CLOZAPINE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 074546/001.

Names and composition

"CLOZAPINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CLOZAPINE.
It belongs to the class Atypical antipsychotics and is used in Psychosis, mania (Central Nervous System)

Answered questions

Clozapine experiment?
I have a form of OCD and I've tried Risperidone, Zyprexa, Seroquel, Solian, and Invega. Because these anti-psychotics have failed, do I have the go ahead with Clozapine? Can you start treatment at home or do you need to be hospitalised? Is it sedating? Please, I'd like to know more about this. Asked by Kendal Vanvoorhis 4 months ago.

Clozapine (sold as Clozaril, Leponex, Fazaclo, Froidir; Denzapine, Zaponex in the UK; Klozapol in Poland, Clopine in NZ/Aus) is an antipsychotic medication used in the treatment of schizophrenia. The first of the atypical antipsychotics to be developed, it was first introduced in Europe in 1971, but was voluntarily withdrawn by the manufacturer in 1975 after it was shown to cause agranulocytosis that led to death in some patients. In 1989, after studies demonstrated that it was more effective than any other antipsychotic for treating schizophrenia, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved clozapine's use but only for treatment-resistant schizophrenia. The FDA requires weekly blood testing for patients taking clozapine.[1] The FDA also requires clozapine to carry five black box warnings for agranulocytosis, seizures, myocarditis, for "other adverse cardiovascular and respiratory effects", and for "increased mortality in elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis."[2] In 2002 the FDA approved clozapine for reducing the risk of suicidal behavior but only for patients with schizophrenia. Clozapine has been shown to be the most effective drug in treating schizophrenia[citation needed] but due to its potential to cause many severe side effects, it is relegated to third-line use. Clozapine is only used in patients after other anti-psychotics have failed. Safer use of clozapine requires weekly blood monitoring for around five months followed by four weekly testing thereafter. Personally, I would think it to be safe to start at home, starting with the lowest dose and working up as ordered by the doctor. Have you tried Luvox and Abilify? Answered by Jospeh Kosuta 4 months ago.

i have felt and acted on suicide many situations. I presently were out of the well-being middle for 3 months. that is a lengthy time period for me. i don't experience astounding yet i trust extra helpful than I have in a lengthy time period. What has labored for me is attempting to modify the harmful thoughts and understanding suicide isn't an determination. I have tried suicide and characteristic not succeededd, so I have realized that i should be right here for a reason and that i'm attempting to stay life to the finest of my potential. I do take drugs that are Neurontin, Serequel, and Remeron. i attempted without kidding probable over one hundred medecines. this mix is operating. Please attempt to trust there is wish. I do not forget that you're feeling hopeless i have been there and reduce back. attempt to picture of issues that you appreciate. Answered by Georgie Hysell 4 months ago.


Clozapine treatment question?
what is clozapine treatment? for whom is it intended? does it work? Asked by Gracie Brickley 4 months ago.

"what is clozapine treatment?" -- Well, we don't say "clozapine treatment". This med is clozapine (Clozaril and Fazaclo) and it is a psychotropic (anti-psychotic) drug used to manage psychotic disorders which includes but is not restricted to schizophrenia and does NOT include dementia-induced psychoses. (Psychoses is plural for psychosis) "for whom is it intended?" -- It's intended for those individuals who have a psychotic disorder for which this drug is recommended. Because it causes agranulocytosis (a reduction in the number of granulated white blood cells) in about 1 in every 100 patients who take it for longer than one year, it's not the first drug of choice and is generally used when patients have failed to respond to other psychotropics like Haldol and Risperdal and for those patients at risk for recurring suicidal behavior. "does it work?" -- For many. Not all medications have the same success, not all patients respond in the same way to all medications. You start with a low dose that might be taken from one to three times a day and titrate cautiously until a therapeutic dose is achieved. Like most psychotropics, it takes several weeks to see the full effect. Answered by Garfield Gip 4 months ago.

Schizophrenia is an imbalance within the mind purpose from genetic or organic elements. The majority of the populace is Christian. Ergo Christians breed the crazies. You can discover all the stipulations of schizophrenia in Christians. withdrawal from truth – Living lifestyles via a fictional ebook approximately a paranormal supernatural being (with out a proof) illogical styles of considering – Everything is fallacious that doesn't trust the bible delusions and hallucinations – talking in tongue, evangelists In end the one rationale there are individuals with schizophrenia, is considering that Christians received’t stop reproducing. Answered by Toi Gradle 4 months ago.

Plural Of Psychosis Answered by Sabra Buziak 4 months ago.


Scared to take clopine(clozapine) for my Schizophrenia?
So heres a little bit about my mental health history.I got diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia at 15 i'm (17) years old now and i've been on numerous anti-psychotics none has worked so far.I'm currently taking 1000mg epilim,6mg benztrop,15mg invega,I don't have a problem with the mood stabiliser... Asked by Miss Bussmann 4 months ago.

So heres a little bit about my mental health history.I got diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia at 15 i'm (17) years old now and i've been on numerous anti-psychotics none has worked so far.I'm currently taking 1000mg epilim,6mg benztrop,15mg invega,I don't have a problem with the mood stabiliser (epilim) but the invega doesn't seem to be working.My psychiatrist told me today that he has no other choice but to put me on clopine(clozapine) but i'm pretty iffy about taking it because it does something to your white blood cells and you could even die from it.That's why you have to get a blood test every week for 18 weeks (3months) and then once every month after that to monitor you.I'm kinda scared to take it though ,whats your opinion on it and have you tried it before or know anyone who's tried it?? Thanks for any input! . Answered by Porsha Isa 4 months ago.

Hi I am on Clozapine for Schizophrenia so will answer your question as truthfully as I can. It is a rare side effect that your white blood cells will drop. This is why you have the weekly blood monitoring for the first 18 weeks to check that this is not happening. If it happens you will be brought carefully off the drug. I've been on clozapine now for a few months and my blood cells have been fine. What they do is a clozapine titration and it will be charted. Every day until you've titrated you will get your blood pressure taken and pulse to check everything is okay there. Before you begin you will have an initial blood test to check you're suitable. All this usually happens in a hospital but it can be done in the community, it's just more complicated/ I was scared to take this drug too, considering all the potential side effects. I'm not going to lie, I've experienced a lot of them. My pulse went pretty fast, I got tachycardia, but I'm now on beta blockers to counteract that. I drool when I sleep, again there are meds for it but haven't found the right ones yet. I get constipation but taking a laxative every night sorts that out. When I take them I feel tired, but not mega tired like I was on quetiapine or olanzapine. I have barely put on any weight on this (YES!!!) which is awesome. As long as you stay healthy it's fine. Clozapine worked slowly for me but I am no longer psychotic and I feel great actually. I started it in hospital so was monitored very carefully. The blood tests are a pain, I must say. But it's necessary if you want to continue taking it. Mail me if you have any more questions, am willing to answer! Good luck in your choice. Answered by Roxanna Embertson 4 months ago.

Like any medication Clozapine has a therapeutic effects and also side effects. The side effect you are worried about calls agranulocytosis, it is a low white blood cells with other words. To avoid this white blood cells count should be measured with a blood test prior to starting treatment and regularly (weekly) during the treatment, and for 4 weeks after it is stopped. Answered by Billi Friedt 4 months ago.

seems like you have two choices, either have schizophrenia without medicine or take the medicine for schizophrenia. Answered by Laure Scherrman 4 months ago.


Can anyone tell me anything about Clozaril/Clozapine?
I'm a Psychotic Depressive. I already take a mood-stabiliser (Lamotrigine) and an anti-depressant (Sertraline). I have previously tried 7 different anti-psychotic medications and none have worked, which is why i am a suitable candidate for Clozapine. Asked by Goldie Coppenger 4 months ago.

Are you schizophrenic, or is your psychiatrist going to give this to you as a 'mood stabilizer'? It's pretty nasty stuff. BAD side effects...BAD side effects... GENERIC NAME: clozapine BRAND NAME: Clozaril DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Clozapine is an anti-psychotic medication that works by blocking receptors in the brain for several neurotransmitters (chemicals that nerves use to communicate with each other) including dopamine type 4 receptors, serotonin type 2 receptors, norepinephrine receptors, acetylcholine receptors, and histamine receptors. Unlike traditional anti-psychotic agents, such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine) and haloperidol (Haldol) as well as the newer anti-psychotics, risperidone (Risperdal) and olanzapine (Zyprexa), clozapine only weakly blocks dopamine type 2 receptors. PRESCRIPTION: Yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets: 25 and 100 mg. STORAGE: Tablets should be kept below 30°C (86 °F). PRESCRIBED FOR: Clozapine is use in the management of psychotic disorders including schizophrenia. Because of concern for the side effect of agranulocytosis (see side effects), clozapine should be reserved for patients who have failed to respond to other standard medications or who are at risk for recurring suicidal behavior. DOSING: Clozapine is given once, twice, or three times daily. The dose often is increased slowly until the optimal dose is found. The full effects of clozapine may not be seen until several weeks after treatment is begun. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Risperidone (Risperdal) may cause an increase in the amount of clozapine in the blood. This could lead to an increased risk of side effects from clozapine. PREGNANCY: There are no adequate studies of clozapine in pregnant women. Studies in animals suggest no important effects on the fetus. Clozapine can be used in pregnancy if the physician feels that it is necessary. NURSING MOTHERS: Animal studies suggest that clozapine is secreted in breast milk. Therefore, women taking clozapine should not nurse their infants. SIDE EFFECTS: Clozapine may cause a severe reduction in white blood cell count, a condition known as agranulocytosis, in approximately 1 in 100 patients who take it for at least one year. White blood cells fight infections, and a severe reduction in white blood cells can result in severe infections. If not caught early, agranulocytosis can be fatal. Therefore, the white blood cell count should be measured (with a blood test) prior to starting treatment and regularly (weekly) while patients receive this medication, and for 4 weeks after it is stopped. Among elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis, treatment with clozapine is associated with an increased risk of death for unclear reasons. Clozapine is not approved for use in dementia-related psychosis. Seizures have occurred in approximately 1 of every 20 to 30 persons receiving clozapine. Patients receiving higher doses seem to be at higher risk. Dizziness may occur in 1 of 5 persons taking clozapine. In some cases this may be due to orthostatic hypotension, a marked decrease in blood pressure that occurs when going from a lying or sitting position to a standing position. The drop in blood pressure may lead to loss of consciousness or even cardiac and respiratory arrest. This reaction is more common during the first few weeks of therapy while the dose is increasing, when drug is stopped briefly, or when patients are taking benzodiazepines such as diazepam (Valium) or other anti-psychotic drugs. The most common side effect of clozapine is drowsiness. Other side effects include increased heart rate, increased salivation, headache, tremor, low blood pressure, and fever. Clozapine has anticholinergic effects that interfere with the function of smooth muscles. This can lead to blurred vision and difficulty urinating (when there is enlargement of the prostate) due to effects on the muscles of the eye and bladder. Clozapine slows the intestine and leads to constipation in approximately 14% of patients. Paralysis of the intestinal muscles can lead to paralytic ileus, a condition in which the intestine stops working. Clozapine also may cause extrapyramidal effects (sudden, often jerky, involuntary motions of the head, neck, arms, body, or eyes). Like other anti-psychotics, clozapine also may cause tardive dyskinesia (potentially irreversible involuntary movements). The risk of such reactions appears to be lower with clozapine than with older anti-psychotics, perhaps due to its weaker effects on dopamine type 2 receptors. Although there is no clear link between clozapine and diabetes, patients should be tested during treatment for elevated blood-sugars. Additionally, persons with risk factors for diabetes, including obesity or a family history of diabetes, should have their fasting levels of blood sugar tested before starting treatment and periodically throughout treatment to detect the onset of diabetes. Any patient developing symptoms that suggest diabetes during treatment should be tested for diabetes. Clozapine is eliminated from the body by enzymes (P450) in the liver. Numerous medications can increase or decrease the activities of these enzymes leading to low (potentially ineffective)or high (potentially toxic) levels of clozapine in the blood. When used with these medications, the dose of clozapine may need to be reduced or increased. WARNING: Because clozapine has rarely caused severe (sometimes fatal) blood disorders (agranulocytosis), clozapine should be used only for severely ill patients who have failed to respond to other therapies. At least two other standard antipsychotic drugs should be tried before trying clozapine. Clozapine may cause seizures, especially when higher amounts of clozapine are used. Inform your doctor if you have a history of seizures. You should not perform activities where sudden loss of consciousness could cause serious risk to yourself or others (e.g., operating machinery, driving, swimming). Dizziness upon standing (with or without fainting) may occur, and may rarely lead to breathing or heart collapse. Tell your doctor if you are using other psychiatric medications (e.g., benzodiazepines) because these problems have also infrequently occurred in people using these other medications. Dizziness may occur at the first dose or during quick dose increases. If you miss doses for a short period of time (2 days or greater since the last dose), contact your doctor since you may need to restart using smaller doses of clozapine. Rare (sometimes fatal) heart disease (e.g., myocarditis, heart failure) may occur with the use of clozapine. If you have a family history of heart failure, you should get a heart evaluation before you start taking this medication. Clozapine is not recommended for use in those with severe heart disease. If you are ever diagnosed with clozapine-related heart disease (e.g., myocarditis), you should not take clozapine ever again. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details. If you develop symptoms of an infection (such as fever, chills, or a persistent sore throat), unusual fatigue, difficulty breathing, rapid or irregular heartbeat, dizziness, or chest pain, notify your doctor immediately. Your doctor will monitor your blood cells before your therapy begins and during treatment. White blood cell testing must continue once a week for four weeks after you stop using this. USES: This medication is used to treat symptoms of a certain type of mental condition (schizophrenia) that is untreatable by other medications. HOW TO USE: Take this medication exactly as directed. Do not take it more often or increase the dose without your doctor's approval. If you are taking the orally disintegrating tablet form of clozapine, peel the foil on the blister. Do not push the tablet through the foil. Instead, remove the tablet with dry hands and place the tablet in your mouth. Allow the tablet to dissolve and swallow with your saliva. No water is needed to take the kind of clozapine. Do not suddenly stop taking this medication without notifying your doctor. Your dose may need to be gradually decreased. During the first few weeks of treatment, your dose may be adjusted until the best dose is identified. It may take several weeks for the full benefit of the drug to occur. SIDE EFFECTS: This medication may cause drowsiness or dizziness. Use caution performing tasks that require alertness. Other side effects include stomach upset, constipation, dry mouth, headache, tremor and increased salivation. If these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor. To relieve dry mouth, suck on (sugarless) hard candy or ice chips, chew (sugarless) gum, drink water or use saliva substitute. Notify your doctor promptly if you develop: chest pain, a rapid heart rate, difficulty breathing, aching muscles and joints, rash, leg swelling/pain, a sore throat, fever, weakness, flu-like symptoms, seizures, a change in the amount of urine. To prevent excessive dizziness, rise slowly from a flat or seated position. Avoid sudden changes in posture and be careful on stairs. This drug may infrequently make your blood sugar level rise, therefore causing or worsening diabetes. This high blood sugar can rarely cause serious (sometimes fatal) conditions such as diabetic coma. Tell your doctor immediately if you develop symptoms of high blood sugar, such as unusual increased thirst and urination, or vision changes. If you already have diabetes, be sure to check your blood sugars regularly. This drug may also cause significant weight gain and a rise in your blood cholesterol (or triglyceride) levels. These effects, along with diabetes, may increase your risk for developing heart disease. Discuss the risks and benefits of treatment with your doctor. (See also Notes section.) If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. Answered by Eulalia Batchelder 4 months ago.

This is a relatively new drug to the public and like all new drugs, docs are prescribing more than the others. It is primarily used for bipolor disorders, but can be used for other things as well. This drug has lots of potential side effects and can interact with a variety of meds including regular antibiotics. You should give blood tests during the first six months of taking the drug to ensure your body is not developing or reacting abnormally. I don't know that I would go with this one myself, but your doc knows your symptoms and he knows your history...I don't. Research, Research, Research. That's the best advice I can give to you. Answered by Margherita Suentenfuss 4 months ago.

I took it for pain and it made me feel wierd and didn't help pain Answered by Verena Dinucci 4 months ago.


Concerns about Clozapine?
Ny partner is taking Clozapine & I believe having many side effects from it, one of which is that her heart is racing. Her pdoc's answer to that is to put her on yet another med, a beta-blocker which = more side effects. I feel she is way overmedicated for her BiPolar (I have it too) but she will not listen... Asked by Raymon Muthart 4 months ago.

Ny partner is taking Clozapine & I believe having many side effects from it, one of which is that her heart is racing. Her pdoc's answer to that is to put her on yet another med, a beta-blocker which = more side effects. I feel she is way overmedicated for her BiPolar (I have it too) but she will not listen to me. I am frustrated. Anyone else use(d) this med & what have been your experiences? Answered by Diane Behning 4 months ago.

my pdoc wanted me to take this for bipolar, after all other classes of medications had failed. after educating myself on it, i decided i'd rather put up with bipolar than the plethora of possible risks of it- i have habit of managing to get alot of the more severe side effects of a medication and the milder ones alot worse than most people would. it is meant to be used as a last resort and only as a last resort. if her pdoc has not tried everything else out there first, i suggest you find another pdoc. before placing her on it, an ecg, heart ultrasound and extensive blood tests are meant to be done. In the first six months, you are meant to have blood tests every two weeks- here (in aus) it is the law, you cannot get your next two weeks supply of meds until the results of the last blood test are in and come back normal. therafter you are meant to have blood tests every 3 months. this is all for safety, it can be an incredibly dangerous drug and much riskier than most. If all of this has not been done, her pdoc is being negligent and playing with her life. again i suggest you change pdocs heart racing (arrhythmias) are a symptom of myocarditis, a potentially life threatening side effect. clozapine carries a black box warning for this. unfortunately, it is not all that uncommon- this and other potential heart problems are the reason for all the initial tests. you should be having them again regularly (im not exactly sure how often) to make sure nothings wrong (especially if symptoms are present) the initial ones are needed as something to compare to. if heart trouble are caused by clozapine, the drug HAS TO be stopped, and can never be taken by that person again The pdoc should have informed you/ your wife of all of this so you could make an informed decision. the fact that he didnt really worries/ disturbs me. though pdocs have a habit of not being entirely honest. take action, dont just assume that 'the doctor knows best' best of luck Answered by Latanya Shortsleeve 4 months ago.


Alternative medication to clozapine for schizophrenia?
my boyfriend took clozapine and he didn't like the side effects he was supposed to take it before bed, it made him pass out really fast, lose memory and gain weight. im wondering about different medications for schizophrenia to look up Asked by Fabiola Entz 4 months ago.

Is that the only one that he tried? They normally don't prescribe clozapine until other options have been exhausted. The unfortunate thing about schizophrenia is the meds uniformly suck. Most cause you to pass out really quickly and gain weight. You can take metformin, which prevents the weight gain. Other than that, you have to work around the side effects. Abilify is supposed to not cause weight gain or excess sleepiness. It didn't work for me. Risperdal is similar to clozapine in its side effects, as is zyprexa and seroquel. Invega and geodon are supposed to be good, but they are similar as well. There are the typical antipsychotics (clozapine is part of the atypical class, as are all of the others previously mentioned) These aren't associated with weight and drowsiness as much. They come with a lot of other side effects, though. I'd trade the clozapine side effects for the typical antipsychotic ones. I'm on clozapine, but I've been on about 5 others. I've learned to deal with the crappy side effects because I know I need my meds. Answered by Dorothy Radisovich 4 months ago.

Its a drugs used whilst maximum others have failed. it extremely is assume to be very sturdy for Schizophrenia and it extremely is tried at many distinctive doses until eventually one works. i think of you have achievement with it, do not subject approximately it not working, attempt it and if it would not then subject yet i think of that is going to assist you. i be conscious of the blood tests are a discomfort yet you will need fewer the greater you're on it :) Answered by Carma Esmont 4 months ago.

Therapy. The medications are horrible. Answered by Ara Welker 4 months ago.


How much of a clozapine overdose would cause death, milligram wise?
Asked by Deshawn Zaragosa 4 months ago.

As with any medicine, it is possible to overdose on clozapine. Overdose effects will depend on how much of the drug was taken and whether it was combined with alcohol or other drugs. Common symptoms of a clozapine overdose can include drowsiness, delirium, and a rapid heart rate. If the clozapine overdose was recent, the stomach may be "pumped" or medicines may be administered to counteract the effects of the overdose. The recommended starting dose of clozapine for schizophrenia is clozapine 12.5 mg (half of a 25-mg tablet), taken once or twice daily. If you tolerate the medication well, your healthcare provider may increase your dose slowly up to clozapine 300 mg to 450 mg total per day. Some people will need to take larger doses, up to clozapine 600 mg to 900 mg per day. Because you will need frequent blood tests to check for dangerous clozapine side effects, your pharmacy will dispense only a certain number of tablets at a time. When you first start treatment, you will need a weekly blood test (and you will be given a week's supply of clozapine). As your treatment continues, the time in between blood tests can be extended (and you will be given a larger supply of clozapine tablets). Answered by Theo Timoteo 4 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How much of a clozapine overdose would cause death, milligram wise? Answered by Marna Station 4 months ago.

In adults, 10 grams(20 500mg pills) at once or in any 24 hour period is putting the person at serious risk for toxicity. The figure is probably lower due to age in this case, but will be roughly the same. Effects of a toxic dose will show up between 12 hours and four days later. However, the treatment for toxic dosages(acetylcysteine) is only effective up to 48 hours after the acetaminophen was injested, which is no good if the visible effects show up after that window for treatment. Answered by Karol Delcine 4 months ago.

Schizophrenic son on clozaril has been having confusing thoughts. Takes 700 mg daily of clozaril. Can I give him 200 mgs every 2-3 hours to help him become stabilized. He show no sign of threat to self or others. Just confused thoughts. I m trying to keep him out of hospital. He always comes home worse than when he went in. Answered by Tangela Kehs 4 months ago.


Clozapine question I have been on clozapine for afew weeks ?
I have been on 37mg of clozapine 12.5mg of a morning 25mg of a night for about 2 weeks now the doctor said he was taking me slow after afew problems I had with it but it seems ok now but he told me at 100mg he was going to see what my levels were my question is what is the average mg people are on Asked by Alessandra Anast 4 months ago.

Hi. Below is a quote from a webpage about Clozapine, and the address is underneath. Your doctor has probably impressed on you the need for blood tests, as your dose of this medicine depends on your individual (and varying) absorption. He or she will hopefully also have told you that if you miss a few doses it's important to build up slowly again under supervision, to avoid an overdose. "As always, do not adjust your clozapine dose unless your healthcare provider specifically instructs you to do so. The recommended starting dose of clozapine for schizophrenia is clozapine 12.5 mg (half of a 25-mg tablet), taken once or twice daily. If you tolerate the medication well, your healthcare provider may increase your dose slowly up to clozapine 300 mg to 450 mg total per day. Some people will need to take larger doses, up to clozapine 600 mg to 900 mg per day. Because you will need frequent blood tests to check for dangerous clozapine side effects, your pharmacy will dispense only a certain number of tablets at a time. When you first start treatment, you will need a weekly blood test (and you will be given a week's supply of clozapine). As your treatment continues, the time in between blood tests can be extended (and you will be given a larger supply of clozapine tablets)." It can be a very effective treatment. Watch your weight, as it can give you a big appetite. Good luck. Answered by Zada Rubin 4 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
074546/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074546/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074949/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074949/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074949/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074949/004 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
075162/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
075162/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075417/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
075417/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075417/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
075417/004 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
075417/005 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075713/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
075713/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075713/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
076809/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
076809/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
076809/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
090308/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG
090308/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 100MG
201824/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 12.5MG
201824/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG
201824/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 100MG
202873/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
202873/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
203039/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 150MG
203039/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 200MG
203807/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
203807/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
206433/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
206433/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
206433/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
206433/004 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019758/001 CLOZARIL CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
019758/002 CLOZARIL CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
021590/001 FAZACLO ODT CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG
021590/002 FAZACLO ODT CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 100MG
021590/003 FAZACLO ODT CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 50MG
021590/004 FAZACLO ODT CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 12.5MG
021590/005 FAZACLO ODT CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 150MG
021590/006 FAZACLO ODT CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 200MG
074546/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074546/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074949/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074949/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074949/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074949/004 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
075162/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
075162/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075417/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
075417/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075417/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
075417/004 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
075417/005 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075713/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
075713/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075713/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
076809/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
076809/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
076809/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
090308/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG
090308/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 100MG
201824/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 12.5MG
201824/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 25MG
201824/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 100MG
202873/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
202873/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
203039/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 150MG
203039/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 200MG
203479/001 VERSACLOZ CLOZAPINE SUSPENSION/ORAL 50MG per ML
203807/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
203807/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
206433/001 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
206433/002 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
206433/003 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
206433/004 CLOZAPINE CLOZAPINE TABLET/ORAL 200MG

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Mylan
Britannia Pharmaceuticals Ltd

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