CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 079085/001.

Names and composition

"CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CARBIDOPA and ENTACAPONE and LEVODOPA.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
079085/001 CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 200MG and 100MG
079085/002 CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 37.5MG and 200MG and 150MG
090786/001 CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG and 200MG and 50MG
090833/001 CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 18.75MG and 200MG and 75MG
090833/002 CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 200MG and 100MG
090833/003 CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 31.25MG and 200MG and 125MG
090833/004 CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 37.5MG and 200MG and 150MG
090833/005 CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 200MG and 200MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
021485/004 STALEVO 200 CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 200MG and 200MG
079085/001 CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 200MG and 100MG
079085/002 CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 37.5MG and 200MG and 150MG
090786/001 CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG and 200MG and 50MG
090833/001 CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 18.75MG and 200MG and 75MG
090833/002 CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 200MG and 100MG
090833/003 CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 31.25MG and 200MG and 125MG
090833/004 CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 37.5MG and 200MG and 150MG
090833/005 CARBIDOPA, LEVODOPA AND ENTACAPONE CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 200MG and 200MG
021485/002 STALEVO 100 CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 200MG and 100MG
021485/006 STALEVO 125 CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 31.25MG and 200MG and 125MG
021485/003 STALEVO 150 CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 37.5MG and 200MG and 150MG
021485/001 STALEVO 50 CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG and 200MG and 50MG
021485/005 STALEVO 75 CARBIDOPA; ENTACAPONE; LEVODOPA TABLET/ORAL 18.75MG and 200MG and 75MG

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Answered questions

My husband has been told by two neurologist that he has parkinson's disease. new dr. says different.?
my husbnd has every symptom I have ever heard of for parkinson. our new dr. took some tests mental-memory follow directions etc. says he didn't do well at all on that. He says that the sinemet 25/100 should have helped him much more than it has. He put him amantadine(i asked him to be taken off this because of... Asked by Margarette Nuuanu 1 month ago.

my husbnd has every symptom I have ever heard of for parkinson. our new dr. took some tests mental-memory follow directions etc. says he didn't do well at all on that. He says that the sinemet 25/100 should have helped him much more than it has. He put him amantadine(i asked him to be taken off this because of side effects I read about-then he was put on comtan and his legs seemed to be very stiff almost as soon as he started the meds. Dr. said the meds should have helped and didn't so he says that maybe he has lewy body disease instead(he hopes not-he says) My husband does have memory loss and has thought he sees something that is not there a few times. the dr. has put my husband on six sinemet pills a day-one every three hrs. Told him to take azilectand to come back in a month. He says we will know more then. Upset again. Wish I knew what was going on!! Answered by Elmira Faisca 1 month ago.

The combination of levodopa and carbidopa is used to treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's-like symptoms that may develop after encephalitis (swelling of the brain) or injury to the nervous system caused by carbon monoxide poisoning or manganese poisoning. Parkinson's symptoms, including tremors (shaking), stiffness, and slowness of movement, are caused by a lack of dopamine, a natural substance usually found in the brain. Levodopa is in a class of medications called central nervous system agents. It works by being converted to dopamine in the brain. Carbidopa is in a class of medications called decarboxylase inhibitors. It works by preventing levodopa from being broken down before it reaches the brain. This allows for a lower dose of levodopa, which causes less nausea and vomiting. Amantadine is used to treat Parkinson's disease and conditions similar to those of Parkinson's disease. Entacapone is an inhibitor of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). It is used in combination with levodopa and carbidopa (Sinemet) to treat the end-of-dose 'wearing-off' symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Entacapone helps the levodopa and carbidopa work better by allowing more of it to reach the brain, where it has its effects. Rasagiline is used alone or in combination with another medication to treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease (a slowly progressing disease of the nervous system causing a fixed face without expression, tremor at rest, slowing of movements, walking with shuffling steps, stooped posture and muscle weakness). Rasagiline is in a class of medications called monoamine oxidase (MAO) type B inhibitors. It works by increasing the amounts of certain natural substances in the brain. Please see the web pages for more details on Carbidopa/levodopa (generic name) Sinemet (brand name), Amantadine, Entacapone (generic name) Comtan (brand name) and Rasagiline (generic name) Azilect (brand name). Answered by Lavada Mazion 1 month ago.

My father was originally diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease, but then the diagnosis eventually was Lewy Body Disease. As it progresses it's like a combination of Parkinson's and dementia. My dad hallucinated (saw things that weren't there) as well. Lewy Body Disease was diagnosed after he was seen by a geriatric specialist. The neurologist was only concerned about his gait disorder and wanted nothing to do with the confusion, memory problems and hallucinations. Sinemet did nothing to help him. I understand how upsetting this is, but sometimes waiting to see what develops is all that can be done. Have they done a Cat Scan of your husband's brain? If I remember correctly the hallmarks of Lewy Body can be seen on the brain. As you most likely know Parkinson's is caused by a lack of dopamine which Sinemet can help with, but Lewy Body there are changes within the brain that can be seem with appropriate radiological techniques. Sorry, I probably haven't been of much help, but I understand your anguish. Good luck. Answered by Leticia Loyborg 1 month ago.

The Parkinson's Reversing Breakthrough? Answered by Antione Quezada 1 month ago.

Here's a possibility that you should consider - your doctors will never tell you about this, but your husband is probably suffering the effects of not enough water intake - dehydration. It would be too difficult to explain everything in this limited space on how water and salt affects the entire physiology of the body, and being low on these substances can cause such health problems as Parkinson's disease. Please click on the first link to get an understanding of how nearly all health problems that aren't inherited or injury-related are the result of the cells not getting the nutrients that water and salt deliver, and how malnourished cells malfunction and are damaged by chemical imbalances. These are caused by dehydration. The second link is where you can learn how to correct your husband's water shortage so that his condition will improve. Answered by Florine Fenrich 1 month ago.

Why don't you try taking him to a Study University where they can have all the potential medical field DR's look at him? You can go on line and type in research study for Parkinson's and find a place that maybe able to help him. Or call the Parkinson's Disease foundation and they can tell where to go or what should be done to get a proper diagnosis. Sorry this wasn't more help. I wish you both the best. ;) Answered by Gaylene Tsuboi 1 month ago.

My thoughts are we will never know what happened for sure. His condition may have been due to an athletic injury...and scientific research keeps evolving and theories emerge. Concussions have been linked to so many unfortunate conditions and diseases. Athlete's have been diagnosed with late-life cognitive impairment, which scientific research points to chronic head injury. You'd think when the head gets slammed enough times, the brain will be affected. So, again it could be that Lou was misdiagnosed. We will never know for sure, and it's an interesting read. I think we should leave it that he died from ALS, the disease that has his name. Answered by Veronica Mcnew 1 month ago.


Looking for infor. for the mads are : sinemet er,requip,comtan?
Asked by Leonor Dobbin 1 month ago.

The combination of levodopa and carbidopa is used to treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's-like symptoms that may develop after encephalitis (swelling of the brain) or injury to the nervous system caused by carbon monoxide poisoning or manganese poisoning. Parkinson's symptoms, including tremors (shaking), stiffness, and slowness of movement, are caused by a lack of dopamine, a natural substance usually found in the brain. Levodopa is in a class of medications called central nervous system agents. It works by being converted to dopamine in the brain. Carbidopa is in a class of medications called decarboxylase inhibitors. It works by preventing levodopa from being broken down before it reaches the brain. This allows for a lower dose of levodopa, which causes less nausea and vomiting. Ropinirole is used alone or with other medications to treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD; a disorder of the nervous system that causes difficulties with movement, muscle control, and balance), including shaking of parts of the body, stiffness, slowed movements, and problems with balance. Ropinirole is also used to treat restless legs syndrome (RLS; a condition that causes discomfort in the legs and a strong urge to move the legs, especially at night and when sitting or lying down). Ropinirole is in a class of medications called dopamine agonists. It works by acting in place of dopamine, a natural substance in the brain that is needed to control movement. Entacapone is an inhibitor of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). It is used in combination with levodopa and carbidopa (Sinemet) to treat the end-of-dose 'wearing-off' symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Entacapone helps the levodopa and carbidopa work better by allowing more of it to reach the brain, where it has its effects. Please see the web pages for more details on Levodopa and Carbidopa (generic name) Sinemet CR (brand name), Ropinirole (generic name) Requip (brand name), Entacapone (generic name) and Comtan (brand name) Answered by Belkis Scheets 1 month ago.

Sinemet is a drug used to help the tremors of Parkinsons diesase. Comitin, is a heart drug, used to lower blood pressure. Answered by Ambrose Walen 1 month ago.


How Is Parkinson's Being Treated?
im doing a report on parkinsons diseas and need the answers.! Asked by Jesusa Greenway 1 month ago.

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Help me figure out what illness/disease Im talking about?
sorry if the question comes off as confusing..but Ive heard of a patient (young girl) who had to take a medicine in order to help the disease she had.. but.. the medication has her lose memory of what happened before she took it in the first place...what kind of illness/disease can that be.. and what kind... Asked by Natacha Apostal 1 month ago.

sorry if the question comes off as confusing.. but Ive heard of a patient (young girl) who had to take a medicine in order to help the disease she had.. but.. the medication has her lose memory of what happened before she took it in the first place... what kind of illness/disease can that be.. and what kind of medication had her lose her memory that way?? Answered by Evie Hobbs 1 month ago.

These drugs can cause memory loss. As you can see, there are far too many to list all the possible illnesses for which any of these medications might be prescribed. * Abilify® - Otsuka America (aripiprazole) Tablets * Ambien® see note below - Sanofi-Synthelabo (zolpidem tartrate) * Abilify® - Bristol-Myers Squibb (aripiprazole) Tablets * Cogentin® Injection - Merck (Benztropine Mesylate) * Copaxone® - Teva Neuroscience (glatiramer acetate injection) * Copaxone® tablets - Roche Laboratories (ribavirin, USP) * Copegus® tablets - 6% - Roche Laboratories (ribavirin, USP) * Cozaar® tablets - Merck (losartan potassium tablets) * Eldepryl® capsules (Somerset) (SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE) * Eskalith® - GlaxoSmithKline (lithium carbonate) * Eskalith® - GlaxoSmithKline (lithium carbonate) * Gleevec® - Novartis (imatinib mesylate) * Hyzaar® tablets - Merck (losartan potassium-hydrochlorothiazide tablets) * Imitrex® Nasal Spray - GlaxoSmithKline (sumatriptan) * Imitrex® tablets - GlaxoSmithKline (sumatriptan succinate) * Klonopin® tablets - 4% - Roche Laboratories (clonazepam) * Klonopin® wafers - 4% - Roche Laboratories (clonazepam orally disintegrating) * Lamictal® tablets - GlaxoSmithKline (lamotrigine) * Lamictal® chewable dispersible tablets - GlaxoSmithKline (lamotrigine) * Lupron Depot® 3.75 mg - 6% - TAP (leuprolide acetate for depot suspension) * Lupron Depot®-3 Month 11.25 mg - TAP (leuprolide acetate for depot suspension) * Lupron® injection - TAP (leuprolide acetate) * Maxalt® tablets - Merck (rizatriptan benzoate) * Maxalt-MLT® orally disintegrating tablets - Merck (rizatriptan benzoate) * Parcopa™ orally disintegrating tablets - Schwarz (carbidopa-levodopa) * Pegasys® - 5% - Roche Laboratories (peginterferon alfa-2a) * Prinivil® tablets - Merck (Lisinopril) * Prinzide® tablets - Merck (Lisinopril-Hydrochlorothiazide) * Rifamate® capsules - Aventis (rifampin and isoniazid) * Rifater® tablets - Aventis (rifampin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide) * Roferon®-A - Roche Laboratories (Interferon alfa-2a, recombinant) * Seromycin® capsules - Lilly (Cycloserine) * Stalevo® 50, 100 and 150 tablets - Novartis (carbidopa, levodopa and entacapone) * Timolide® tablets - Merck (Timolol Maleate-Hydrochlorothiazide) * Topamax® tablets - 3.2% - Ortho-McNeil (topiramate) * Topamax® sprinkle capsules - 3.2% - Ortho-McNeil (topiramate capsules) * Transderm Scop® - Novartis (scopolamine 1.5 mg Transdermal Therapeutic System) * Vesanoid® capsules - 3% - Roche Laboratories (tretinoin) * Wellbutrin® - GlaxoSmithKline (bupropion hydrochloride) * Wellbutrin SR® sustained-release tablets - GlaxoSmithKline (bupropion hydrochloride) * Wellbutrin XL™ extended-release tablets - GlaxoSmithKline (bupropion hydrochloride) * Xanax® - 33.1%- Pharmacia & Upjohn (alprazolam) * Xanax XR® - 15.4% extended-release tablets - Pharmacia & Upjohn (alprazolam) * Zonegran® capsules - 6% - Eisai (zonisamide) * Zyban® Sustained-Release tablets - GlaxoSmithKline (bupropion hydrochloride) Note: Although not expressed as a percentage, Ambien has been documented to cause a "significant decrease in next-morning recall" of information presented to subjects. Answered by Shawnda Rael 1 month ago.

there are numerous medications that can have that side effect, without more information no one can answer your questions. Answered by Earlie Benear 1 month ago.


My husband has parkinson's and is taking sinemet His dr wants him to take comtan with it. Need to know more?
My dr. has recommended comtan but I don't like the side effects and he told me not to be upset because most of it never effects people. I always talk to the druggist or get a print out of side effects. I know the dr. gets upset with me but I want to know whats going on. Should I be upset? Maybe I worry too... Asked by Tashia Gloyd 1 month ago.

My dr. has recommended comtan but I don't like the side effects and he told me not to be upset because most of it never effects people. I always talk to the druggist or get a print out of side effects. I know the dr. gets upset with me but I want to know whats going on. Should I be upset? Maybe I worry too much? I don't know. Answered by Bianca Odien 1 month ago.

Yeah, you worry too much but that's not always a bad thing. After all, this IS your husband. But the potential adverse reactions to Comtan aren't any worse than those for Sinemet. And Sinemet is a combination of levadopa and carbadopa while Comtan is only one medication. I sincerely doubt that your husband is the first patient his doctor prescribed Comtan for. The doctor has already has experience with the side effects most likely to appear. Is your husband able to speak? Has he expressed his own opinion about this? Sometimes it's not about what you want -- you're not the patient. Try getting involved in an activity other than your husband. Perhaps you need the break to keep things in perspective. Answered by Dacia Reichelderfer 1 month ago.

If you REALLY want to see your doctor get upset, start treating your husband with water and salt. I'm not saying this as a joke. There is evidence that Parkinson's Disease is caused by dehydration. By correcting the insufficient water level, he could make a complete recovery, assuming that no permanent damage has been done. Doctors don't like to talk about dehydration - it's in direct competition with them. Most health problems that aren't inherited or injury-related are caused by dehydration, and many of these can be reversed or even cured by drinking more water - this includes the "incurable" diseases. Click on the links below to learn more. I wish you the best. Answered by Catarina Sabet 1 month ago.


My mom has Parkinson's. My dad and I think her problem is bigger than that. What do you think?
My mother got her diagnosis a few years ago. She has all the symptoms of Parkinson's except the tremors. She is on Requip and Carba Leva Dova (spelling ?). Although, initially, we thought it helped. However, now it seems to make things worse. We have spoken to the neurologist, but he seems to let it go in... Asked by Olen Podlas 1 month ago.

My mother got her diagnosis a few years ago. She has all the symptoms of Parkinson's except the tremors. She is on Requip and Carba Leva Dova (spelling ?). Although, initially, we thought it helped. However, now it seems to make things worse. We have spoken to the neurologist, but he seems to let it go in one ear and out the other. He upped her dosage. For the first two days, we saw signs of improvement. Then, things got worse. She had polio when she was a child and we know this has an effect on her. It was in her leg. Her balance is horrible. She falls frequently. However, until Feb "08, she was perfectly capable of caring for herself, unassisted. Then she fell and broke her hip. It has been a huge downward spiral since then. She has very little to no judgment. She is completely incapable of making rational decisions. She is somewhat forgetful, but not to the point we think she has Alzheimer. However, her father who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's, was the same way. He also had dementia. We noticed far more problems with his dementia than Alzheimer's. We are certain though he had far more problems as well. They both are very similar in actions. He was 83 when he died. She is 64. We do constantly remind her of judgment things such as, "mom you can't have your hands full when you push your walker. You will fall". Or "mom, you have to uncross your legs to get up". I've noticed a severe decrease in physical activity. She fell yesterday and would NOT allow me to help her up. She has VERY little muscle tone left. Her appetite has increased immensely. When it is time for her meds, she appears drunk. Her eyes roll, she has a blank stare, and is completely immobile. Once her meds take affect, she is back. We have forbidden her to drive because of her lack of judgment. There is so much more detail I could offer, but want to keep it short and to the point in hopes of help. I will answer any other questions. We have no idea what else we can do and are certain with her decline over the last 18 months, she will be bed ridden in less than a year. Answered by Tu Smedley 1 month ago.

I have worked with people who have Parkinson's, and have a lot of experience with this lousy disease. It does sound like your mom has had a rough time, and I agree that it doesn't sound like she is doing very well right now, especially for a 65 year old lady. Here are a few thoughts: 1)you mention she did have polio in her leg; could she now be experiencing a post-polio type syndrome now on top of all of her other problems? 2)Parkinson's is associated with cognitive problems. sometimes they show up in the after only a few years, sometimes never. 3)the drug regimen is a delicate balance, and one that requires a lot of communication between the patient/caregiver/doctor. the balance between the benefits and the side effects can be razor thin some days. 4)you mentioned she broke her hip and "hasn't been the same since." I do see this some times with people who have a chronic disease; perhaps you and your dad can request home therapy services from her doctor, or even maybe a short inpatient rehab stay. Sometimes people do need a "tune-up." I would hate to hear that she is bedridden in a year; she should have access to some form of therapy I would hope (disclaimer: I am an occupational therapist, LOL). If you have any other questions, feel free to ask. good luck. Answered by Leana Fechtner 1 month ago.

Unfortunately the drugs to treat the disease become less effective over time, at which point new treatment options must be explored. The illness is progressive, at at some point there may no longer be a way to treat in such a way that she will be herself. I agree, you need a second opinion. Answered by Nakita Mearns 1 month ago.

One piece of advice is to find another neurologist who will listen to you and your family and do a thorough neurological assessment........ Answered by Lindsey Kaiserman 1 month ago.


Why is Deep Brain Surgery only performed on people with Parkinson's disease later?
Why aren't these electrodes set into the brains of those afflicted by parkinson's disease earlier on? At the moment the procedures are done at the end-of dose period of L-Dopa... why? Thank you! Asked by Jonah Lather 1 month ago.

Mainly because there is risk with any surgery. Seizures, infections, miss your target by just a little and there are serious problems, and it is expensive. Insurance companies are not about to pay for it unless you convince them that you have done everything else and nothing is working now. Answered by Rosalinda Houde 1 month ago.


What can my grandfather take for a sinus head ache, when he takes medication for parkinsons?
Please help.My grandfather is having a lot of trouble. He went to the drug store to get over the counter medication since it is 11 pm here. But when we got home we relized he cannot take it. Since he is on medication for his parkinsons. I need to know what medication he can take that will not have any negative... Asked by Dorris Dowdall 1 month ago.

Please help. My grandfather is having a lot of trouble. He went to the drug store to get over the counter medication since it is 11 pm here. But when we got home we relized he cannot take it. Since he is on medication for his parkinsons. I need to know what medication he can take that will not have any negative side effects with his current medication. Please help. Thanks Answered by Randi Pocekay 1 month ago.

Anything people without Parkinsons take for a sinus headache. There is no concern about interactions with OTC pain relievers Maybe next time ask the pharmacist while you are still in the store. Answered by Sidney Souvannakhily 1 month ago.

Yes that's exactly what it is!! I get those all the time. I tried using tylenol sinus medication and it goes away. You can also try allergy medicine which helps take away the pain for me. It may not be a sinus infection but just full or blocked sinuses. It may go away on its own but if not go see your doctor because sinus infections can get very serious if not treated properly! Answered by Thad Ridener 1 month ago.

Easy, get a "hot water bottle" like the ones used by older people when they get cold feet at night, they are about $10.00 in Walgreen's and fill it up with hot water, put the bag on top of his head for a few minutes until the head ache is gone, I do that every time I have a sinus head ache and it works like a charm and it is 100% natural. Answered by Cristi Percy 1 month ago.


Can I increase my Rheumatoid Factor in days?
I need some serious expertise from future Nobel Prize winners...This may be a weird question but I wish to increase my Rheumatoid Factor in a short period of time because that would allow me to waive my country's stupid mandatory military service. My RA was tested near 37 before, but somehow it came down to... Asked by Lynda Bazin 1 month ago.

I need some serious expertise from future Nobel Prize winners... This may be a weird question but I wish to increase my Rheumatoid Factor in a short period of time because that would allow me to waive my country's stupid mandatory military service. My RA was tested near 37 before, but somehow it came down to 10. I am not sure if the drop is due to the different methods of tests or it just comes down for other reasons. My father has Parkinson's disease so he has some medications such as Amantadine, Levodopa, Carbidopa, Entacapone, and some anti-depressed medications. Would any of the above medicines help INCREASE RA factor if a normal person takes it? My fingers do hurt once in a while, but need a positive RA factor result to back up and therefore waive the mandatory militaryservicee. Future Nobel Prize winners, please help~~~ Answered by Mckinley Volo 1 month ago.

discuss this in detail with your rheumatologist. Answered by Julietta Liborio 1 month ago.

No you had better not go for yourself Answered by Afton Eccles 1 month ago.


Parkinsons disease ?
my husband has had pd for two years now and has just started on sinemet. I have read about the side effects and how bad they can be. I am concerned about this although I have heard that you may not have all of them. I was wondering how this drug helps other people and how some of the side effects others? Asked by Etha Benyard 1 month ago.

The Parkinson's Reversing Breakthrough? Answered by Delta Lendon 1 month ago.

well alzheimers disease is more from arabs the indain part of the world parkision more in the uk jokes and also the U.S.A thats a main differnace now the main symptons is that parkison is none stop shaking cuz thats where them kind of cells attack all round the body alzheimers just attacks the brain like arthythoiles that attacks a specfic part like say your arm or leg but if you have rhymatsim arthytoiles then it attacks all over u most freqentl constant too so it just how and how long and how many and how few the cells specfil loactions are and how many to attack whch parts now these dieases are main so there is lots o batrieca bad cells so it will attack bad in allround u body except for alzheimer and arthyoiles cuz there have specfic part unlike the other 2 parksion diease and rhymatism arthyoiles Answered by Kenneth Festa 1 month ago.

Yes it should help considerably. minor side effects are common and tend to go with time. Usually patients are started on low dose and increased slowly. This should help to miminise side effects too. Answered by Kraig Chalita 1 month ago.


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