CHLORAMPHENICOL Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 062406/001.

Names and composition

"CHLORAMPHENICOL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CHLORAMPHENICOL SODIUM SUCCINATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
062406/001 CHLORAMPHENICOL CHLORAMPHENICOL SODIUM SUCCINATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1GM BASE per VIAL
060133/001 CHLORAMPHENICOL CHLORAMPHENICOL OINTMENT/OPHTHALMIC 1%
062042/001 CHLORAMPHENICOL CHLORAMPHENICOL SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 0.5%
062247/001 CHLORAMPHENICOL CHLORAMPHENICOL CAPSULE/ ORAL 250MG
062628/001 CHLORAMPHENICOL CHLORAMPHENICOL SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 0.5%

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
060132/001 MYCHEL-S CHLORAMPHENICOL SODIUM SUCCINATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1GM BASE per VIAL
062406/001 CHLORAMPHENICOL CHLORAMPHENICOL SODIUM SUCCINATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1GM BASE per VIAL
062278/001 CHLORAMPHENICOL SODIUM SUCCINATE CHLORAMPHENICOL SODIUM SUCCINATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1GM BASE per VIAL
050155/001 CHLOROMYCETIN CHLORAMPHENICOL SODIUM SUCCINATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1GM BASE per VIAL
062365/001 CHLORAMPHENICOL SODIUM SUCCINATE CHLORAMPHENICOL SODIUM SUCCINATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION EQ 1GM BASE per VIAL

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Answered questions

Cephalosporin and chloramphenicol are antibacterial antibiotics that target cell wall and protein synthesis?
Cephalosporin and chloramphenicol are antibacterial antibiotics that target cell wall synthesis and protein synthesis, respectively. In general, the side effects of cephalosporin in humans are rare and relatively mild, whereas those of chloramphenicol are common and severe. Formulate a hypothesis explaining these... Asked by Joe Ockey 1 month ago.

Cephalosporin and chloramphenicol are antibacterial antibiotics that target cell wall synthesis and protein synthesis, respectively. In general, the side effects of cephalosporin in humans are rare and relatively mild, whereas those of chloramphenicol are common and severe. Formulate a hypothesis explaining these interesting phenomena. Answered by Casey Uc 1 month ago.

Chloramphenicol targets the bacterial 70S ribosome, with a consequent effect on protein synthesis. Whilst the majority of the human cell contains 80S ribosomes, the human mitochondria contain 70S ribosomes. It is the action on these that is thought to result in the dose-related bone marrow toxicity of chloramphenicol. Cephalosporins do not affect 70S ribosomes at all (as you said, they are cell wall active) and therefore do not elicit this effect. The aplastic anaemia side effect of chloramphenicol is idiosyncratic, and is likely to be due to complex host/antibiotic reactions that are not currently known. Interestingly, there are examples of twins both getting aplastic anaemia after chloramphenicol (actually quite rare - 1 in 20,000-40,000 people), suggesting there may be a genetic component. As an aside, I would argue that chloramphenicol is actually not as unsafe as you make out. Aplastic anaemia is rare, and chloramphenicol is otherwise very well tolerated in my experience. Cephalosporins has significant side effects of their own, including a greatly increased susceptibility to C. difficile diarrhoea - which comes with considerable morbidity and some mortality. Answered by Katy Spane 1 month ago.


Why are the side effect of chloramphenicol and Cephalosporin so different?
Asked by Amina Baldos 1 month ago.

Chloramphenicol's mechanism of action is to inhibit peptidyl transferase activity of prokaryotic ribosomes thus preventing bacterial protein synthesis. Cephalosporin is a beta-lactam antibiotic preventing cross-linking in the bacterial peptidoglycan cell wall. Many of the side effects in eukaryotes (e.g. humans) are due to their effect on mitochondria. Mitochondria are derived from prokaryotic organisms and have retained their prokaryotic ribosomes. Thus mitochondrial protein synthesis is inhibited by chloramphenicol. As the mitochondria are housed within the eukaryotic cell, they do not have a need for a peptidoglycan cell wall and thus are not effected by cephalosporin antibiotics. Cephalosporin still has side effects such as nausea etc due to its effect on gut microflora. Answered by Willette Schlottmann 1 month ago.

Cephalosporins Side Effects Answered by Enedina Socci 1 month ago.


Chloramphenicol in milk?
what is it and does it come to a misuse of it? Asked by Kennith Lespier 1 month ago.

Chloramphenicol is a broad spectrum antibiotic. It is rarely used for treating bacterial infections mainly do to its toxic side affects. It is has been banned in the US and Europe in feed for food producing animals because of the toxicity of the substance, and it will be present in the milk from dairy cattle if their feed is supplemeted with it. Chloramphenicol is also a suspected carcinogen. Answered by Coletta Catholic 1 month ago.


Did u know Chloramphenicol ? it's one of antibiotics ? it's safe to use everyday while one weeks ?
what is side effect of this drugs ? please helps... thx Asked by Abigail Winney 1 month ago.

Chloramphenicol is an antibiotic that has been available for many years but it has fallen out of use in the developing world because of serious side effects: primarily aplastic anemia and "gray baby" syndrome. It has for the most part been supplanted by much better antibiotics with less risk. It is still available in many developing countries and often can be purchased over the counter -- with the consequence that there are a significant number of people who have serious side effects that may be fatal. Unfortunately, in these areas life is cheap and it is often not even realized what the cause of the death was. There might be serious infections that would be worth the risk if there were no alternatives available, but it should not be taken lightly. Answered by Iona Carby 1 month ago.


How chloramphenicol, and tetracycline inhibit protein synthesis in bacteria?
deals with protein synthesis in bacteria Asked by Jonas Gingg 1 month ago.

Chloramphenicol is a bacteriostatic antibiotic that binds to the 23S rRNA of the 50S subunit of the bacterial ribosome, inhibiting peptidyl transferase and thus inhibiting protein synthesis at large. Tetracycline is also bacteriostatic and has a similar method: it binds to the 16S rRNA of the 30S subunit, blocking aminoacyl-tRNA and thus inhibiting protein synthesis. Answered by Leila Brislin 1 month ago.

tetracycline and chloramphenicol both inhibit protein synthesis in bacteria and are both bacteriostatic antibiotics. Tetracycline attaches to the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribisime complex and inhibits attachment of the subsequent amino acid. Chloramphenicol attaches to the 50S subunit and impairs substrate binding. Answered by Jake Minardi 1 month ago.

Chloramphenicol: It functions by inhibiting peptidyl transferase activity of the bacterial ribosome, binding to A2451 and A2452 residues in the 23S rRNA of the 50S ribosomal subunit, preventing peptide bond formation. Tetracyclines: Inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the subunit of the bacterial ribosome (30S subunit). Tetracycline antibiotics inhibit protein synthesis by inhibiting the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA to the mRNA-ribosome complex. They do so mainly by binding to the 30S ribosomal subunit in the mRNA translation complex. Answered by Andres Beecham 1 month ago.

Penicillin is an extremely consumer-friendly Gram-valuable antibiotic. there is likewise cephalosporin C, cephalothine, cefepim and cefoxitin yet those 2 impact cellular wall formation. here anti-biotics impact protein synthesis: Chloramphenicol, Tetracyclines, Erythromycine and Streptomycine. Answered by Loreta Babin 1 month ago.


How does Chloramphenicol work?
Explain how chloramphenicol works by describing the basic processes of protein synthesis. Please help, and please post any good sites/figures that you know. Asked by Nery Keleher 1 month ago.

How Chloramphenicol Works Answered by Cherise Hallmon 1 month ago.

General overview of protein synthesis: DNA ----transcription----> mRNA ----translation----> Protein Overview of bacterial translation: The naked mRNA binds with 30s ribosome and then the 50s ribosome to make the 70s complex. The ribosome then starts to elongate, translating codons until it comes to a stop codon. Chloramphenicol inhibits protein synthesis during ELONGATION. It's important to know that it inhibits during elongation, because the result are incomplete proteins, where as if an antibiotic inhibited initiation, you would have less proteins, but the few that are made would be full length. Chloramphenicol binds to the 50s subunit ribosome during elongation, leading to shortened, incomplete proteins. If bacteria have these short nonfunctional proteins, they die which is why chloramphenicol is an antibiotic. Hope this makes sense. Answered by Wayne Madock 1 month ago.

the prescription is a mild antisepetic and yes it will be safe Answered by Leigh Bauske 1 month ago.


Chloramphenicol?
I just movd to UK and their meds a very different. I can't even find Neosporin!! Well, I got some antibacterial eye drops, because it looks like i have pink eye. the active antibiotic is chloramphenicol. I've never had it before. I administered the drops, and a few minutes later, I could almost taste it... Asked by Yuko Isaac 1 month ago.

I just movd to UK and their meds a very different. I can't even find Neosporin!! Well, I got some antibacterial eye drops, because it looks like i have pink eye. the active antibiotic is chloramphenicol. I've never had it before. I administered the drops, and a few minutes later, I could almost taste it running down my throat. I began to feel a bit like i was going to throw up. It's gone now though. I looked at side effects, and nasea and vomiting were 'potential' side effects. Has anyone ever taking these? Is the 'draining' feeling normal? it taste horrible >.< Answered by Darrel Kenefick 1 month ago.

The drops should drain into the nose - not down the throat. If they are going down the throat, this is not so good. Chloramphenicol has been known to give people permanent aplastic anemia (ie it kills off the bone marrow cells that make all blood cells.) I had them once for the same reason and did not have this side effect. Answered by Marjorie Alicandro 1 month ago.


What is the type of microbial agent and method of action for Chloramphenicol?
Type of Microbial Agenta. aminoglycosidesb. B-lactamsc. carbapenemsd. cephalosporinse. glycopeptidesf. macrolidesg. Monobactamsh. quinolonesi. sulfonamidesj. TetracyclinesMethod of Action:1. Inhibit enzyme activity2. Inhibit cell wall synthesis3. Inhibit protein synthesis4. Inhibit... Asked by Maynard Nilsen 1 month ago.

Type of Microbial Agent a. aminoglycosides b. B-lactams c. carbapenems d. cephalosporins e. glycopeptides f. macrolides g. Monobactams h. quinolones i. sulfonamides j. Tetracyclines Method of Action: 1. Inhibit enzyme activity 2. Inhibit cell wall synthesis 3. Inhibit protein synthesis 4. Inhibit nucleic acid sythesis Answered by Melodee Lehtinen 1 month ago.

Chloramphenicol acts by inhibiting protein synthesis. It doesn't fit into any of those 10 categories, though. Answered by Celestina Panahon 1 month ago.


What is the role of Chloramphenicol in beta galactosidase induction experiment?
Asked by Serafina Byrum 1 month ago.

ok, chloramphenicol is an anitibiotic, in the presence of which normal E.coli cells stop producing beta galactosidase as they don't possess resistance against the antibiotic. So chloramphenicol stops the production of beta gatactosidase. Answered by Francine Dapvaala 1 month ago.

Ever observed that usually it somewhat is all-American Rejects and each so often the hyphen isn't there, however the awfulness isn't affected. Hmm. ok, here is my test: Jo! Nas! Bro! Thers! Nope, even once I separate each and each syllable with an exclamation element, they suck. i do no longer comprehend a thank you to insert them into text fabric at here, yet consistent with risk if we placed those little dot issues over the O's (like motley crue or blue oyster cult) they could develop some. Answered by Kiesha Tuning 1 month ago.


Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - Blog - All rights reserved