CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 074788/001.

Names and composition

"CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CAPTOPRIL and HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
074788/001 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 15MG
074788/002 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
074788/003 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
074788/004 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 15MG
074827/001 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 15MG
074827/002 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
074827/003 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
074827/004 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 15MG
074832/001 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
074896/001 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 15MG
074896/002 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
074896/003 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
074896/004 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 15MG
075055/001 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 15MG
075055/002 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
075055/003 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
075055/004 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 15MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018709/001 CAPOZIDE 25/15 CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 15MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018709/002 CAPOZIDE 25/25 CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018709/003 CAPOZIDE 50/25 CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018709/004 CAPOZIDE 50/15 CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 15MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
074788/001 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 15MG
074788/002 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
074788/003 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
074788/004 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 15MG
074827/001 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 15MG
074827/002 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
074827/003 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
074827/004 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 15MG
074832/001 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
074896/001 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 15MG
074896/002 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
074896/003 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
074896/004 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 15MG
075055/001 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 15MG
075055/002 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG and 25MG
075055/003 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 25MG
075055/004 CAPTOPRIL AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE CAPTOPRIL; HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG and 15MG

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Answered questions

Heart palpitations extending into both arms?
34 m, hypertensive, slightly overweight, This is the second time this is happening, the first time, just over a week ago, i took half a glass of gin and a half a bottle of beer, and after a while i started feeling my heart racing, later it slowed a bit and that night i couldn't sleep cos of palpitations... Asked by Evan Moring 2 months ago.

34 m, hypertensive, slightly overweight, This is the second time this is happening, the first time, just over a week ago, i took half a glass of gin and a half a bottle of beer, and after a while i started feeling my heart racing, later it slowed a bit and that night i couldn't sleep cos of palpitations extending into my arms, have never felt them so strong b4, taking over my chest and arms. Then last night it happened again, afer two bottles of beer, 6 hours later, just after having sex with my wife. i feel my heart beating heavily and extending into both arms, I can actually feel my pulse in both arms without touching them. It makes me so uncomfortable and scared that i can't sleep. I don't feel any heart pain just my heartbeat vibrating into my arms, and the beat is rather slow and irregular...I am hypertensive and currently taking atenolol, amlodipine, moduretic (K sparing water pill) and captopril. My Bp is usually under control and when i checked it during the palpitations it was 140/90. Its usually about 130/80 but last night i had two bottles of beer and a pack of cigs so i guess that brought it up a bit. Also Usually 4-6 hrs after a few bottles of beer, my pulse increases and my bp goes up to 150/95 despite the anti-hbp drugs. I had to cut down to not more than two bottles a day and not more than twice a week. So these palpitations is a new experience to me, I went to the doctor and he didn't find anything wrong, altho when he checked me the palpitations were absent, a recent ecg was ok although an echo revealed a slight enlarged lv which my doc explained is as a result of the hpb and that i shudn't worry about it. I am very worried about it cos i couldn't sleep all thru last light, almost made a dash to the nearest hospital before i noticed that when i sit up or stand and move about it subsides, only to return if i lie down, also during that time i felt extremely weak, sort of muscle weakness, can anyone explain what is happening to me? I've decided to stop drinking and smoking completely to avoid any future episodes, i play football and jog and i don't experience any probs, only after drinking a little alcohol that i have these irregular beats and heart pain Answered by Joya Berliew 2 months ago.

* Avoid food, drinks and medications that cause heart palpitations. (Medications to treat an irregular heart rhythm will sometimes cause a different irregular rhythm). * Stop smoking. * If you are particular, you may drink 24 oz of red beer. Amlodipine may sometimes cause serious side effects. The following symptoms are uncommon, but if you experience any of them, call your doctor immediately: * more frequent or more severe chest pain * rapid, pounding, or irregular heartbeat * fainting Captopril may also cause fast heart beat. Please see the web pages for more details on Atenolol (generic name) Amlodipine (generic name) Captopril (generic name) Amiloride and Hydrochlorothiazide / Co-amilozide (generic name) Moduretic (brand name) Answered by Leif Ruda 2 months ago.

Hiatus hernia I think you will find is the correct term. It may be from a connective tissue disorder and therefore could possibly be related to a heart problem...its unlikely but worth an investigation if you are convinced you have a heart problem. I was also convinced I had a heart problem but I had a strong family history of heart problems. (I was right...I had an aneurysm and a faulty valve.) sometimes we just know when something is not right....if this is so for you keep going until you get diagnosed. Answered by Drew Wyly 2 months ago.

it is alcohol induced hypertension Answered by Ching Carbine 2 months ago.


About bp and hyper tension?
my husband is suferring from high blood pressure for the last 20 yrs. earlier he has taken atenelol50, then now amilopress. now the doctors have advised him to take ramipril, attrovastin. he is confused as the earlier drugs were beta bloakers and now it is ace inhibitors. can one change to other? wont it have any... Asked by Bo Garczynski 2 months ago.

my husband is suferring from high blood pressure for the last 20 yrs. earlier he has taken atenelol50, then now amilopress. now the doctors have advised him to take ramipril, attrovastin. he is confused as the earlier drugs were beta bloakers and now it is ace inhibitors. can one change to other? wont it have any side effect? can any body clarify my question and give details? thank you. Answered by Amira Leib 2 months ago.

Beta-blockers work by affecting the response to some nerve impulses in certain parts of the body. As a result, they decrease the heart's need for blood and oxygen by reducing its workload. They also help the heart to beat more regularly.The exact way in which benazepril, captopril, enalapril, lisinopril, moexipril, and quinapril work is not known. They block an enzyme in the body that is necessary to produce a substance that causes blood vessels to tighten. As a result, they relax blood vessels. This lowers blood pressure and increases the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart. Hydrochlorothiazide helps reduce the amount of salt and water in the body by acting on the kidneys to increase the flow of urine; this also helps to lower blood pressure. Physicians have many choices of medications to treat high blood pressure. Beta-blockers and diuretics have been demonstrated to reduce the risk of complications associated with long standing hypertension (high blood pressure) more than other classes of drugs. Furthermore, the side effects are generally minimal when used in ideal patient candidates. (Beta blockers might not be tolerated by persons with asthma, congestive heart failure, depression, or underlying fatigue.) Beta blocker drugs, such as propranolol, can be especially helpful in patients with high blood pressure that is associated with coronary artery disease or abnormal heart rhythms (such as tachycardia). However, in patients with certain co-existing conditions, other classes of medications may be preferred. ACE inhibitors, for example, have protective effects for the kidney in persons with diabetes or in persons with early kidney damage. In persons with congestive heart failure, ACE inhibitors may prolong survival. There is some evidence that persons with a condition called left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), ACE inhibitors may be more effective than other classes of medications. LVH is a condition in which the largest muscular part of the heart has expanded, a direct result of the strain of having to beat against a high pressure. LVH is associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Also, ACE inhibitors are the blood pressure medication of choice in persons with scleroderma, a disease which can be associated with severe blood pressure elevation and kidney failure. Answered by Elden Granada 2 months ago.

The tension felt between two people who want to do something sexual together but hold back. You guys clearly hooked up many times so 'sexual tension' was used out of context. The guy clearly doesn't know what sexual tension means, otherwise he would have used it in proper context. Answered by Toni Salos 2 months ago.

About Us | Privacy Policy July 22, 2006 MedicineNet Home > Medications A-Z List > High Blood Pressure Home Page > ACE Inhibitors help 1 ACE Inhibitors Index | Next Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors Pharmacy Author: Omudhome Ogbru, Pharm.D. Medical Editor: Jay W. Marks, M.D. What are ACE inhibitors, and how do they work? Angiotensin II is a very potent chemical that causes the muscles surrounding blood vessels to contract and thereby narrows the blood vessels. The narrowing of the vessels increases the pressure within the vessels and can cause high blood pressure (hypertension). Angiotensin II is formed from angiotensin I in the blood by the enzyme, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). ACE inhibitors are medications that slow (inhibit) the activity of the enzyme, which decreases the production of angiotensin II. As a result, the blood vessels enlarge or dilate, and the blood pressure is reduced. This lower blood pressure makes it easier for the heart to pump blood and can improve the function of a failing heart. In addition, the progression of kidney disease due to high blood pressure or diabetes is slowed. For what conditions are ACE inhibitors used? ACE inhibitors are used for controlling blood pressure, treating heart failure and preventing kidney damage in people with hypertension or diabetes. They also benefit patients who have had heart attacks. In studies, individuals with hypertension, heart failure, or prior heart attacks who were treated with an ACE inhibitor lived longer than patients who did not take an ACE inhibitor. Because they prevent early death resulting from hypertension, heart failure or heart attacks, ACE inhibitors are one of the most important group of drugs. Some individuals with hypertension do not respond sufficiently to ACE inhibitors alone. In these cases, other drugs are used in combination with ACE inhibitors. Are there any differences among the different types of ACE inhibitors? ACE inhibitors are very similar. However, they differ in how they are eliminated from the body and their doses. Some ACE inhibitors need to be converted into an active form in the body before they work. In addition, some ACE inhibitors may work more on ACE that is found in tissues than on ACE that is present in the blood. The importance of this difference or whether one ACE inhibitor is better than another, has not been determined. What are the side effects of ACE inhibitors? ACE inhibitors are relatively well-tolerated by most individuals. Nevertheless, they are not free of side effects, and some patients should not use ACE inhibitors. ACE inhibitors usually are not prescribed for pregnant patients because they may cause birth defects. Individuals with severe kidney problems and people who have had a severe reaction to ACE inhibitors probably should avoid them. The most common side effects are cough, elevated blood potassium levels, low blood pressure, dizziness, headache, drowsiness, weakness, abnormal taste (metallic or salty taste), and rash. It may take up to a month for coughing to subside, and if one ACE inhibitor causes cough it is likely that the others will too. The most serious, but rare, side effects of ACE inhibitors are kidney failure, allergic reactions, a decrease in white blood cells, and swelling of tissues (angioedema). With which drugs do ACE inhibitors interact? ACE inhibitors have few interactions with other drugs. Since ACE inhibitors may increase blood levels of potassium, the use of potassium supplements, salt substitutes (which often contain potassium), or other drugs that increase the body's potassium may result in excessive blood potassium levels. ACE inhibitors also may increase the blood concentration of lithium (Eskalith) and lead to an increase in side effects from lithium. There have been reports that aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) such as ibuprofen, indomethacin, and naproxen may reduce the effects of ACE inhibitors; however, there is no conclusive evidence that this interaction, if it exists, is important. What ACE inhibitors are available? The following is a list of the ACE inhibitors that are available in the United States: captopril (Capoten), benazepril (Lotensin), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril) fosinopril (Monopril), ramipril (Altace), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), and trandolapril (Mavik). Answered by Gertrudis Yahraus 2 months ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Charleen Hartlein 2 months ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Janyce Sauerwein 2 months ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Gertrude Gonzales 2 months ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Lola Merica 2 months ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Houston Rosette 2 months ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Sanjuanita Beringer 2 months ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Glenn Brannon 2 months ago.


In congestive heart failure,the weakened heart is unable to pump with?
sufficent strength to empy its own chambers.as a result,blood backs up in the veins,blood pressure rises,and circulation is imparied.Describe what will happen as th is situation worsens owing to positive feed back.Then predict how a heart-strengthening medication will reverse the positive feedback? Asked by Rosalyn Ohanley 2 months ago.

Your doctor may prescribe the following medications: * ACE inhibitors such as captopril, enalapril, lisinopril, and ramipril to open up blood vessels and decrease the work load of the heart * Diuretics including hydrochlorothiazide, chlorthalidone, chlorothiazide, furosemide, torsemide, bumetanide, and spironolactone to help rid your body of fluid and salt (sodium) * Digitalis glycosides to help the heart muscle to contract properly and help treat some heart rhythm disturbances * Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) such as losartan and candesartan for those who have side effects with ACE inhibitors * Beta-blockers such as carvedilol and metoprolol, which may be helpful for some patients The following devices may be recommended for certain patients with heart failure: * A pacemaker to help treat slow heart rates or other heart signaling problems * A biventricular pacemaker to help the both sides of your heart contract at the same time; it is also called cardiac resynchronization therapy. * An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator that recognizes life-threatening, abnormal heart rhythms and sends an electrical pulse to stop them. Answered by Fredda Frohlich 2 months ago.


Generic for Diovan hct?
Asked by Olivia Brocker 2 months ago.

Diovan HCT has two ingredients: valsartan and hydrochlorothiazide. Hydrochlorothiazide is available as generic; valsartan is not. In fact, no drug from the angiotensin-II receptor blockers (ARBs, the group to which valsartan belongs) is currently available as generic. However, there are several medications that are similar to (but not the same as) valsartan that are available as generic: enalapril, lisinopril, captopril - from the ACEI (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor) group. Answered by Tiana Rodde 2 months ago.

As far as I know neither Tricor or Diovan HCT are available as generics. Tricor is fenofibrate and is also available as Triglide, Lofibra, and Antara--all with similar dosing (~130-160 mg per day, except for Lofibra capsules which are 200 mg per day). I would guess the prices are all similar, but you could ask your pharmacist to check. I also don't know if there have been any studies comparing the different formulations--some might be better than others. Diovan HCT is a combination of hydrochlorothiazide and valsartan. Hydrochlorothiazide is available as a generic, but valsartan is not (and no other drugs in its class--angiotension II receptor blockers--are either). I don't know if taking them separately would save you money or not--you could ask your pharmacist. If you're looking to save money, you should mention that to your doctor. There are a lot of older blood pressure medications (i.e., off patent) that may not work quite as well or have some minor side effects, but are still effective. There is a much smaller list of drugs available for lowering cholesterol since it is a problem that was only recognized relatively recently. The only ones available as generics are gemfibrozil, the bile acid binders (cholestyramine, cholestipol), and the statins. I don't know how useful the first two are, but the statins have a proven track record. I don't know how they compare with newer drugs like fenofibrate though. Lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin are all available as generics and there are a couple (Lipitor, Lescol) that aren't. Answered by Sylvester Coontz 2 months ago.

Diovan HCT is Diovan combined with hydrochlorothiazide. You might try Hyzaar, which is Cozaar combined with hydrochlorothiazide. They're both ARBs (angiotensin-II receptor blockers). Answered by Tonita Lipsey 2 months ago.


What are the 38 drugs that can cause drug-induced lupus?
I just heard that someone can have drug-induced lupus. My mother-in-law has lupus and is on a multitude of medications (for God knows what; since before diagnosed with lupus) so this issue has peaked my interest.From doing a search, I could only find the top three medications, but I was hoping someone could... Asked by Mari Whitesel 2 months ago.

I just heard that someone can have drug-induced lupus. My mother-in-law has lupus and is on a multitude of medications (for God knows what; since before diagnosed with lupus) so this issue has peaked my interest. From doing a search, I could only find the top three medications, but I was hoping someone could tell me the 38 drugs that can cause lupus. Thank you! Answered by Kristian Lampp 2 months ago.

can it be cause by Keppra or Lamictal . I used to take Dilantin and tegretol as well as mysoline. But haven't taken them for years. I have been on Lamictal since it came out on the market with tegretol for most of it till 2005 Then in 2007 I began the keppra. I was diagnosed with Lupus back in 2013, after they found I had hyper thyroidism/ Graves Disease, RA and a few other problems. They told me they're all connected and can stem from the anti seizure drugs. i don't see them on any lists but do see anti seizure drugs. I'm concerned. As the combination or the 2 drugs have given me control of my seizures. BUt At what price must i live with if I want to keep control. As stopping them to stop the lupus could cause me to spiral back into the dark pit pof no control and leave me homebound again. Answered by Jettie Gent 2 months ago.

Drug Induced Lupus Answered by Youlanda Pavlikowski 2 months ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Annette Skulski 2 months ago.

Her rheumatologist will certainly look over her list of medications. S/he will spot any that can cause drug induced lupus. If the lupus is drug induced, it will go away when the medication is withdrawn. Some of the medications listed by femmina matt are high blood pressure meds and anti TB meds. Answered by Joey Ciesco 2 months ago.


Drugs which suppressive the immune system can make swollen lymph node?
Asked by Elisa Sama 2 months ago.

yeah there are some drugs like INDOMETHACIN ,anti -convulsant drugs and ethosuximide that cause lymphnode enlargement!! they even cause a condition Pseudolymphoma" refers to a group of non-cancerous lymphocytic disorders of the skin that simulate malignant lymphomas. However, unlike lymphomas, patients who have a pseudolymphoma usually undergo spontaneous remission and will not die of the disease. The term "pseudo" means "not real", and "lymphoma" means "a cancerous tumor of lymphocytes". The causes of pseudolymphoma are broad and are classified based on their clinical features: drug induced causes : a. anticonvulsants b. antipsychotics: chlorpromazine, thioridazine c. antihypertensives: captopril, atenolol, verapamil, diltiazem, moduretic, hydrochlorothiazide d. cytotoxics: cyclosporine, methotrexate e. antirheumatics: gold, salicylates, phenacetin, D-penicillamine, allopurinol f. antibiotics: penicillin, nitrofurantoin g. antidepressants: fluoxetine, doxepin, desipramine, amitriptyline hydrochloride, lithium h. anxiolytics: alprazolam, clonazepam, lorazepam i. antihistamines: diphenhydramine, cimetidine, ranitidine j. antiarrhythmics: mexiletine chloride Answered by Rona Tarvis 2 months ago.


23, married, mom, bipolar?
I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until... Asked by Dorthy Gnegy 2 months ago.

I got into the fight with hubby that almost ruined it for me. After that I decided to pick the lithium and seroquel back up. I take two 300mg a nite and 1 in the morn. One seroquel at bedtime. I feel worse after the 1st week. I also take phentermine 37.5mg. What are the interactions? I can't see do until week after next. Never have been consistent with meds so i was also curious of how i was supposed to feel? Answered by Eugenia Hoople 2 months ago.

Lithium drug interactions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), [for example, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen Naprosyn, Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, Arthrotec), ketorolac (Toradol)], reduce the kidney's ability to eliminate lithium and lead to elevated levels of lithium in the blood and lithium side effects. Blood concentrations of lithium may need to be measured for 4 to 7 days after an NSAID is either added or stopped during lithium therapy. Aspirin and sulindac (Clinoril) do not appear to affect lithium concentrations in the blood. Diuretics (water pills) should be used cautiously in patients receiving lithium. Diuretics that act at the distal renal tubule, [for example, hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril), spironolactone (Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium; Dyazide, Maxzide)], can increase blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics that act at the proximal tubule, [for example, acetazolamide (Diamox)], are more likely to reduce blood concentrations of lithium. Diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) may have no affect on lithium concentrations in blood. ACE inhibitors, [for example, enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), benazepril (Lotensin), quinapril (Accupril), moexipril (Univasc), captopril (Capoten), ramipril (Altace)], may increase the risk of developing lithium toxicity, by increasing the amount of lithium that is reabsorbed in the tubules of the kidney and thereby reducing the excretion of lithium. When carbamazepine (Tegretol) and lithium are used together, some patients may experience side effects, including dizziness, lethargy, and tremor. Central nervous system side effects also may occur when lithium is used with antidepressants, [for example, fluoxetine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil), fluvoxamine (Luvox), amitriptyline (Elavil), imipramine (Tofranil), desipramine (Norpramin)]. Medications which cause the urine to become alkaline (the opposite of acidic) can increase the amount of lithium that is lost into the urine. This results in lower blood concentrations of lithium and reduces the effects of lithium. Such drugs include potassium acetate, potassium citrate (Urocit-K), sodium bicarbonate, and sodium citrate (Bicitra, Cytra-2, Liqui-Citra, Oracit, Shohl's). Caffeine appears to reduce serum lithium concentrations, and side effects of lithium have increased in frequency when caffeine is consumed. Both diltiazem (Cardizem-CD, Tiazac, Dilacor-XR) and verapamil (Calan-SR, Isoptin-SR, Verelan, Covera-HS) have been reported to have variable effects on lithium levels in blood. In some patients there may be decreased lithium blood levels and in others lithium toxicity. Methyldopa (Aldomet) may increase the likelihood of lithium toxicity. Various reactions have resulted when lithium is administered with phenothiazines, [for example, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine) or with haloperidol (Haldol)]. Such reactions have included delirium, seizures, encephalopathy, high fever or certain neurologic reactions that affect movement of muscles, called extrapyramidal symptoms. Lithium can cause goiter or hypothyroidism. The use of lithium with potassium iodide can increase the likelihood of this adverse reaction. The use of the beta blocker, propranolol (Inderal), with lithium can lead to a slow heart rate and dizziness. Other beta blockers, [for example, metoprolol (Lopressor), atenolol (Tenormin)] also may interact with lithium and be associated with a slow heart rate. Seroquel interations: Your healthcare professionals (e.g., doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. This drug should not be used with the following medication because very serious interactions may occur: sibutramine. If you are currently using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting quetiapine. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: anticholinergics (e.g., belladonna alkaloids, benztropine, scopolamine), dopamine-like drugs (e.g., bromocriptine, cabergoline), levodopa, rifabutin, drugs for treating high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers such as prazosin, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem, "water pills"/diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide), drugs affecting liver enzymes that remove quetiapine from your body (e.g., azole antifungals such as fluconazole/ketoconazole/itraconazole, barbiturates such as phenobarbital, glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone, macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin, rifampin, certain anti-seizure drugs such as carbamazepine/phenytoin, thioridazine), thyroid medicine (e.g., thyroxine). Al Answered by Fumiko Hirn 2 months ago.

Well, its kinda hard if you arent consistent with your medications. The meds aren't miracle workers, you can't really expect them to really do their job if you don't take them regularly. Those do sound like somewhat higher doses, at least the seroquel does. Generally most doctors will start you rather low, and gradually work your dosage up to what you need, that way side effects are minimized. If you don't take them for awhile, then all of a sudden decide to start up again, you can expect to feel worse for the first week. I would see your doc as soon as you can, let them know how you're feeling and what you've been doing with the meds, and once they prescribe you more, stick to it and you'll feel better. Answered by Josue Katterjohn 2 months ago.

It sounds to me like both of you are the problem. Whether you like it or not, she does have the right to tell you what to do. She is the adult and you are the child in the household. Grow up and get over it. The crap of "Of course I went over budget" Shows a complete disregard for others. She has no business screaming at you but I think there is more to the story and a lot of history in your relationship. The best thing to do would be to seek counseling with a professional. Neither of you is completely right or wrong but there are some serious issues to deal with. Be ready to compromise. Just for the record, I raised my step daughter from the time she was two years old. There were lots of issues because she thought the same way you do and in my house I am the undisputed boss. Had she screamed at me, even at 15, she would have been over my knee and spanked before she could get half a sentence out of her mouth. But then, I tried to always be fair and reasonable, even taking her side against my own daughter several times because I felt the stepdaughter was right. In the end, you are fighting a losing battle and making matters worse with your attitude. Try working together! Answered by Wesley Too 2 months ago.

In order for the meds. to work correctly you need to take them regularly. Your doctor has you on these dosages because he thinks they will work the best in this combination. Keep taking them every day on time until you have your appointment. If things haven't cleared up then have a talk with him and he can recommend any changes you may need. Answered by Rickey Lovellette 2 months ago.


Is bp 168/88 bad for a 35yr old male?
Asked by Shanell Nichols 2 months ago.

Beginning at 115/75 mmHg, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk doubles for each increment of 20/10 mmHg. For most people, the goal blood pressure is <140/90 mmHg, but it will be lower (<130/80) if you have diabetes or chronic kidney disease. For most patients, the cause is unknown, but in 5-10% of the cases, hypertension is caused by another condition such as chronic kidney disease, Cushing’s syndrome, sleep apnea, hyperthyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, hyperaldosteronism, or pheochromocytoma.1,2 Diagnosis is not just made on one high level, because your blood pressure can fluctuate greatly during the day, and is affected by exercise, stress, caffeine intake, medications, or herbal supplements. Blood pressure readings should be taken in both arms, and both sitting and standing. The average of two or more measurements taken during two or more clinical encounters are often used for diagnosis. Blood pressures are classified into four groups: normal, prehypertension, stage 1 hypertension, and stage 2 hypertension.1,2 Classification: Systolic Blood Pressure / Diastolic Blood Pressure Normal: <120 / <180 Prehypertension: 120-139/ 80-89 Stage 1 Hypertension: 140-159/ 90-99 Stage 2 Hypertension: >160 / >100 If you do smoke, quitting is the absolute best thing you can do for yourself. Other ways to reduce your blood pressure are through lifestyle modifications. The chart below shows the recommendations and the estimated amount of blood pressure reduction you should see.1,2 Lifestyle Modification: Recommendation (Approx. SBP reduction) Weight reduction:Maintain a normal body weight [BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2] (5-20 per 10 kg weight loss) DASH diet: Consume a diet rich in fruits, nuts, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products with a reduced content of saturated and total fat; avoid processed foods(3-7) Decrease sodium intake: Reduce sodium to no more than 2.4 g/day (2-8) Physical activity:Engage in regular aerobic physical activity, such as brisk walking at least 30 min a day most days of the week(4-9) Moderate alcohol consumption:No more than 1 drink/day for women, 2 drinks/day for men [1 drink = 12 oz. beer, 5 oz. wine, 1.5 oz. of 80 proof liquor] (2-4) If your doctor does diagnose you with hypertension, drug therapy will be added to the lifestyle modifications mentioned above. The five most frequently used classes of medications are diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin 2 receptor blockers (ARBs), beta blockers, and calcium channel blockers. If blood pressure is >20/10 mmHg above goal, two medications are usually used, one of which will most likely be a thiazide diuretic. In general, the following are the most commonly used medications for treatment of hypertension:1,2 Thiazide diuretics •Hydrochlorothiazide, chlorthalidone ACEIs •Benazepril, captopril, enalapril, lisinopril, quinapril, ramipril ARBs •Losartan, valsartan, olmesartan, telmisartan, irbesartan, candesartan Beta blockers •Atenolol, bisoprolol, metoprolol, propranolol, carvedilol, labetalol Calcium channel blockers •Amlodipine, nifedipine, felodipine, verapamil, diltiazem Choices of medications can depend on your race or concurrent disease states. For example, thiazide diuretics are preferred in African Americans, because they usually respond poorly to beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, and ARBs. Dual therapy is also recommended at a more stringent level (>15/10 mmHg above goal) in African Americans. In patients with heart failure, beta blockers, ACEIs, and aldosterone antagonists are most commonly used; after experiencing a heart attack, beta blockers and ACEIs are most common; diabetes and chronic kidney disease, ACEIs and ARBs; and for recurrent stroke prevention, diuretics and ACEIs are usually used.1,2,3,4 Getting back to your original question, it depends if your blood pressure was just high that one time or if it consistently has been in those high numbers. Other factors that could contribute to high blood pressure are your race/ethnicity, concurrent disease states, and lifestyle. Again, “normal” blood pressure is <120/80. If you are diagnosed with hypertension, your goal blood pressure will be <140/90, or <130/80 if you have diabetes or CKD. It is always a good idea for you to monitor your pressure on a consistent basis, and bring these readings with you to your physician. This will help him or her have a better idea of where your blood pressures are typically running, and could help you attain better control of your condition, further decreasing your risk of experiencing a cardiovascular event. 1,2 Answered by Kaci Molina 2 months ago.

Normal blood pressure is 120/80, but it's normal for this to be lower in younger, healthy individuals. Anything above 140/85 is getting high, and should be checked out. Normal pulse is 60-100 beats per minute. The pressures and pulses that you reported are fine. Answered by Spring Chargois 2 months ago.

the 168 part is horrible, the 88 part is great. im 35 and mine is 150over 110 my doc said my 150/110 was terribly bad. so your 168 is even worse., well, the 88 isnt GREAT, but it aint bad. what do you weigh? im 35, 5'8" 240lbs. i just went last week and doc told me to limit my calories to 2400 per day and try to bring my weight under 200 lbs. i dont know what your story is but thats mine. watch your salt intake/ sodium. Answered by Rosalinda Forry 2 months ago.


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