CLOZARIL Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019758/001.

Names and composition

"CLOZARIL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CLOZAPINE.
It belongs to the class Atypical antipsychotics and is used in Psychosis, mania (Central Nervous System)

Answered questions

How good is the medicine clozaril?
I begun to take clozaril , is a week now , I feel so uncoordinated and heavy is it going to be like this forever? Asked by Nadia Lejeune 4 months ago.

Clozaril is effective, but has a lot of side effects. This comes from the Clozaril web site: Side Effects Associated with CLOZARIL As with any medication, certain side effects are associated with CLOZARIL. Some of the side effects that have been reported when therapy is started disappear with time or after the healthcare professional adjusts the dosage. In some cases the side effects require treatment. The healthcare professional, or another member of the treatment team, can give advice on how to recognize potential side effects and what to do about them. In addition to agranulocytosis (the most serious side effect associated with CLOZARIL), the following side effects have been reported: Seizures or convulsions: The higher the dosage, the greater the risk of seizures. Also, people who have had seizures in the past are more likely to have them with CLOZARIL. If a person suffers a seizure, he or she should tell their healthcare professional at once. Fast or irregular heartbeat: If this happens, the dosage may be reduced, or this side effect may be treated with another medication. Myocarditis (an inflammation of a muscle in the heart): The risk is greatest during the first month of CLOZARIL therapy. Orthostatic hypotension (a fall in blood pressure when suddenly standing up): The risk is highest when treatment with CLOZARIL is started. Other less serious reported side effects are drowsiness, heavy drooling, headache, constipation, fever, fatigue, nausea, and weight gain. Because healthcare professionals are familiar with these and other possible side effects, they can offer advice on relieving them. Answered by Georgeann Catrett 4 months ago.

There isn't any well reply on your query, everybody is distinctive and responds to meds another way. Your brother could had been experiencing facet results at the clozaril so the general practitioner desired to take a look at some thing else. Side results may also be lethal so the general practitioner is watching out for his nice pursuits. Everyone is somewhat distinctive and a few meds paintings larger on a few individuals than others. Some medicines lose effectiveness over the years. Some psych medicines placed individuals at threat for metabolic issues, diabetes, and neurological facet results. The general practitioner is watching for the nice drug or blend to curb facet results and reduce signs. Also there's a probability that your brother used to be no longer one hundred% treatment compliant. Many sufferers don't take the meds as prescribed and that may end up in hospitalizations. Some assets state that lower than five% of sufferers take the meds on time table as prescribed daily. I can simplest think how tough it's so that you can see your brother endure. Hang in there, it'll get larger. Know that the medical professionals wish him stabilized up to you do. They do not wish to peer him hospitalized anymore both. Answered by Jone Daron 4 months ago.


I have a few questions about clozaril?
How sedative is it if you're on 100mg likeliness of fainting from it? also how alert are you when you first start taking it and also as youre on it? does the medicine effect you're personality? how common is it for the blood levels of the medication to get too high in your bloodstream?? Asked by Deloras Phyfiher 4 months ago.

Clozaril is currently on European drug alert due to its risk of causing potentially fatal agranulocytosis. It is also on surveillance alert as it can also cause myocarditis which has also been fatal. It is thus used in a very limited way in a very small and clearly defined group of patients all of whom must have very frequent blood count and cardiac monitoring. Clozaril is indicated in treatment-resistant schizophrenic patients and in schizophrenia patients who have severe, untreatable neurological adverse reactions to other antipsychotic agents, including atypical antipsychotics. Clozaril is also indicated in psychotic disorders occurring during the course of Parkinson's disease, in cases where standard treatment has failed. Prescribing physicians must comply fully with the required safety measures. Answered by Zula Jaross 4 months ago.

Truehope dispensing in Canada has the main effective bi-polar (organic source) product on the marketplace. No side outcomes. no one knows what the long term outcomes of maximum drugs are because of the fact they're basically examined on matters for form of 8 weeks. it is it. there is not any finding out of two or extra drugs taken mutually, no longer to show 3. self reliant finding out of maximum anti-psychotic drugs has did no longer prepare that they are any further effective than placebo for the condition meant yet (such as you have found out) produce countless undesirable outcomes. Get a consultation with a expert Homeopath for a distinctive approach that unquestionably works. Answered by Christin Binnie 4 months ago.

Clozapine is used to treat the symptoms of schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual thinking, loss of interest in life, and strong or inappropriate emotions) in patients who have not been helped by other medications or who have tried to kill themselves and are likely to try to kill or harm themselves again. Clozapine is in a class of medications called atypical antipsychotics. It works by changing the activity of certain natural substances in the brain. Consult the doctor or a pharmacist. Answered by Leonardo Markou 4 months ago.

clozaril is an antipsychotic drug clozapine, it is not a sedative. it definitely affects your behaviour. Answered by Cassi Kishel 4 months ago.

very lethal jk idk Answered by Rayna Pinzone 4 months ago.


Is 50 mg of clozaril really strong?
is clozaril a strong drug? will being on trilafon make it stronger?? Asked by Candie Beale 4 months ago.

Clozaril is an extremely potent atypical antipsychotic agent, hands down substantially more effective than any other medication for currently in use. It does however have substantial risks that require regular blood tests for the first year of use. That said, it is the go-to medication when all other atypical and typical antipsychotic agents have failed. 50mg is not a high dose at all, it's a moderate starting dosage. Actual therapeutic dosages start in the 300-900mg range. Trilafon is a typical antipsychotic agent. It does not directly affect Clozaril, but it essentially does the same thing with less potency and effect. In general, you shouldn't be on both unless you're switching from one, to another. Answered by Fabiola Preis 4 months ago.


Saphris and Clozaril ?
How do they work seperate and together? Please Let me Know. Thank You & God Bless! Asked by Lashawnda Derosso 4 months ago.

Saphris is an antipsychotic medication. It works by changing the actions of chemicals in the brain. Clozaril is an antipsychotic medication. It works by changing the actions of chemicals in the brain. Clozaril is used to treat severe schizophrenia symptoms in people who have not responded to other medications. It is also used to help reduce the risk of suicidal behavior in people with schizophrenia or similar disorders. These meds have interactions if used together: CNS depression, tardive dyskinesia, tachycardia, and ECG changes. Anticholinergic effects of these agents may also be additively increased. Excessive anticholinergic effects may result in paralytic ileus, hyperthermia, heat stroke, and the anticholinergic intoxication syndrome. Peripheral symptoms of anticholinergic intoxication commonly include mydriasis, blurred vision, flushed face, fever, dry skin and mucous membranes, tachycardia, urinary retention and constipation. Central symptoms may include memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, hallucinations, psychosis, delirium, hyperactivity, twitching or jerking movements, stereotypy and seizures. Please read the following website, you may want to talk to a pharmacist and your doctor about it though. Answered by Daine Leonetti 4 months ago.

Just from a quick wiki check both are Atypicals used in the treatment of schizophrenia Clozaril is older and Saphris is the new shiny toy. I am not sure how they work separately. Answered by Destiny Desatnik 4 months ago.


How sedative is clozaril if you're on a low dose and whats the likeliness of fainting from it?
how common is it for your blood levels of the medication to get too high Asked by Rochel Waldroff 4 months ago.

Clozaril is currently on European drug alert due to its risk of causing potentially fatal agranulocytosis. It is also on surveillance alert as it can also cause myocarditis which has also been fatal. It is thus used in a very limited way in a very small and clearly defined group of patients all of whom must have very frequent blood count and cardiac monitoring. Clozaril is indicated in treatment-resistant schizophrenic patients and in schizophrenia patients who have severe, untreatable neurological adverse reactions to other antipsychotic agents, including atypical antipsychotics. Clozaril is also indicated in psychotic disorders occurring during the course of Parkinson's disease, in cases where standard treatment has failed. Prescribing physicians must comply fully with the required safety measures. Answered by Oswaldo Hellings 4 months ago.


What can happen if you drink alcohol while on clozaril?
Asked by Reginald Stipetich 4 months ago.

According to the clozapine (Clozaril®, FazaClo®) prescribing information, drinking alcohol while taking the drug is not recommended. Combining alcohol and clozapine can increase the chance and severity of several clozapine side effects. In addition, many people with a mental illness are usually advised to avoid alcohol. Alcohol and Clozapine Side Effects Drinking alcohol may increase your risk of certain side effects of clozapine, such as drowsiness or low blood pressure when sitting or standing up (orthostatic hypertension). You may also be more sensitive to the effects of alcohol if you are taking clozapine. You may not be able to safely drink as much alcohol as you are used to drinking in the past. Clozapine is approved to treat schizophrenia. Generally, it is best for people with this type of mental illness to avoid alcohol, as it may make symptoms worse and is often a form of "self-medication." Talking With Your Healthcare Provider About Alcohol and Clozapine Although it is not recommended that you drink alcohol while taking clozapine, you should not be afraid to discuss your alcohol consumption with your healthcare provider. Together, the two of you can make a shared decision about clozapine and alcohol that is right for your particular situation. If you do drink and want to stop, your healthcare provider can also suggest ways to help you with this Answered by Arielle Boelsche 4 months ago.


Do they use the medication "Clozaril" for Bipolar disorders?
Asked by Joella Lied 4 months ago.

Clozaril is given to help people with severe schizophrenia who have failed to respond to standard treatments. It is also used to help reduce the risk of suicidal behavior in people with schizophrenia. Clozaril is not a cure, but it can help some people return to more normal lives. It may also have other uses, as determined by your doctor. Answered by Karren Bogner 4 months ago.

clozaril is an antipsychotic and in the nursing drug guide i looked it up in there was no mention of it being used to treat bipolar disorder but still many antipsychotics are used for treating bipolar disorder. i think just because this book doesn't mention it doesn't mean it couldn't be used for it. maybe calling a pharmacy could answer your questions. Answered by Vickey Hodgdon 4 months ago.


How does Clozaril lower white blood cells and did I spell it write?
Asked by Tracy Weis 4 months ago.

Clozaril induced Agranulocytosis: The actual mechanism is unknown. So, there is no answer other than speculation. We have patients, occasionally, on Clozaril. You have to make sure they are registered and that their labs are in order before supplying. It can be a pain to get those patients their meds. Answered by Beulah Quinlivan 4 months ago.


Clozaril works with tegretol?
can you take clozaril with tegretol? Asked by Bart Donel 4 months ago.

It isn't recommended because carbamazepine (tegretol) can reduce the white blood cell count and thereby increase the risk of agranulocytosis, a potentially serious side effect. Clozaril itself can lower the seizure threshhold so if you are taking tegretol for seizures, it would be a serious risk to consider as well. Clozaril is only used when other anti-psychotics fail, so if you are in this situation it may be a necessary risk, but discuss this with your psychiatrist. Perhaps another anti-convulsant can be tried for seizures or mood stabilization if Clozaril is deemed necessary. I will say I have seen some truly astounding positive results with Clozaril. Answered by Emma Lamirand 4 months ago.


Can anyone tell me anything about Clozaril/Clozapine?
I'm a Psychotic Depressive. I already take a mood-stabiliser (Lamotrigine) and an anti-depressant (Sertraline). I have previously tried 7 different anti-psychotic medications and none have worked, which is why i am a suitable candidate for Clozapine. Asked by Sherika Grosenick 4 months ago.

Are you schizophrenic, or is your psychiatrist going to give this to you as a 'mood stabilizer'? It's pretty nasty stuff. BAD side effects...BAD side effects... GENERIC NAME: clozapine BRAND NAME: Clozaril DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Clozapine is an anti-psychotic medication that works by blocking receptors in the brain for several neurotransmitters (chemicals that nerves use to communicate with each other) including dopamine type 4 receptors, serotonin type 2 receptors, norepinephrine receptors, acetylcholine receptors, and histamine receptors. Unlike traditional anti-psychotic agents, such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine) and haloperidol (Haldol) as well as the newer anti-psychotics, risperidone (Risperdal) and olanzapine (Zyprexa), clozapine only weakly blocks dopamine type 2 receptors. PRESCRIPTION: Yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets: 25 and 100 mg. STORAGE: Tablets should be kept below 30°C (86 °F). PRESCRIBED FOR: Clozapine is use in the management of psychotic disorders including schizophrenia. Because of concern for the side effect of agranulocytosis (see side effects), clozapine should be reserved for patients who have failed to respond to other standard medications or who are at risk for recurring suicidal behavior. DOSING: Clozapine is given once, twice, or three times daily. The dose often is increased slowly until the optimal dose is found. The full effects of clozapine may not be seen until several weeks after treatment is begun. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Risperidone (Risperdal) may cause an increase in the amount of clozapine in the blood. This could lead to an increased risk of side effects from clozapine. PREGNANCY: There are no adequate studies of clozapine in pregnant women. Studies in animals suggest no important effects on the fetus. Clozapine can be used in pregnancy if the physician feels that it is necessary. NURSING MOTHERS: Animal studies suggest that clozapine is secreted in breast milk. Therefore, women taking clozapine should not nurse their infants. SIDE EFFECTS: Clozapine may cause a severe reduction in white blood cell count, a condition known as agranulocytosis, in approximately 1 in 100 patients who take it for at least one year. White blood cells fight infections, and a severe reduction in white blood cells can result in severe infections. If not caught early, agranulocytosis can be fatal. Therefore, the white blood cell count should be measured (with a blood test) prior to starting treatment and regularly (weekly) while patients receive this medication, and for 4 weeks after it is stopped. Among elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis, treatment with clozapine is associated with an increased risk of death for unclear reasons. Clozapine is not approved for use in dementia-related psychosis. Seizures have occurred in approximately 1 of every 20 to 30 persons receiving clozapine. Patients receiving higher doses seem to be at higher risk. Dizziness may occur in 1 of 5 persons taking clozapine. In some cases this may be due to orthostatic hypotension, a marked decrease in blood pressure that occurs when going from a lying or sitting position to a standing position. The drop in blood pressure may lead to loss of consciousness or even cardiac and respiratory arrest. This reaction is more common during the first few weeks of therapy while the dose is increasing, when drug is stopped briefly, or when patients are taking benzodiazepines such as diazepam (Valium) or other anti-psychotic drugs. The most common side effect of clozapine is drowsiness. Other side effects include increased heart rate, increased salivation, headache, tremor, low blood pressure, and fever. Clozapine has anticholinergic effects that interfere with the function of smooth muscles. This can lead to blurred vision and difficulty urinating (when there is enlargement of the prostate) due to effects on the muscles of the eye and bladder. Clozapine slows the intestine and leads to constipation in approximately 14% of patients. Paralysis of the intestinal muscles can lead to paralytic ileus, a condition in which the intestine stops working. Clozapine also may cause extrapyramidal effects (sudden, often jerky, involuntary motions of the head, neck, arms, body, or eyes). Like other anti-psychotics, clozapine also may cause tardive dyskinesia (potentially irreversible involuntary movements). The risk of such reactions appears to be lower with clozapine than with older anti-psychotics, perhaps due to its weaker effects on dopamine type 2 receptors. Although there is no clear link between clozapine and diabetes, patients should be tested during treatment for elevated blood-sugars. Additionally, persons with risk factors for diabetes, including obesity or a family history of diabetes, should have their fasting levels of blood sugar tested before starting treatment and periodically throughout treatment to detect the onset of diabetes. Any patient developing symptoms that suggest diabetes during treatment should be tested for diabetes. Clozapine is eliminated from the body by enzymes (P450) in the liver. Numerous medications can increase or decrease the activities of these enzymes leading to low (potentially ineffective)or high (potentially toxic) levels of clozapine in the blood. When used with these medications, the dose of clozapine may need to be reduced or increased. WARNING: Because clozapine has rarely caused severe (sometimes fatal) blood disorders (agranulocytosis), clozapine should be used only for severely ill patients who have failed to respond to other therapies. At least two other standard antipsychotic drugs should be tried before trying clozapine. Clozapine may cause seizures, especially when higher amounts of clozapine are used. Inform your doctor if you have a history of seizures. You should not perform activities where sudden loss of consciousness could cause serious risk to yourself or others (e.g., operating machinery, driving, swimming). Dizziness upon standing (with or without fainting) may occur, and may rarely lead to breathing or heart collapse. Tell your doctor if you are using other psychiatric medications (e.g., benzodiazepines) because these problems have also infrequently occurred in people using these other medications. Dizziness may occur at the first dose or during quick dose increases. If you miss doses for a short period of time (2 days or greater since the last dose), contact your doctor since you may need to restart using smaller doses of clozapine. Rare (sometimes fatal) heart disease (e.g., myocarditis, heart failure) may occur with the use of clozapine. If you have a family history of heart failure, you should get a heart evaluation before you start taking this medication. Clozapine is not recommended for use in those with severe heart disease. If you are ever diagnosed with clozapine-related heart disease (e.g., myocarditis), you should not take clozapine ever again. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details. If you develop symptoms of an infection (such as fever, chills, or a persistent sore throat), unusual fatigue, difficulty breathing, rapid or irregular heartbeat, dizziness, or chest pain, notify your doctor immediately. Your doctor will monitor your blood cells before your therapy begins and during treatment. White blood cell testing must continue once a week for four weeks after you stop using this. USES: This medication is used to treat symptoms of a certain type of mental condition (schizophrenia) that is untreatable by other medications. HOW TO USE: Take this medication exactly as directed. Do not take it more often or increase the dose without your doctor's approval. If you are taking the orally disintegrating tablet form of clozapine, peel the foil on the blister. Do not push the tablet through the foil. Instead, remove the tablet with dry hands and place the tablet in your mouth. Allow the tablet to dissolve and swallow with your saliva. No water is needed to take the kind of clozapine. Do not suddenly stop taking this medication without notifying your doctor. Your dose may need to be gradually decreased. During the first few weeks of treatment, your dose may be adjusted until the best dose is identified. It may take several weeks for the full benefit of the drug to occur. SIDE EFFECTS: This medication may cause drowsiness or dizziness. Use caution performing tasks that require alertness. Other side effects include stomach upset, constipation, dry mouth, headache, tremor and increased salivation. If these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor. To relieve dry mouth, suck on (sugarless) hard candy or ice chips, chew (sugarless) gum, drink water or use saliva substitute. Notify your doctor promptly if you develop: chest pain, a rapid heart rate, difficulty breathing, aching muscles and joints, rash, leg swelling/pain, a sore throat, fever, weakness, flu-like symptoms, seizures, a change in the amount of urine. To prevent excessive dizziness, rise slowly from a flat or seated position. Avoid sudden changes in posture and be careful on stairs. This drug may infrequently make your blood sugar level rise, therefore causing or worsening diabetes. This high blood sugar can rarely cause serious (sometimes fatal) conditions such as diabetic coma. Tell your doctor immediately if you develop symptoms of high blood sugar, such as unusual increased thirst and urination, or vision changes. If you already have diabetes, be sure to check your blood sugars regularly. This drug may also cause significant weight gain and a rise in your blood cholesterol (or triglyceride) levels. These effects, along with diabetes, may increase your risk for developing heart disease. Discuss the risks and benefits of treatment with your doctor. (See also Notes section.) If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. Answered by Tyson Artiaga 4 months ago.

This is a relatively new drug to the public and like all new drugs, docs are prescribing more than the others. It is primarily used for bipolor disorders, but can be used for other things as well. This drug has lots of potential side effects and can interact with a variety of meds including regular antibiotics. You should give blood tests during the first six months of taking the drug to ensure your body is not developing or reacting abnormally. I don't know that I would go with this one myself, but your doc knows your symptoms and he knows your history...I don't. Research, Research, Research. That's the best advice I can give to you. Answered by Hector Boies 4 months ago.

I took it for pain and it made me feel wierd and didn't help pain Answered by Edmund Stricker 4 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019758/001 CLOZARIL CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
019758/002 CLOZARIL CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019758/001 CLOZARIL CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
019758/002 CLOZARIL CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
021590/001 FAZACLO ODT CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG
021590/002 FAZACLO ODT CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 100MG
021590/003 FAZACLO ODT CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 50MG
021590/004 FAZACLO ODT CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 12.5MG
021590/005 FAZACLO ODT CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 150MG
021590/006 FAZACLO ODT CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 200MG
074546/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074546/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074949/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074949/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074949/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074949/004 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
075162/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
075162/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075417/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
075417/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075417/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
075417/004 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
075417/005 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075713/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
075713/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075713/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
076809/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
076809/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
076809/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
090308/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG
090308/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 100MG
201824/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 12.5MG
201824/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG
201824/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 100MG
202873/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
202873/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
203039/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 150MG
203039/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 200MG
203479/001 VERSACLOZ CLOZAPINE SUSPENSION/ORAL 50MG per ML
203807/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
203807/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
206433/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
206433/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
206433/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
206433/004 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Mylan

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