Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019833/002.

Names and composition

"CHILDREN'S ADVIL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of IBUPROFEN.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019833/002 CHILDREN'S ADVIL IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
020589/001 CHILDREN'S ADVIL IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
020944/001 CHILDREN'S ADVIL IBUPROFEN TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 50MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017463/002 MOTRIN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017463/003 MOTRIN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 300MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017463/004 MOTRIN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017463/005 MOTRIN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018197/001 IBU IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
018197/002 RUFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
018989/001 ADVIL IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
019012/001 NUPRIN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
019012/002 NUPRIN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
019012/003 MOTRIN IB IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
019012/004 MOTRIN MIGRAINE PAIN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
019784/001 IBU IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
019833/002 CHILDREN'S ADVIL IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
019842/001 MOTRIN IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020135/001 MOTRIN IBUPROFEN TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 50MG
020135/002 MOTRIN IBUPROFEN TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 100MG
020267/002 JUNIOR STRENGTH ADVIL IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 100MG
020402/001 ADVIL LIQUI-GELS IBUPROFEN CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 200MG FREE ACID AND POTASSIUM SALT
020402/002 ADVIL MIGRAINE LIQUI-GELS IBUPROFEN CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 200MG FREE ACID AND POTASSIUM SALT
020418/001 MOTRIN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 100MG
020476/001 MOTRIN IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/DROPS/ORAL 40MG per ML
020516/001 CHILDREN'S MOTRIN IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
020589/001 CHILDREN'S ADVIL IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
020589/002 CHILDREN'S ADVIL-FLAVORED IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
020601/001 CHILDREN'S MOTRIN IBUPROFEN TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 50MG
020601/003 JUNIOR STRENGTH MOTRIN IBUPROFEN TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 100MG
020602/001 JUNIOR STRENGTH MOTRIN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 100MG
020603/001 CHILDREN'S MOTRIN IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/DROPS/ORAL 40MG per ML
020812/001 PEDIATRIC ADVIL IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/DROPS/ORAL 100MG per 2.5ML
020944/001 CHILDREN'S ADVIL IBUPROFEN TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 50MG
020944/002 JUNIOR STRENGTH ADVIL IBUPROFEN TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 100MG
021472/001 MIDOL LIQUID GELS IBUPROFEN CAPSULE/ORAL 200MG
021604/001 CHILDREN'S ELIXSURE IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
022348/001 CALDOLOR IBUPROFEN SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 400MG per 4ML (100MG per ML)
022348/002 CALDOLOR IBUPROFEN SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 800MG per 8ML (100MG per ML)
070038/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
070041/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
070045/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
070057/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
070079/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
070080/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
070081/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
070083/001 IBU IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
070088/001 IBU IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
070099/001 IBU IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
070328/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070329/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
070330/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
070435/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
070436/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
070437/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
070469/001 IBUPROHM IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
070475/001 MEDIPREN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
070476/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
070481/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
070493/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
070556/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
070591/001 MIDOL IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
070626/001 MIDOL IBUPROFEN CAPSULE/ORAL 200MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
070629/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
070630/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
070709/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
070733/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
070736/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
070736/002 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 300MG
070736/003 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
070745/001 IBU IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
070818/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
070908/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
070985/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
070986/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
071001/001 MIDOL IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071002/001 MIDOL IBUPROFEN CAPSULE/ORAL 200MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
071027/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071028/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 300MG
071029/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
071030/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
071057/001 IBU-TAB 200 IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071058/001 IBU-TAB IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
071059/001 IBU-TAB IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
071065/001 ACHES-N-PAIN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071122/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071123/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 300MG
071124/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
071125/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
071144/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071145/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
071146/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
071154/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071163/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071214/001 IBUPROHM IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071215/001 MEDIPREN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071229/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071230/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 300MG
071231/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
071232/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
071264/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
071265/001 PROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071266/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 300MG
071267/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
071268/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
071268/002 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
071268/003 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
071333/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071334/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
071335/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
071338/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 300MG
071448/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
071462/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071547/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
071575/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071639/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071644/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
071664/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071666/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
071667/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
071668/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
071732/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071735/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071765/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071769/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
071773/001 IBUPRIN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071807/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071870/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071905/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
071911/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
071935/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
071938/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
071964/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
071965/001 IBU-TAB IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
071999/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
072004/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
072035/001 NUPRIN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
072036/001 NUPRIN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
072040/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
072064/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
072065/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
072095/001 TAB-PROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
072096/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
072097/001 CAP-PROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
072098/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
072137/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
072169/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
072199/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
072249/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
072299/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
072300/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
072901/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
072903/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
073019/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
073141/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
073343/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
073344/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
073345/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
073691/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
074525/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
074533/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
074782/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN CAPSULE/ORAL 200MG
074916/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
074931/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
074937/001 CHILDREN'S IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
074978/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
075010/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075139/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075217/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/DROPS/ORAL 40MG per ML
075367/001 JUNIOR STRENGTH IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075661/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075682/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
075682/002 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
075682/003 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
075995/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
076112/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
076112/002 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
076112/003 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
076117/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 100MG
076359/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 50MG
076359/002 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 100MG
076460/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
076741/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 100MG
076925/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
077114/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
077114/002 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
077114/003 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
077338/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 200MG FREE ACID AND POTASSIUM SALT
077349/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
078132/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
078132/002 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
078132/003 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
078329/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
078329/002 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
078329/003 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
078558/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
078558/002 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
078558/003 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
078682/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 200MG FREE ACID AND POTASSIUM SALT
079058/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/DROPS/ORAL 40MG per ML
079129/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
079174/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
079205/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 200MG FREE ACID AND POTASSIUM SALT
079233/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
090796/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
090796/002 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
090796/003 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
091237/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
091239/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
091355/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
091625/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
091625/002 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
091625/003 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
200457/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
202300/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 200MG FREE ACID AND POTASSIUM SALT
202312/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
202413/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
202413/002 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 600MG
202413/003 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 800MG
203599/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 200MG FREE ACID AND POTASSIUM SALT
205647/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
206568/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 200MG FREE ACID AND POTASSIUM SALT
207052/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
207095/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN TABLET/ORAL 200MG
209204/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
209207/001 IBUPROFEN IBUPROFEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Pregnant? can I take advil?
What's wrong with advil? Can it hurt my baby,? Asked by Dane Pillips 1 year ago.

I was told only children's Tylenol. If something is wrong that that absolutely wont help at all you should talk to your doctor. Answered by Monika Anez 1 year ago.

You can take Tylenol, but don't take advil, aspirin, or other pain medication unless prescribed by your doctor. Don't take more than the directed amount. Good Luck! Answered by Debbra Losada 1 year ago.

Tylenol. Normal recommend dosage on the bottle. Do not take ADVIL. Answered by Kenyetta Hannum 1 year ago.

Tylenol, and NOTHING else unless prescribed by your doctor. I had the flu in week 5, and I couldn't even take anything. Youjust have to suffer through it. Answered by Hai Lowek 1 year ago.

why do you need to tell us your age? no, take the recommended dose of regular strength tylonal. (found on the lable, on the back of the bottle) Answered by Kraig Woy 1 year ago.


My 4 yr old has a 102 fever, what should I do?
My daughter hasn't been sick since she was 2 years old so I don't know about what to do at this age. It's the third day of this. Fever spikes in afternoon and breaks in the middle of the night. She is keeping down fluids after vomiting on the first day. I have heard that a fever is the bodies way of... Asked by Arla Winnike 1 year ago.

My daughter hasn't been sick since she was 2 years old so I don't know about what to do at this age. It's the third day of this. Fever spikes in afternoon and breaks in the middle of the night. She is keeping down fluids after vomiting on the first day. I have heard that a fever is the bodies way of fighting viruses but should I still give a fever reducer or just let it ride it's course? She doesn't complain of sore throat or have any rashes, but she does have a dry cough. Thanks in advance for any advice you have. We really want to avoid taking her to the doctor and exposing her to more germs while she is less tolerant. Answered by Shakira Morock 1 year ago.

Fever in Children Treatment Self-Care at Home The 3 goals of home care for a child with a fever are to reduce the temperature, prevent dehydration, and monitor for serious or life-threatening illness. The first goal is to make the child comfortable by monitoring and reducing the fever to under 102°F (38.9°C). This is done using a thermometer and medications and dressing the child appropriately. A warm water bath can also be helpful. * To check your child’s temperature, you will need a thermometer. Thermometers available are glass mercury, digital, and tympanic (used in the ear). * Stay away from tympanic thermometers, the jury is still out about their accuracy. o Glass thermometers work well but may break and take several minutes to get a reading. o Digital thermometers are inexpensive and obtain a reading in seconds. * It is best to check an infant's or toddler’s temperature rectally. o Hold the child chest down across your knees. o Spread the buttocks with one hand and insert the thermometer lubricated with a water-soluble jelly about 1 inch into the rectum with the other hand. * Oral temperatures may be obtained in older children who are not mouth breathing or have not recently had a hot or cold beverage. * Acetaminophen (Children’s Tylenol, Tempra) and ibuprofen (Children’s Advil, Children’s Motrin) are used to reduce fever. o Follow the dosage and frequency printed on the label. o Remember to continue to give the medication over at least 24 hours or the fever will usually return. o Do not use aspirin to treat fever in children, especially for a fever with chickenpox. It has been linked to Reye’s syndrome which causes liver failure. Ibuprofen use in chickenpox is also being questioned. * Children should not be overdressed indoors, even in the winter. o Overdressing keeps the body from cooling using evaporation, radiation, conduction, or convection. o Most practical is to dress the child in a single layer of clothing and cover the child with a sheet or light blanket. * A sponge bath in warm water will help reduce a fever. o This is usually not needed but may more quickly reduce the fever. o Put the child in a few inches of warm water and use a sponge or washcloth to wet the skin of the body and arms and legs. o The water itself does not cool the child. The evaporation of the water off the skin does, so do not cover the child with wet towels. o Contrary to the popular folk remedy to reduce fever, under no circumstances should rubbing alcohol be used in a bath or rubbed on the skin. Alcohol is poisonous to children. The second goal is to keep the child from becoming dehydrated. Humans lose extra water from the skin and lungs during a fever. * Encourage the child to drink clear fluids such as non-carbonated drinks without caffeine or juice (not water). Water does not contain the necessary electrolytes and glucose. Other clear fluids are chicken soup, Pedialyte, and other rehydrating drinks available at your grocery or drug store. * Tea or other caffeine-containing products should not be used. They act as diurectics and increase urination and fluid loss. This is not the effect you want. * Your child should urinate light-colored urine at least every 4 hours if well hydrated. The third goal is to monitor the child for signs of serious or life-threatening illness. * A good strategy is to reduce the child’s temperature to under 102°F (39.0°C). * Also, make sure the child is drinking enough clear fluids (not water). * If both these conditions are met and your child is still ill appearing, a more serious problem may exist. Medical Treatment Your doctor may or may not be able to tell you the exact cause of your child’s fever. Viral infections of the respiratory system are the most common cause of fever. Antibiotics do not cure or help with viral infections. * If your doctor diagnoses a bacterial infection, your child will be started on antibiotics. o Urinary tract infections, ear infections, throat infections, sinus infections, skin infections, gastrointestinal infections, and pneumonia may be treated with antibiotics at home. o Your child may receive oral antibiotics or a shot or both. * Children diagnosed with bacterial meningitis are always admitted to the hospital. Additionally, your doctor may give acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil) for fever. Dehydration may be treated by giving oral or intravenous fluids. * If a child is vomiting, an anti-nausea drug may be given by injection or by rectal suppository. * After a period of time, oral fluids will be attempted. If your child’s condition improves after reducing the fever, treating dehydration, and serious bacterial infections have been ruled out, the doctor will more than likely discharge your child from the emergency department for further care and monitoring at home. Answered by Nelson Gwaltney 1 year ago.

2 Year Old Has 102 Fever Answered by Carlee Clarkson 1 year ago.

2 Year Old Fever 102 Answered by Kesha Trupiano 1 year ago.

You are absolutely right about the fever fighting off infection. However, after a while you have to wonder why it is taking so long for the infection to subside. It is a good sign that it breads off and on. In you quetion about giving her Tylenol or Ibeuprofin, the idea is to keep her comfortable. If she can tolerate her condition without it, fine. If she becomes uncomfortable and say for instance, has trouble sleeping, then give it to her. I wouldn't worry about exposing her to the germs at the doctors' office. If you can keep your distances from the other people as much as possible and wash hands when you can, certainly before leaving the facility and when you get home. Is she too old for Pedialyte? Probably couldn't hurt. I alwayt take the safe side and go right to the doc. If it were me, I would take her. A person just never knows and it is better to error on the side of safety. Good luck and I hope you two feel better soon. Answered by Kathey Mirelez 1 year ago.

When temperature is 100 degrees Fahrenheit or more, you should give an antipyretic to make the child comfortable. As the fever is high grade, it is better that she should be seen by a doctor, in case she has a bacterial infection and needs an antibiotic. Give her plenty of fluids to drink and frequent, small meals of soft food. Answered by Carter Sisko 1 year ago.

Correct with the fever information. Keep her hydrated as much as possible and if she can eat, feed her nutritious food.. Since the fever is breaking at times, that's a good sign. Allow the fever to take it's course. If it lasts for a week, then contact her doctor. Answered by Shay Gnabah 1 year ago.

There should be a nurse on call that you can contact. Usually through your pediatrician. if you call their number it will give you the nurse on call number. THey are really helpful. 102.1 is not that high in a child as long as she/he is over a year old. Not eating is no big deal and throwing up is prob the sickness with no food in her belly. I would only worry about the shallow breathing depending on how shallow it is. If she is really having trouble breathing call someone right away or go to ER. if its just the cold keep a close eye on her through the night and if you alternate between the Tylenol and Motrin that always breaks the fever. Please check with someone on all this though bc im just a mom. If her fever gets to 103 take her in! Not 105 thats really really hot! GOod luck I hate when my boys are sick its so nerve racking. Answered by Tessa Plienis 1 year ago.

Take her to the emergency room. With the continued high fever, she could sustain serious brain damage. They will probably give her antibiotics. Put a cold cloth on her head in the car, and have her lay down or sleep(keeping the seatbelt on, ov course!). Answered by Deann Deschomp 1 year ago.

I'm a nurse. Please take her to the doctor right away. Her organs are cooking by her fever being so high. Also if the fever isn't reduced, it can cause brain damage. I don't want to scare you, I just care. Answered by Grisel Inverso 1 year ago.

No dont hold back on going to the doctor. It'll help. She'll get some antibiotics. take her tto emergency in the hosptal. Answered by Asha Ellebrecht 1 year ago.


Can i take two Advil at a time?
Im a 14 year old girl about 115 pounds and im not sure if i can take 2 advils at a time. i know the bottle says not to, but 1 usually doesn't work that well. its the little circular pills by the way, i forgot what its called. Asked by Glen Derienzo 1 year ago.

The strength of over-the-counter Advil is 200 mg. Doctors often prescribe up to 600-800 mg at a time. At your age and weight, you would look at the adult dosing not the children's. You can safely take two Advil at one time and repeat it according to what the bottle says (3-4 hours), just don't exceed the maximum for a 24 hour period. As someone else said, longterm use can cause problems, so if you're needing to take it every day, you need to talk to a doctor about what's causing your symptoms. Answered by Chong Bouvia 1 year ago.

Yes, you can safely double dose over the counter anti-inflammatories for a short time. Don't overdo it or it could cause stomach liver and kidney problems. Answered by Nubia Minn 1 year ago.

2 advil won't hurt you.. i have to take 3-4 just to get rid of my head aches sometimes Answered by Dylan Boykins 1 year ago.

It's perfectly fine to take 2, but don't overdose to often. Answered by Rubye Dominici 1 year ago.

if it says not to, don't. 1 may not be working for you because you are used to them, why dont you try taking something else, excedrine, tylenol etc Answered by Tanna Boegel 1 year ago.

yes that's fine. at your age, i took the same. you'll be fine, especially since you notice that only 1 isn't working. Answered by Gracia Abdul 1 year ago.


What happens when you swallow 3 different kinds of pain relievers like, Children Tylenol, Children Advil....?
so i was feeling nauseous this morning and and the whole day and i threw up twice or three times in the whole day, and well it came to be about 9 or 8 and i came to be very tired and i went to sleep and woke up at 10:20 or so, and i remembered about 2 weeks ago my football mate was talking about how he chugged a... Asked by Veronika Sudweeks 1 year ago.

so i was feeling nauseous this morning and and the whole day and i threw up twice or three times in the whole day, and well it came to be about 9 or 8 and i came to be very tired and i went to sleep and woke up at 10:20 or so, and i remembered about 2 weeks ago my football mate was talking about how he chugged a bottle of NyQuil when he woke up one day and went to sleep and woke up feeling so much better so i went straight to the kitchen and well there wasn't any NyQuil and so i grabbed one bottle of Children s Motrin or something like that an then another bottle of Children s Advil and a bottle of Children s Tylenol, and the first one i chugged was the Children s Motrin and that one didn't have much it only had about half a teaspoon or so and i grabbed the Advil and chugged it to, that one had a little bit more than half a teaspoon like maybe a teaspoon or a teaspoon and a half or so, the third was finally the Tylenol and that one had a lot but i only chugged about half a teaspoon and then after i grabbed a spoon and had two tea spoons, an then i went to my sisters room where my mom was and asked "do we have NyQuil?" and she said "didn't you already have some medicine?" and i said "yes" and she said "lets wait a bit because we cant mix them up" well that's when i got curious about what is going to happen and well yeah so last im 14 years old a freshmen in high school and i feel like S*** and i just want to know after i wake up will i feel better or just wake up worse or will i get sick or what? thanks Answered by Freeda Mcgavock 1 year ago.

You should feel better once you get some rest. However, you should never mix several pain relievers together, especially without measuring them. You could accidentally overdose. Also, pain relievers don't really help with nausea. They have medicine to help with nausea, so I would check that out. So, I would lay off the pain relievers for a few days and then see how you feel. Good luck. Answered by Adrienne Northrup 1 year ago.

funny enough it does opposite, you feel pain 3x as much than you would normally. Answered by Esther Porath 1 year ago.


Ibuprofen and alcohol ?
So about maybe 4-5 hours ago I took 3 tsp of Children s Advil (Ibuprofen)for a headache. 30 minutes ago I took about 5 medium sips of red wine until I remembered I had taken the medicine. I was wondering if I should worry xD? Asked by Alyce Mazzillo 1 year ago.

Ibuprofen should be ok but too much paracetomol or codine based painkillers with alcohol is far worse. The only thing with ibuprofen is stomach irritation and alcohol may make it worse leading to acid and heartburn but not always. Answered by Renda Mespelt 1 year ago.

if you took it once and after 4-5hrs then alittle wine theres no problem only make sure you dont mix them again ibuprofen is very strong anti-inflammatory drug and mixing it with alcohol could make its side effect worse. Answered by Kirby Stipp 1 year ago.

Nah, you will be fine. Answered by Sherly Papelian 1 year ago.


Pregnant? can I take advil?
What's wrong with advil? Can it hurt my baby,? Asked by Wm Stepney 1 year ago.

I was told only children's Tylenol. If something is wrong that that absolutely wont help at all you should talk to your doctor. Answered by Flora Soltani 1 year ago.

You can take Tylenol, but don't take advil, aspirin, or other pain medication unless prescribed by your doctor. Don't take more than the directed amount. Good Luck! Answered by Berenice Raducha 1 year ago.

Tylenol. Normal recommend dosage on the bottle. Do not take ADVIL. Answered by Kala Shelmon 1 year ago.

Tylenol, and NOTHING else unless prescribed by your doctor. I had the flu in week 5, and I couldn't even take anything. Youjust have to suffer through it. Answered by Samatha Fosser 1 year ago.

why do you need to tell us your age? no, take the recommended dose of regular strength tylonal. (found on the lable, on the back of the bottle) Answered by Hui Barthelman 1 year ago.


My 4 yr old has a 102 fever, what should I do?
My daughter hasn't been sick since she was 2 years old so I don't know about what to do at this age. It's the third day of this. Fever spikes in afternoon and breaks in the middle of the night. She is keeping down fluids after vomiting on the first day. I have heard that a fever is the bodies way of... Asked by Modesto Husenaj 1 year ago.

My daughter hasn't been sick since she was 2 years old so I don't know about what to do at this age. It's the third day of this. Fever spikes in afternoon and breaks in the middle of the night. She is keeping down fluids after vomiting on the first day. I have heard that a fever is the bodies way of fighting viruses but should I still give a fever reducer or just let it ride it's course? She doesn't complain of sore throat or have any rashes, but she does have a dry cough. Thanks in advance for any advice you have. We really want to avoid taking her to the doctor and exposing her to more germs while she is less tolerant. Answered by Shayne Debold 1 year ago.

Fever in Children Treatment Self-Care at Home The 3 goals of home care for a child with a fever are to reduce the temperature, prevent dehydration, and monitor for serious or life-threatening illness. The first goal is to make the child comfortable by monitoring and reducing the fever to under 102°F (38.9°C). This is done using a thermometer and medications and dressing the child appropriately. A warm water bath can also be helpful. * To check your child’s temperature, you will need a thermometer. Thermometers available are glass mercury, digital, and tympanic (used in the ear). * Stay away from tympanic thermometers, the jury is still out about their accuracy. o Glass thermometers work well but may break and take several minutes to get a reading. o Digital thermometers are inexpensive and obtain a reading in seconds. * It is best to check an infant's or toddler’s temperature rectally. o Hold the child chest down across your knees. o Spread the buttocks with one hand and insert the thermometer lubricated with a water-soluble jelly about 1 inch into the rectum with the other hand. * Oral temperatures may be obtained in older children who are not mouth breathing or have not recently had a hot or cold beverage. * Acetaminophen (Children’s Tylenol, Tempra) and ibuprofen (Children’s Advil, Children’s Motrin) are used to reduce fever. o Follow the dosage and frequency printed on the label. o Remember to continue to give the medication over at least 24 hours or the fever will usually return. o Do not use aspirin to treat fever in children, especially for a fever with chickenpox. It has been linked to Reye’s syndrome which causes liver failure. Ibuprofen use in chickenpox is also being questioned. * Children should not be overdressed indoors, even in the winter. o Overdressing keeps the body from cooling using evaporation, radiation, conduction, or convection. o Most practical is to dress the child in a single layer of clothing and cover the child with a sheet or light blanket. * A sponge bath in warm water will help reduce a fever. o This is usually not needed but may more quickly reduce the fever. o Put the child in a few inches of warm water and use a sponge or washcloth to wet the skin of the body and arms and legs. o The water itself does not cool the child. The evaporation of the water off the skin does, so do not cover the child with wet towels. o Contrary to the popular folk remedy to reduce fever, under no circumstances should rubbing alcohol be used in a bath or rubbed on the skin. Alcohol is poisonous to children. The second goal is to keep the child from becoming dehydrated. Humans lose extra water from the skin and lungs during a fever. * Encourage the child to drink clear fluids such as non-carbonated drinks without caffeine or juice (not water). Water does not contain the necessary electrolytes and glucose. Other clear fluids are chicken soup, Pedialyte, and other rehydrating drinks available at your grocery or drug store. * Tea or other caffeine-containing products should not be used. They act as diurectics and increase urination and fluid loss. This is not the effect you want. * Your child should urinate light-colored urine at least every 4 hours if well hydrated. The third goal is to monitor the child for signs of serious or life-threatening illness. * A good strategy is to reduce the child’s temperature to under 102°F (39.0°C). * Also, make sure the child is drinking enough clear fluids (not water). * If both these conditions are met and your child is still ill appearing, a more serious problem may exist. Medical Treatment Your doctor may or may not be able to tell you the exact cause of your child’s fever. Viral infections of the respiratory system are the most common cause of fever. Antibiotics do not cure or help with viral infections. * If your doctor diagnoses a bacterial infection, your child will be started on antibiotics. o Urinary tract infections, ear infections, throat infections, sinus infections, skin infections, gastrointestinal infections, and pneumonia may be treated with antibiotics at home. o Your child may receive oral antibiotics or a shot or both. * Children diagnosed with bacterial meningitis are always admitted to the hospital. Additionally, your doctor may give acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil) for fever. Dehydration may be treated by giving oral or intravenous fluids. * If a child is vomiting, an anti-nausea drug may be given by injection or by rectal suppository. * After a period of time, oral fluids will be attempted. If your child’s condition improves after reducing the fever, treating dehydration, and serious bacterial infections have been ruled out, the doctor will more than likely discharge your child from the emergency department for further care and monitoring at home. Answered by Neta Estrade 1 year ago.

2 Year Old Has 102 Fever Answered by Cliff Bytheway 1 year ago.

2 Year Old Fever 102 Answered by Darwin Sagredo 1 year ago.

You are absolutely right about the fever fighting off infection. However, after a while you have to wonder why it is taking so long for the infection to subside. It is a good sign that it breads off and on. In you quetion about giving her Tylenol or Ibeuprofin, the idea is to keep her comfortable. If she can tolerate her condition without it, fine. If she becomes uncomfortable and say for instance, has trouble sleeping, then give it to her. I wouldn't worry about exposing her to the germs at the doctors' office. If you can keep your distances from the other people as much as possible and wash hands when you can, certainly before leaving the facility and when you get home. Is she too old for Pedialyte? Probably couldn't hurt. I alwayt take the safe side and go right to the doc. If it were me, I would take her. A person just never knows and it is better to error on the side of safety. Good luck and I hope you two feel better soon. Answered by Bridgette Borowicz 1 year ago.

When temperature is 100 degrees Fahrenheit or more, you should give an antipyretic to make the child comfortable. As the fever is high grade, it is better that she should be seen by a doctor, in case she has a bacterial infection and needs an antibiotic. Give her plenty of fluids to drink and frequent, small meals of soft food. Answered by Lang Corry 1 year ago.

Correct with the fever information. Keep her hydrated as much as possible and if she can eat, feed her nutritious food.. Since the fever is breaking at times, that's a good sign. Allow the fever to take it's course. If it lasts for a week, then contact her doctor. Answered by Francis Oltremari 1 year ago.

There should be a nurse on call that you can contact. Usually through your pediatrician. if you call their number it will give you the nurse on call number. THey are really helpful. 102.1 is not that high in a child as long as she/he is over a year old. Not eating is no big deal and throwing up is prob the sickness with no food in her belly. I would only worry about the shallow breathing depending on how shallow it is. If she is really having trouble breathing call someone right away or go to ER. if its just the cold keep a close eye on her through the night and if you alternate between the Tylenol and Motrin that always breaks the fever. Please check with someone on all this though bc im just a mom. If her fever gets to 103 take her in! Not 105 thats really really hot! GOod luck I hate when my boys are sick its so nerve racking. Answered by Armida Kraling 1 year ago.

Take her to the emergency room. With the continued high fever, she could sustain serious brain damage. They will probably give her antibiotics. Put a cold cloth on her head in the car, and have her lay down or sleep(keeping the seatbelt on, ov course!). Answered by Lela Studmire 1 year ago.

I'm a nurse. Please take her to the doctor right away. Her organs are cooking by her fever being so high. Also if the fever isn't reduced, it can cause brain damage. I don't want to scare you, I just care. Answered by Laurie Stanforth 1 year ago.

No dont hold back on going to the doctor. It'll help. She'll get some antibiotics. take her tto emergency in the hosptal. Answered by Freddie Poe 1 year ago.


Can i take two Advil at a time?
Im a 14 year old girl about 115 pounds and im not sure if i can take 2 advils at a time. i know the bottle says not to, but 1 usually doesn't work that well. its the little circular pills by the way, i forgot what its called. Asked by Romeo Hofmeister 1 year ago.

The strength of over-the-counter Advil is 200 mg. Doctors often prescribe up to 600-800 mg at a time. At your age and weight, you would look at the adult dosing not the children's. You can safely take two Advil at one time and repeat it according to what the bottle says (3-4 hours), just don't exceed the maximum for a 24 hour period. As someone else said, longterm use can cause problems, so if you're needing to take it every day, you need to talk to a doctor about what's causing your symptoms. Answered by Teresita Mensch 1 year ago.

Yes, you can safely double dose over the counter anti-inflammatories for a short time. Don't overdo it or it could cause stomach liver and kidney problems. Answered by Floretta Shadid 1 year ago.

2 advil won't hurt you.. i have to take 3-4 just to get rid of my head aches sometimes Answered by Toi Ugaitafa 1 year ago.

It's perfectly fine to take 2, but don't overdose to often. Answered by Hannah Kelsey 1 year ago.

if it says not to, don't. 1 may not be working for you because you are used to them, why dont you try taking something else, excedrine, tylenol etc Answered by Laraine Saraceno 1 year ago.

yes that's fine. at your age, i took the same. you'll be fine, especially since you notice that only 1 isn't working. Answered by Klara Spangle 1 year ago.


What happens when you swallow 3 different kinds of pain relievers like, Children Tylenol, Children Advil....?
so i was feeling nauseous this morning and and the whole day and i threw up twice or three times in the whole day, and well it came to be about 9 or 8 and i came to be very tired and i went to sleep and woke up at 10:20 or so, and i remembered about 2 weeks ago my football mate was talking about how he chugged a... Asked by Herb Taray 1 year ago.

so i was feeling nauseous this morning and and the whole day and i threw up twice or three times in the whole day, and well it came to be about 9 or 8 and i came to be very tired and i went to sleep and woke up at 10:20 or so, and i remembered about 2 weeks ago my football mate was talking about how he chugged a bottle of NyQuil when he woke up one day and went to sleep and woke up feeling so much better so i went straight to the kitchen and well there wasn't any NyQuil and so i grabbed one bottle of Children s Motrin or something like that an then another bottle of Children s Advil and a bottle of Children s Tylenol, and the first one i chugged was the Children s Motrin and that one didn't have much it only had about half a teaspoon or so and i grabbed the Advil and chugged it to, that one had a little bit more than half a teaspoon like maybe a teaspoon or a teaspoon and a half or so, the third was finally the Tylenol and that one had a lot but i only chugged about half a teaspoon and then after i grabbed a spoon and had two tea spoons, an then i went to my sisters room where my mom was and asked "do we have NyQuil?" and she said "didn't you already have some medicine?" and i said "yes" and she said "lets wait a bit because we cant mix them up" well that's when i got curious about what is going to happen and well yeah so last im 14 years old a freshmen in high school and i feel like S*** and i just want to know after i wake up will i feel better or just wake up worse or will i get sick or what? thanks Answered by Carly Waldram 1 year ago.

You should feel better once you get some rest. However, you should never mix several pain relievers together, especially without measuring them. You could accidentally overdose. Also, pain relievers don't really help with nausea. They have medicine to help with nausea, so I would check that out. So, I would lay off the pain relievers for a few days and then see how you feel. Good luck. Answered by Felicia Fedorczyk 1 year ago.

funny enough it does opposite, you feel pain 3x as much than you would normally. Answered by Nelida Wintringham 1 year ago.


Ibuprofen and alcohol ?
So about maybe 4-5 hours ago I took 3 tsp of Children s Advil (Ibuprofen)for a headache. 30 minutes ago I took about 5 medium sips of red wine until I remembered I had taken the medicine. I was wondering if I should worry xD? Asked by Dierdre Baell 1 year ago.

Ibuprofen should be ok but too much paracetomol or codine based painkillers with alcohol is far worse. The only thing with ibuprofen is stomach irritation and alcohol may make it worse leading to acid and heartburn but not always. Answered by Clair Deeken 1 year ago.

if you took it once and after 4-5hrs then alittle wine theres no problem only make sure you dont mix them again ibuprofen is very strong anti-inflammatory drug and mixing it with alcohol could make its side effect worse. Answered by Oralia Canal 1 year ago.

Nah, you will be fine. Answered by Iris Larusso 1 year ago.


Pregnant? can I take advil?
What's wrong with advil? Can it hurt my baby,? Asked by Betsy Norquest 1 year ago.

I was told only children's Tylenol. If something is wrong that that absolutely wont help at all you should talk to your doctor. Answered by Zachariah Train 1 year ago.

You can take Tylenol, but don't take advil, aspirin, or other pain medication unless prescribed by your doctor. Don't take more than the directed amount. Good Luck! Answered by Dodie Coiro 1 year ago.

Tylenol. Normal recommend dosage on the bottle. Do not take ADVIL. Answered by Corrinne Newell 1 year ago.

Tylenol, and NOTHING else unless prescribed by your doctor. I had the flu in week 5, and I couldn't even take anything. Youjust have to suffer through it. Answered by Bulah Igbinosun 1 year ago.

why do you need to tell us your age? no, take the recommended dose of regular strength tylonal. (found on the lable, on the back of the bottle) Answered by Melvina Rattner 1 year ago.


My 4 yr old has a 102 fever, what should I do?
My daughter hasn't been sick since she was 2 years old so I don't know about what to do at this age. It's the third day of this. Fever spikes in afternoon and breaks in the middle of the night. She is keeping down fluids after vomiting on the first day. I have heard that a fever is the bodies way of... Asked by Lauryn Roura 1 year ago.

My daughter hasn't been sick since she was 2 years old so I don't know about what to do at this age. It's the third day of this. Fever spikes in afternoon and breaks in the middle of the night. She is keeping down fluids after vomiting on the first day. I have heard that a fever is the bodies way of fighting viruses but should I still give a fever reducer or just let it ride it's course? She doesn't complain of sore throat or have any rashes, but she does have a dry cough. Thanks in advance for any advice you have. We really want to avoid taking her to the doctor and exposing her to more germs while she is less tolerant. Answered by Emely Bogus 1 year ago.

Fever in Children Treatment Self-Care at Home The 3 goals of home care for a child with a fever are to reduce the temperature, prevent dehydration, and monitor for serious or life-threatening illness. The first goal is to make the child comfortable by monitoring and reducing the fever to under 102°F (38.9°C). This is done using a thermometer and medications and dressing the child appropriately. A warm water bath can also be helpful. * To check your child’s temperature, you will need a thermometer. Thermometers available are glass mercury, digital, and tympanic (used in the ear). * Stay away from tympanic thermometers, the jury is still out about their accuracy. o Glass thermometers work well but may break and take several minutes to get a reading. o Digital thermometers are inexpensive and obtain a reading in seconds. * It is best to check an infant's or toddler’s temperature rectally. o Hold the child chest down across your knees. o Spread the buttocks with one hand and insert the thermometer lubricated with a water-soluble jelly about 1 inch into the rectum with the other hand. * Oral temperatures may be obtained in older children who are not mouth breathing or have not recently had a hot or cold beverage. * Acetaminophen (Children’s Tylenol, Tempra) and ibuprofen (Children’s Advil, Children’s Motrin) are used to reduce fever. o Follow the dosage and frequency printed on the label. o Remember to continue to give the medication over at least 24 hours or the fever will usually return. o Do not use aspirin to treat fever in children, especially for a fever with chickenpox. It has been linked to Reye’s syndrome which causes liver failure. Ibuprofen use in chickenpox is also being questioned. * Children should not be overdressed indoors, even in the winter. o Overdressing keeps the body from cooling using evaporation, radiation, conduction, or convection. o Most practical is to dress the child in a single layer of clothing and cover the child with a sheet or light blanket. * A sponge bath in warm water will help reduce a fever. o This is usually not needed but may more quickly reduce the fever. o Put the child in a few inches of warm water and use a sponge or washcloth to wet the skin of the body and arms and legs. o The water itself does not cool the child. The evaporation of the water off the skin does, so do not cover the child with wet towels. o Contrary to the popular folk remedy to reduce fever, under no circumstances should rubbing alcohol be used in a bath or rubbed on the skin. Alcohol is poisonous to children. The second goal is to keep the child from becoming dehydrated. Humans lose extra water from the skin and lungs during a fever. * Encourage the child to drink clear fluids such as non-carbonated drinks without caffeine or juice (not water). Water does not contain the necessary electrolytes and glucose. Other clear fluids are chicken soup, Pedialyte, and other rehydrating drinks available at your grocery or drug store. * Tea or other caffeine-containing products should not be used. They act as diurectics and increase urination and fluid loss. This is not the effect you want. * Your child should urinate light-colored urine at least every 4 hours if well hydrated. The third goal is to monitor the child for signs of serious or life-threatening illness. * A good strategy is to reduce the child’s temperature to under 102°F (39.0°C). * Also, make sure the child is drinking enough clear fluids (not water). * If both these conditions are met and your child is still ill appearing, a more serious problem may exist. Medical Treatment Your doctor may or may not be able to tell you the exact cause of your child’s fever. Viral infections of the respiratory system are the most common cause of fever. Antibiotics do not cure or help with viral infections. * If your doctor diagnoses a bacterial infection, your child will be started on antibiotics. o Urinary tract infections, ear infections, throat infections, sinus infections, skin infections, gastrointestinal infections, and pneumonia may be treated with antibiotics at home. o Your child may receive oral antibiotics or a shot or both. * Children diagnosed with bacterial meningitis are always admitted to the hospital. Additionally, your doctor may give acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil) for fever. Dehydration may be treated by giving oral or intravenous fluids. * If a child is vomiting, an anti-nausea drug may be given by injection or by rectal suppository. * After a period of time, oral fluids will be attempted. If your child’s condition improves after reducing the fever, treating dehydration, and serious bacterial infections have been ruled out, the doctor will more than likely discharge your child from the emergency department for further care and monitoring at home. Answered by Suzanna Layfield 1 year ago.

2 Year Old Has 102 Fever Answered by Laura Gladue 1 year ago.

2 Year Old Fever 102 Answered by Magdalena Fanny 1 year ago.

You are absolutely right about the fever fighting off infection. However, after a while you have to wonder why it is taking so long for the infection to subside. It is a good sign that it breads off and on. In you quetion about giving her Tylenol or Ibeuprofin, the idea is to keep her comfortable. If she can tolerate her condition without it, fine. If she becomes uncomfortable and say for instance, has trouble sleeping, then give it to her. I wouldn't worry about exposing her to the germs at the doctors' office. If you can keep your distances from the other people as much as possible and wash hands when you can, certainly before leaving the facility and when you get home. Is she too old for Pedialyte? Probably couldn't hurt. I alwayt take the safe side and go right to the doc. If it were me, I would take her. A person just never knows and it is better to error on the side of safety. Good luck and I hope you two feel better soon. Answered by Samella Estrem 1 year ago.

When temperature is 100 degrees Fahrenheit or more, you should give an antipyretic to make the child comfortable. As the fever is high grade, it is better that she should be seen by a doctor, in case she has a bacterial infection and needs an antibiotic. Give her plenty of fluids to drink and frequent, small meals of soft food. Answered by Hugo Leidel 1 year ago.

Correct with the fever information. Keep her hydrated as much as possible and if she can eat, feed her nutritious food.. Since the fever is breaking at times, that's a good sign. Allow the fever to take it's course. If it lasts for a week, then contact her doctor. Answered by Susanne Poli 1 year ago.

There should be a nurse on call that you can contact. Usually through your pediatrician. if you call their number it will give you the nurse on call number. THey are really helpful. 102.1 is not that high in a child as long as she/he is over a year old. Not eating is no big deal and throwing up is prob the sickness with no food in her belly. I would only worry about the shallow breathing depending on how shallow it is. If she is really having trouble breathing call someone right away or go to ER. if its just the cold keep a close eye on her through the night and if you alternate between the Tylenol and Motrin that always breaks the fever. Please check with someone on all this though bc im just a mom. If her fever gets to 103 take her in! Not 105 thats really really hot! GOod luck I hate when my boys are sick its so nerve racking. Answered by Carmella Shult 1 year ago.

Take her to the emergency room. With the continued high fever, she could sustain serious brain damage. They will probably give her antibiotics. Put a cold cloth on her head in the car, and have her lay down or sleep(keeping the seatbelt on, ov course!). Answered by Lovetta Labriola 1 year ago.

I'm a nurse. Please take her to the doctor right away. Her organs are cooking by her fever being so high. Also if the fever isn't reduced, it can cause brain damage. I don't want to scare you, I just care. Answered by Winnifred Mcgowen 1 year ago.

No dont hold back on going to the doctor. It'll help. She'll get some antibiotics. take her tto emergency in the hosptal. Answered by Le Suoboda 1 year ago.


Can i take two Advil at a time?
Im a 14 year old girl about 115 pounds and im not sure if i can take 2 advils at a time. i know the bottle says not to, but 1 usually doesn't work that well. its the little circular pills by the way, i forgot what its called. Asked by Erinn Ridgel 1 year ago.

The strength of over-the-counter Advil is 200 mg. Doctors often prescribe up to 600-800 mg at a time. At your age and weight, you would look at the adult dosing not the children's. You can safely take two Advil at one time and repeat it according to what the bottle says (3-4 hours), just don't exceed the maximum for a 24 hour period. As someone else said, longterm use can cause problems, so if you're needing to take it every day, you need to talk to a doctor about what's causing your symptoms. Answered by Isaiah Fryson 1 year ago.

Yes, you can safely double dose over the counter anti-inflammatories for a short time. Don't overdo it or it could cause stomach liver and kidney problems. Answered by Samuel Urbino 1 year ago.

2 advil won't hurt you.. i have to take 3-4 just to get rid of my head aches sometimes Answered by Lavona Rhode 1 year ago.

It's perfectly fine to take 2, but don't overdose to often. Answered by Colton Calderone 1 year ago.

if it says not to, don't. 1 may not be working for you because you are used to them, why dont you try taking something else, excedrine, tylenol etc Answered by Yelena Andreotti 1 year ago.

yes that's fine. at your age, i took the same. you'll be fine, especially since you notice that only 1 isn't working. Answered by Jeannette Celenza 1 year ago.


What happens when you swallow 3 different kinds of pain relievers like, Children Tylenol, Children Advil....?
so i was feeling nauseous this morning and and the whole day and i threw up twice or three times in the whole day, and well it came to be about 9 or 8 and i came to be very tired and i went to sleep and woke up at 10:20 or so, and i remembered about 2 weeks ago my football mate was talking about how he chugged a... Asked by Fatima Dimoulakis 1 year ago.

so i was feeling nauseous this morning and and the whole day and i threw up twice or three times in the whole day, and well it came to be about 9 or 8 and i came to be very tired and i went to sleep and woke up at 10:20 or so, and i remembered about 2 weeks ago my football mate was talking about how he chugged a bottle of NyQuil when he woke up one day and went to sleep and woke up feeling so much better so i went straight to the kitchen and well there wasn't any NyQuil and so i grabbed one bottle of Children s Motrin or something like that an then another bottle of Children s Advil and a bottle of Children s Tylenol, and the first one i chugged was the Children s Motrin and that one didn't have much it only had about half a teaspoon or so and i grabbed the Advil and chugged it to, that one had a little bit more than half a teaspoon like maybe a teaspoon or a teaspoon and a half or so, the third was finally the Tylenol and that one had a lot but i only chugged about half a teaspoon and then after i grabbed a spoon and had two tea spoons, an then i went to my sisters room where my mom was and asked "do we have NyQuil?" and she said "didn't you already have some medicine?" and i said "yes" and she said "lets wait a bit because we cant mix them up" well that's when i got curious about what is going to happen and well yeah so last im 14 years old a freshmen in high school and i feel like S*** and i just want to know after i wake up will i feel better or just wake up worse or will i get sick or what? thanks Answered by Talitha Ramsier 1 year ago.

You should feel better once you get some rest. However, you should never mix several pain relievers together, especially without measuring them. You could accidentally overdose. Also, pain relievers don't really help with nausea. They have medicine to help with nausea, so I would check that out. So, I would lay off the pain relievers for a few days and then see how you feel. Good luck. Answered by Catarina Fegley 1 year ago.

funny enough it does opposite, you feel pain 3x as much than you would normally. Answered by Julianne Sirignano 1 year ago.


Ibuprofen and alcohol ?
So about maybe 4-5 hours ago I took 3 tsp of Children s Advil (Ibuprofen)for a headache. 30 minutes ago I took about 5 medium sips of red wine until I remembered I had taken the medicine. I was wondering if I should worry xD? Asked by Tammi Salafia 1 year ago.

Ibuprofen should be ok but too much paracetomol or codine based painkillers with alcohol is far worse. The only thing with ibuprofen is stomach irritation and alcohol may make it worse leading to acid and heartburn but not always. Answered by Katelin Bastilla 1 year ago.

if you took it once and after 4-5hrs then alittle wine theres no problem only make sure you dont mix them again ibuprofen is very strong anti-inflammatory drug and mixing it with alcohol could make its side effect worse. Answered by Tu Miears 1 year ago.

Nah, you will be fine. Answered by Mayme Scarset 1 year ago.


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