Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019658/003.

Names and composition

"CLARITIN HIVES RELIEF" is the commercial name of a drug composed of LORATADINE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019658/003 CLARITIN HIVES RELIEF LORATADINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
020641/003 CLARITIN HIVES RELIEF LORATADINE SYRUP/ORAL 1MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019658/002 CLARITIN LORATADINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
019658/003 CLARITIN HIVES RELIEF LORATADINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
020641/002 CLARITIN LORATADINE SYRUP/ORAL 1MG per ML
020641/003 CLARITIN HIVES RELIEF LORATADINE SYRUP/ORAL 1MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020704/002 CLARITIN REDITABS LORATADINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 10MG
020704/003 CLARITIN HIVES RELIEF REDITAB LORATADINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 10MG
021375/001 ALAVERT LORATADINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 10MG
021512/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
021734/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE SUSPENSION/ORAL 1MG per ML
021891/001 CHILDREN'S CLARITIN LORATADINE TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 5MG
021952/001 CLARITIN LORATADINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
021993/001 CLARITIN REDITABS LORATADINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 5MG
075209/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075505/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE SYRUP/ORAL 1MG per ML
075565/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE SYRUP/ORAL 1MG per ML
075565/002 LORATADINE LORATADINE SYRUP/ ORAL 5MG per 5ML
075728/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE SYRUP/ORAL 1MG per ML
075790/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075815/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE SYRUP/ORAL 1MG per ML
075822/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 10MG
075990/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 10MG
076011/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 10MG
076134/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076154/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076301/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076471/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076529/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE SYRUP/ORAL 1MG per ML
076805/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE SYRUP/ORAL 1MG per ML
077153/001 LORATADINE REDIDOSE LORATADINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 10MG
077421/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE SYRUP/ORAL 1MG per ML
078447/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
201865/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE SYRUP/ORAL 1MG per ML
206214/001 LORATADINE LORATADINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG

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Answered questions

How do you get relief from hives?
My boyfriend has hives all over his body. I think it is from the dog that showed up on out door step a few days ago but I am unable to figure out what to do so that he can sleep at night other than getting rid of the dog all together. I would appreciate any help. Asked by Jana Quin 1 year ago.

I have chronic hives so I have to deal with this a lot. Benadryl is supposed to stop the itching (scratching hives only makes them worse) and it's what I use but I don't like it because it makes me really drowsy. If your boyfriend's hives are really bad/everywhere, you can try Claritin (I had to use it when I developed a bee allergy- more hives. Agh!). It's over the counter now and clears up hives. I've also used Zyrtec before but that prescription. My breakouts now are usually mild enough that I can tolerate it without medecine. You can also buy an anti-itch cream to put on the hives to stop the itching. Answered by Selina Montcalm 1 year ago.

I had a problem with hives that seemed to come from nowhere. Turned out I'm allergic to aspirin. Probably not his problem.The Doctor had me take Claritin. Worked great. Hives are caused by an allergy, could be anything. Buy Claritin at any drug store and Walmart. Answered by Brande Manasares 1 year ago.

Benadryl will most likely help although it can make you drowsy you could also try to take an oatmeal bath...you can get both of these at a pharmacy and will help the bath is to sooth the irritation from the hives and the benadryl is to help with the reaction and the hives...they both are safe. Answered by Cassey Alspach 1 year ago.

Benadryl makes a capsule specifically for hives Answered by Elayne Farabaugh 1 year ago.

Soak in a cool oatmeal bath - or get him aveeno bath. He can also take an over the counter antihistemine like Benedryl. Expect the hives to stick around awhile. Answered by Jack Soffa 1 year ago.

Get hime some Benadryl. Answered by Markus Cools 1 year ago.

Try calamine lotion Answered by Lucy Serfass 1 year ago.


Can i take loratadine with wellbutrin ??/?
Asked by Magan Koloc 1 year ago.

LORATADINE (Alavert., Claritin®, Claritin® Reditab, Claritin® Hives Relief) is an antihistamine. It relieves the symptoms of hay fever (sneezing, runny nose, and itchy, watery eyes), and can also treat hives and associated itching of the skin. What drug(s) may interact with loratadine? * certain antibiotics (clarithromycin, erythromycin) * medicines for fungal infections (fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, voriconazole) * medicines for HIV infection or AIDS In addition, the following medicines can make you feel drowsy: * alcohol * barbiturate medicines for inducing sleep or treating seizures (convulsions) * medicines for anxiety or sleeping problems, such as alprazolam, diazepam, or temazepam * medicines for hay fever and other allergies such as antihistamines * medicines for mental problems, including anxiety, depression and psychotic disturbances * medicines for pain Answered by Stacy Imhoff 1 year ago.

check with a pharmacist or your doctor. most of us here are not in the position to give you proper medical advice Answered by Afton Sixon 1 year ago.


Everynight around bedtime I break out in hives, what is causing it and how to I prevent it?
I've switched to a hypo-allergenic detergent and it has not helped. I itch like crazy around bed time. It's mostly on my upper legs, my armpits, and my feet.. and sometimes my arms.. I am a 21 yr old female. This has been going on for about a year. It happens every night. Asked by Alexia Appana 1 year ago.

Dry and/or greasy skin due to poor oil composition of the skin. Thick greasy oils clog pores, lack of oil leads to dryness and irritation. You need thin oils to moisturize while dissolving and clearing gunk in your poors. Try fish oil or seafood. 2 tsp fish oil a day or 4 servings of seafood a week. Stick it out for at least 2 months; it will take a long time to replace all your oil. Any effect after 1-2 days is temporary or random; so even if it makes you break out a little at first, you haven't given it a full try yet. In the short term you can wash and moisturize well, but that will only go so far. Plus excessive washing can be drying and excessive moisturizing can be clogging. Use a small amount of a light moisturizer, made with oil not jelly or grease. Often that means soybean oil or mineral oil. Mineral oil means mined from the ground. So soybean oil is usually better, though mineral oil won't cause too much harm. Clean with soap and water, not a harsh acne cleanser. Even then they only work so well. So you really need the seafood. Antibiotics aren't really good for bacteria long term, they'll come back in force after. Short term they may help. After you get off them find some kefir with acidophilus listed first or 2nd to replace the friendly bacteria they destroyed. Studies show less illness when you have these bacteria, even outside the stomach in places such as the lungs and elsewhere. You want friendly bacteria to fill the void when the antibiotics stop, not harmful ones. In the short term you might also try 100,000+ iu retinol vitamin A (a megadose, and too much for normal use) or one of the acne drugs that is similar to retinol vitamin A. It's some minor harm to your organs, but it helps against bacteria on your skin. At least it doesn't have the other long term drawbacks to your skin that antibiotics and many scrubs do. If you would like to learn how to treat your acne permanently and regain your health and wellbeing, without drugs, without typical acne treatments, and without any side effects, then this will be the most important letter you will ever read. Weird Trick Forces Your Body To Eliminate Your Acne Giving You Beautiful Clear Skin In 30-60 Days? Make sure your sound is turned on! Answered by Joella Links 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Everynight around bedtime I break out in hives, what is causing it and how to I prevent it? I've switched to a hypo-allergenic detergent and it has not helped. I itch like crazy around bed time. It's mostly on my upper legs, my armpits, and my feet.. and sometimes my arms.. I am a 21 yr old female. This has been going on for about a year. It happens every night. Answered by Miguelina Belscher 1 year ago.

Do you have any after dinner snacks that you eat? Something you have in the evening that you don't have during the day? Maybe it could be a food allergy. Do you shower or bathe before bedtime? Have you tried changing soaps, shampoo and conditioner? Do you have a pet that is laying in your lap before bedtime or sleeping with you? Think about everything you do or eat or come in contact with in the evening. Try changing one thing for a couple of days and see if it makes a difference. If it doesn't, move on to the next thing. Testing one thing at a time will help you determine what is causing it. You may want to see a doctor about allergy testing. Answered by Margo Duane 1 year ago.

It could be dust mites. If you have a fabric sofa you could be getting them from it. Or they could be in your mattress. Well, actually, everyone has what is called bed bugs. Get you a cover for your mattress, box springs, and your pillows. Take a vacuum and clean your sofa if it's fabric. The exact same thing happened to me a couple of years ago. I went to my doc and this was his advice and it helped me. He also said to vacuum under my furniture really well and there is some spray you can buy. You can buy all of these items at Walmart or any mass market store. By the way, it could be just your nerves too. Has anything been going on that is troubling you? Answered by Octavio Taffer 1 year ago.

This is a very broad question. Atheism literally means 'without god' and since most human acts of devastation have been in the name of one god or another, this would suggest that they are less harmful than people with a religion. If you think about it in a more abstract way, atheism promotes free thinking and the choice to believe what you want without the hindrance of someone telling you what is correct without any evidence. In this way, many religions actually promote ignorance over knowledge. (The reasoning behind this lays with early society humans trying to form a manageable society that functions well together. Religion is a very effective way to do this, hence why there are so many similarities between them). So depending on what you mean by harm, in early human society atheism could have been more detrimental to the progression of the human race but in recent times (the last 150 years or so) religion is losing its place in modern society. Answered by Ted Kimble 1 year ago.

I know this is an old yahoo question from years ago , but, are you better now and if so how long until the hives stopped?The same exact thing is happening to me at the same exact places as you described and I haven't read or heard anyone going through what I'm going through until now. Answered by Yun Merle 1 year ago.

where are you before bed? on your couch, do you have a cat do you pet them on your lap and carry them under your arms and do they rub against your feet?? They say hives are not cause by allergies. Take some benadryl and see how that works or put on histamine cream. If they dont go away in 2 weeks I would go to a doctor! Answered by Beverlee Standridge 1 year ago.

You may be allergic to dust mites and would need to buy a special casing for your mattress and pillows to protect you from them. You can find them at Wal-mart or on line. You may be allergic to down if you have a down comforter or pillows or something. If you shower or bathe before you go to sleep, check to see if the body wash or soap or even shampoo and lotion is not irritating your skin. I use Dove sensitive skin body wash, it's unscented. You could be allergic to wool if you have wool blankets. Answered by Georgia Dolence 1 year ago.


Does acupuncture work for hives??
I took Benadryl but hives come up immediately when I stop taking them and worry if I have to take them forever... Asked by Willene Maceda 1 year ago.

I heard the most of case that cause hives are because his/her body sealed heat in and can't let it go so acupucture would help. I got histeric hives all over my body now and trying to find the best way for it.One says I need to see a doc and other says American doctor just give you medicine could get over the counter. And one suggested me very strongly Chinese herbs and acupuncture is the best even it works slowly. I guess I got hives by beverage or bacteria that might have been attatched on bottle or cap but does acupuncture will help even those case??Or does it work for any allegic sympton? Thank you very much in advance for all giving me opinons ;-)) Answered by Kyla Bazzanella 1 year ago.

No, see your physician and get some Clariton! "SCHERING-PLOUGH ANNOUNCES PRESCRIPTION-STRENGTH CLARITIN APPROVED FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER SALES Nation's Most-Prescribed Antihistamine to Be Widely Available Without a Doctor's Prescription for Allergies Only OTC Antihistamine to Provide Once-daily Non-drowsy Allergy Relief KENILWORTH, N.J., Nov. 27, 2002 — Schering-Plough Corporation (NYSE: SGP) announced today that all five formulations of the CLARITIN brand of non-drowsy allergy products have been approved at their original prescription strengths by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as over-the-counter (OTC) medicines for the treatment of allergies. With this approval, the CLARITIN brand becomes the only OTC antihistamine to offer non-drowsy allergy relief to adults and children 2 years of age and older. The company expects that CLARITIN OTC products will be available by mid-December to consumers across the nation where OTC medicines are sold. The approval of CLARITIN as the only non-drowsy OTC antihistamine for allergies builds upon Schering-Plough's more than 50-year heritage as a leader in the discovery, development and marketing of allergy medications. With this approval, Schering-Plough now offers a full range of non-drowsy prescription and OTC treatment options for allergy sufferers, including prescription CLARINEX (desloratadine), the first and only 24-hour nonsedating prescription antihistamine approved for the treatment of allergies caused by year-round indoor allergens and seasonal outdoor allergens, and prescription NASONEX (mometasone furoate monohydrate), a once-daily nasal-inhaled steroid. "The availability of CLARITIN as a non-drowsy, original prescription-strength OTC antihistamine represents an important new treatment option for the estimated 20 million Americans who currently choose to treat their allergies with a non-prescription medication," said Richard W. Zahn, president of Schering Laboratories, the U.S. pharmaceutical and OTC marketing arm of Schering-Plough. "The conversion of CLARITIN to OTC status, together with the continued strength of prescription CLARINEX, gives Schering-Plough an opportunity to establish leadership in both the prescription and OTC antihistamine categories by providing allergy sufferers with treatment options that offer non-drowsy relief — with or without a doctor's prescription." A MILESTONE IN OTC ALLERGY RELIEF "The approval of CLARITIN as an OTC product at its original prescription strength is a milestone in allergy relief for millions of light-to-moderate allergy sufferers who choose OTC antihistamines," said Leonard Fromer, M.D., board certified in family practice, with a practice subspecialty in allergy, at the Prairie Medical Group in Santa Monica, Calif., and a Fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians. "As a doctor, I believe CLARITIN is an important addition to the non-prescription allergy category because it is currently the only OTC antihistamine that effectively controls allergy symptoms without sedating side effects." "Currently available OTC antihistamines must carry warnings about drowsiness and performing tasks requiring mental alertness," said Gary Kay, Ph.D., clinical associate professor of neurology at Georgetown University. "CLARITIN controls allergy symptoms without causing drowsiness giving allergy sufferers the freedom to go about their normal daily activities. The availability of CLARITIN as an OTC product is good news for the many allergy sufferers who currently choose not to treat their symptoms with OTC products due to concerns about sedating side effects, which may impair performance," added Kay. The CLARITIN line of OTC products will be marketed in all of its five formulations, each at its original prescription strength. The CLARITIN line of products includes: CLARITIN Tablets, a once-daily formulation; CLARITIN RediTabs Tablets, a novel once-daily formulation in an orally disintegrating tablet; CLARITIN-D 24 Hour Extended Release Tablets, a once-daily formulation with a decongestant; CLARITIN-D 12 Hour Extended Release Tablets, a twice-daily formulation with a decongestant; and CLARITIN Syrup, a liquid formulation for use in children 2 years of age and older. The company intends to support CLARITIN as an OTC product with a multi-faceted educational program focusing on allergies, allergy management and potentially associated conditions, such as asthma. The program will also provide allergy sufferers with recommendations about when to remain in close communication with their treating physician. Allergies affect an estimated 50 million people in the United States and can have a significant impact on daily activities at work, school and leisure time. The direct costs of seasonal allergies, including medications and physician visits, have been estimated at $4.5 billion annually. Indirect costs from absenteeism include the loss of an estimated 6 million workdays and 2 million school days each year. It is estimated that 77 percent of Americans with allergies use some form of medication to treat their allergy symptoms. For people who recognize and understand their allergy symptoms, CLARITIN offers a safe and effective, once-daily alternative to currently available OTC antihistamines — all of which have sedating side effects. The company also announced that it received an "approvable" letter from the FDA for the use of CLARITIN as an OTC treatment for hives. To obtain approval, the FDA has asked the company for the following: Provide the results of a label comprehension study or studies that demonstrate consumers are able to understand how to safely use these drugs to treat hives. The label studied should be consistent with 21 CFR 201.66 and include language identifying the OTC indication as "hives," as recommended by the Nonprescription Drugs Advisory Committee. Provide labeling to all three supplements that is supported by the results of the label comprehension study or studies. As a prescription product, CLARITIN was indicated for chronic idiopathic urticaria, which represented about 2 percent of CLARITIN line prescriptions." Answered by Kelsi Lazarz 1 year ago.

Conditions A-Z That Acupunture Will Help Acne Addiction AIDS Allergies Alzheimer's Angina Anxiety Arthritis Asthma Back Pain (Self-Help) Back Pain (Chinese Medicine) Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Breast Cancer Breast Lumps Cancer Candidiasis (Yeast Infection) Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Cholesterol, High Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Constipation Crohn's Disease Depression Dermatitis (Eczema) Diabetes Diarrhea Diverticular Disease Endometriosis Eye Diseases Female Sexual Dysfunction Fibroids Fibromyalgia Flu (and Colds) Glaucoma Gout Gum Disease Hayfever Headache Heartburn Hemorrhoids Hypertension Impotence Indigestion Infertility Irritable Bowel Syndrome Insomnia Kidney Stones Lung Cancer Male Infertility Memory Loss Meniere's Disease Menopause Menstrual Cramps Muscle Strain and Sprain Osteoporosis Parkinson's Premenstrual Syndrome Preventative Medicine Psoriasis Rheumatoid Arthritis SARS Shingles Sinusitis Stroke Tinnitus Trigeminal Neuralgia Ulcerative Colitis Urinary Incontinence Urinary Tract Infection Hives isnt on this list. Answered by Leeanne Crummett 1 year ago.

If you haven't been screened for allergies, it possible this is not actually CU. You may have a straight-forward systemic allergic reaction to something you are eating or regularly coming into contact with, especially if you don't actually have hives or if the itching occurs on your palms or the soles of your feet. I can't answer about acupuncture, but Zyrtec is extremely effective in many people with CU and it has very few side effects. if you have CU, hot showers or anything that causes you to sweat is likely to make things worse - i don't think there is any treatment of this nature that is helpful. Answered by Branden Sifuentes 1 year ago.

take some benedryl and the hives will be gone in around an hour Answered by Nellie Maldomado 1 year ago.

we use a steroid called predisone and topical benedryl and oral benedryl so thats an american way ive got poison ivey right now and am in this process Answered by Sharan Kilmon 1 year ago.

go try & trust your chinese docs. Answered by Kayla Kellogg 1 year ago.


What can you use to help a full body rash?
my husband had this rash for about a week, tried some creams from the pharmacy and still keeps getting worse. and he can't afford to go to the doctors. what else can we do. Asked by Petronila Defreitas 1 year ago.

Try Claritin hives relief, or benadryl Answered by Kara Lagrand 1 year ago.

I am dealing with a similar problem myself. He needs to find a clinic or a doc with a sliding scale fee. I got a rash on my stomach from wearing my whistle at work under my shirt. I'm allergic to cheap metal and the rubber guard fell off the whistle. This was waaayyyy back in June/July. The rash started out about the size of a dime. I went to a clinic with a sliding scale fee about a month or so later because it wasn't going away. They gave me a steroid shot and some kind of prescription cream samples. The cream didn't work. I kept using cortisone cream to help stop the itching. Then, around Nov., I began getting these little itchy red bumps on my arms and legs. I waited until the itching got so bad I couldn't take it. Turns out, I got scabies from one of the kids where I work. Because I waited so long to have that checked out, it took about 6 tubes of some prescription scabicide to get rid of it (and I still have some little sores from it) when ordinarily, it should only take 1 tube or less to get rid of the scabies. I still have the rash on my stomach. It started out the size of a dime or so. Now, it's spread out into an area of about 4 X 4 " and is so itchy and sore I am to the point I wish I could just shave off that layer of skin and start over. I just filed my taxes online and am using my return to see the doc again next week. You guys are just going to have to bite the bullet and go to a doc. The longer you 2 wait, the worse the rash will get and it will probably end up costing you more to treat it now than it would have if it had been taken care of when the rash was first discovered. Answered by Kelsey Merceir 1 year ago.

Had one also and was told to take medications with antihistamines in it. Helped some but needed to go to a doctor and get some form of steroid medication which cleared it up in a day or so. Answered by Ramona Gadson 1 year ago.

I think you need to go to the local clinic - suck up the expense - and have a professional check him out. They usually except credit cards - if his health gets worse you are going to regret spending the money now. Don't wait anymore. Good Luck!!! Answered by Terry Chaput 1 year ago.

Try Cortisone cream. Answered by Krishna Nuvallie 1 year ago.

Calamine or Gold Bond. Answered by Noe Muscente 1 year ago.

IF you live in the States,there are some "county hospitals" that will treat those without insurance. Answered by Renaldo Elgin 1 year ago.

I know a family whose daughter had eczema all over her body. They gave her glyconutrients and it disappeared. Answered by Audrie Meharry 1 year ago.

Try an antihistamine Answered by Honey Penland 1 year ago.


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