Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 012125/003.

Names and composition

"CARBOCAINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012125/003 CARBOCAINE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012250/001 CARBOCAINE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1%
012250/002 CARBOCAINE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2%
012250/005 CARBOCAINE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1.5%

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012125/003 CARBOCAINE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012250/001 CARBOCAINE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1%
012250/002 CARBOCAINE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2%
012250/005 CARBOCAINE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1.5%
040806/001 MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3%
080925/001 ISOCAINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3%
083559/001 MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3%
084777/002 ARESTOCAINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3%
087509/001 MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1%
088387/001 SCANDONEST PLAIN MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3%
088653/001 POLOCAINE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3%
088769/001 MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1%
088770/001 MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2%
089406/001 POLOCAINE-MPF MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1%
089407/001 POLOCAINE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1%
089408/001 POLOCAINE-MPF MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1.5%
089409/001 POLOCAINE-MPF MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2%
089410/001 POLOCAINE MEPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2%

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Answered questions

How does Lidocaine, Procaine, Carbocaine, Novocaine, etc work?
Peter H: Thanks that is what I was looking for. Asked by Tiffaney Rella 1 year ago.

The simple answer is that the local anaesthetics act directly on the nerve cell and prevent the electrical impulses from passing along the nerve. The more complicated answer depends on understanding how the nerve impulse is generated in the first place, which occupies several pages of the textbook. Briefly, in the resting state the nerve cell generates a voltage across the cell membrane by virtue of an active pumping mechanism which pumps sodium ions out of the cell, and allows potassium to diffuse in, to create an electrochemical gradient. When the nerve is stimulated, sodium channels open and allow sodium ions to flow back in, reversing the electrical gradient ("depolarisation"). This electrical change serves to open the sodium channels in the adjacent section of membrane, and so a wave of depolarisation travels along the nerve cell. The local anaesthetic drug works by sitting on the sodium channel and preventing depolarisation, thus preventing the sodium entry into the cell. Answered by Marcelene Sharpley 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How does Lidocaine, Procaine, Carbocaine, Novocaine, etc work? Like HOW do they numb? 10 pts. best (most detailed) answer! Answered by Rory Jhonston 1 year ago.

First, let me explain that there are two basic types of local anesthetic used in dentistry: 1) novacaine, which is an ester-type anesthetic; and 2) lidocaine, which is an amide-type anesthetic. Novacaine was discovered first, but due to allergic reactions, lidocaine and related anesthetics were developed in the 1940s. With the amide anesthetics, allergies are rare. Here are the steps involved in achieving local anesthesia as adapted from Malamed, Stanley F., Handbook of Local Anesthesia, 2nd Edition, C.V. Mosby Company (1986) p. 13: Displacement of calcium ions from the nerve receptor site Binding of local anesthetic molecule to this receptor site Blockade of the sodium channel Decrease in sodium conductance Depression of rate of electrical depolarization Failure to achieve threshold potential level Lack of development of propagated action potential Conduction blockade These steps cause impulses that arrive in the blocked area to become stalled, thus preventing the "pain" impulses from reaching the brain. The most commonly used local anesthetics are lidocaine or xylocaine. For most people, the anesthesia lasts about two hours. The duration of numbness depends on how long the anesthetic takes to diffuse out of the tissues Answered by Owen Talford 1 year ago.


Chemistry homework help.?
A 3.59 gram sample of carbocaine, C7,H11,N2,O4, is burned in a bomb calorimeter that has a heat capacity of 1,855 joules/ degree calcius and which contains 965 grams of water. The temperature of the calorimeter and the water rises from 32.45 degrees calcius to 39.62 degrees. What is the heat of combustion per model... Asked by Coralie Mckouen 1 year ago.

A 3.59 gram sample of carbocaine, C7,H11,N2,O4, is burned in a bomb calorimeter that has a heat capacity of 1,855 joules/ degree calcius and which contains 965 grams of water. The temperature of the calorimeter and the water rises from 32.45 degrees calcius to 39.62 degrees. What is the heat of combustion per model of carbocaine? Answered by Kaylene Christina 1 year ago.

Nad here is how you do this. The total heat output found by burning the carbocaine will be the heat absorbed by the calorimeter itself plus the heat absorbed by the water around it. so the heat absorbed by the structure of the calorimeter only will be (39.62 degrees minus 32.45 degrees ) times 1855 joules absorbed per degree C which equals 13300.3 joules absorbed and for heat absorbed by the water 965 grams water times 7.17 degrees temp increase times 4.184 Joules/gm/degree = 28949.3 joules absorbed by the water. so total heat absorbed by calorimeter plus water = l3300.3 J + 28949.3 J =42249.6 Joules and this was the heat energy derived from burning only 3.59 grams of carbocaine. so now we have to scale up to heat output for burning a full mole of carbocaine. Add up the formula weight of carbocain to get 187 grams per mole and you only burned 3.59g over l87 g/mole or .019 moles of carbocaine so scaling up .019 moles over 42249.6 joules = one mole over X joules cross multiply to get 2.2 x l0^6 joules heat from burning one mole of carbocaine Answered by Deanne Scarnato 1 year ago.


Where can i find local anesthetics?
examples-bupivacaine Carbocaine lidocaine Marcaine mepivacaine Naropin Nesacaine Novocain procaine Septocaine Tucks Hemorrhoidal Ointment Xylocaine Asked by Bernardine Segerson 1 year ago.

Some over-the-counter preparations have local anesthetics in them. To get the injectable kind you'll need either a prescription from a physician, or a medical or dental license/DEA registration. Answered by Jani Dupass 1 year ago.

The locals that you listed are mostly injectibles. I'm almost sure you can only find those in a hospital or in a prescription. If you are looking for an over-the-counter local anesthetic, benzocaine is really the only one. It is found in various strengths and can only be used directly on the skin or topically. It also comes in several formulations like orajel drops for teeth an gums, sprays, and topical applications. They are quite short-acting, with a duration of about 45 minutes at the most. You should talk to your pharmacist about them if you have more questions. Due to their short duration, people tend to overuse them, which can lead to systemic toxicities. Answered by Tracee Gaudio 1 year ago.

YOU CAN'T. CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE. TUCKS...ANY DRUG STORE. Answered by Nena Parayno 1 year ago.


Is it safe to have local anesthesia while pregnant? (dentist)?
Carbocaine Inj is an anesthetic (numbing medicine) that blocks the nerve impulses that send pain signals to your brain or Lidocaine. The first is classified as class C drug, the other class B. Asked by Basilia Fujii 1 year ago.

When I was pregnant I was advised by my gynecologist NOT to use local anesthesia at the dentest. He suggested that I use the same type of anesthesia heart patients use (I am sorry I can not remember what he called it). Heart patients that have had surgery or have a pace maker use a special kind of localanesthesiaa. Answered by Roosevelt Verrelli 1 year ago.

No it's not. You actually should get a note from your OB before you see the dentist with all the rules about X-rays, antibiotics etc. You cannot take most of the antibiotics that would be prescribed after a total procedure too. Talks o y our OB first. Dentists are not medical doctors and do not know what is harmful and what isn't to a fetus. Answered by Sona Chermak 1 year ago.

If it wasn't they wouldn't give it to you. Is it me or is everyone on here thick as 2 short planks. Answered by Porfirio Goslin 1 year ago.


How does Lidocaine, Procaine, Carbocaine, Novocaine, etc work?
Peter H: Thanks that is what I was looking for. Asked by Shante Toothaker 1 year ago.

The simple answer is that the local anaesthetics act directly on the nerve cell and prevent the electrical impulses from passing along the nerve. The more complicated answer depends on understanding how the nerve impulse is generated in the first place, which occupies several pages of the textbook. Briefly, in the resting state the nerve cell generates a voltage across the cell membrane by virtue of an active pumping mechanism which pumps sodium ions out of the cell, and allows potassium to diffuse in, to create an electrochemical gradient. When the nerve is stimulated, sodium channels open and allow sodium ions to flow back in, reversing the electrical gradient ("depolarisation"). This electrical change serves to open the sodium channels in the adjacent section of membrane, and so a wave of depolarisation travels along the nerve cell. The local anaesthetic drug works by sitting on the sodium channel and preventing depolarisation, thus preventing the sodium entry into the cell. Answered by Hilde Bailado 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How does Lidocaine, Procaine, Carbocaine, Novocaine, etc work? Like HOW do they numb? 10 pts. best (most detailed) answer! Answered by Lavern Gautier 1 year ago.

First, let me explain that there are two basic types of local anesthetic used in dentistry: 1) novacaine, which is an ester-type anesthetic; and 2) lidocaine, which is an amide-type anesthetic. Novacaine was discovered first, but due to allergic reactions, lidocaine and related anesthetics were developed in the 1940s. With the amide anesthetics, allergies are rare. Here are the steps involved in achieving local anesthesia as adapted from Malamed, Stanley F., Handbook of Local Anesthesia, 2nd Edition, C.V. Mosby Company (1986) p. 13: Displacement of calcium ions from the nerve receptor site Binding of local anesthetic molecule to this receptor site Blockade of the sodium channel Decrease in sodium conductance Depression of rate of electrical depolarization Failure to achieve threshold potential level Lack of development of propagated action potential Conduction blockade These steps cause impulses that arrive in the blocked area to become stalled, thus preventing the "pain" impulses from reaching the brain. The most commonly used local anesthetics are lidocaine or xylocaine. For most people, the anesthesia lasts about two hours. The duration of numbness depends on how long the anesthetic takes to diffuse out of the tissues Answered by Ossie Lovellette 1 year ago.


Chemistry homework help.?
A 3.59 gram sample of carbocaine, C7,H11,N2,O4, is burned in a bomb calorimeter that has a heat capacity of 1,855 joules/ degree calcius and which contains 965 grams of water. The temperature of the calorimeter and the water rises from 32.45 degrees calcius to 39.62 degrees. What is the heat of combustion per model... Asked by Meryl Luangsingotha 1 year ago.

A 3.59 gram sample of carbocaine, C7,H11,N2,O4, is burned in a bomb calorimeter that has a heat capacity of 1,855 joules/ degree calcius and which contains 965 grams of water. The temperature of the calorimeter and the water rises from 32.45 degrees calcius to 39.62 degrees. What is the heat of combustion per model of carbocaine? Answered by Harley Misercola 1 year ago.

Nad here is how you do this. The total heat output found by burning the carbocaine will be the heat absorbed by the calorimeter itself plus the heat absorbed by the water around it. so the heat absorbed by the structure of the calorimeter only will be (39.62 degrees minus 32.45 degrees ) times 1855 joules absorbed per degree C which equals 13300.3 joules absorbed and for heat absorbed by the water 965 grams water times 7.17 degrees temp increase times 4.184 Joules/gm/degree = 28949.3 joules absorbed by the water. so total heat absorbed by calorimeter plus water = l3300.3 J + 28949.3 J =42249.6 Joules and this was the heat energy derived from burning only 3.59 grams of carbocaine. so now we have to scale up to heat output for burning a full mole of carbocaine. Add up the formula weight of carbocain to get 187 grams per mole and you only burned 3.59g over l87 g/mole or .019 moles of carbocaine so scaling up .019 moles over 42249.6 joules = one mole over X joules cross multiply to get 2.2 x l0^6 joules heat from burning one mole of carbocaine Answered by Kristyn Zakarian 1 year ago.


Where can i find local anesthetics?
examples-bupivacaine Carbocaine lidocaine Marcaine mepivacaine Naropin Nesacaine Novocain procaine Septocaine Tucks Hemorrhoidal Ointment Xylocaine Asked by Bradley Statton 1 year ago.

Some over-the-counter preparations have local anesthetics in them. To get the injectable kind you'll need either a prescription from a physician, or a medical or dental license/DEA registration. Answered by Tommie Buhmann 1 year ago.

The locals that you listed are mostly injectibles. I'm almost sure you can only find those in a hospital or in a prescription. If you are looking for an over-the-counter local anesthetic, benzocaine is really the only one. It is found in various strengths and can only be used directly on the skin or topically. It also comes in several formulations like orajel drops for teeth an gums, sprays, and topical applications. They are quite short-acting, with a duration of about 45 minutes at the most. You should talk to your pharmacist about them if you have more questions. Due to their short duration, people tend to overuse them, which can lead to systemic toxicities. Answered by Bambi Wooley 1 year ago.

YOU CAN'T. CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE. TUCKS...ANY DRUG STORE. Answered by Beatris Daughtry 1 year ago.


Is it safe to have local anesthesia while pregnant? (dentist)?
Carbocaine Inj is an anesthetic (numbing medicine) that blocks the nerve impulses that send pain signals to your brain or Lidocaine. The first is classified as class C drug, the other class B. Asked by Tatiana Nailer 1 year ago.

When I was pregnant I was advised by my gynecologist NOT to use local anesthesia at the dentest. He suggested that I use the same type of anesthesia heart patients use (I am sorry I can not remember what he called it). Heart patients that have had surgery or have a pace maker use a special kind of localanesthesiaa. Answered by Devona Keaser 1 year ago.

No it's not. You actually should get a note from your OB before you see the dentist with all the rules about X-rays, antibiotics etc. You cannot take most of the antibiotics that would be prescribed after a total procedure too. Talks o y our OB first. Dentists are not medical doctors and do not know what is harmful and what isn't to a fetus. Answered by Foster Wing 1 year ago.

If it wasn't they wouldn't give it to you. Is it me or is everyone on here thick as 2 short planks. Answered by Johanna Norville 1 year ago.


How does Lidocaine, Procaine, Carbocaine, Novocaine, etc work?
Peter H: Thanks that is what I was looking for. Asked by Ora Furnas 1 year ago.

The simple answer is that the local anaesthetics act directly on the nerve cell and prevent the electrical impulses from passing along the nerve. The more complicated answer depends on understanding how the nerve impulse is generated in the first place, which occupies several pages of the textbook. Briefly, in the resting state the nerve cell generates a voltage across the cell membrane by virtue of an active pumping mechanism which pumps sodium ions out of the cell, and allows potassium to diffuse in, to create an electrochemical gradient. When the nerve is stimulated, sodium channels open and allow sodium ions to flow back in, reversing the electrical gradient ("depolarisation"). This electrical change serves to open the sodium channels in the adjacent section of membrane, and so a wave of depolarisation travels along the nerve cell. The local anaesthetic drug works by sitting on the sodium channel and preventing depolarisation, thus preventing the sodium entry into the cell. Answered by Hortensia Shopp 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How does Lidocaine, Procaine, Carbocaine, Novocaine, etc work? Like HOW do they numb? 10 pts. best (most detailed) answer! Answered by Antonette Tarlow 1 year ago.

First, let me explain that there are two basic types of local anesthetic used in dentistry: 1) novacaine, which is an ester-type anesthetic; and 2) lidocaine, which is an amide-type anesthetic. Novacaine was discovered first, but due to allergic reactions, lidocaine and related anesthetics were developed in the 1940s. With the amide anesthetics, allergies are rare. Here are the steps involved in achieving local anesthesia as adapted from Malamed, Stanley F., Handbook of Local Anesthesia, 2nd Edition, C.V. Mosby Company (1986) p. 13: Displacement of calcium ions from the nerve receptor site Binding of local anesthetic molecule to this receptor site Blockade of the sodium channel Decrease in sodium conductance Depression of rate of electrical depolarization Failure to achieve threshold potential level Lack of development of propagated action potential Conduction blockade These steps cause impulses that arrive in the blocked area to become stalled, thus preventing the "pain" impulses from reaching the brain. The most commonly used local anesthetics are lidocaine or xylocaine. For most people, the anesthesia lasts about two hours. The duration of numbness depends on how long the anesthetic takes to diffuse out of the tissues Answered by Ignacio Beska 1 year ago.


Chemistry homework help.?
A 3.59 gram sample of carbocaine, C7,H11,N2,O4, is burned in a bomb calorimeter that has a heat capacity of 1,855 joules/ degree calcius and which contains 965 grams of water. The temperature of the calorimeter and the water rises from 32.45 degrees calcius to 39.62 degrees. What is the heat of combustion per model... Asked by Lynda Wisenbaker 1 year ago.

A 3.59 gram sample of carbocaine, C7,H11,N2,O4, is burned in a bomb calorimeter that has a heat capacity of 1,855 joules/ degree calcius and which contains 965 grams of water. The temperature of the calorimeter and the water rises from 32.45 degrees calcius to 39.62 degrees. What is the heat of combustion per model of carbocaine? Answered by Many Loss 1 year ago.

Nad here is how you do this. The total heat output found by burning the carbocaine will be the heat absorbed by the calorimeter itself plus the heat absorbed by the water around it. so the heat absorbed by the structure of the calorimeter only will be (39.62 degrees minus 32.45 degrees ) times 1855 joules absorbed per degree C which equals 13300.3 joules absorbed and for heat absorbed by the water 965 grams water times 7.17 degrees temp increase times 4.184 Joules/gm/degree = 28949.3 joules absorbed by the water. so total heat absorbed by calorimeter plus water = l3300.3 J + 28949.3 J =42249.6 Joules and this was the heat energy derived from burning only 3.59 grams of carbocaine. so now we have to scale up to heat output for burning a full mole of carbocaine. Add up the formula weight of carbocain to get 187 grams per mole and you only burned 3.59g over l87 g/mole or .019 moles of carbocaine so scaling up .019 moles over 42249.6 joules = one mole over X joules cross multiply to get 2.2 x l0^6 joules heat from burning one mole of carbocaine Answered by Minta Urion 1 year ago.


Where can i find local anesthetics?
examples-bupivacaine Carbocaine lidocaine Marcaine mepivacaine Naropin Nesacaine Novocain procaine Septocaine Tucks Hemorrhoidal Ointment Xylocaine Asked by Chance Magliano 1 year ago.

Some over-the-counter preparations have local anesthetics in them. To get the injectable kind you'll need either a prescription from a physician, or a medical or dental license/DEA registration. Answered by Ingrid Brannan 1 year ago.

The locals that you listed are mostly injectibles. I'm almost sure you can only find those in a hospital or in a prescription. If you are looking for an over-the-counter local anesthetic, benzocaine is really the only one. It is found in various strengths and can only be used directly on the skin or topically. It also comes in several formulations like orajel drops for teeth an gums, sprays, and topical applications. They are quite short-acting, with a duration of about 45 minutes at the most. You should talk to your pharmacist about them if you have more questions. Due to their short duration, people tend to overuse them, which can lead to systemic toxicities. Answered by Retha Schoepf 1 year ago.

YOU CAN'T. CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE. TUCKS...ANY DRUG STORE. Answered by Cathey Jares 1 year ago.


Is it safe to have local anesthesia while pregnant? (dentist)?
Carbocaine Inj is an anesthetic (numbing medicine) that blocks the nerve impulses that send pain signals to your brain or Lidocaine. The first is classified as class C drug, the other class B. Asked by Agustina Mazzini 1 year ago.

When I was pregnant I was advised by my gynecologist NOT to use local anesthesia at the dentest. He suggested that I use the same type of anesthesia heart patients use (I am sorry I can not remember what he called it). Heart patients that have had surgery or have a pace maker use a special kind of localanesthesiaa. Answered by Sammie Shinn 1 year ago.

No it's not. You actually should get a note from your OB before you see the dentist with all the rules about X-rays, antibiotics etc. You cannot take most of the antibiotics that would be prescribed after a total procedure too. Talks o y our OB first. Dentists are not medical doctors and do not know what is harmful and what isn't to a fetus. Answered by Henry Launius 1 year ago.

If it wasn't they wouldn't give it to you. Is it me or is everyone on here thick as 2 short planks. Answered by Pearle Broomes 1 year ago.


How does Lidocaine, Procaine, Carbocaine, Novocaine, etc work?
Peter H: Thanks that is what I was looking for. Asked by Billie Neblett 1 year ago.

The simple answer is that the local anaesthetics act directly on the nerve cell and prevent the electrical impulses from passing along the nerve. The more complicated answer depends on understanding how the nerve impulse is generated in the first place, which occupies several pages of the textbook. Briefly, in the resting state the nerve cell generates a voltage across the cell membrane by virtue of an active pumping mechanism which pumps sodium ions out of the cell, and allows potassium to diffuse in, to create an electrochemical gradient. When the nerve is stimulated, sodium channels open and allow sodium ions to flow back in, reversing the electrical gradient ("depolarisation"). This electrical change serves to open the sodium channels in the adjacent section of membrane, and so a wave of depolarisation travels along the nerve cell. The local anaesthetic drug works by sitting on the sodium channel and preventing depolarisation, thus preventing the sodium entry into the cell. Answered by Mabelle Baldasaro 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How does Lidocaine, Procaine, Carbocaine, Novocaine, etc work? Like HOW do they numb? 10 pts. best (most detailed) answer! Answered by Vincent Siron 1 year ago.

First, let me explain that there are two basic types of local anesthetic used in dentistry: 1) novacaine, which is an ester-type anesthetic; and 2) lidocaine, which is an amide-type anesthetic. Novacaine was discovered first, but due to allergic reactions, lidocaine and related anesthetics were developed in the 1940s. With the amide anesthetics, allergies are rare. Here are the steps involved in achieving local anesthesia as adapted from Malamed, Stanley F., Handbook of Local Anesthesia, 2nd Edition, C.V. Mosby Company (1986) p. 13: Displacement of calcium ions from the nerve receptor site Binding of local anesthetic molecule to this receptor site Blockade of the sodium channel Decrease in sodium conductance Depression of rate of electrical depolarization Failure to achieve threshold potential level Lack of development of propagated action potential Conduction blockade These steps cause impulses that arrive in the blocked area to become stalled, thus preventing the "pain" impulses from reaching the brain. The most commonly used local anesthetics are lidocaine or xylocaine. For most people, the anesthesia lasts about two hours. The duration of numbness depends on how long the anesthetic takes to diffuse out of the tissues Answered by Dacia Sheaks 1 year ago.


Chemistry homework help.?
A 3.59 gram sample of carbocaine, C7,H11,N2,O4, is burned in a bomb calorimeter that has a heat capacity of 1,855 joules/ degree calcius and which contains 965 grams of water. The temperature of the calorimeter and the water rises from 32.45 degrees calcius to 39.62 degrees. What is the heat of combustion per model... Asked by Tameika Trinidad 1 year ago.

A 3.59 gram sample of carbocaine, C7,H11,N2,O4, is burned in a bomb calorimeter that has a heat capacity of 1,855 joules/ degree calcius and which contains 965 grams of water. The temperature of the calorimeter and the water rises from 32.45 degrees calcius to 39.62 degrees. What is the heat of combustion per model of carbocaine? Answered by Erinn Goepfarth 1 year ago.

Nad here is how you do this. The total heat output found by burning the carbocaine will be the heat absorbed by the calorimeter itself plus the heat absorbed by the water around it. so the heat absorbed by the structure of the calorimeter only will be (39.62 degrees minus 32.45 degrees ) times 1855 joules absorbed per degree C which equals 13300.3 joules absorbed and for heat absorbed by the water 965 grams water times 7.17 degrees temp increase times 4.184 Joules/gm/degree = 28949.3 joules absorbed by the water. so total heat absorbed by calorimeter plus water = l3300.3 J + 28949.3 J =42249.6 Joules and this was the heat energy derived from burning only 3.59 grams of carbocaine. so now we have to scale up to heat output for burning a full mole of carbocaine. Add up the formula weight of carbocain to get 187 grams per mole and you only burned 3.59g over l87 g/mole or .019 moles of carbocaine so scaling up .019 moles over 42249.6 joules = one mole over X joules cross multiply to get 2.2 x l0^6 joules heat from burning one mole of carbocaine Answered by Fleta Waddle 1 year ago.


Where can i find local anesthetics?
examples-bupivacaine Carbocaine lidocaine Marcaine mepivacaine Naropin Nesacaine Novocain procaine Septocaine Tucks Hemorrhoidal Ointment Xylocaine Asked by Ellis Sibal 1 year ago.

Some over-the-counter preparations have local anesthetics in them. To get the injectable kind you'll need either a prescription from a physician, or a medical or dental license/DEA registration. Answered by Brady Dauzart 1 year ago.

The locals that you listed are mostly injectibles. I'm almost sure you can only find those in a hospital or in a prescription. If you are looking for an over-the-counter local anesthetic, benzocaine is really the only one. It is found in various strengths and can only be used directly on the skin or topically. It also comes in several formulations like orajel drops for teeth an gums, sprays, and topical applications. They are quite short-acting, with a duration of about 45 minutes at the most. You should talk to your pharmacist about them if you have more questions. Due to their short duration, people tend to overuse them, which can lead to systemic toxicities. Answered by Camilla Rathgeb 1 year ago.

YOU CAN'T. CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE. TUCKS...ANY DRUG STORE. Answered by Markus Moeckel 1 year ago.


Is it safe to have local anesthesia while pregnant? (dentist)?
Carbocaine Inj is an anesthetic (numbing medicine) that blocks the nerve impulses that send pain signals to your brain or Lidocaine. The first is classified as class C drug, the other class B. Asked by Alix Spratte 1 year ago.

When I was pregnant I was advised by my gynecologist NOT to use local anesthesia at the dentest. He suggested that I use the same type of anesthesia heart patients use (I am sorry I can not remember what he called it). Heart patients that have had surgery or have a pace maker use a special kind of localanesthesiaa. Answered by Magdalena Ranjel 1 year ago.

No it's not. You actually should get a note from your OB before you see the dentist with all the rules about X-rays, antibiotics etc. You cannot take most of the antibiotics that would be prescribed after a total procedure too. Talks o y our OB first. Dentists are not medical doctors and do not know what is harmful and what isn't to a fetus. Answered by Jimmy Barta 1 year ago.

If it wasn't they wouldn't give it to you. Is it me or is everyone on here thick as 2 short planks. Answered by Flora Vovak 1 year ago.


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