Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019471/001.

Names and composition

"CARDIZEM SR" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019471/001 CARDIZEM SR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019471/002 CARDIZEM SR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019471/003 CARDIZEM SR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019471/004 CARDIZEM SR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018602/001 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
018602/002 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
018602/003 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
018602/004 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
019471/001 CARDIZEM SR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019471/002 CARDIZEM SR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019471/003 CARDIZEM SR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019471/004 CARDIZEM SR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020027/001 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020027/003 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020062/001 CARDIZEM CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
020062/002 CARDIZEM CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
020062/003 CARDIZEM CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
020062/004 CARDIZEM CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
020062/005 CARDIZEM CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
020092/001 DILACOR XR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020092/002 DILACOR XR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020092/003 DILACOR XR DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020401/001 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
020401/002 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
020401/003 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
020401/004 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
020401/005 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
020401/006 TIAZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
020792/001 CARDIZEM DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per VIAL
020939/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
020939/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
020939/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
020939/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
020939/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
020939/006 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
021392/001 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
021392/002 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
021392/003 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
021392/004 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
021392/005 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
021392/006 CARDIZEM LA DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
072838/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
072838/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
072838/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
072838/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074051/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074051/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074051/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074051/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074067/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074067/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074067/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074067/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074079/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
074079/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
074079/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074084/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074084/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074093/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074093/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074093/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074093/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074168/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074168/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074168/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074168/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074185/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
074185/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
074185/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 90MG
074185/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 120MG
074617/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
074752/001 CARTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074752/002 CARTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074752/003 CARTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074752/004 CARTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
074845/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
074845/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
074845/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074852/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074852/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074852/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074894/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
074910/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
074910/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
074910/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074941/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
074943/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074943/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074943/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074984/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
074984/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
074984/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
074984/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
075004/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075086/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075106/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075116/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075116/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075116/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
075116/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
075124/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
075124/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075124/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075375/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075401/001 TAZTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
075401/002 TAZTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
075401/003 TAZTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
075401/004 TAZTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
075401/005 TAZTIA XT DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
075749/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075853/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per VIAL
076151/001 DILT-CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
076151/002 DILT-CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
076151/003 DILT-CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
076151/004 DILT-CD DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076395/001 DILTZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
076395/002 DILTZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
076395/003 DILTZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
076395/004 DILTZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076395/005 DILTZAC DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
076563/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
076563/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
076563/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
076563/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
076563/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
076563/006 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
077686/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
077686/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
077686/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
077686/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
077686/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
077686/006 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
078538/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
090421/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
090421/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
090421/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
090421/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
090421/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
090492/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
090492/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
090492/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
090492/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
090492/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
091022/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
091022/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
091022/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
091022/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
091022/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
091022/006 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 420MG
202463/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG
202651/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
202651/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 50MG per 10ML
202651/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/ INJECTION 125MG per 25ML
203023/001 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
203023/002 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
203023/003 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 240MG
203023/004 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 300MG
203023/005 DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE DILTIAZEM HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 360MG

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Answered questions

What happens when a doctor prescribes cardizem to a 62 yr old man with normal blood pressure?
Had heart attack caused by cardizem Asked by Marinda Hamid 1 year ago.

Brand name: Cardizem Pronounced: CAR-di-zem Generic name: Diltiazem hydrochloride Other brand names: Cardizem CD, Cardizem SR, Dilacor XR, Tiazac Why is this drug prescribed? Cardizem and Cardizem CD (a controlled release form of diltiazem) are used in the treatment of angina pectoris (chest pain usually caused by lack of oxygen to the heart due to clogged arteries) and chronic stable angina (caused by exertion). Cardizem CD is also used to treat high blood pressure. Another controlled release form, Cardizem SR, is used only in the treatment of high blood pressure. Cardizem, a calcium channel blocker, dilates blood vessels and slows the heart to reduce blood pressure and the pain of angina. Doctors sometimes prescribe Cardizem for loss of circulation in the fingers and toes (Raynaud's phenomenon), for involuntary movements (tardive dyskinesia), and to prevent heart attack. Tiazac and Dilacor XR are used in the treatment of high blood pressure and chronic stable angina. They may be taken alone or combined with other blood pressure medications. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Cardizem. •More common side effects may include: Abnormally slow heartbeat (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), dizziness, fluid retention, flushing (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), headache, nausea, rash, weakness •Less common or rare side effects may include: Abnormal dreams, allergic reaction, altered way of walking, amnesia, anemia, angina (severe chest pain), blood disorders, congestive heart failure, constipation, cough, depression, diarrhea, difficulty sleeping, drowsiness, dry mouth, excessive urination at night, eye irritation, fainting, flu symptoms, hair loss, hallucinations, heart attack, high blood sugar, hives, impotence, increased output of pale urine, indigestion, infection, irregular heartbeat, itching, joint pain, labored breathing, loss of appetite, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, muscle cramps, nasal congestion or inflammation, nervousness, nosebleed, pain, personality change, pounding heartbeat, rapid heartbeat, reddish or purplish spots on skin, ringing in ears, sexual difficulties, skin inflammation/flaking or peeling, sensitivity to light, sleepiness, sore throat, taste alteration, thirst, tingling or pins and needles, tremor, vision changes, vomiting, welts, weight increase Answered by Carissa Mesler 1 year ago.

The American Heart Association set new guidelines for normal B/P ranges and 120/90 is too high. They want to see an average pressure of 117/68. So, your B/P of 120/90 is too high and 100/50 is okay. Please remember that B/P fluctuates throughout the day and night and throughout your lifetime. B/Ps are typically lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon/early evening. And the average B/P for a healthy 5-year-old is very different from that of a healthy 15-year-old and a healthy 75-year-old. B/P is affected by stress. Stress comes in many forms. Even Illness, strong emotions and obesity are forms of stress on the body. Pretty much everything is a form of stress. And stress can, at times, be a good thing. So "stress" is a general, catch-all word. Yes, of course you experience stress whether or not you know it when you see it. An isolated reading of 120/90 may not be significant. High or low blood pressure is generally determined by what the values are consistently. Spot checks won't establish a baseline unless done in a specific way. Check your B/P with the same equipment on 3 different days and at 3 different times of day (Morning, mid day and night). You'll get a much better idea of what your baseline B/P is and how it rates according to the AHA. Answered by Audie Barus 1 year ago.

High blood pressure is not the only reason Cardizem can be prescribed. It does have other uses. Who told you Cardizem caused the heart attack? I have never heard of that. Answered by Whitney Hufana 1 year ago.


What are the differences between Cardizem LA, Cardizem CD and Diltiazem HCL SA?
Asked by Maurice Poll 1 year ago.

Cardizem LA, Cardizem CD and diltiazem HCl SA are essentially the same thing. They are used to treat high blood pressure, angina (cardiac chest pressure) and certain cardiac irregularities. Diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker (CCB), is the generic name for the drug. One company sells it as Cardizem CD, another as Cardizem LA. There is also a formulation callled Cardizem SR. Diltiazem is a three time a day medication unless it is formulated to be released slowly over 24 hours. When this is the case, it is once daily and bears the CD, LA, SR or SA designation. These stand for phrases like long-acting and slow release. Technically, there may be trivial distinctions between the different slow release mechanisms, but from a practical standpoint, they should be considered identical. Answered by Elwanda Opper 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What are the differences between Cardizem LA, Cardizem CD and Diltiazem HCL SA? Answered by Vickey Alexandropoul 1 year ago.

Cardizem Cd Answered by Camille Mercer 1 year ago.

Cardizem La Answered by Desire Clopper 1 year ago.

A flirt is someone who will talk nasty to you, give you sexual looks and give the occasional long hug. a tease is someone who shows skin, more of a look but don't touch kind of deal. Get you in a room start messing around, then make some excuse of why they can't go any further. I prefer the flirt over the tease!! Answered by Mario Jhanson 1 year ago.


Can I take Benadryl while taking Toprol XL?
Asked by Kory Nakaahiki 1 year ago.

No, you should not a drug interaction may occur. You should ask you local pharmacist what would be acceptable to take without having any type of drug interaction. Here are a list of medications (prescription & OTC) that should not be taken with Toprol XL... (Partial List) There are a number of medicines that may interact with Toprol-XL® (metoprolol succinate). Some Toprol-XL drug interactions can involve medications such as: Reserpine Clonidine (Catapres®, Duraclon®) Amiodarone (Cordarone®) Cimetidine (Tagamet®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) Bupropion (Wellbutrin®) Thioridazine (Mellaril®) Quinidine Propafenone (Rythmol®) Ritonavir (Norvir®) Diphenhydramine (Banophen®, Benadryl®) ************** Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil®) Terbinafine (Lamisil®) Calcium channel blockers, such as: o Amlodipine (Norvasc®) o Verapamil (Calan®, Isoptin®) o Verapamil Extended-Release (Calan® SR, Covera-HS®, Isoptin® SR, Verelan®, Verelan® PM) o Diltiazem (Cardizem®) o Diltiazem ER (Cardizem® CD, Cardizem® LA, Cardizem® SR, Dilacor XR®, Diltia XT™, Tiazac®) o Nifedipine (Adalat®, Procardia®) o Nifedipine ER (Adalat® CC, Procardia XL®) o Felodipine (Plendil®) o Nisoldipine (Sular®) o Isradipine (DynaCirc®) o Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®), naproxen (Naprosyn®), naproxen sodium (Aleve®, Anaprox®, Naprelan®), diclofenac (Cataflam®, Voltaren®), indomethacin (Indocin®), nabumetone (Relafen®), oxaprozin (Daypro®), celecoxib (Celebrex®), meloxicam (Mobic®), etodolac (Lodine®), ketoprofen, ketorolac (Toradol®), and others Certain diabetes medicines, such as glyburide (DiaBeta®, Glynase®, Micronase®) Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), selegiline (Eldepryl®, EMSAM®), and tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Answered by Heriberto Ruan 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl Interactions Answered by Rozanne Tanweer 1 year ago.

I looked at the list of meds that you shouldn't take with Toprol. My daughter is on Toprol and she was recently given ibuprofen for an injury per the advise of her doctor. She took it for several days without complications. Why aren't you supposed to take it? Just wondering for future use. Answered by Karol Buenviaje 1 year ago.

And I take Norvasc with Toprol XL per doc? Answered by Natisha Rosewall 1 year ago.

I wouldn't mess with anything till you know how you will react to the medication. Although if you are thinking of maybe a glass of wine once in a while you should be fine, but I would ask my doctor to make sure. Answered by Earle Huwe 1 year ago.

Benadryl may raise your blood pressure. I would check with your Dr. first. Answered by Bess Gates 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Lauralee Cousey 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Zofia Bernau 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Tad Kozak 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Chasidy Lawler 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Barbie Tatem 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Alan Pinales 1 year ago.


What happens when a doctor prescribes cardizem to a 62 yr old man with normal blood pressure?
Had heart attack caused by cardizem Asked by Denae Schools 1 year ago.

Brand name: Cardizem Pronounced: CAR-di-zem Generic name: Diltiazem hydrochloride Other brand names: Cardizem CD, Cardizem SR, Dilacor XR, Tiazac Why is this drug prescribed? Cardizem and Cardizem CD (a controlled release form of diltiazem) are used in the treatment of angina pectoris (chest pain usually caused by lack of oxygen to the heart due to clogged arteries) and chronic stable angina (caused by exertion). Cardizem CD is also used to treat high blood pressure. Another controlled release form, Cardizem SR, is used only in the treatment of high blood pressure. Cardizem, a calcium channel blocker, dilates blood vessels and slows the heart to reduce blood pressure and the pain of angina. Doctors sometimes prescribe Cardizem for loss of circulation in the fingers and toes (Raynaud's phenomenon), for involuntary movements (tardive dyskinesia), and to prevent heart attack. Tiazac and Dilacor XR are used in the treatment of high blood pressure and chronic stable angina. They may be taken alone or combined with other blood pressure medications. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Cardizem. •More common side effects may include: Abnormally slow heartbeat (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), dizziness, fluid retention, flushing (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), headache, nausea, rash, weakness •Less common or rare side effects may include: Abnormal dreams, allergic reaction, altered way of walking, amnesia, anemia, angina (severe chest pain), blood disorders, congestive heart failure, constipation, cough, depression, diarrhea, difficulty sleeping, drowsiness, dry mouth, excessive urination at night, eye irritation, fainting, flu symptoms, hair loss, hallucinations, heart attack, high blood sugar, hives, impotence, increased output of pale urine, indigestion, infection, irregular heartbeat, itching, joint pain, labored breathing, loss of appetite, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, muscle cramps, nasal congestion or inflammation, nervousness, nosebleed, pain, personality change, pounding heartbeat, rapid heartbeat, reddish or purplish spots on skin, ringing in ears, sexual difficulties, skin inflammation/flaking or peeling, sensitivity to light, sleepiness, sore throat, taste alteration, thirst, tingling or pins and needles, tremor, vision changes, vomiting, welts, weight increase Answered by Neal Akerson 1 year ago.

The American Heart Association set new guidelines for normal B/P ranges and 120/90 is too high. They want to see an average pressure of 117/68. So, your B/P of 120/90 is too high and 100/50 is okay. Please remember that B/P fluctuates throughout the day and night and throughout your lifetime. B/Ps are typically lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon/early evening. And the average B/P for a healthy 5-year-old is very different from that of a healthy 15-year-old and a healthy 75-year-old. B/P is affected by stress. Stress comes in many forms. Even Illness, strong emotions and obesity are forms of stress on the body. Pretty much everything is a form of stress. And stress can, at times, be a good thing. So "stress" is a general, catch-all word. Yes, of course you experience stress whether or not you know it when you see it. An isolated reading of 120/90 may not be significant. High or low blood pressure is generally determined by what the values are consistently. Spot checks won't establish a baseline unless done in a specific way. Check your B/P with the same equipment on 3 different days and at 3 different times of day (Morning, mid day and night). You'll get a much better idea of what your baseline B/P is and how it rates according to the AHA. Answered by Carlena Solonika 1 year ago.

High blood pressure is not the only reason Cardizem can be prescribed. It does have other uses. Who told you Cardizem caused the heart attack? I have never heard of that. Answered by Lettie Williar 1 year ago.


What are the differences between Cardizem LA, Cardizem CD and Diltiazem HCL SA?
Asked by Britni Rutheford 1 year ago.

Cardizem LA, Cardizem CD and diltiazem HCl SA are essentially the same thing. They are used to treat high blood pressure, angina (cardiac chest pressure) and certain cardiac irregularities. Diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker (CCB), is the generic name for the drug. One company sells it as Cardizem CD, another as Cardizem LA. There is also a formulation callled Cardizem SR. Diltiazem is a three time a day medication unless it is formulated to be released slowly over 24 hours. When this is the case, it is once daily and bears the CD, LA, SR or SA designation. These stand for phrases like long-acting and slow release. Technically, there may be trivial distinctions between the different slow release mechanisms, but from a practical standpoint, they should be considered identical. Answered by Alease Lucius 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What are the differences between Cardizem LA, Cardizem CD and Diltiazem HCL SA? Answered by Joleen Howlin 1 year ago.

Cardizem Cd Answered by Lawanna Easom 1 year ago.

Cardizem La Answered by Melani Thramer 1 year ago.

A flirt is someone who will talk nasty to you, give you sexual looks and give the occasional long hug. a tease is someone who shows skin, more of a look but don't touch kind of deal. Get you in a room start messing around, then make some excuse of why they can't go any further. I prefer the flirt over the tease!! Answered by Sharan Pasquin 1 year ago.


Can I take Benadryl while taking Toprol XL?
Asked by Rubin Uhlman 1 year ago.

No, you should not a drug interaction may occur. You should ask you local pharmacist what would be acceptable to take without having any type of drug interaction. Here are a list of medications (prescription & OTC) that should not be taken with Toprol XL... (Partial List) There are a number of medicines that may interact with Toprol-XL® (metoprolol succinate). Some Toprol-XL drug interactions can involve medications such as: Reserpine Clonidine (Catapres®, Duraclon®) Amiodarone (Cordarone®) Cimetidine (Tagamet®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) Bupropion (Wellbutrin®) Thioridazine (Mellaril®) Quinidine Propafenone (Rythmol®) Ritonavir (Norvir®) Diphenhydramine (Banophen®, Benadryl®) ************** Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil®) Terbinafine (Lamisil®) Calcium channel blockers, such as: o Amlodipine (Norvasc®) o Verapamil (Calan®, Isoptin®) o Verapamil Extended-Release (Calan® SR, Covera-HS®, Isoptin® SR, Verelan®, Verelan® PM) o Diltiazem (Cardizem®) o Diltiazem ER (Cardizem® CD, Cardizem® LA, Cardizem® SR, Dilacor XR®, Diltia XT™, Tiazac®) o Nifedipine (Adalat®, Procardia®) o Nifedipine ER (Adalat® CC, Procardia XL®) o Felodipine (Plendil®) o Nisoldipine (Sular®) o Isradipine (DynaCirc®) o Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®), naproxen (Naprosyn®), naproxen sodium (Aleve®, Anaprox®, Naprelan®), diclofenac (Cataflam®, Voltaren®), indomethacin (Indocin®), nabumetone (Relafen®), oxaprozin (Daypro®), celecoxib (Celebrex®), meloxicam (Mobic®), etodolac (Lodine®), ketoprofen, ketorolac (Toradol®), and others Certain diabetes medicines, such as glyburide (DiaBeta®, Glynase®, Micronase®) Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), selegiline (Eldepryl®, EMSAM®), and tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Answered by Waneta Syon 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl Interactions Answered by Fe Janus 1 year ago.

I looked at the list of meds that you shouldn't take with Toprol. My daughter is on Toprol and she was recently given ibuprofen for an injury per the advise of her doctor. She took it for several days without complications. Why aren't you supposed to take it? Just wondering for future use. Answered by Nicole Boster 1 year ago.

And I take Norvasc with Toprol XL per doc? Answered by Nettie Villacorta 1 year ago.

I wouldn't mess with anything till you know how you will react to the medication. Although if you are thinking of maybe a glass of wine once in a while you should be fine, but I would ask my doctor to make sure. Answered by Andera Barrett 1 year ago.

Benadryl may raise your blood pressure. I would check with your Dr. first. Answered by Tiesha Ostler 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Tonja Windler 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Launa Bivin 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Dominic Greeves 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Palmira Wiant 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Rena Verner 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Delpha Eason 1 year ago.


What happens when a doctor prescribes cardizem to a 62 yr old man with normal blood pressure?
Had heart attack caused by cardizem Asked by Hana Kiesling 1 year ago.

Brand name: Cardizem Pronounced: CAR-di-zem Generic name: Diltiazem hydrochloride Other brand names: Cardizem CD, Cardizem SR, Dilacor XR, Tiazac Why is this drug prescribed? Cardizem and Cardizem CD (a controlled release form of diltiazem) are used in the treatment of angina pectoris (chest pain usually caused by lack of oxygen to the heart due to clogged arteries) and chronic stable angina (caused by exertion). Cardizem CD is also used to treat high blood pressure. Another controlled release form, Cardizem SR, is used only in the treatment of high blood pressure. Cardizem, a calcium channel blocker, dilates blood vessels and slows the heart to reduce blood pressure and the pain of angina. Doctors sometimes prescribe Cardizem for loss of circulation in the fingers and toes (Raynaud's phenomenon), for involuntary movements (tardive dyskinesia), and to prevent heart attack. Tiazac and Dilacor XR are used in the treatment of high blood pressure and chronic stable angina. They may be taken alone or combined with other blood pressure medications. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Cardizem. •More common side effects may include: Abnormally slow heartbeat (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), dizziness, fluid retention, flushing (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), headache, nausea, rash, weakness •Less common or rare side effects may include: Abnormal dreams, allergic reaction, altered way of walking, amnesia, anemia, angina (severe chest pain), blood disorders, congestive heart failure, constipation, cough, depression, diarrhea, difficulty sleeping, drowsiness, dry mouth, excessive urination at night, eye irritation, fainting, flu symptoms, hair loss, hallucinations, heart attack, high blood sugar, hives, impotence, increased output of pale urine, indigestion, infection, irregular heartbeat, itching, joint pain, labored breathing, loss of appetite, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, muscle cramps, nasal congestion or inflammation, nervousness, nosebleed, pain, personality change, pounding heartbeat, rapid heartbeat, reddish or purplish spots on skin, ringing in ears, sexual difficulties, skin inflammation/flaking or peeling, sensitivity to light, sleepiness, sore throat, taste alteration, thirst, tingling or pins and needles, tremor, vision changes, vomiting, welts, weight increase Answered by Ladonna Perilli 1 year ago.

The American Heart Association set new guidelines for normal B/P ranges and 120/90 is too high. They want to see an average pressure of 117/68. So, your B/P of 120/90 is too high and 100/50 is okay. Please remember that B/P fluctuates throughout the day and night and throughout your lifetime. B/Ps are typically lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon/early evening. And the average B/P for a healthy 5-year-old is very different from that of a healthy 15-year-old and a healthy 75-year-old. B/P is affected by stress. Stress comes in many forms. Even Illness, strong emotions and obesity are forms of stress on the body. Pretty much everything is a form of stress. And stress can, at times, be a good thing. So "stress" is a general, catch-all word. Yes, of course you experience stress whether or not you know it when you see it. An isolated reading of 120/90 may not be significant. High or low blood pressure is generally determined by what the values are consistently. Spot checks won't establish a baseline unless done in a specific way. Check your B/P with the same equipment on 3 different days and at 3 different times of day (Morning, mid day and night). You'll get a much better idea of what your baseline B/P is and how it rates according to the AHA. Answered by Rosamaria Raelson 1 year ago.

High blood pressure is not the only reason Cardizem can be prescribed. It does have other uses. Who told you Cardizem caused the heart attack? I have never heard of that. Answered by Sharlene Noeldner 1 year ago.


What are the differences between Cardizem LA, Cardizem CD and Diltiazem HCL SA?
Asked by Aron Vanhoecke 1 year ago.

Cardizem LA, Cardizem CD and diltiazem HCl SA are essentially the same thing. They are used to treat high blood pressure, angina (cardiac chest pressure) and certain cardiac irregularities. Diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker (CCB), is the generic name for the drug. One company sells it as Cardizem CD, another as Cardizem LA. There is also a formulation callled Cardizem SR. Diltiazem is a three time a day medication unless it is formulated to be released slowly over 24 hours. When this is the case, it is once daily and bears the CD, LA, SR or SA designation. These stand for phrases like long-acting and slow release. Technically, there may be trivial distinctions between the different slow release mechanisms, but from a practical standpoint, they should be considered identical. Answered by Kathy Abuel 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What are the differences between Cardizem LA, Cardizem CD and Diltiazem HCL SA? Answered by Rodrick Dunkinson 1 year ago.

Cardizem Cd Answered by Keith Zaiss 1 year ago.

Cardizem La Answered by Marcelina Rydolph 1 year ago.

A flirt is someone who will talk nasty to you, give you sexual looks and give the occasional long hug. a tease is someone who shows skin, more of a look but don't touch kind of deal. Get you in a room start messing around, then make some excuse of why they can't go any further. I prefer the flirt over the tease!! Answered by Margarett Zoulek 1 year ago.


Can I take Benadryl while taking Toprol XL?
Asked by Delphia Drummonds 1 year ago.

No, you should not a drug interaction may occur. You should ask you local pharmacist what would be acceptable to take without having any type of drug interaction. Here are a list of medications (prescription & OTC) that should not be taken with Toprol XL... (Partial List) There are a number of medicines that may interact with Toprol-XL® (metoprolol succinate). Some Toprol-XL drug interactions can involve medications such as: Reserpine Clonidine (Catapres®, Duraclon®) Amiodarone (Cordarone®) Cimetidine (Tagamet®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) Bupropion (Wellbutrin®) Thioridazine (Mellaril®) Quinidine Propafenone (Rythmol®) Ritonavir (Norvir®) Diphenhydramine (Banophen®, Benadryl®) ************** Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil®) Terbinafine (Lamisil®) Calcium channel blockers, such as: o Amlodipine (Norvasc®) o Verapamil (Calan®, Isoptin®) o Verapamil Extended-Release (Calan® SR, Covera-HS®, Isoptin® SR, Verelan®, Verelan® PM) o Diltiazem (Cardizem®) o Diltiazem ER (Cardizem® CD, Cardizem® LA, Cardizem® SR, Dilacor XR®, Diltia XT™, Tiazac®) o Nifedipine (Adalat®, Procardia®) o Nifedipine ER (Adalat® CC, Procardia XL®) o Felodipine (Plendil®) o Nisoldipine (Sular®) o Isradipine (DynaCirc®) o Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®), naproxen (Naprosyn®), naproxen sodium (Aleve®, Anaprox®, Naprelan®), diclofenac (Cataflam®, Voltaren®), indomethacin (Indocin®), nabumetone (Relafen®), oxaprozin (Daypro®), celecoxib (Celebrex®), meloxicam (Mobic®), etodolac (Lodine®), ketoprofen, ketorolac (Toradol®), and others Certain diabetes medicines, such as glyburide (DiaBeta®, Glynase®, Micronase®) Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), selegiline (Eldepryl®, EMSAM®), and tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Answered by Arla Rowls 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl Interactions Answered by Lou Emshwiller 1 year ago.

I looked at the list of meds that you shouldn't take with Toprol. My daughter is on Toprol and she was recently given ibuprofen for an injury per the advise of her doctor. She took it for several days without complications. Why aren't you supposed to take it? Just wondering for future use. Answered by Beula Tenney 1 year ago.

And I take Norvasc with Toprol XL per doc? Answered by Laine Letofsky 1 year ago.

I wouldn't mess with anything till you know how you will react to the medication. Although if you are thinking of maybe a glass of wine once in a while you should be fine, but I would ask my doctor to make sure. Answered by Deangelo Mcgiveron 1 year ago.

Benadryl may raise your blood pressure. I would check with your Dr. first. Answered by Stella Coram 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Delmar Desisles 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Estelle Sixkiller 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Alfredo Mettert 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Daisey Korber 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Hettie Losier 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Rosina Cabam 1 year ago.


What happens when a doctor prescribes cardizem to a 62 yr old man with normal blood pressure?
Had heart attack caused by cardizem Asked by Emiko Biondi 1 year ago.

Brand name: Cardizem Pronounced: CAR-di-zem Generic name: Diltiazem hydrochloride Other brand names: Cardizem CD, Cardizem SR, Dilacor XR, Tiazac Why is this drug prescribed? Cardizem and Cardizem CD (a controlled release form of diltiazem) are used in the treatment of angina pectoris (chest pain usually caused by lack of oxygen to the heart due to clogged arteries) and chronic stable angina (caused by exertion). Cardizem CD is also used to treat high blood pressure. Another controlled release form, Cardizem SR, is used only in the treatment of high blood pressure. Cardizem, a calcium channel blocker, dilates blood vessels and slows the heart to reduce blood pressure and the pain of angina. Doctors sometimes prescribe Cardizem for loss of circulation in the fingers and toes (Raynaud's phenomenon), for involuntary movements (tardive dyskinesia), and to prevent heart attack. Tiazac and Dilacor XR are used in the treatment of high blood pressure and chronic stable angina. They may be taken alone or combined with other blood pressure medications. What side effects may occur? Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Cardizem. •More common side effects may include: Abnormally slow heartbeat (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), dizziness, fluid retention, flushing (more common with Cardizem SR and Cardizem CD), headache, nausea, rash, weakness •Less common or rare side effects may include: Abnormal dreams, allergic reaction, altered way of walking, amnesia, anemia, angina (severe chest pain), blood disorders, congestive heart failure, constipation, cough, depression, diarrhea, difficulty sleeping, drowsiness, dry mouth, excessive urination at night, eye irritation, fainting, flu symptoms, hair loss, hallucinations, heart attack, high blood sugar, hives, impotence, increased output of pale urine, indigestion, infection, irregular heartbeat, itching, joint pain, labored breathing, loss of appetite, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, muscle cramps, nasal congestion or inflammation, nervousness, nosebleed, pain, personality change, pounding heartbeat, rapid heartbeat, reddish or purplish spots on skin, ringing in ears, sexual difficulties, skin inflammation/flaking or peeling, sensitivity to light, sleepiness, sore throat, taste alteration, thirst, tingling or pins and needles, tremor, vision changes, vomiting, welts, weight increase Answered by James Rivelli 1 year ago.

The American Heart Association set new guidelines for normal B/P ranges and 120/90 is too high. They want to see an average pressure of 117/68. So, your B/P of 120/90 is too high and 100/50 is okay. Please remember that B/P fluctuates throughout the day and night and throughout your lifetime. B/Ps are typically lower in the morning and higher in the late afternoon/early evening. And the average B/P for a healthy 5-year-old is very different from that of a healthy 15-year-old and a healthy 75-year-old. B/P is affected by stress. Stress comes in many forms. Even Illness, strong emotions and obesity are forms of stress on the body. Pretty much everything is a form of stress. And stress can, at times, be a good thing. So "stress" is a general, catch-all word. Yes, of course you experience stress whether or not you know it when you see it. An isolated reading of 120/90 may not be significant. High or low blood pressure is generally determined by what the values are consistently. Spot checks won't establish a baseline unless done in a specific way. Check your B/P with the same equipment on 3 different days and at 3 different times of day (Morning, mid day and night). You'll get a much better idea of what your baseline B/P is and how it rates according to the AHA. Answered by Lue Wilabay 1 year ago.

High blood pressure is not the only reason Cardizem can be prescribed. It does have other uses. Who told you Cardizem caused the heart attack? I have never heard of that. Answered by Nicki Srey 1 year ago.


What are the differences between Cardizem LA, Cardizem CD and Diltiazem HCL SA?
Asked by Irving Amacker 1 year ago.

Cardizem LA, Cardizem CD and diltiazem HCl SA are essentially the same thing. They are used to treat high blood pressure, angina (cardiac chest pressure) and certain cardiac irregularities. Diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker (CCB), is the generic name for the drug. One company sells it as Cardizem CD, another as Cardizem LA. There is also a formulation callled Cardizem SR. Diltiazem is a three time a day medication unless it is formulated to be released slowly over 24 hours. When this is the case, it is once daily and bears the CD, LA, SR or SA designation. These stand for phrases like long-acting and slow release. Technically, there may be trivial distinctions between the different slow release mechanisms, but from a practical standpoint, they should be considered identical. Answered by Cara Haymon 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What are the differences between Cardizem LA, Cardizem CD and Diltiazem HCL SA? Answered by Arletha Hoefling 1 year ago.

Cardizem Cd Answered by Juliann Mey 1 year ago.

Cardizem La Answered by Shay Wratchford 1 year ago.

A flirt is someone who will talk nasty to you, give you sexual looks and give the occasional long hug. a tease is someone who shows skin, more of a look but don't touch kind of deal. Get you in a room start messing around, then make some excuse of why they can't go any further. I prefer the flirt over the tease!! Answered by Yvone Schells 1 year ago.


Can I take Benadryl while taking Toprol XL?
Asked by Laurence Cassetta 1 year ago.

No, you should not a drug interaction may occur. You should ask you local pharmacist what would be acceptable to take without having any type of drug interaction. Here are a list of medications (prescription & OTC) that should not be taken with Toprol XL... (Partial List) There are a number of medicines that may interact with Toprol-XL® (metoprolol succinate). Some Toprol-XL drug interactions can involve medications such as: Reserpine Clonidine (Catapres®, Duraclon®) Amiodarone (Cordarone®) Cimetidine (Tagamet®) Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) Bupropion (Wellbutrin®) Thioridazine (Mellaril®) Quinidine Propafenone (Rythmol®) Ritonavir (Norvir®) Diphenhydramine (Banophen®, Benadryl®) ************** Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil®) Terbinafine (Lamisil®) Calcium channel blockers, such as: o Amlodipine (Norvasc®) o Verapamil (Calan®, Isoptin®) o Verapamil Extended-Release (Calan® SR, Covera-HS®, Isoptin® SR, Verelan®, Verelan® PM) o Diltiazem (Cardizem®) o Diltiazem ER (Cardizem® CD, Cardizem® LA, Cardizem® SR, Dilacor XR®, Diltia XT™, Tiazac®) o Nifedipine (Adalat®, Procardia®) o Nifedipine ER (Adalat® CC, Procardia XL®) o Felodipine (Plendil®) o Nisoldipine (Sular®) o Isradipine (DynaCirc®) o Nicardipine (Cardene®) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®), naproxen (Naprosyn®), naproxen sodium (Aleve®, Anaprox®, Naprelan®), diclofenac (Cataflam®, Voltaren®), indomethacin (Indocin®), nabumetone (Relafen®), oxaprozin (Daypro®), celecoxib (Celebrex®), meloxicam (Mobic®), etodolac (Lodine®), ketoprofen, ketorolac (Toradol®), and others Certain diabetes medicines, such as glyburide (DiaBeta®, Glynase®, Micronase®) Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), selegiline (Eldepryl®, EMSAM®), and tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Answered by Valeria Dezalia 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl Interactions Answered by Cynthia Piland 1 year ago.

I looked at the list of meds that you shouldn't take with Toprol. My daughter is on Toprol and she was recently given ibuprofen for an injury per the advise of her doctor. She took it for several days without complications. Why aren't you supposed to take it? Just wondering for future use. Answered by Tillie Madalinski 1 year ago.

And I take Norvasc with Toprol XL per doc? Answered by Colton Lundberg 1 year ago.

I wouldn't mess with anything till you know how you will react to the medication. Although if you are thinking of maybe a glass of wine once in a while you should be fine, but I would ask my doctor to make sure. Answered by Lila Viramontas 1 year ago.

Benadryl may raise your blood pressure. I would check with your Dr. first. Answered by Concetta Needles 1 year ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Marcene Toller 1 year ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Stacee Bartosiak 1 year ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Aracelis Lois 1 year ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Ezequiel Slavick 1 year ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Vallie Sarabia 1 year ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Yelena Wondoloski 1 year ago.


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