Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 202532/001.

Names and composition

"CLARITHROMYCIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CLARITHROMYCIN.
It belongs to the class Macrolides and is used in Bacterial infections (Infections and Infestations)

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
202532/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
202710/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
202710/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
203243/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
203584/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
203584/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065136/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065137/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065137/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065144/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065145/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
065154/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
065155/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065155/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065174/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065174/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065178/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065178/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065195/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065195/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065210/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 1GM
065250/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
065266/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065266/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065283/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 125MG per 5ML
065283/003 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 250MG per 5ML
065382/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 125MG per 5ML
065382/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 250MG per 5ML
065384/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065384/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065489/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065489/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
050662/001 BIAXIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
050775/001 BIAXIN XL CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
050662/002 BIAXIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
202532/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
050697/001 BIAXIN CLARITHROMYCIN TREATMENT/ MAC 0
202710/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
050698/001 BIAXIN CLARITHROMYCIN FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 125MG per 5ML
202710/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
050698/002 BIAXIN CLARITHROMYCIN FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 250MG per 5ML
203243/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
050698/003 BIAXIN CLARITHROMYCIN FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 187MG per 5ML
203584/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
203584/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065136/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065137/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065137/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065144/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065145/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
065154/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
065155/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065155/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065174/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065174/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065178/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065178/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065195/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065195/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065210/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 1GM
065250/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
065266/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065266/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065283/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 125MG per 5ML
065283/003 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 250MG per 5ML
065382/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 125MG per 5ML
065382/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 250MG per 5ML
065384/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065384/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
065489/001 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
065489/002 CLARITHROMYCIN CLARITHROMYCIN TABLET/ORAL 500MG

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Mylan

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Answered questions

Clarithromycin other antibiotics and heart long qt syndrome question? Is this stuff safe?
I've been searching around and I read in many places that clarithromycin can induce long qt syndrome! (irregular heartbeats)? Is this a rare side affect, or does it happen to everyone who takes it!? Asked by Luise Duckworth 3 days ago.

Clarithromycin and several other antibiotics have been reported to prolong the QT interval, but the reports of Clarithromycin doing this are limited. These reports are mainly case reports of it occurring in rare individuals. Therefore this is believed to be a rare side effect for Clarithromycin. Other antibiotics like Erythromycin have been more thoroughly studied regarding the changes in the QT interval. Not everyone who takes these medications will experience the prolonged QT interval or any complications of this. The concern with a prolonged QT interval is that it can lead to a deadly heart rhythm known as Torsades de pointes, which is fatal if not immediately treated. Reports of Torsades de pointes occurring after Clarithromycin administration are rare. Answered by Cleotilde Mills 3 days ago.

when I checked all I could find was info that said if you had a prexisting LQT (Jervell and Lange Neilson and Romano Ward Syndrome) not to take Clarithromycin. If your nervous have an ecg done. I take 1 medication that can prolong your QT then I was put on 2 more. My QT stayed the same. I think you need to contact your local pharmacy or you can repost your question under Science and Mathematics then post under Medicine. I find alot of pharmacists answer questions there. Answered by Ronnie Wanamaker 3 days ago.

I have LQTS and before I take any medication-whether rx or OTC-I always check it against the lists www.qtdrugs.org. These are medications that i can't take because it causes the QT to be further prolonged and can also the QT prolonged in otherwise healthy people. do you have a heart condition? If you're concerned I would talk to your doctor Answered by Maia Bodiford 3 days ago.


Is clarithromycin prescribed for children 5+ years?
Asked by Domitila Visher 3 days ago.

Clarithromycin is in a group of drugs called macrolide antibiotics, which fights bacteria in your body. It is licenced for use in children 6 months and older - so yes it can be prescribed for children over 5 years old. The dose for children older than 6 months depends on how much the child weighs. Clarithromycin is usually given twice a day for 10 days. General dose for chlidren 6 months of age and older is 7.5 mg per kilogram (kg) (3.4 mg per pound) of body weight every twelve hours for ten days. . Answered by Cameron Eisermann 3 days ago.

Yes. It is indicated to be safe for pediatric purposes. It is usually only prescribed for children when a less harsh antibiotic (such as amoxil) is not very appropriate. These conditions include, but are not limited to, sinus infections, tonsillitis, pharyngitis, or pneumonia. I hope you found this useful! Answered by Echo Oulette 3 days ago.


Is there pencillin in clarithromycin?
Had a severe allergic reaction about three days into taking the clarithromycin. As usually the ER doctor did not give an explaination. And he seemed like it was almost impossible for me to have the severe reaction to it. My tongue and throat started swelling. i have taken it before for my sinus infections, but... Asked by Verda Bartosiak 3 days ago.

Had a severe allergic reaction about three days into taking the clarithromycin. As usually the ER doctor did not give an explaination. And he seemed like it was almost impossible for me to have the severe reaction to it. My tongue and throat started swelling. i have taken it before for my sinus infections, but this last time it effected me.I have looked on the internet for an explaination and cannot find one.I take levothyroxine 50mg, zoloft,100mg and neurontin 300mg on a daily basis. Answered by Deangelo Bosma 3 days ago.

No, there is no penicillin component to Clarithromycin, and I would not consider the other three prescription medications that you report as taking as the likely culprit for the reaction which you experienced. Antibiotics are a prime suspect as the causative agent behind drug-related allergic reactions, particularly with the development of the reactions as having occurred shortly after starting antibiotic therapy May I assume, based on the phrasing of your question, that you also have a history of penicillin (PCN) allergy? Normally the Macrolide class of antibiotic, of which Clarithromycin (trade name = Biaxin) is a member, is considered to be a suitable broad-spectrum substitute for those individuals with PCN allergies. However, it is possible for anyone to develop an allergy to any antibiotic (or any medication, for that matter) at any time after the first dose is administered. In other words, a first-time exposure to a substance will not trigger an allergic reaction, but any subsequent doses or exposures may do so. Allergic reactions to macrolides are, in my clinical experience, somewhat unusual but certainly not unheard of. My suggestion to you is to avoid all macrolide class antibiotics in the future. You also need to make sure that *all* of your healthcare providers are made aware of this reaction to clarithromycin, so as to not have macrolide antibiotics unwittingly prescribed to you at a future time. If you do indeed have a PCN allergy, you may also want to avoid any cephalosporin class antibiotics (ie: Cephalexin, cefazolin, etc.) as well. Cross-sensitivities and allergic reactions to those medications have been known to occur in individuals with PCN allergies . If you have need of oral antibiotic therapy in the future, your healthcare provider might possibly consider prescribing drugs in the following categories: Quinolones, sulfonamides, lincosamides, and tetracyclines, as well as others. All should be safe for use in those individuals with known or suspected allergies to PCNs and macrolides. Answered by Jeraldine Uhlich 3 days ago.

it sounds weird Answered by Hyun Sura 3 days ago.


Biaxin (clarithromycin) for sinus infection?
I'm hoping there is a PA, NP, MD, or DO in the audience.I had tonsilitis in June and was given Biaxin for it. I promptly lost the bottle after my first dose. I got another Rx for it as I could not find the original anywhere. It has since turned up... I now have a sinus infection (i get enough of these to... Asked by Allena Crosswell 3 days ago.

I'm hoping there is a PA, NP, MD, or DO in the audience. I had tonsilitis in June and was given Biaxin for it. I promptly lost the bottle after my first dose. I got another Rx for it as I could not find the original anywhere. It has since turned up... I now have a sinus infection (i get enough of these to know)- cannot smell anything at all, persistent bad taste in mouth, green discharge, postnasal drip, face is sensitive to touch.. Are most sinus infections caused by a bacteria that is sensitive to Biaxin? (I took microbiology so I understand the concept behind it). I don't have time to go to PMD between work and school... thanks! Answered by Sana Stammel 3 days ago.

Clarithromycin is in a group of drugs called macrolide antibiotics and fights bacteria in your body. Clarithromycin is used to treat many different types of bacterial infections affecting the skin and respiratory system. It's also used together with other medicines to treat stomach ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori. Call your doctor before you begin this round of antibiotics-he/she may want you on a different drug since you've so recently taken this one. Be sure that it's not expired before you begin it. I hope you feel better soon, God bless! Answered by Kary Klose 3 days ago.

It would be inappropriate to answer that question here, for a number of reasons. First, it is a medical question, and an ethical doctor will not offer advice without preferably seeing you, or at least seeing a test and getting a basic medical history. Second, there are other diseases whose symptoms mimic gonorrhea -- typically called non-specific urethritis. Without a test, no one can be certain just what disease is in question, or what is the best treatment for that disease. Finally, the doctors in your area are familiar with what's "going around" and have a good idea of how to treat it. There are now some strains of gonorrhea which are resistant to most antibiotics. If an inappropriate antibiotic is used, the disease may not go away. Local health care professionals will make sure that the right medicine is dispensed. Finally, and this is the voice of experience -- in my opinion the best place to go for treatment of a sexually transmitted disease is the clinic at your local health department. First, these guys are the real pros as far as STDs are concerned, as they see more of it than anyone. Second, it's much cheaper than a regular doctor visit, as the health department will most often give away whatever medicine is called for. Finally, the fact that the patient was treated for an STD does not go on that patient's primary record, so it shouldn't come out anytime in the future. Answered by Kasandra Bessel 3 days ago.


Question about Clarithromycin?
I was taken to hospital with pulse of 130 at rest 150 on walking. 98% oxygen saturation 94% on walking. ECG revealed ' some minor t-wave changes' - whatever that means(?!?) Dctr at A&E diagnosed pneumonia after ECG only. Asked by Natalie Pittmann 3 days ago.

Clarithromycin may not be the drug of choice for a lower respiratory infection (if thats what you have). All depends on what bacteria your prescribing doctor thought you have. Also what sort of "chest infection" do you have? Pneumonia / bronchitis / some form of skin infection? Knowing what the diagnosis is would go a long way to confirm what antibiotic should be used first. The trick about these types of infections and treating them is guessing what the bacteria is / are and using the antibiotic that has the best utility for them. Answered by Michelina Kenebrew 3 days ago.


Can Clarithromycin cause a miscarriage in the early stages of pregnancy?
Can Clarithromycin cause a miscarriage in the early stages of pregnancy? Asked by Concepcion Guilbe 3 days ago.

Clarithromycin is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether clarithromycin will harm an unborn baby. Do not take clarithromycin without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Answered by Tyra Tyus 3 days ago.


I was given a prescription of klaricid, but instead i bought a cheaper clarithromycin.?
i'm suffering from an URTI and a physician prescribed Klaricid 500 mg bid x 7 days.klaricid is too expensive so i just bought a generic clarithromycin that costs less than 50% of klaricid. i bought 5. and after 2 days i bought another 5 but of a different brand but it was cheaper again. would the... Asked by Raymond Linstrom 3 days ago.

i'm suffering from an URTI and a physician prescribed Klaricid 500 mg bid x 7 days. klaricid is too expensive so i just bought a generic clarithromycin that costs less than 50% of klaricid. i bought 5. and after 2 days i bought another 5 but of a different brand but it was cheaper again. would the drug's effectivity be compromised? Answered by Loreta Rimbach 3 days ago.

Clarithromycin is the generic of brand klaricid, therefore it is the same medication. However, a physician never prescribes like that by placing the brand first. Overall should you experience any abdominal pain, vomiting, nausea, and diarrhea then it is a possible overdose on the medication. In such case it will be better if you take the 250 mg ones twice a day. See if you can return these back. Last but not the least, never try to cut or break the tablets for they are coated. Good Health To You! Answered by Herma Plyler 3 days ago.


What are the results / effects of long term 9 over 1 1/2 years) Clarithromycin use?
My father has been on several different types of antibiotics over the last two years to treat a rare bacterial infection in his eye. he is so run down now that he was hospitalize and now in a rehab center. Dr saying no physical reason he just has given up. I think is is the long term use of antibiotics and... Asked by Christina Deems 3 days ago.

My father has been on several different types of antibiotics over the last two years to treat a rare bacterial infection in his eye. he is so run down now that he was hospitalize and now in a rehab center. Dr saying no physical reason he just has given up. I think is is the long term use of antibiotics and dehyrdation. I cant find any research on the efffect of long term antibiotic use. Anyone know of any simular situations??? Answered by Camellia Alquesta 3 days ago.

The majority of side effects observed in clinical trials were of a mild and transient nature. Fewer than 3% of adult patients without mycobacterial infections and fewer than 2% of pediatric patients without mycobacterial infections discontinued therapy because of drug-related side effects. Fewer than 2% of adult patients taking BIAXIN XL tablets discontinued therapy because of drug-related side effects. The most frequently reported events in adults taking BIAXIN tablets (clarithromycin tablets, USP) were diarrhea (3%), nausea (3%), abnormal taste (3%), dyspepsia (2%), abdominal pain/discomfort (2%), and headache (2%). In pediatric patients, the most frequently reported events were diarrhea (6%), vomiting (6%), abdominal pain (3%), rash (3%), and headache (2%). Most of these events were described as mild or moderate in severity. Of the reported adverse events, only 1% was described as severe. The most frequently reported events in adults taking BIAXIN XL (clarithromycin extended-release tablets) were diarrhea (6%), abnormal taste (7%), and nausea (3%). Most of these events were described as mild or moderate in severity. Of the reported adverse events, less than 1% were described as severe. In the acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis and acute maxillary sinusitis studies overall gastrointestinal adverse events were reported by a similar proportion of patients taking either BIAXIN tablets or BIAXIN XL tablets; however, patients taking BIAXIN XL tablets reported significantly less severe gastrointestinal symptoms compared to patients taking BIAXIN tablets. In addition, patients taking BIAXIN XL tablets had significantly fewer premature discontinuations for drug-related gastrointestinal or abnormal taste adverse events compared to BIAXIN tablets. In community-acquired pneumonia studies conducted in adults comparing clarithromycin to erythromycin base or erythromycin stearate, there were fewer adverse events involving the digestive system in clarithromycin-treated patients compared to erythromycin-treated patients (13% vs. 32%; p<0.01). Twenty percent of erythromycin-treated patients discontinued therapy due to adverse events compared to 4% of clarithromycin-treated patients. In two U.S. studies of acute otitis media comparing clarithromycin to amoxicillin/potassium clavulanate in pediatric patients, there were fewer adverse events involving the digestive system in clarithromycin-treated patients compared to amoxicillin/potassium clavulanate-treated patients (21% vs. 40%, p<0.001). One-third as many clarithromycin-treated patients reported diarrhea as did amoxicillin/potassium clavulanate-treated patients. Allergic reactions ranging from urticaria and mild skin eruptions to rare cases of anaphylaxis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis have occurred. Other spontaneously reported adverse events include glossitis, stomatitis, oral moniliasis, anorexia, vomiting, pancreatitis, tongue discoloration, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, neutropenia, and dizziness. There have been reports of tooth discoloration in patients treated with BIAXIN. Tooth discoloration is usually reversible with professional dental cleaning. There have been isolated reports of hearing loss, which is usually reversible, occurring chiefly in elderly women. Reports of alterations of the sense of smell, usually in conjunction with taste perversion or taste loss have also been reported. Transient CNS events including anxiety, behavioral changes, confusional states, convulsions, depersonalization, disorientation, hallucinations, insomnia, manic behavior, nightmares, psychosis, tinnitus, tremor, and vertigo have been reported during post-marketing surveillance. Events usually resolve with discontinuation of the drug. Hepatic dysfunction, including increased liver enzymes, and hepatocellular and/or cholestatic hepatitis, with or without jaundice, has been infrequently reported with clarithromycin. This hepatic dysfunction may be severe and is usually reversible. In very rare instances, hepatic failure with fatal outcome has been reported and generally has been associated with serious underlying diseases and/or concomitant medications. There have been rare reports of hypoglycemia, some of which have occurred in patients taking oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin. There have been postmarketing reports of BIAXIN XL tablets in the stool, many of which have occurred in patients with anatomic (including ileostomy or colostomy) or functional gastrointestinal disorders with shortened GI transit times. As with other macrolides, clarithromycin has been associated with QT prolongation and ventricular arrhythmias, including ventricular tachycardia and torsades de pointes. There have been reports of interstitial nephritis coincident with clarithromycin use. Answered by Lawerence Laramore 3 days ago.

Some of the after-effects of masturbation are : The nervous system is affected the most. Besides the heart, the digestive system, the urinary system as well as the other systems are adversely affected and consequently the whole body becomes the museum of diseases with profound weakness. The eyes become sunken, the cheek bones protrude and there is a black rim round the eyes. Continuous headache and backache. Dizziness and loss of memory. Palpitation of heart on lightest exertion. Nervousness. Unable to perform any heavy physical or mental work. The person dislikes any company and activities and rather likes to sit in seclusion and suffers from weakness. All the senses are impaired. Vision becomes dim, the tongue begins to stammer and ears tend to become deaf etc. Lastly T. B. or insanity or some other serious disease catch hold of the victim to lead his life to a close. Impotency. Answered by Demarcus Litwiler 3 days ago.


Is this antibiotic safe to take this way? Clarithromycin not dissolved?
I picked up my prescription of Clarithromycin (Clarithromycin 250mg/5ml oral suspension) today and I was wondering if the oral suspension is supposed to have gritty granules in the liquid or if the granules are supposed to be completely dissolved? It had a very bitter taste and I was unable to even... Asked by Venus Balok 3 days ago.

I picked up my prescription of Clarithromycin (Clarithromycin 250mg/5ml oral suspension) today and I was wondering if the oral suspension is supposed to have gritty granules in the liquid or if the granules are supposed to be completely dissolved? It had a very bitter taste and I was unable to even swallow it. My pharmacist also said I was given the generic version. Could this have been why they were not dissolved? I can't see this being the proper form of the medication. I have only swallowed 2.5ml and I already feel nauseous from the taste and texture. Answered by Randee Turchetta 3 days ago.

The antibiotic you're taking, Clarithromycin 250mg/5ml oral suspension is supposed to have gritty granules in it and they help the medicine to last longer, i.e. to lengthen the half life of the antibiotic. The side effects you mention are common among the patients who take this medicine so if you think you cannot continue to take the entire dosage prescribed to you then you need to call your doctor who prescribed it and see if he can give you a substitute. Clarithromycin also comes in a tablet form so your doctor might Rx that for you. There is a long list of other medicines that are contraindicated with the taking of Clarithromycin so you might want to get a list of them from your phramacy. Answered by Fannie Stillwagon 3 days ago.


My doctor gave me treatment for h pylory clarithromycin ,metronidazole,omeprazol is it correct?
my bw showed hpylory positive and my doc gave me flagyl 250mg bid ,omeprazol 20mg 2bid and clarithromycin 250mg 2bid .is it correct treatment ,there are two antibiotic together? thank you Asked by Jeffry Satow 3 days ago.

Metronidazole And Clarithromycin Answered by Kira Nalbach 3 days ago.

Im pretty sure the doctor knows what he's doing....all the medications will work together to clear up the infection....and you have one antibiotic, one antifungal, and one stomach medication....not two antibiotics....make sure you do NOT take alcohol while taking that flagyl (metronidazole)....Im very serious!! Any other questions you have you should refer to the pharmacist you picked up your medications from.... Answered by Valery Aldarondo 3 days ago.


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