Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 009268/003.

Names and composition

"CHOLEDYL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of OXTRIPHYLLINE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009268/003 CHOLEDYL OXTRIPHYLLINE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
009268/007 CHOLEDYL OXTRIPHYLLINE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
009268/011 CHOLEDYL OXTRIPHYLLINE SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
009268/012 CHOLEDYL OXTRIPHYLLINE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009268/003 CHOLEDYL OXTRIPHYLLINE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
009268/007 CHOLEDYL OXTRIPHYLLINE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
009268/011 CHOLEDYL OXTRIPHYLLINE SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
009268/012 CHOLEDYL OXTRIPHYLLINE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
086742/001 CHOLEDYL SA OXTRIPHYLLINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 600MG
087835/001 OXTRIPHYLLINE OXTRIPHYLLINE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
087863/001 CHOLEDYL SA OXTRIPHYLLINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 400MG
087866/001 OXTRIPHYLLINE OXTRIPHYLLINE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
088242/001 OXTRIPHYLLINE PEDIATRIC OXTRIPHYLLINE SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
088243/001 OXTRIPHYLLINE OXTRIPHYLLINE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Drug Dosage Problem.........?
I have taken a math class a year ago and now in pharm trying to remember how the process goes.... Here is a practice problem. Please help me step by step to remember...Thanks a bunch!!!Order: Choledyl elixer 3.1 mg/kg p.o. q6hAvail: Choledyl elixer 100mg/5mlPt weighs 121lbsHow many mL of Choledyl... Asked by Gearldine Gronstal 2 years ago.

I have taken a math class a year ago and now in pharm trying to remember how the process goes.... Here is a practice problem. Please help me step by step to remember... Thanks a bunch!!! Order: Choledyl elixer 3.1 mg/kg p.o. q6h Avail: Choledyl elixer 100mg/5ml Pt weighs 121lbs How many mL of Choledyl elixer should the pt receive? **************************************... I did the weight conversion to 55kg but cant remember if its Ordered / Available.. or what... Thanks in advance Answered by Chi Virrueta 2 years ago.

121/2.2=55 kilograms kg x dose/kg = 55 x 3.1= 170.5 mg if 100 mg / 5 mL, then 100 mg/5 ml = 20 mg per mL 170.5/ 20 = 8.525 mL or simply multiply 5 x 1.705 to get the same answer. 8.525 mL is the final dose the patient should receive by mouth, every six hours.. Answered by Joane Canonico 2 years ago.

First, you convert the patients weight to kilograms, which you have done correctly. Second step would be to find the total dosage that the patient should receive. This is done by multiplying the patient weight by the weight based dose. (3.1 mg/kg) x 55 kg = 170.5 mg The next step would be to find the total amount of liquid to administer. This is done by dividing the dose by the available amount on hand. 170.5 mg / (100mg/5ml) = 8.525 ml Answered by Teresia Cautillo 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Josiah Polizzi 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Sammie Musielak 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Alec Athanasiou 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Janna Duross 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Kristeen Speelman 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Eugenia Santin 2 years ago.


Drug Dosage Problem.........?
I have taken a math class a year ago and now in pharm trying to remember how the process goes.... Here is a practice problem. Please help me step by step to remember...Thanks a bunch!!!Order: Choledyl elixer 3.1 mg/kg p.o. q6hAvail: Choledyl elixer 100mg/5mlPt weighs 121lbsHow many mL of Choledyl... Asked by Lise Currier 2 years ago.

I have taken a math class a year ago and now in pharm trying to remember how the process goes.... Here is a practice problem. Please help me step by step to remember... Thanks a bunch!!! Order: Choledyl elixer 3.1 mg/kg p.o. q6h Avail: Choledyl elixer 100mg/5ml Pt weighs 121lbs How many mL of Choledyl elixer should the pt receive? **************************************... I did the weight conversion to 55kg but cant remember if its Ordered / Available.. or what... Thanks in advance Answered by Freda Gamons 2 years ago.

121/2.2=55 kilograms kg x dose/kg = 55 x 3.1= 170.5 mg if 100 mg / 5 mL, then 100 mg/5 ml = 20 mg per mL 170.5/ 20 = 8.525 mL or simply multiply 5 x 1.705 to get the same answer. 8.525 mL is the final dose the patient should receive by mouth, every six hours.. Answered by Belle Dafonte 2 years ago.

First, you convert the patients weight to kilograms, which you have done correctly. Second step would be to find the total dosage that the patient should receive. This is done by multiplying the patient weight by the weight based dose. (3.1 mg/kg) x 55 kg = 170.5 mg The next step would be to find the total amount of liquid to administer. This is done by dividing the dose by the available amount on hand. 170.5 mg / (100mg/5ml) = 8.525 ml Answered by Versie Kapnick 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Cherri Kussman 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Janis Bodovsky 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Ione Gutierrex 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Laure Treadaway 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Claude Dashnaw 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Andre Jarnutowski 2 years ago.


Drug Dosage Problem.........?
I have taken a math class a year ago and now in pharm trying to remember how the process goes.... Here is a practice problem. Please help me step by step to remember...Thanks a bunch!!!Order: Choledyl elixer 3.1 mg/kg p.o. q6hAvail: Choledyl elixer 100mg/5mlPt weighs 121lbsHow many mL of Choledyl... Asked by Michaela Kampa 2 years ago.

I have taken a math class a year ago and now in pharm trying to remember how the process goes.... Here is a practice problem. Please help me step by step to remember... Thanks a bunch!!! Order: Choledyl elixer 3.1 mg/kg p.o. q6h Avail: Choledyl elixer 100mg/5ml Pt weighs 121lbs How many mL of Choledyl elixer should the pt receive? **************************************... I did the weight conversion to 55kg but cant remember if its Ordered / Available.. or what... Thanks in advance Answered by Kristian Shufelt 2 years ago.

121/2.2=55 kilograms kg x dose/kg = 55 x 3.1= 170.5 mg if 100 mg / 5 mL, then 100 mg/5 ml = 20 mg per mL 170.5/ 20 = 8.525 mL or simply multiply 5 x 1.705 to get the same answer. 8.525 mL is the final dose the patient should receive by mouth, every six hours.. Answered by Jeramy Tornincasa 2 years ago.

First, you convert the patients weight to kilograms, which you have done correctly. Second step would be to find the total dosage that the patient should receive. This is done by multiplying the patient weight by the weight based dose. (3.1 mg/kg) x 55 kg = 170.5 mg The next step would be to find the total amount of liquid to administer. This is done by dividing the dose by the available amount on hand. 170.5 mg / (100mg/5ml) = 8.525 ml Answered by Reatha Stottlemyer 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Simona Corporon 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Denisha Strem 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Leonard Endreson 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Floyd Serandos 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Katharine Wyre 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Edyth Angton 2 years ago.


Drug Dosage Problem.........?
I have taken a math class a year ago and now in pharm trying to remember how the process goes.... Here is a practice problem. Please help me step by step to remember...Thanks a bunch!!!Order: Choledyl elixer 3.1 mg/kg p.o. q6hAvail: Choledyl elixer 100mg/5mlPt weighs 121lbsHow many mL of Choledyl... Asked by Latoya Mecham 2 years ago.

I have taken a math class a year ago and now in pharm trying to remember how the process goes.... Here is a practice problem. Please help me step by step to remember... Thanks a bunch!!! Order: Choledyl elixer 3.1 mg/kg p.o. q6h Avail: Choledyl elixer 100mg/5ml Pt weighs 121lbs How many mL of Choledyl elixer should the pt receive? **************************************... I did the weight conversion to 55kg but cant remember if its Ordered / Available.. or what... Thanks in advance Answered by Shanta Placzek 2 years ago.

121/2.2=55 kilograms kg x dose/kg = 55 x 3.1= 170.5 mg if 100 mg / 5 mL, then 100 mg/5 ml = 20 mg per mL 170.5/ 20 = 8.525 mL or simply multiply 5 x 1.705 to get the same answer. 8.525 mL is the final dose the patient should receive by mouth, every six hours.. Answered by Carlyn Carey 2 years ago.

First, you convert the patients weight to kilograms, which you have done correctly. Second step would be to find the total dosage that the patient should receive. This is done by multiplying the patient weight by the weight based dose. (3.1 mg/kg) x 55 kg = 170.5 mg The next step would be to find the total amount of liquid to administer. This is done by dividing the dose by the available amount on hand. 170.5 mg / (100mg/5ml) = 8.525 ml Answered by Madelyn Trusty 2 years ago.


If you take antibiotics and you get a real bad headache from it would you stop?
The medicine is call Erythromycin base 500 Asked by Noma Golia 2 years ago.

Side Effects of This Medicine: Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Fever; headache, nausea; skin rash, redness, or itching; stomach pain (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; vomiting; yellow eyes or skin-with erythromycin estolate (rare with other erythromycins) Pain, swelling, or redness at place of injection Fainting (repeated); irregular or slow heartbeat; loss of hearing (temporary) Other medicines—Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking or receiving erythromycins, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following: Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Amiodarone (e.g., Cordarone) or Anabolic steroids (nandrolone [e.g., Anabolin], oxandrolone [e.g., Anavar], oxymetholone [e.g., Anadrol], stanozolol [e.g., Winstrol]) or Androgens (male hormones) or Antithyroid agents (medicine for overactive thyroid) or Carmustine (e.g., BiCNU) or Chloroquine (e.g., Aralen) or Dantrolene (e.g., Dantrium) or Daunorubicin (e.g., Cerubidine) or Disulfiram (e.g., Antabuse) or Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or Estrogens (female hormones) or Etretinate (e.g., Tegison) or Gold salts (medicine for arthritis) or Hydroxychloroquine (e.g., Plaquenil) or Mercaptopurine (e.g., Purinethol) or Methotrexate (e.g., Mexate) or Methyldopa (e.g., Aldomet) or Naltrexone (e.g., Trexan) (with long-term, high-dose use) or Oral contraceptives (birth control pills) containing estrogen or Other anti-infectives by mouth or by injection (medicine for infection) or Phenothiazines (acetophenazine [e.g., Tindal], chlorpromazine [e.g., Thorazine], fluphenazine [e.g., Prolixin], mesoridazine [e.g., Serentil], perphenazine [e.g., Trilafon], prochlorperazine [e.g., Compazine], promazine [e.g., Sparine], promethazine [e.g., Phenergan], thioridazine [e.g., Mellaril], trifluoperazine [e.g., Stelazine], triflupromazine [e.g., Vesprin], trimeprazine [e.g., Temaril]) or Phenytoin (e.g., Dilantin) or Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins, especially erythromycin estolate, may increase the chance of liver problems Aminophylline (e.g., Somophyllin) or Caffeine (e.g., NoDoz) or Oxtriphylline (e.g., Choledyl) or Theophylline (e.g., Somophyllin-T, Theo-Dur)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the chance of side effects from aminophylline, caffeine, oxtriphylline, or theophylline Astemizole (e.g., Hismanal) or Terfenadine (e.g., Seldane)—Use of astemizole or terfenadine with erythromycins may cause heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat; these medicines should not be used together Carbamazepine (e.g., Tegretol)—Use of carbamazepine with erythromycin may increase the side effects of carbamazepine or increase the chance of liver problems Chloramphenicol (e.g., Chloromycetin) or Clindamycin (e.g., Cleocin) or Lincomycin (e.g., Lincocin)—Use of these medicines with erythromycins may decrease the effectiveness of these other antibiotics Cyclosporine (e.g., Sandimmune) or Warfarin (e.g., Coumadin)—Use of any of these medicines with erythromycins may increase the side effects of these medicines Other medical problems—The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of erythromycins. Answered by Melanie Siegel 2 years ago.

I'd page my doctor right away to ask if the headache is actually related to the medication and not something happening by chance. Only your doctor can advise you whether you should take a medication or not--remember also to tell the doctor the names of the other medications you're on to make sure there's not an interaction. Answered by Stanley Helget 2 years ago.

It is not likely that the antibiotic is giving you the headache. You have to finish your antibiotics, as long as you don't have a life threatening reaction. Take some Tylenol for your head. If it is really bothering you, you should ask your parents, anyway. Answered by Joanie Praska 2 years ago.

in case you get a headache because of the fact of taking the medicine and as you think of you're clearing up now, you are able to desire to not proceed taking the medicine. Drink countless comfortable beverages, shop hydrated to have sufficient kidney filtration. Answered by Tonette Darmiento 2 years ago.

Headaches aren't a side effect to this drug (in a general sense). Don't stop taking it unless the prescribing doctor says so. Answered by Maddie Knoop 2 years ago.


Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - All rights reserved