Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019488/001.

Names and composition

"CARDENE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019488/001 CARDENE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019488/002 CARDENE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 30MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019734/001 CARDENE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per 10ML (2.5MG per ML)

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019488/001 CARDENE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019488/002 CARDENE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 30MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019734/001 CARDENE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per 10ML (2.5MG per ML)
019734/002 CARDENE IN 4.8% DEXTROSE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INTRAVENOUS 20MG per 200ML (0.1MG per ML)
019734/003 CARDENE IN 0.86% SODIUM CHLORIDE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INTRAVENOUS 20MG per 200ML (0.1MG per ML)
019734/004 CARDENE IN 0.83% SODIUM CHLORIDE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INTRAVENOUS 40MG per 200ML (0.2MG per ML)
019734/005 CARDENE IN 5.0% DEXTROSE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INTRAVENOUS 40MG per 200ML (0.2MG per ML)
020005/001 CARDENE SR NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
020005/002 CARDENE SR NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 45MG
020005/003 CARDENE SR NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
022276/001 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per 10ML (2.5MG per ML)
022276/002 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE IN 0.9% SODIUM CHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INTRAVENOUS 20MG per 200ML (0.1MG per ML)
022276/003 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE IN 0.9% SODIUM CHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INTRAVENOUS 40MG per 200ML (0.2MG per ML)
074439/001 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
074439/002 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 30MG
074540/001 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
074540/002 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 30MG
074642/001 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
074642/002 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 30MG
074670/001 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
074670/002 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 30MG
074928/001 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
074928/002 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 30MG
078405/001 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per 10ML (2.5MG per ML)
078714/001 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per 10ML (2.5MG per ML)
090125/001 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per 10ML (2.5MG per ML)
090534/001 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per 10ML (2.5MG per ML)
090664/001 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per 10ML (2.5MG per ML)
090671/001 NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE NICARDIPINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per 10ML (2.5MG per ML)

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Answered questions

What is the standard IV dosing for cardene for a hemorrhagic stroke?not a drip?
my patient had a dose of 20 mL/hr, but in the drug book i can only find 5mg/hr titrated as needed for acute hypertensive episodes, i guess what I'm asking is if this is accurate, or what the concentration of the bags is (how many mg/mL they come in) Asked by Lenora Fife 1 year ago.

Cardene (nicardipine) comes in standard strength (0.1 mg/ml) with 20 mg in 200 ml and double strength (0.2 mg/ml) with 40 mg in 200 ml. Also, yes, 5 mg/hr is the starting dose and is is titrated up to a maximum of 15 mg/hr and after getting the BP under control it is common to be able to back it down to less then the 5 mg/hr you started at. It is always given as a continuous infusion on a pump when given IV (or it can also be given PO) but not IV push as it has a very short duration of effect and drops pressure very quickly. Answered by Janis Boratko 1 year ago.


So what is the best IV drip for sinus tach (underlying cause: suspect sepsis)?
...so, why don't we treat the sepsis (antibiotics) and also treat sinus tach (cardene drip)? is cardene drip useless or harmful in this case? Asked by Carin Dekker 1 year ago.

Sinus tach isn't bad by itself. In fact, a sepsis patient will usually have a low blood pressure, and the tachycardia helps compensate for that. You would only want to "treat" the sinus tach if the patient had ischemic cardiac disease and the tachycardia was increasing the heart muscle's oxygen demand beyond what their diseased vessels could deliver. But if you did that, you might compromise their peripheral perfusion, and they might start losing fingers and toes. That's the problem with sepsis--you have multiple systems failing and you have to figure out which ones you can still push harder without collapsing the whole house of cards. EDIT: Not sure where AbeLincoln is practicing, but I give Diltiazem IV all the time here in America. Answered by Brandon Usman 1 year ago.

From the limited review of the literature I made, I came to the following conclusion: IF you were going to use a Ca++ channel blocker IV the only two I see listed as having good SA node automaticity suppression are Diltiazem and Verapamil, but they are not available anymore by IV. Cardene, as I see it listed has weak SA node suppression, but I have not at my finger tips the specific literature on this drug, just general information. Sepsis is a complex topic, and cardiovascular conditions can change rapidly over a wide range. What I would consider would be Adenosine. Adenosine acts quickly and is cleared quickly, and bolus doses slows sinus rates. Adrenerics like dopamine or NE are tricky and are more out of vogue, in the older texts they suggested rasiing up blood pressure to increase vagal tone using these drugs. Answered by Roselee Werksman 1 year ago.

The sinus tachycardia is compensatory in that situation, and artificially lowering the rate is likely to cause a decrease in perfusion; that is, you don't treat the monitor, you treat the patient. In your circumstance, the correct drip is normal saline, plain, with antibiotics to cover the suspected organisms. Answered by Maryetta Kohlmyer 1 year ago.

You shouldn't be treating sinus tach, the way to treat tachycardia caused by sepsis is by treating the sepsis and providing supportive care. Sinus tachycardia is a symptom, not a disease, and should not be treated specifically- you treat the cause. Answered by Sylvia Kudej 1 year ago.

Cardizem Drip Answered by Jenni Difrancesco 1 year ago.

Cardizem Gtt Answered by Vena Noya 1 year ago.


Any drug interaction with Inderal and Diphenhydramine?
I take a low dose of inderal and I'm wondering if I can take one benadryl that only has one ingredient (diphenhydramine)....will there be any bad side affects besides drowsiness??? I can't get through to my pharmacist tonight for some reason... Asked by Mozell Kitching 1 year ago.

Diphenhydramine Drug Interactions Answered by Earlean Saporita 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Any drug interaction with Inderal and Diphenhydramine? I take a low dose of inderal and I'm wondering if I can take one benadryl that only has one ingredient (diphenhydramine)....will there be any bad side affects besides drowsiness??? I can't get through to my pharmacist tonight for some reason... Answered by Basilia Samela 1 year ago.

You are (already) overdosing. You shouldn't take more than 1 kind of antihistamine, they all do the same thing. Taking 2 of X and 2 of Y is the same as taking 4 of X. You can take an antihistamine and decongestant at the same time, and even a pain relieving tablet, but not 2 anti-histamines, unless a doctor is monitoring your situation. You're asking for trouble, your poor liver. I hope you don't drink alcohol too. Look for antihistamines that people complain cause drowsiness, unfortunately these are the most effective, but you would have to put up with the drowsiness in exchange for better relief. Answered by Samara Graza 1 year ago.

don't take your drug advice from anonymous people with dubious qualification to answer. Are there no 24 hour pharmacies where you live? btw aside from the drowsiness, they are OK to take together. That's what you pharmacist told you......right? Answered by Krystle Galo 1 year ago.


Can high blood pressure medication cause nervous system side effects?
I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high... Asked by Loriann Kettler 1 year ago.

I am taking a high blood pressure medication, and it seems/appears that since I have been taking the medication I have had headaches all over, dizziness/light headedness, numbness in parts my face, as well as a stiff neck. These symptoms arent consisently there, maybe 1-2 times a day for an hour or so. Can a high blood pressure medication cause such or is this some unrelated condition that I should seek out? Answered by Lashaun Lide 1 year ago.

Possible Side Effects of Drugs That Lower Blood Pressure Some of the drugs listed below can affect certain functions of the body, resulting in bad side effects. However, drugs that lower blood pressure have proven effective over the years. The benefits of using them far outweigh the risk of side effects. Most people who’ve taken these drugs haven’t had any problems. Diuretics — Some of these drugs may decrease your body's supply of a mineral called potassium. Symptoms such as weakness, leg cramps or being tired may result. Eating foods containing potassium may help prevent significant potassium loss. You can prevent potassium loss by taking a liquid or tablet that has potassium along with the diuretic, if your doctor recommends it. Diuretics such as amiloride (Midamar), spironolactone (Aldactone) or triamterene (Dyrenium) are called "potassium sparing" agents. They don’t cause the body to lose potassium. They might be prescribed alone but are usually used with another diuretic. Some of these combinations are Aldactazide, Dyazide, Maxzide or Moduretic. Some people suffer from attacks of gout after prolonged treatment with diuretics. This side effect isn't common and can be managed by other treatment. In people with diabetes, diuretic drugs may increase the blood sugar level. A change in drug, diet, insulin or oral antidiabetic dosage corrects this in most cases. Your doctor can change your treatment. Most of the time the degree of increase in blood sugar isn't much. Impotence may also occur in a small percentage of people. Beta-blockers — Acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal) or timolol (Blocadren) may cause insomnia, cold hands and feet, tiredness or depression, a slow heartbeat or symptoms of asthma. Impotence may occur. If you have diabetes and you’re taking insulin, have your responses to therapy monitored closely. ACE inhibitors — These drugs, such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril or Prinivil), may cause a skin rash; loss of taste; a chronic dry, hacking cough; and in rare instances, kidney damage. Angiotensin II receptor blockers — These drugs may cause occasional dizziness. Calcium channel blockers — Diltiazem (Cardizem), nicardipine (Cardene), Nifedipine (Procardia) and verapamil (Calan or Isoptin) may cause palpitations, swollen ankles, constipation, headache or dizziness. Side effects with each of these drugs differ a great deal. Alpha blockers — These drugs may cause fast heart rate, dizziness or a drop in blood pressure when you stand up. Combined alpha and beta blockers — People taking these drugs may experience a drop in blood pressure when they stand up. Central agonists — Alpha methyldopa (Aldomet) may produce a greater drop in blood pressure when you're in an upright position (standing or walking) and may make you feel weak or faint if the pressure has been lowered too far. This drug may also cause drowsiness or sluggishness, dryness of the mouth, fever or anemia. Male patients may experience impotence. If this side effect persists, your doctor may have to change the drug dosage or use another medication. Clonidine (Catapres), guanabenz (Wytensin) or guanfacine (Tenex) may produce severe dryness of the mouth, constipation or drowsiness. If you're taking any of these drugs, don’t stop suddenly, because your blood pressure may rise quickly to dangerously high levels. Peripheral adrenergic inhibitors — Reserpine may cause a stuffy nose, diarrhea or heartburn. These effects aren't severe and no treatment is required other than to change the amount of drugs taken. If you have nightmares or insomnia or get depressed, tell your doctor. You should stop using the drugs. Guanadrel (Hylorel) or guanethidine (Ismelin) may cause some diarrhea, which may persist in some people. This side effect usually becomes less of a problem if you continue treatment. These drugs reduce blood pressure more when you stand. Consequently, you may get dizzy and lightheaded and feel weak when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up suddenly. If you notice any of these reactions — and if they persist for more than a minute or two — sit or lie down and either reduce or omit the next dose of the drug. If symptoms continue, contact your doctor. When you're taking guanethidine, don't keep standing in the hot sun or at a social gathering if you begin to feel faint or weak. These activities cause low blood pressure. Male patients may experience impotence. Contact your doctor if this occurs. These drugs are rarely used unless other medications don’t help. Blood vessel dilators — Hydralzine (Apresoline) may cause headaches, swelling around the eyes, heart palpitations or aches and pains in the joints. Usually none of these symptoms are severe, and most will go away after a few weeks of treatment. This drug isn't usually used by itself. Minoxidil (Loniten) is a potent drug that's usually used only in resistant cases of severe high blood pressure. It may cause fluid retention (marked weight gain) or excessive hair growth. Answered by Mozella Brumbaugh 1 year ago.

You really should speak to your doctor, while yes, high blood pressure meds do have "Side Effects" to some of those effects, you really should make doubly sure that you can take them, and they will not harm you. So speak to your doctor. I take blood pressure meds and the least I get is light headiness, when my blood pressure drops to "Normal" from being too high. Answered by Vanessa Haskell 1 year ago.


What is the standard IV dosing for cardene for a hemorrhagic stroke?not a drip?
my patient had a dose of 20 mL/hr, but in the drug book i can only find 5mg/hr titrated as needed for acute hypertensive episodes, i guess what I'm asking is if this is accurate, or what the concentration of the bags is (how many mg/mL they come in) Asked by Arlen Niquette 1 year ago.

Cardene (nicardipine) comes in standard strength (0.1 mg/ml) with 20 mg in 200 ml and double strength (0.2 mg/ml) with 40 mg in 200 ml. Also, yes, 5 mg/hr is the starting dose and is is titrated up to a maximum of 15 mg/hr and after getting the BP under control it is common to be able to back it down to less then the 5 mg/hr you started at. It is always given as a continuous infusion on a pump when given IV (or it can also be given PO) but not IV push as it has a very short duration of effect and drops pressure very quickly. Answered by Jenny Carbonella 1 year ago.


So what is the best IV drip for sinus tach (underlying cause: suspect sepsis)?
...so, why don't we treat the sepsis (antibiotics) and also treat sinus tach (cardene drip)? is cardene drip useless or harmful in this case? Asked by Edmond Parra 1 year ago.

Sinus tach isn't bad by itself. In fact, a sepsis patient will usually have a low blood pressure, and the tachycardia helps compensate for that. You would only want to "treat" the sinus tach if the patient had ischemic cardiac disease and the tachycardia was increasing the heart muscle's oxygen demand beyond what their diseased vessels could deliver. But if you did that, you might compromise their peripheral perfusion, and they might start losing fingers and toes. That's the problem with sepsis--you have multiple systems failing and you have to figure out which ones you can still push harder without collapsing the whole house of cards. EDIT: Not sure where AbeLincoln is practicing, but I give Diltiazem IV all the time here in America. Answered by Melani Pauk 1 year ago.

From the limited review of the literature I made, I came to the following conclusion: IF you were going to use a Ca++ channel blocker IV the only two I see listed as having good SA node automaticity suppression are Diltiazem and Verapamil, but they are not available anymore by IV. Cardene, as I see it listed has weak SA node suppression, but I have not at my finger tips the specific literature on this drug, just general information. Sepsis is a complex topic, and cardiovascular conditions can change rapidly over a wide range. What I would consider would be Adenosine. Adenosine acts quickly and is cleared quickly, and bolus doses slows sinus rates. Adrenerics like dopamine or NE are tricky and are more out of vogue, in the older texts they suggested rasiing up blood pressure to increase vagal tone using these drugs. Answered by Remona Daquino 1 year ago.

The sinus tachycardia is compensatory in that situation, and artificially lowering the rate is likely to cause a decrease in perfusion; that is, you don't treat the monitor, you treat the patient. In your circumstance, the correct drip is normal saline, plain, with antibiotics to cover the suspected organisms. Answered by Reatha Sandone 1 year ago.

You shouldn't be treating sinus tach, the way to treat tachycardia caused by sepsis is by treating the sepsis and providing supportive care. Sinus tachycardia is a symptom, not a disease, and should not be treated specifically- you treat the cause. Answered by Lynwood Rothgaber 1 year ago.

Cardizem Drip Answered by Jeane Coovert 1 year ago.

Cardizem Gtt Answered by Miesha Monks 1 year ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Ricki Marcet 1 year ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Casandra Forde 1 year ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Mark Soloman 1 year ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Rafaela Heatherton 1 year ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Elinore Plattsmier 1 year ago.


What is the standard IV dosing for cardene for a hemorrhagic stroke?not a drip?
my patient had a dose of 20 mL/hr, but in the drug book i can only find 5mg/hr titrated as needed for acute hypertensive episodes, i guess what I'm asking is if this is accurate, or what the concentration of the bags is (how many mg/mL they come in) Asked by Rickie Maddison 1 year ago.

Cardene (nicardipine) comes in standard strength (0.1 mg/ml) with 20 mg in 200 ml and double strength (0.2 mg/ml) with 40 mg in 200 ml. Also, yes, 5 mg/hr is the starting dose and is is titrated up to a maximum of 15 mg/hr and after getting the BP under control it is common to be able to back it down to less then the 5 mg/hr you started at. It is always given as a continuous infusion on a pump when given IV (or it can also be given PO) but not IV push as it has a very short duration of effect and drops pressure very quickly. Answered by Brandon Gagliardi 1 year ago.


So what is the best IV drip for sinus tach (underlying cause: suspect sepsis)?
...so, why don't we treat the sepsis (antibiotics) and also treat sinus tach (cardene drip)? is cardene drip useless or harmful in this case? Asked by Elyse Furno 1 year ago.

Sinus tach isn't bad by itself. In fact, a sepsis patient will usually have a low blood pressure, and the tachycardia helps compensate for that. You would only want to "treat" the sinus tach if the patient had ischemic cardiac disease and the tachycardia was increasing the heart muscle's oxygen demand beyond what their diseased vessels could deliver. But if you did that, you might compromise their peripheral perfusion, and they might start losing fingers and toes. That's the problem with sepsis--you have multiple systems failing and you have to figure out which ones you can still push harder without collapsing the whole house of cards. EDIT: Not sure where AbeLincoln is practicing, but I give Diltiazem IV all the time here in America. Answered by Virgilio Leisher 1 year ago.

From the limited review of the literature I made, I came to the following conclusion: IF you were going to use a Ca++ channel blocker IV the only two I see listed as having good SA node automaticity suppression are Diltiazem and Verapamil, but they are not available anymore by IV. Cardene, as I see it listed has weak SA node suppression, but I have not at my finger tips the specific literature on this drug, just general information. Sepsis is a complex topic, and cardiovascular conditions can change rapidly over a wide range. What I would consider would be Adenosine. Adenosine acts quickly and is cleared quickly, and bolus doses slows sinus rates. Adrenerics like dopamine or NE are tricky and are more out of vogue, in the older texts they suggested rasiing up blood pressure to increase vagal tone using these drugs. Answered by Dannette Wiggens 1 year ago.

The sinus tachycardia is compensatory in that situation, and artificially lowering the rate is likely to cause a decrease in perfusion; that is, you don't treat the monitor, you treat the patient. In your circumstance, the correct drip is normal saline, plain, with antibiotics to cover the suspected organisms. Answered by Maritza Hackenberg 1 year ago.

You shouldn't be treating sinus tach, the way to treat tachycardia caused by sepsis is by treating the sepsis and providing supportive care. Sinus tachycardia is a symptom, not a disease, and should not be treated specifically- you treat the cause. Answered by Hulda Kocurek 1 year ago.

Cardizem Drip Answered by Palmira Huor 1 year ago.

Cardizem Gtt Answered by Candy Lewellen 1 year ago.


Hypertension problem?
I'm 23 years old anyways. Asked by Reyna Vegetabile 1 year ago.

Well it's been like this, I have been treated for hypertension for like 4-5 months with sotalol 40mg morning, diuretic in mid day, and 40mg at night sotalol (2 x half tablet). It helped me to take off some symtpoms, I had chest pain, was feeling faint, and etc. My blood pressure even with medicine never got down under 140, mostly 150 and so. But recently I woke up one morning and my heart was pounding so much, and i measured 190/110. And later again i started to feel faint somehow, and out of streght, this all preceded 3-4 day headache, which i still have to some bit. Now what I'm wondering. Even I drink medicine. Why doesn't my blood pressure go to normal count? I will tomorrow settle appointment with my cardilogist. Should my blood pressure be under 140/95, considering i had surgery (tetralogiae fallot) and have mild regurgitation which isn't making problem. Could it be that I'm not taking enough medicine for my condition? Any experiences or answers are welcome! Thanks Answered by Talisha Lalka 1 year ago.

Hypertension can be classified either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma). Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. In terms of medications for this medical condition; there are several types: - Diuretics (water pills) helps your body to get rid of extra sodium (salt) and water so your blood vessels don't have to hold too much fluid. Some examples of diuretics include chlorthalidone (brand name: Thalitone), furosemide (brand name: Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (brand name: Esidrix) and indapamide (brand name: Lozol). Your doctor may also prescribe a combination of diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide combined with triamterene (brand names: Dyazide, Maxzide). - Beta-blockers makes the heart beat slower so that blood passes through your blood vessels with less force. Some examples of beta-blockers include acebutolol (brand name: Sectral), atenolol (brand name: Tenormin), carvedilol (brand name: Coreg), metoprolol (brand names: Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (brand name: Corgard), propranolol (brand name: Inderal) and timolol (brand name: Blocadren). - Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also called ACE inhibitors) keeps your body from making angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ACE inhibitors include benazepril (brand name: Lotensin), enalapril (brand name: Vasotec), lisinopril (brand names: Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (brand name: Accupril), ramipril (brand name: Altace) and trandolapril (brand name: Mavik). - Angiotensin II receptor blockers (also called ARBs) protects your blood vessels from the effects of angiotensin II, a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of ARBs include candesartan (brand name: Atacand), irbesartan (brand name: Avapro), losartan (brand name: Cozaar), olmesartan (brand name: Benicar), telmisartan (brand name: Micardis) and valsartan (brand name: Diovan). - Calcium channel blockers (also called CCBs) helps to keep your blood vessels from constricting (becoming narrow) by blocking calcium from entering your cells. Some examples of CCBs include amlodipine (brand name: Norvasc), diltiazem (brand names: Cardizem, Cartia, Dilacor, Tiazac), felodipine (brand name: Plendil), nicardipine (brand name: Cardene), nifedipine (brand names: Adalat, Procardia) and verapamil (some brand names: Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). - Alpha-blockers helps to relax your blood vessels by reducing nerve impulses. This allows your blood to pass through more easily. Some examples of alpha-blockers include doxazosin (brand name: Cardura), prazosin (brand name: Minipress) and terazosin (brand name: Hytrin). - Centrally acting drugs may affect your brain and central nervous system to reduce the nerve impulses that can cause your blood vessels to narrow. Some examples of centrally acting drugs include clonidine (brand name: Catapres) and methyldopa. - Direct vasodilators relaxes the muscles in the blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to widen. Some examples of vasodilators include hydralazine (brand name: Apresoline) and minoxidil (brand name: Loniten). I will personally suggest that You get an Echocardiogram scan done. You must also get your cholesterol, fat and sugar levels of your body tested. A good result will reflect the following normal results: - The Total Cholesterol level should remain below 200 mg/dL all the time; HDL's typical normal level is considered to be at 40 mg/dL and above. However, the higher your HDL level be the better it is for your health. Some natural ways to maintain and raise your HDL level are by aerobic exercising and excluding trans fatty acids from your diet; The normal ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL is considered at 5:1 or below; a desirable LDL-cholesterol level must always be below 140 mg/dL to be considered normal. - Triglycerides level is also important and must remain below 150 mg/dL. - Glucose level. Normal is about 90mg/100ml, or 5mM/L. Overall, You should be getting regular check-ups, following a healthy diet, taking your medications as prescript, rest and other instructions from your specialist/s and general physician. Good Health To You ! Answered by Ardelia Mcanulty 1 year ago.

sorry but you should never just cease your medication like this. you should go back to your health professional and see where you go from here. depending on your age and many other factors of your life you need to keep your BP under control and often you it can take some time to find the right medication to keep you in a stable condition. never never never muck about with hypertension. Answered by Daniella Rincan 1 year ago.

Eat less animal fat & lose weight. Answered by Yadira Hassler 1 year ago.


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