Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019204/001.

Names and composition

"CARTROL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CARTEOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019204/001 CARTROL CARTEOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
019204/002 CARTROL CARTEOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
019204/003 CARTROL CARTEOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019204/001 CARTROL CARTEOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
019204/002 CARTROL CARTEOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
019204/003 CARTROL CARTEOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
019972/001 OCUPRESS CARTEOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 1%
075476/001 CARTEOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE CARTEOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 1%
075546/001 CARTEOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE CARTEOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 1%
076097/001 CARTEOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE CARTEOLOL HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 1%

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Can cartrol oil put you in labor?
Asked by Paige Seaman 1 year ago.

Old-wives tale in my opinion. Baby comes when he/she wants to! Answered by Marietta Faulk 1 year ago.

I've heard that your supposed to use it speed labor up when your already contracting so you don't waste a trip to the hospital. It won't work if your not having any labor symptoms at all and its too early in your pregnancy. Answered by Ferne Archibald 1 year ago.

I personally would never try castrol oil to induce labor. I hear its nasty and has other side effects besides putting you into labor. Really not worth the side effects if you ask me. Answered by Louis Waymire 1 year ago.

Castor Oil will put you into labor, my brother's ex wife used this method and I was there to witness it, but it's not safe for your baby. Answered by Enedina Ceaser 1 year ago.

Cartrol oil can't do anything, because I'm not sure it exists. Castor Oil however can do it, by causing explosive diarrhea and risking serious illness, that is. Answered by Jesse Tatro 1 year ago.

its castro and just i took it but its very pain full i mean very and the first time i did it gave me false labor but felt like really thing if you do it read on it first it can make baby poop in you and they can swallow and cause lots of problems i would advise against it because i had lots of problems with it Answered by Maira Mclaen 1 year ago.

I work with a nurse, who tried it when she was pregnant, gave her the runs. She advises against it. It gives you the runs, doesn't work. The baby will come on it's own terms/time. Answered by Rosanne Holtmeier 1 year ago.

some people says it helped them. i never tried it. i believe the baby will come when he/she is ready. could be it was there time anyways and just took it at the right time. Answered by Vida Verhulst 1 year ago.

i got real sick from it Answered by Latasha Ocran 1 year ago.


Aspirin and sudafed together?
Asked by Ewa Nothum 1 year ago.

Combining aspirin and Sudafed should not be a problem. One is an NSAID painkiller / fever reducer / anti-inflammatory; the other is a decongestant. Combination cold medicines often include both the active ingredient in Sudafed, and an NSAID (usually acetaminophen or ibuprofen, not aspirin). But aspirin should not be a problem. When in doubt, read the package instructions. Answered by Terresa Kaderlik 1 year ago.

i've got faith all and sundry putting jointly a equipment like this... probable is acquainted with what is going in a single, and the thank you to apply them. That individual would additionally comprehend how ridiculous it would be to get a visual reveal unit/defib unit in a usual help equipment. That individual would in all probability be waiting to spell defibrillator as nicely. **Rant aside...** in case you rather desire to place jointly your "dream" equipment, you are able to as nicely merely purchase an ALS First-In bag, with equipment lined. save the Edison drugs right down to an AED, and word of the incredibly some rules concerning administering drugs. supply up and study your affected person inhabitants. previous, youthful, scientific background? probability of suffering reasonable-to-extreme trauma? that would desire to lead your judgements to your equipment. reliable success. Answered by Tuyet Rosser 1 year ago.

Yes, it's ok. Answered by Beverlee Gruwell 1 year ago.


Pre-term labor question??? Twins?
I forgot to add, the On-call doctor decided not to prescribe the Terbutaline pills to me after she saw my reaction. I guess it scared them. I have asthma and they wouldnt let me use my inhaler when I was short of breath. It was scary. Asked by Etsuko Kuzminski 1 year ago.

Hello to all :) I am 34 weeks pregnant with twins. I went into pre-term labor 2 weeks ago. I was advised to go to the hospital and did. They were advised by an on-call doctor at my dr office, to give me 2 bags of IV fluid and to give me 2 shots of Terbutalene and 1 Terbutalene pill to take. Well, I started having complications from the medicines. My heart started racing, and I couldnt breathe, I also had severe chest pain and they had to perform 2 EKG's. They later released me to the ER where I was placed on oxygen for an hour until my heart rate returned to normal. My contractions did stop that day but have been ongoing ever since. I have been having "real" contractions, not Braxton Hicks. I have no idea if I have dialated. Basically my Dr. wants me to go to the hospital and get more of the medicine that almost killed me so they can stop the contractions. I know I have the right to not take it. I feel like if its time, its time. How would you handle this with your dr? Answered by Julietta Bonillas 1 year ago.

This is YOUR pregnancy and you need to do what you feel is right. If this stuff nearly killed you, it may happen again. You dying is not going to help those babies! Talk to your doctor about options. If he won't be cooperative, ask if you can talk to someone else for a second opinion. Ask if they can try a different medication. If not, weigh the pros and cons of delivering now or attempting to take the medication again. It's always better if the babies are delivered full term but many babies have been delivered at 34 weeks due to preterm labor or complications with the mother, baby(s), and/or pregnancy. Although they have a higher risk of complications, it is sometimes necessary to do this and many are just fine. My own siblings (twins) were delivered at 34 weeks and spent a couple weeks in the NICU. No complications other than they were small and needed help breathing for a few days. They're now 26 years old and perfectly normal. Good luck and I hope things work out for you. Congratulations on your twins! Answered by Peggie Potthast 1 year ago.

From my understanding twins ussually come early and are smaller anyways. My husband is a twin. They were born at 32 weeks and weighed about 3.5 lbs a piece and are both fine. When I first found out I was pregnant I was wondering if it was twins seeing as how it runs in both our families, and had asked him about it. Althogh 37 weeks is "full term" He also said that technology is so advance that babies are surviving at 20+ weeks. I would think bue to your reaction to the meds last time that theywould never give it to you again and putit on file that it is not for you! If your contractions are real close together and you are thinking it is time I would jsut go strait to the hospital tell them tht theycan not stop your labor with the meds because this happened 2 weeks ago with it, and they hopefully will listen! Some er docs I learned are alot better in these situations than your doc that wants you to wait. Good luk and congrats on the twins. I hope you find a way to relax and sooth yourself until that point! Answered by Will Lehigh 1 year ago.

If you are having strong, frequent contractions, there is no question about it, you need to go in and be checked. People confuse braxton hicks, thinking they are "fake", but they can feel very strong at times. It's possible you haven't dilated enough to worry about it yet. If you are in labor, and they can't give you anything else to stop contractions, maybe they can go ahead and check on the twins via ultrasound to see how they are doing. It's possible that a delivery at this point could be ok. After all 34 weeks isn't all that early for twins anyway. Answered by Shaun Kopis 1 year ago.

My cousin took the same medicine & could hardly breath when she took them. 34 wks for twins is good, but the longer u go the better the chance that their lungs have matured, and they won't be in the nicu. I was 37 wks w/ a single baby and contractions & they would not deliver me either. My Dr. said 38 weeks plus for the babies lungs. If u feel u r contracting, go to the Dr. and get checked right away,don't take chances. Dr.'s don't want to do anything until they actually see you. I think they r so used to their job they forget u r the one going through this & its all new to u. Congratulations on the twins & making it to 34wks Answered by Vanessa Amara 1 year ago.

Signs of preterm labor: Call your midwife or doctor right away if you're having any of the following symptoms in your second or third trimester (before 37 weeks): • An increase in vaginal discharge • A change in the type of discharge — if it becomes watery, mucus-like, or bloody (even if it's pink or just tinged with blood) • Any vaginal bleeding or spotting • Abdominal pain, menstrual-like cramping, or more than four contractions in one hour (even if they don't hurt) • An increase in pressure in the pelvic area (a feeling that your baby is pushing down) • Low back pain, especially if you didn't previously have back pain These symptoms can be confusing because some of them, such as pelvic pressure or low back pain, occur during normal pregnancies, too, and sporadic early contractions may just be Braxton Hicks contractions. But it's always better to be safe than sorry, so call your midwife or doctor right away if you're experiencing anything unusual. Answered by Errol Rook 1 year ago.

My 2nd pregnancy was twins, I also had preterm labor at 32wks, was given meds to stop it...it's common for those meds to make your heart race just not the chest pain. I went into labor again at 34wks 5days and they let me deliver that time. Twins were great weights and extremely healthy. I don't know why on earth she'd give you those meds again but if you're in labor and having real contractions that are regular you need to go in. If they are real but irregular then you should be fine, ,maybe jsut call and let them know? If I were you I wouldn't take the meds again especially not at this point. Answered by Shawnee Palin 1 year ago.

I had twins and early contractions 30 weeks. my specialist put me on bed rest and gave me the same stuff. It made my heart race, but that's it. I was told it was OK to go into labor at 34 weeks. I did go into labor at 34 weeks and 3 days and they delivered me. Is there a reason they wont deliver you now? Or is there something else they can give you because you had such a bad reaction. Answered by Mickey Moevao 1 year ago.

I would talk to your doc and tell him your concerns. I think that it is your right not to take it. Just remember that you have two little ones inside you and the longer they stay there the better off they are. Congrats and Good Luck Answered by Laquita Polite 1 year ago.

I'm all with betsy on this one. Have you also considered the fact that this may be due to an allergic reaction? Ask whats in that stuff and see. Answered by Georgetta Amerman 1 year ago.


How do you raise your blood Sugar level?
What medicines bring your blood sugar levels up? Asked by Valentina Heineck 1 year ago.

Blood sugar also known as Glucose , the only safe "medicine" is sweetened water , just a few days ago a patient developed cardiac arrest while being given a Glucose increasing medication during an Glucose evaluation test anyway here is a list of medicines that can cause HYPERGLYCEMIA (High Blood Sugar) Abacavir (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine, zidovudine (Trizivir®) Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Acitretin (Soriatane®) Albuterol (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium (Combivent®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV (Abelcet®) Amprenavir (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide (Trisenox®) Asparaginase (Elspar®) Atazanavir (Reyataz ®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin (Lipitor®) Atovaquone (Mepron®) Baclofen (Lioresal®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide (Lotension®) Betamethasone topical (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene (Targretin®) Bicalutamide (Casodex®) Bisoprolol + hydrochlorothiazide (Ziac®) Bumetanide (Bumex®) Caffeine (Caffeine in moderation may actually be beneficial in diabetes but in large amounts can raise blood sugar.) Candesartan + hydrochlorothiazide (Atacand HCT®) Captopril + hydrochlorothiazide (Capozide®) Carteolol (Cartrol® oral, Occupress® eyedrops) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Chlorothiazide (Diuril®) Chlorthalidone (Chlorthalidone Tablets®, Clorpres®, Tenoretic®, Thalitone®) Choline salicylate (Numerous tradenames of aspirin formulations: check label.) Choline salicylate + magnesium salicylate (CMT®, Tricosal®, Trilisate®) Clobetasol (Clobevate®, Cormax®, Cormax® Scalp Application, Embeline® E, Olux®, Temovate®, Temovate® E, Temovate® Scalp Application) Clozapine (Clozaril®, FazaClo®) Conjugated estrogens (Estrace®, Estring®, Femring®, Premarin®, Vagifem®, Cenestin®, Enjuvia®, Estrace®, Femtrace®, Gynodiol®, Menest®, Ogen®) Conjugated estrogens + medroxyprogesterone (Premphase®, Prempro®) Corticosteroids (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Corticotropin Cortisone (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Cyclosporine (Sandimmune®, Neoral®, Gengraf®) Daclizumab (Zenapax®) Decitabine (Dacogen®) Desonide (DesOwen®, Tridesilon®) Desoximetasone (Topicort®) DO NOT TAKE ANY OF THESE MEDICATIONS WITHOUT AN PRESCRIPTION Answered by Majorie Gartman 1 year ago.

Consume pure carbohydrates or sugar, whether it is fruit juice, honey, sucrose, etc. Blood suger level is a transient condition and is directly impacted on what you eat and how quickly your body metabolizes it. Answered by Shasta Cobham 1 year ago.

Anything you eat that has protein, carbs, or fats will raise it. Answered by Kizzy Stable 1 year ago.


Can cartrol oil put you in labor?
Asked by Rubie Choe 1 year ago.

Old-wives tale in my opinion. Baby comes when he/she wants to! Answered by Lauren Dejoie 1 year ago.

I've heard that your supposed to use it speed labor up when your already contracting so you don't waste a trip to the hospital. It won't work if your not having any labor symptoms at all and its too early in your pregnancy. Answered by Margene Schmal 1 year ago.

I personally would never try castrol oil to induce labor. I hear its nasty and has other side effects besides putting you into labor. Really not worth the side effects if you ask me. Answered by Ralph Golebiowski 1 year ago.

Castor Oil will put you into labor, my brother's ex wife used this method and I was there to witness it, but it's not safe for your baby. Answered by Angele Mulrenin 1 year ago.

Cartrol oil can't do anything, because I'm not sure it exists. Castor Oil however can do it, by causing explosive diarrhea and risking serious illness, that is. Answered by Emmaline Cofield 1 year ago.

its castro and just i took it but its very pain full i mean very and the first time i did it gave me false labor but felt like really thing if you do it read on it first it can make baby poop in you and they can swallow and cause lots of problems i would advise against it because i had lots of problems with it Answered by Chester Rosas 1 year ago.

I work with a nurse, who tried it when she was pregnant, gave her the runs. She advises against it. It gives you the runs, doesn't work. The baby will come on it's own terms/time. Answered by Marylouise Ruvalcava 1 year ago.

some people says it helped them. i never tried it. i believe the baby will come when he/she is ready. could be it was there time anyways and just took it at the right time. Answered by Carissa Pezzullo 1 year ago.

i got real sick from it Answered by Isobel Freckleton 1 year ago.


Aspirin and sudafed together?
Asked by Noma Casares 1 year ago.

Combining aspirin and Sudafed should not be a problem. One is an NSAID painkiller / fever reducer / anti-inflammatory; the other is a decongestant. Combination cold medicines often include both the active ingredient in Sudafed, and an NSAID (usually acetaminophen or ibuprofen, not aspirin). But aspirin should not be a problem. When in doubt, read the package instructions. Answered by Eddie Pokallas 1 year ago.

i've got faith all and sundry putting jointly a equipment like this... probable is acquainted with what is going in a single, and the thank you to apply them. That individual would additionally comprehend how ridiculous it would be to get a visual reveal unit/defib unit in a usual help equipment. That individual would in all probability be waiting to spell defibrillator as nicely. **Rant aside...** in case you rather desire to place jointly your "dream" equipment, you are able to as nicely merely purchase an ALS First-In bag, with equipment lined. save the Edison drugs right down to an AED, and word of the incredibly some rules concerning administering drugs. supply up and study your affected person inhabitants. previous, youthful, scientific background? probability of suffering reasonable-to-extreme trauma? that would desire to lead your judgements to your equipment. reliable success. Answered by Basilia Gobbi 1 year ago.

Yes, it's ok. Answered by Melvin Brandel 1 year ago.


Pre-term labor question??? Twins?
I forgot to add, the On-call doctor decided not to prescribe the Terbutaline pills to me after she saw my reaction. I guess it scared them. I have asthma and they wouldnt let me use my inhaler when I was short of breath. It was scary. Asked by Ronda Ardelean 1 year ago.

Hello to all :) I am 34 weeks pregnant with twins. I went into pre-term labor 2 weeks ago. I was advised to go to the hospital and did. They were advised by an on-call doctor at my dr office, to give me 2 bags of IV fluid and to give me 2 shots of Terbutalene and 1 Terbutalene pill to take. Well, I started having complications from the medicines. My heart started racing, and I couldnt breathe, I also had severe chest pain and they had to perform 2 EKG's. They later released me to the ER where I was placed on oxygen for an hour until my heart rate returned to normal. My contractions did stop that day but have been ongoing ever since. I have been having "real" contractions, not Braxton Hicks. I have no idea if I have dialated. Basically my Dr. wants me to go to the hospital and get more of the medicine that almost killed me so they can stop the contractions. I know I have the right to not take it. I feel like if its time, its time. How would you handle this with your dr? Answered by Miyoko Johannessen 1 year ago.

This is YOUR pregnancy and you need to do what you feel is right. If this stuff nearly killed you, it may happen again. You dying is not going to help those babies! Talk to your doctor about options. If he won't be cooperative, ask if you can talk to someone else for a second opinion. Ask if they can try a different medication. If not, weigh the pros and cons of delivering now or attempting to take the medication again. It's always better if the babies are delivered full term but many babies have been delivered at 34 weeks due to preterm labor or complications with the mother, baby(s), and/or pregnancy. Although they have a higher risk of complications, it is sometimes necessary to do this and many are just fine. My own siblings (twins) were delivered at 34 weeks and spent a couple weeks in the NICU. No complications other than they were small and needed help breathing for a few days. They're now 26 years old and perfectly normal. Good luck and I hope things work out for you. Congratulations on your twins! Answered by Abe Menear 1 year ago.

From my understanding twins ussually come early and are smaller anyways. My husband is a twin. They were born at 32 weeks and weighed about 3.5 lbs a piece and are both fine. When I first found out I was pregnant I was wondering if it was twins seeing as how it runs in both our families, and had asked him about it. Althogh 37 weeks is "full term" He also said that technology is so advance that babies are surviving at 20+ weeks. I would think bue to your reaction to the meds last time that theywould never give it to you again and putit on file that it is not for you! If your contractions are real close together and you are thinking it is time I would jsut go strait to the hospital tell them tht theycan not stop your labor with the meds because this happened 2 weeks ago with it, and they hopefully will listen! Some er docs I learned are alot better in these situations than your doc that wants you to wait. Good luk and congrats on the twins. I hope you find a way to relax and sooth yourself until that point! Answered by Maurice Dyser 1 year ago.

If you are having strong, frequent contractions, there is no question about it, you need to go in and be checked. People confuse braxton hicks, thinking they are "fake", but they can feel very strong at times. It's possible you haven't dilated enough to worry about it yet. If you are in labor, and they can't give you anything else to stop contractions, maybe they can go ahead and check on the twins via ultrasound to see how they are doing. It's possible that a delivery at this point could be ok. After all 34 weeks isn't all that early for twins anyway. Answered by Camille Hasas 1 year ago.

My cousin took the same medicine & could hardly breath when she took them. 34 wks for twins is good, but the longer u go the better the chance that their lungs have matured, and they won't be in the nicu. I was 37 wks w/ a single baby and contractions & they would not deliver me either. My Dr. said 38 weeks plus for the babies lungs. If u feel u r contracting, go to the Dr. and get checked right away,don't take chances. Dr.'s don't want to do anything until they actually see you. I think they r so used to their job they forget u r the one going through this & its all new to u. Congratulations on the twins & making it to 34wks Answered by Concha Sanlatte 1 year ago.

Signs of preterm labor: Call your midwife or doctor right away if you're having any of the following symptoms in your second or third trimester (before 37 weeks): • An increase in vaginal discharge • A change in the type of discharge — if it becomes watery, mucus-like, or bloody (even if it's pink or just tinged with blood) • Any vaginal bleeding or spotting • Abdominal pain, menstrual-like cramping, or more than four contractions in one hour (even if they don't hurt) • An increase in pressure in the pelvic area (a feeling that your baby is pushing down) • Low back pain, especially if you didn't previously have back pain These symptoms can be confusing because some of them, such as pelvic pressure or low back pain, occur during normal pregnancies, too, and sporadic early contractions may just be Braxton Hicks contractions. But it's always better to be safe than sorry, so call your midwife or doctor right away if you're experiencing anything unusual. Answered by Jimmy Medinger 1 year ago.

My 2nd pregnancy was twins, I also had preterm labor at 32wks, was given meds to stop it...it's common for those meds to make your heart race just not the chest pain. I went into labor again at 34wks 5days and they let me deliver that time. Twins were great weights and extremely healthy. I don't know why on earth she'd give you those meds again but if you're in labor and having real contractions that are regular you need to go in. If they are real but irregular then you should be fine, ,maybe jsut call and let them know? If I were you I wouldn't take the meds again especially not at this point. Answered by Madie Steinback 1 year ago.

I had twins and early contractions 30 weeks. my specialist put me on bed rest and gave me the same stuff. It made my heart race, but that's it. I was told it was OK to go into labor at 34 weeks. I did go into labor at 34 weeks and 3 days and they delivered me. Is there a reason they wont deliver you now? Or is there something else they can give you because you had such a bad reaction. Answered by Yolanda Verdine 1 year ago.

I would talk to your doc and tell him your concerns. I think that it is your right not to take it. Just remember that you have two little ones inside you and the longer they stay there the better off they are. Congrats and Good Luck Answered by Cherie Minatra 1 year ago.

I'm all with betsy on this one. Have you also considered the fact that this may be due to an allergic reaction? Ask whats in that stuff and see. Answered by Meggan Girod 1 year ago.


How do you raise your blood Sugar level?
What medicines bring your blood sugar levels up? Asked by Angelica Dalley 1 year ago.

Blood sugar also known as Glucose , the only safe "medicine" is sweetened water , just a few days ago a patient developed cardiac arrest while being given a Glucose increasing medication during an Glucose evaluation test anyway here is a list of medicines that can cause HYPERGLYCEMIA (High Blood Sugar) Abacavir (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine, zidovudine (Trizivir®) Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Acitretin (Soriatane®) Albuterol (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium (Combivent®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV (Abelcet®) Amprenavir (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide (Trisenox®) Asparaginase (Elspar®) Atazanavir (Reyataz ®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin (Lipitor®) Atovaquone (Mepron®) Baclofen (Lioresal®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide (Lotension®) Betamethasone topical (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene (Targretin®) Bicalutamide (Casodex®) Bisoprolol + hydrochlorothiazide (Ziac®) Bumetanide (Bumex®) Caffeine (Caffeine in moderation may actually be beneficial in diabetes but in large amounts can raise blood sugar.) Candesartan + hydrochlorothiazide (Atacand HCT®) Captopril + hydrochlorothiazide (Capozide®) Carteolol (Cartrol® oral, Occupress® eyedrops) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Chlorothiazide (Diuril®) Chlorthalidone (Chlorthalidone Tablets®, Clorpres®, Tenoretic®, Thalitone®) Choline salicylate (Numerous tradenames of aspirin formulations: check label.) Choline salicylate + magnesium salicylate (CMT®, Tricosal®, Trilisate®) Clobetasol (Clobevate®, Cormax®, Cormax® Scalp Application, Embeline® E, Olux®, Temovate®, Temovate® E, Temovate® Scalp Application) Clozapine (Clozaril®, FazaClo®) Conjugated estrogens (Estrace®, Estring®, Femring®, Premarin®, Vagifem®, Cenestin®, Enjuvia®, Estrace®, Femtrace®, Gynodiol®, Menest®, Ogen®) Conjugated estrogens + medroxyprogesterone (Premphase®, Prempro®) Corticosteroids (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Corticotropin Cortisone (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Cyclosporine (Sandimmune®, Neoral®, Gengraf®) Daclizumab (Zenapax®) Decitabine (Dacogen®) Desonide (DesOwen®, Tridesilon®) Desoximetasone (Topicort®) DO NOT TAKE ANY OF THESE MEDICATIONS WITHOUT AN PRESCRIPTION Answered by George Jufer 1 year ago.

Consume pure carbohydrates or sugar, whether it is fruit juice, honey, sucrose, etc. Blood suger level is a transient condition and is directly impacted on what you eat and how quickly your body metabolizes it. Answered by Francisco Basel 1 year ago.

Anything you eat that has protein, carbs, or fats will raise it. Answered by Alesha Bake 1 year ago.


Can cartrol oil put you in labor?
Asked by Danica Coriaty 1 year ago.

Old-wives tale in my opinion. Baby comes when he/she wants to! Answered by Cinderella Stowell 1 year ago.

I've heard that your supposed to use it speed labor up when your already contracting so you don't waste a trip to the hospital. It won't work if your not having any labor symptoms at all and its too early in your pregnancy. Answered by Jerome Ortmeier 1 year ago.

I personally would never try castrol oil to induce labor. I hear its nasty and has other side effects besides putting you into labor. Really not worth the side effects if you ask me. Answered by Chanel Ruescher 1 year ago.

Castor Oil will put you into labor, my brother's ex wife used this method and I was there to witness it, but it's not safe for your baby. Answered by Jodie Vanrossum 1 year ago.

Cartrol oil can't do anything, because I'm not sure it exists. Castor Oil however can do it, by causing explosive diarrhea and risking serious illness, that is. Answered by Adriane Vandenburg 1 year ago.

its castro and just i took it but its very pain full i mean very and the first time i did it gave me false labor but felt like really thing if you do it read on it first it can make baby poop in you and they can swallow and cause lots of problems i would advise against it because i had lots of problems with it Answered by Trinh Karnopp 1 year ago.

I work with a nurse, who tried it when she was pregnant, gave her the runs. She advises against it. It gives you the runs, doesn't work. The baby will come on it's own terms/time. Answered by Marshall Schipper 1 year ago.

some people says it helped them. i never tried it. i believe the baby will come when he/she is ready. could be it was there time anyways and just took it at the right time. Answered by Vanita Buffin 1 year ago.

i got real sick from it Answered by Britt Caparros 1 year ago.


Aspirin and sudafed together?
Asked by Benjamin Hennessy 1 year ago.

Combining aspirin and Sudafed should not be a problem. One is an NSAID painkiller / fever reducer / anti-inflammatory; the other is a decongestant. Combination cold medicines often include both the active ingredient in Sudafed, and an NSAID (usually acetaminophen or ibuprofen, not aspirin). But aspirin should not be a problem. When in doubt, read the package instructions. Answered by Ted Greenawalt 1 year ago.

i've got faith all and sundry putting jointly a equipment like this... probable is acquainted with what is going in a single, and the thank you to apply them. That individual would additionally comprehend how ridiculous it would be to get a visual reveal unit/defib unit in a usual help equipment. That individual would in all probability be waiting to spell defibrillator as nicely. **Rant aside...** in case you rather desire to place jointly your "dream" equipment, you are able to as nicely merely purchase an ALS First-In bag, with equipment lined. save the Edison drugs right down to an AED, and word of the incredibly some rules concerning administering drugs. supply up and study your affected person inhabitants. previous, youthful, scientific background? probability of suffering reasonable-to-extreme trauma? that would desire to lead your judgements to your equipment. reliable success. Answered by Tristan Schenker 1 year ago.

Yes, it's ok. Answered by Zonia Verville 1 year ago.


Pre-term labor question??? Twins?
I forgot to add, the On-call doctor decided not to prescribe the Terbutaline pills to me after she saw my reaction. I guess it scared them. I have asthma and they wouldnt let me use my inhaler when I was short of breath. It was scary. Asked by Leroy Atwater 1 year ago.

Hello to all :) I am 34 weeks pregnant with twins. I went into pre-term labor 2 weeks ago. I was advised to go to the hospital and did. They were advised by an on-call doctor at my dr office, to give me 2 bags of IV fluid and to give me 2 shots of Terbutalene and 1 Terbutalene pill to take. Well, I started having complications from the medicines. My heart started racing, and I couldnt breathe, I also had severe chest pain and they had to perform 2 EKG's. They later released me to the ER where I was placed on oxygen for an hour until my heart rate returned to normal. My contractions did stop that day but have been ongoing ever since. I have been having "real" contractions, not Braxton Hicks. I have no idea if I have dialated. Basically my Dr. wants me to go to the hospital and get more of the medicine that almost killed me so they can stop the contractions. I know I have the right to not take it. I feel like if its time, its time. How would you handle this with your dr? Answered by Shenna Hilb 1 year ago.

This is YOUR pregnancy and you need to do what you feel is right. If this stuff nearly killed you, it may happen again. You dying is not going to help those babies! Talk to your doctor about options. If he won't be cooperative, ask if you can talk to someone else for a second opinion. Ask if they can try a different medication. If not, weigh the pros and cons of delivering now or attempting to take the medication again. It's always better if the babies are delivered full term but many babies have been delivered at 34 weeks due to preterm labor or complications with the mother, baby(s), and/or pregnancy. Although they have a higher risk of complications, it is sometimes necessary to do this and many are just fine. My own siblings (twins) were delivered at 34 weeks and spent a couple weeks in the NICU. No complications other than they were small and needed help breathing for a few days. They're now 26 years old and perfectly normal. Good luck and I hope things work out for you. Congratulations on your twins! Answered by Jena Glass 1 year ago.

From my understanding twins ussually come early and are smaller anyways. My husband is a twin. They were born at 32 weeks and weighed about 3.5 lbs a piece and are both fine. When I first found out I was pregnant I was wondering if it was twins seeing as how it runs in both our families, and had asked him about it. Althogh 37 weeks is "full term" He also said that technology is so advance that babies are surviving at 20+ weeks. I would think bue to your reaction to the meds last time that theywould never give it to you again and putit on file that it is not for you! If your contractions are real close together and you are thinking it is time I would jsut go strait to the hospital tell them tht theycan not stop your labor with the meds because this happened 2 weeks ago with it, and they hopefully will listen! Some er docs I learned are alot better in these situations than your doc that wants you to wait. Good luk and congrats on the twins. I hope you find a way to relax and sooth yourself until that point! Answered by Adah Wyrosdick 1 year ago.

If you are having strong, frequent contractions, there is no question about it, you need to go in and be checked. People confuse braxton hicks, thinking they are "fake", but they can feel very strong at times. It's possible you haven't dilated enough to worry about it yet. If you are in labor, and they can't give you anything else to stop contractions, maybe they can go ahead and check on the twins via ultrasound to see how they are doing. It's possible that a delivery at this point could be ok. After all 34 weeks isn't all that early for twins anyway. Answered by Agripina Veenstra 1 year ago.

My cousin took the same medicine & could hardly breath when she took them. 34 wks for twins is good, but the longer u go the better the chance that their lungs have matured, and they won't be in the nicu. I was 37 wks w/ a single baby and contractions & they would not deliver me either. My Dr. said 38 weeks plus for the babies lungs. If u feel u r contracting, go to the Dr. and get checked right away,don't take chances. Dr.'s don't want to do anything until they actually see you. I think they r so used to their job they forget u r the one going through this & its all new to u. Congratulations on the twins & making it to 34wks Answered by Ashley Balmir 1 year ago.

Signs of preterm labor: Call your midwife or doctor right away if you're having any of the following symptoms in your second or third trimester (before 37 weeks): • An increase in vaginal discharge • A change in the type of discharge — if it becomes watery, mucus-like, or bloody (even if it's pink or just tinged with blood) • Any vaginal bleeding or spotting • Abdominal pain, menstrual-like cramping, or more than four contractions in one hour (even if they don't hurt) • An increase in pressure in the pelvic area (a feeling that your baby is pushing down) • Low back pain, especially if you didn't previously have back pain These symptoms can be confusing because some of them, such as pelvic pressure or low back pain, occur during normal pregnancies, too, and sporadic early contractions may just be Braxton Hicks contractions. But it's always better to be safe than sorry, so call your midwife or doctor right away if you're experiencing anything unusual. Answered by Christine Dunmead 1 year ago.

My 2nd pregnancy was twins, I also had preterm labor at 32wks, was given meds to stop it...it's common for those meds to make your heart race just not the chest pain. I went into labor again at 34wks 5days and they let me deliver that time. Twins were great weights and extremely healthy. I don't know why on earth she'd give you those meds again but if you're in labor and having real contractions that are regular you need to go in. If they are real but irregular then you should be fine, ,maybe jsut call and let them know? If I were you I wouldn't take the meds again especially not at this point. Answered by Josephine Charland 1 year ago.

I had twins and early contractions 30 weeks. my specialist put me on bed rest and gave me the same stuff. It made my heart race, but that's it. I was told it was OK to go into labor at 34 weeks. I did go into labor at 34 weeks and 3 days and they delivered me. Is there a reason they wont deliver you now? Or is there something else they can give you because you had such a bad reaction. Answered by Marchelle Boots 1 year ago.

I would talk to your doc and tell him your concerns. I think that it is your right not to take it. Just remember that you have two little ones inside you and the longer they stay there the better off they are. Congrats and Good Luck Answered by Joella Bonini 1 year ago.

I'm all with betsy on this one. Have you also considered the fact that this may be due to an allergic reaction? Ask whats in that stuff and see. Answered by Angle Cooksley 1 year ago.


How do you raise your blood Sugar level?
What medicines bring your blood sugar levels up? Asked by Cory Egnew 1 year ago.

Blood sugar also known as Glucose , the only safe "medicine" is sweetened water , just a few days ago a patient developed cardiac arrest while being given a Glucose increasing medication during an Glucose evaluation test anyway here is a list of medicines that can cause HYPERGLYCEMIA (High Blood Sugar) Abacavir (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine, zidovudine (Trizivir®) Acetazolamide (Diamox®) Acitretin (Soriatane®) Albuterol (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium (Combivent®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV (Abelcet®) Amprenavir (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide (Trisenox®) Asparaginase (Elspar®) Atazanavir (Reyataz ®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin (Lipitor®) Atovaquone (Mepron®) Baclofen (Lioresal®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide (Lotension®) Betamethasone topical (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene (Targretin®) Bicalutamide (Casodex®) Bisoprolol + hydrochlorothiazide (Ziac®) Bumetanide (Bumex®) Caffeine (Caffeine in moderation may actually be beneficial in diabetes but in large amounts can raise blood sugar.) Candesartan + hydrochlorothiazide (Atacand HCT®) Captopril + hydrochlorothiazide (Capozide®) Carteolol (Cartrol® oral, Occupress® eyedrops) Carvedilol (Coreg®) Chlorothiazide (Diuril®) Chlorthalidone (Chlorthalidone Tablets®, Clorpres®, Tenoretic®, Thalitone®) Choline salicylate (Numerous tradenames of aspirin formulations: check label.) Choline salicylate + magnesium salicylate (CMT®, Tricosal®, Trilisate®) Clobetasol (Clobevate®, Cormax®, Cormax® Scalp Application, Embeline® E, Olux®, Temovate®, Temovate® E, Temovate® Scalp Application) Clozapine (Clozaril®, FazaClo®) Conjugated estrogens (Estrace®, Estring®, Femring®, Premarin®, Vagifem®, Cenestin®, Enjuvia®, Estrace®, Femtrace®, Gynodiol®, Menest®, Ogen®) Conjugated estrogens + medroxyprogesterone (Premphase®, Prempro®) Corticosteroids (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Corticotropin Cortisone (Numerous tradenames: check label.) Cyclosporine (Sandimmune®, Neoral®, Gengraf®) Daclizumab (Zenapax®) Decitabine (Dacogen®) Desonide (DesOwen®, Tridesilon®) Desoximetasone (Topicort®) DO NOT TAKE ANY OF THESE MEDICATIONS WITHOUT AN PRESCRIPTION Answered by Geneva Prazenica 1 year ago.

Consume pure carbohydrates or sugar, whether it is fruit juice, honey, sucrose, etc. Blood suger level is a transient condition and is directly impacted on what you eat and how quickly your body metabolizes it. Answered by Jose Contreas 1 year ago.

Anything you eat that has protein, carbs, or fats will raise it. Answered by Tosha Seeliger 1 year ago.


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