin K you consume on a daily basis. Limit or avoid foods that are high in vitamin K, such as: Kale Spinach Broccoli Turnip greens Collards Swiss chard Parsley Mustard greens Soybean & Cannola Oils (limit) The following is a partial list of foods that contain medium (M) to high (H) levels of vitamin K: FATS AND DRESSINGS Margarine M Mayonnaise H Soybean, canola, and salad oils H Olive oil M VEGETABLES Asparagus M Avocado M Broccoli H Brussels sprouts H Cabbage H Cabbage, red M Collard greens H Endive (raw) H Green scallion (raw) H Kale leaf (raw) H Lettuce, bibb, red leaf (raw) H Lettuce, iceberg (raw) M Mustard greens (raw) H Parsley H Peas, green (cooked) M Spinach leaf (raw) H Turning greens (raw) H Watercress (raw) H CONDIMENT Dill pickle M In addition to foods containing vitamin K, certain beverages can increase the effect of Coumadin, leading to bleeding problems: Cranberry juice Alcohol If you take Coumadin, eat a sensible diet. Talk to your doctor before making any major changes in your diet. If you are unable to eat for several days or have persistent stomach upset, diarrhea or fever, consult your doctor. He or she may need to adjust your dose. In addition, several medications and dietary supplements can affect the way Coumadin works in your body. For example, there's evidence that vitamin E has blood-thinning effects and may increase your risk of bleeding. Tell your doctor before taking any new medications, including herbal supplements and over-the-counter remedies. Other supplements and herbal medications known to affect Coumadin include: Arnica Bilberry Butcher's broom Cat's claw Dong quai Feverfew Forskolin Garlic Ginger Ginkgo Horse chestnut Inositol Licorice Melilot (sweet clover) Pau d'arco Red clover St. John's wort Sweet woodruff Turmeric Willow bark Wheatgrass Additional supplements that can interact with Coumadin:: Fish oil and omega-3 supplements Vitamin K Bromelains Coenzyme Q10 (ubidecarenone) Cranberry extracts Danshen Ginseng Also, you should avoid taking aspirin and frequent or high doses of acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), which can increase the effects of Coumadin and cause bleeding problems. Certain antibiotics also can interfere with the effect of this drug, so be sure to check with your doctor before starting a new antibiotic. Drugs that can interact with Coumadin include: Aspirin or aspirin-containing products Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve) Tylenol or acetaminophen-containing products, especially when the dose of acetaminophen exceeds 1,500 milligrams a day Many antibiotics Heparin Cold or allergy medicines Birth control pills Medications that treat abnormal heart rhythms, such as amiodarone Hope this info helps answer your question. My grandmother takes this and has not had any problems. Always doublecheck any medicines you take while on Coumadin with both your doctor & Pharmacist to be safest. I would also advise wearing a medical ID bracelet or carry info in your wallet about the fact that you are on this drug, in case of an emergency. Answered by Myong Franchette 2 years ago.

coumadin kind diet Answered by Buddy Wheelus 2 years ago.

If you are going to eat salad, then eat the same sized salad every day. Don't skip a day and make sure it's the same size each day. Don't take supplements with vitamin k. Answered by Joette Sutherland 2 years ago.

i dk. but be careful. my grandfather used to take coumadin it thinned out his bood sooooo much. it was unbelivable how much he bled and how often he bled. Answered by Aleta Dahlka 2 years ago.

what about purple cabbage, yellow, or green peppers, sunflower oil, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, olives, and Echinacea drops on a base of alcohol? thank you for your answers. Answered by Mellissa Sutyak 2 years ago.


Coumadin????
alright, so i dont take another test until this wednesday, one day? that would effect my test results? Asked by Tambra Swilley 2 years ago.

Coumadin reaches full therapeutic impact fairly quickly. By inhibiting vitamin K-mediated clotting, if you stop taking the drug then its effect disappear as it is removed from you body (as opposed to actual blood thinners). How long it takes to get out of your system depends on the dose you were taking. Generally, levels drop below theraputic concentrations within 3-4 days for normal people. Drinking more water and having a healthy liver increase this rate. Missing one dose is not likely to have a serious impact on the drug efficacy. You SHOULD NOT take a double dose the next time and keep your normal schedule. The hospital and your doctor should be advised that you are on this medication. Small internal hemorrhages from your accident may be difficult to control while on coumadin. If your belly become painful, swollen, or you notice large patches of blue/black skin, you should seek medical attention. I hope this answers your question. Answered by Michel Paladini 2 years ago.

If you are saying that you got into a car accident while you were taking Coumadin, you should have told anyone who treated you after that accident that you were on it. If the danger of bleeding is greater than the danger of whatever it is that you're taking the Coumadin for, they would have stopped it (and checked you for bleeding). If you were in a car accident, are on Coumadin, and you have NOT been seen by a medical professional, you need to see one immediately. Please. You should neither assume that everything is all right nor stop taking your anticoagulants without medical advice. Answered by Shaun Brallier 2 years ago.

you need to make sure to stay on and take what the doctor said. as it affects how the tests read. Answered by Lacy Hatten 2 years ago.


Is anyone familiar with coumadin?
I'm on coumadin for Pulmonary Emboli and I've been loosing a lot of hair only I was also diagnosed with lupus but the doctors weren't 100 % sure if I really have lupus could my losing my hair be from the medication or the lupus? Asked by Sook Riblet 2 years ago.

coumadin is an anticoagulant, that is "blood thinner" for people that don't speak fluent doctor. The close monitoring of a person taking it is critical as the blood becomes thin so does your ability to not clot, which could cause a domino of other problems if you had an injury or needed emergency surgery. Prothombin times should be done weekly or more to evaluate your bloods clotting factor. The effects of the coumadin or its treatment does not consider the Lupus. Lupus, or mixed conective tissue disease is usually associated with a person that has RA, Rheumatoid Arthritis, your hair loss may be a side effect of the medicatons, stress, or even the illness you experienced or are currently experiencing. The best thing that you can do to heal your body would be a diet high protien and vitamin C these two things combined heal our bodies. The fact that you are recovering from such an ordeal would indicate that you need very high level because your not only compensating for the illness you need to maintain your normal levels. When I had a significant injury and surgery, I started to drink protien drinks which contained 20-24 grams of protien each, I drank 4-6 a day. I also would take 3-4 oranges and squeeze them in a juicer, this would give me a fairly large glass of juice which is like liquid sunshine, I felt better in a shorter amount of time and I maintain the practice to this day, not as much but everyday! Good luck and I hope you feel better! Answered by Junie Mcclerkin 2 years ago.

Coumadin is a blood thinner and will not cause your hair to fall out. The Lupus however does cause unusual hair loss. www.niams.noh.gov Answered by Harley Phatdouang 2 years ago.

coumadin helps to thin the blood to avoid blood clots from the two sites I quickly read, it sounds like the lupus and the coumadin could be a cause. Take care and get well Answered by Ethel Catalani 2 years ago.

coumadin is a blood thinner, and I've never heard of someone losing their hair from it.. with lupus i guess it could attack your hair follicles but I've never seen it (my aunt has lupus so I've tried to research it a little) in all honesty, it's probably stress.. it's very common to lose hair when you are overly stress, or when you have had a surgery/long hospital stay (injury stresses the body, it's still stress, even if it's not mental stress) Answered by Carolee Clarence 2 years ago.

Lupus is an autoimmune disorder, one of many. Another one is a low thyroid condition called Hashimoto's thyroiditis. I would have your doctor check for that as they often appear together but the latter gets overlooked because lupus is a bigger focus. Low thyroid will cause hair loss; in fact it's usually one of the first signs. Answered by Sharri Slusser 2 years ago.

Warfarin (also known under the brand names of Coumadin®, Jantoven®, Marevan®, and Waran®) is an anticoagulant medication that is administered orally or, very rarely, by injection. It is used for the prophylaxis of thrombosis and embolism in many disorders. Its activity has to be monitored by frequent blood testing for the international normalized ratio (INR). It is named for the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. Warfarin is a synthetic derivative of coumarin, a chemical found naturally in many plants, notably woodruff (Galium odoratum, Rubiaceae), and at lower levels in licorice, lavender and various other species. Warfarin was originally developed as a rat poison, but it is no longer used for that purpose as modern poisons are much more potent and toxic (e.g. brodifacoum). However, warfarin and contemporary rodenticides belong to the same class of drugs (coumarins) and both decrease blood coagulation by interfering with vitamin K metabolism. Just be careful of using this drug and take a second openion. Answered by Leslie Pestana 2 years ago.

Probably the Lupus but you need to see your Dr. right away. Answered by Niesha Hammerly 2 years ago.

u would lose your hair if u were not eating right Answered by Kathryn Demond 2 years ago.


What do I need to know about Coumadin and Lovenox?
I'm having a pulmonary vein isolation/ablation procedure in early March. I have never taken either of these. I am looking for personal accounts or advice that people who take or have taken either of these. I will be taking them for atrial fibrillation. Thank you. Asked by Latonya Baumler 2 years ago.

Coumadin and Lovenox are types of blood thinners commonly used in cases of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation can lead to blood clots forming in her heart which later can cause strokes so preventing these clots from forming is very important. Coumadin is an oral medicine which you will likely need to take every day. Your doctors, especially in the beginning, will need to check labs on you on a regular basis (your INR) and adjust the dose as necessary (an INR that's too high could put you at increased risk for bleeding complications, while if it's too low, it won't protect you from blood clots). Since it may take time before the correct dosage is achieved, many doctors will "bridge" patients with Lovenox until the INR level is therapeutic. Lovenox is a form of heparin that thins the blood immediately and thus protects you from blood clots while the coumadin dose is being adjusted to the proper dose. It has to be taken as a subcutaneous shot twice a day. Either you or a family member will be instructed on how to give these shots before you get discharged or visiting nurse services can be arranged to help you with them. Lovenox is temporary and will be stopped once the coumadin dosage is established. This is just a general overview and you should ask your doctor about how this will specifically apply to you. Good luck. Answered by Nedra Ruminski 2 years ago.

You should also expect some diet restrictions and changes, but the above answer is just about as good as its gonna get on here! great advice!! Answered by Nena Gleaves 2 years ago.


What is the equivalency of asprin to coumadin?
Im currently taking Coumadin 4mg a day ans was wondering. Also if I was to run out of my Coumadin before getting a refill or another prescription for more. Asked by Terra Dorso 2 years ago.

Coumadin does not need prescription.,,and its strongly recommended NOT to substitute it with other platelet inhibitor, such as aspirin, because they work in very different manners,....coumadin works at liver level, blocking the synthesis of prothrombine and antagonizing the effects of carboxylations of vitamin "K" which is the proper antidote against excessive dose (tablets normally contain 5 miligrans of Coumadin (Warfarin sodium)...and they can be obtained from your local pharmacist...without prescription. Aspirin wont help you, and will only compound matters, making your bleeding time longer,and working in a different manner. There is no real EQUIVALENCE of aspirin, as substitute for coumadin,,, Its my opinion that you should be checked and followed in your coumadin doses, by proper weekly or bi-weekly chacks on your prothrombine time (PT) which is the best guide to calculate your daily needs of coumadin... Good luck Answered by Angele Mador 2 years ago.

Coumadin thins your blood, you can only get with a prescription, so if the doctor put u in this med u shouldn't run out. Give the doc a call..........aspirin can b used 4 a lot of things. Answered by Marisha Ingham 2 years ago.

If your doctor has prescribed Coumadin, its really important to take this as directed and to have you PT / INR checked weekly... You do not want your blood too thick or too thin - make sure you have this checked out. I would not subsitute with Asprin, its not as strong as Coumadin. Answered by Malorie Cantor 2 years ago.

there is no drug the same as coumidin.it is a rat poisin used in humans to improve circulation in the veins by thinning and keeping the blood flowing. it is very possible to bleed a lot during an injury while taking this medecine,be very careful with it Answered by Kacie Nichole 2 years ago.


Lovenox vs. Coumadin?
Well I was on birth control only because it was required in order to take accunate which caused it. Asked by Pearl Cradler 2 years ago.

Coumadin is an oral pill as previously mentioned however the clotting levels (INR) need to be monitored frequently to ensure that you are taking the proper dose. This requires frequent clinic visits for blood tests. Lovenox is an injection however it does not require strict monitoring like coumadin does. You need to sit down with your doctor and have him/her explain the risks and benefits of each drug so that you can make an informed decision. Since you are a minor your parents should be there and help you figure it out. Just curious as to what caused the blood clot as you are very young to have such a diagnosis. Answered by Andre Thadison 2 years ago.

lovenox has to be injected, means poking yourself every day. coumadin is probably your better choice, it's a pill. Answered by Ezekiel Konek 2 years ago.


Coumadin....?
I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his... Asked by Sherryl Burgun 2 years ago.

I have a question about coumadin, my father in law called me these morning and told me that both of his feet are discolored a bright red and the top of his left arm is also discolored. He has been on coumadin for the past 2 years, he has emphysema is on portable oxygen...ans was given the coumadin to thin his blood. Could the discoloration be from the coumadin? Im worried about him, but I live in New york state and he lives in Florida. I cant have my husband talk to him, because my husband is deployed to Iraq... Does anyone know anything about this med? Answered by Alida Tinker 2 years ago.

the coumadin can cause bruising and I would assume the discloration you are speaking of is possibly bleeding under the skin... he needs to be seen by his medical doctor so they can do a PT with INR (prothrombin time) on him to make sure that the coumadin dose is the proper one... if his PT is high, he may need to be readjusted... Has he recently changed his diet in any way... if so, it could have affected the way the medication is absorbing into his body...If he has any kind of home health agency seeing him, tell him to call them, and they can get an order to go to his house and draw blood, if not, he needs to call the doc asap for an appointment or either go to the ER if the discolorations become worse or seems to be getting larger... the feet being bright red could also be a circulation problem, among other things... good luck Answered by Xiao Kaber 2 years ago.

He should head for the ER ASAP. I do not believe it is from the coumadin, this is not one of the listed side effects, but there is something brewing. Answered by Faustina Krausz 2 years ago.


I don't want to take coumadin anymore, and I'm looking for an herbal/natural supplement?
Yeah, I was reading that ginger, garlic, feverfew and tree ear mushrooms can reduce the amount of coumadin needed. And to the person that said depression......I said depressed where exactly? Asked by Lavette Drake 2 years ago.

What is Coumadin? Coumadin (warfarin) is an anticoagulant (blood thinner). Coumadin reduces the formation of blood clots by blocking the formation of certain clotting factors. Coumadin is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and blood clots in veins and arteries. Coumadin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Important information about Coumadin: Coumadin can cause birth defects or fatal bleeding in an unborn baby. Do not use Coumadin if you are pregnant. Never take a double dose of this medication or take it together with other products that contain warfarin or coumarin. You should not take Coumadin if you have a bleeding or blood cell disorder, blood in your urine or stools, an infection of the lining of your heart, stomach bleeding, bleeding in the brain, recent or upcoming surgery, or if you need a spinal tap or spinal anesthesia (epidural). Coumadin may cause you to bleed more easily, especially if you have: a history of bleeding problems, high blood pressure or severe heart disease, kidney disease, cancer, surgery or a medical emergency, a disease affecting the blood vessels in your brain, a history of stomach or intestinal bleeding, if you are 65 or older, or if you are severely ill or debilitated. Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Any doctor, dentist, surgeon, or other medical care provider who treats you should know that you are taking Coumadin. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor What should I avoid while taking Coumadin? Ask your doctor before taking any medicine for pain, arthritis, fever, or swelling. This includes acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin, celecoxib (Celebrex), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. These medicines may affect blood clotting and may also increase your risk of stomach bleeding. Do not eat large amounts of foods high in vitamin K (such as liver, leafy green vegetables or vegetable oils). Vitamin K can make Coumadin less effective. Avoid making any changes in your diet without first talking to your doctor. Avoid eating cranberries, drinking cranberry juice, or taking cranberry herbal products. Avoid herbal teas that contain tonka beans, sweet clover, or sweet woodruff. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Coumadin What other drugs will affect Coumadin? Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems or death if you take them with Coumadin. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used. Coumadin can interact with certain herbal (botanical) products, which can increase your risk of bleeding. Do not use any of the following products without first asking your doctor: bromelains; coenzyme Q10; cranberry; danshen; dong quai; garlic; ginkgo biloba; ginseng; or St. John's wort. This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with Coumadin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you...... more With all said, Don't take herbs while coumadin is still in your system! Once you've been free of it and you withdrawed safely then it might be safe for you. Answered by Charleen Richarson 2 years ago.

The problem with "natural" remedies is that they're not given the same oversight by the FDA that drugs are. Strength levels can vary widely, active ingredients may or may not be what is advertised on the container, and even the advertised benefits may or may not be real. If given a choice between natural remedies like herbal supplements and drugs, the drugs are actually far more likely to be effective. If I were you, I'd go to your doctor or your pharmacist to find out what possible alternatives are out there for you. Coumadin isn't a med you can just stop, significant and sometimes severe health implications can result. Answered by Becki Desola 2 years ago.

Ok. No one really likes to take Rat Poison on a regular basis. But in your case you have little choice. There is a reason you are on it, and no doctor just puts a person on coumadin for fun. Yes it sucks, and yes I know. Just do it. And see someone about the depression if you need to, 'cause it's the real issue. Answered by Carletta Calvi 2 years ago.

Hi It can be done but it MUST be done in conjunction with your physician and a qualified natural health practitioner ... a qualified and experienced medical herbalist would actually be the best bet. There are some herbs that can help but I am not going to mention the names as I do not want anyone (not necessarily you) rushing off and trying this without proper supervision as their are risks involved in commencing one, and gradually weaning off the other and bearing in mind your monitoring of blood levels. I know this isn't probably what you wanted to hear, but I really do not think this is something that can be safely addressed at home, by the lay person without medical support. Answered by Maryln Coleson 2 years ago.

Just take the bloody Coumadin, unless you want your blood to turn solid Answered by Wava Krnach 2 years ago.

I am not a girly girl and I dress modestly and behave with morals and kindness. I am a jeans and t-shirt kinda girl. My mother tried to make me wear skirts and stuff but I always hated it, so it wasn't her that made me who I am today. I was always a tom boy and always will be. Wearing a dress, stocking, and high heels make me so uncomfortable. If it makes you feel good about yourself then go for it. Answered by Danyel Doeden 2 years ago.

I bet you are blood type A.Type A is the thickest blood.Eat for your blood type.Eating animal protein makes the blood thicker.Ginko biloba and garlic are natural blood thinners.Vit K clots the blood,should you cut yourself or have uncontrolable bleeding. Answered by Darla Eggleston 2 years ago.


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