CAPOTEN Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018343/001.

Names and composition

"CAPOTEN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CAPTOPRIL.
It belongs to the class ACE inhibitors and is used in MI, LVD (Cardiovascular System)

Answered questions

Can capoten be administered sub-lingual?
Asked by Eloise Saurez 3 months ago.

no swallow whole for full benifits Answered by Maxima Parsi 3 months ago.

yes I've seen that done to get bp down quicker than po Answered by Rickie Marden 3 months ago.


Why does the medication Capoten cause dry, hacking cough in patients?
Asked by Mechelle Stoute 3 months ago.

ACE Inhibitors block the conversion of Angiotensin I to Angiotensin II, at the same time blocking the breakdown bradykinin at the same time. ARB's block the conversion of Angiotensin I to II, without affecting bradykinin, so they aren't as likely to cause the dry cough or angioedema. Answered by Gia Caputi 3 months ago.

i forget exactly why, but angiotensin converitng enzyme (which ACE inhibitors like captapril block) converts angiotensin to angiotensin 2 which plays some role with the lungs as well as with blood pressure (i forget exactly what it does) and its inhibition irritates the lungs. anyway, i already forget the biochemical reason why it does, but about 30-40% of people who use it get that cough. the newer "sartan" drugs like micardis, diovan, etc. inhibit the angiotensin 2 receptors which bypasses the enzyme so people dont get the cough, but because they are newer and there isnt a generic out they are more expensive Answered by Jarod Agosta 3 months ago.

capoten (captopril) is one of the oldest medications in a class called ACE inhibitors used in the treatment of high blood pressure. dry, hacking cough is an unexplainable side effect of the medication. all ACE inhibitors can cause this side effect but the incidence is highest with capoten. you may want to ask your doctor if another ACE inhibitor or another type of medication would be better fo you. Answered by Buster Webster 3 months ago.

The mechanism is an increase in bradykinin, which the ARB class is less likely to cause. Hope this helps. Answered by Andria Pirie 3 months ago.

Beacuase it's made from chicken feathers and fur balls. Answered by Gloria Duggins 3 months ago.


If you have selected the 25mg tab, how many tab will mrs. nelson need to take each d?
capoten 150mg PO t.i.d. is ordered for mrs. nelson. available is captopril in 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 mg tab. select the most appropriate dosage form for this order. can you please show me how to do this and set this up to get the answer? thank you so much! Asked by Vanesa Devary 3 months ago.

You divide 150 by 25 which equals 6, so take 6 tab three times daily (tid) equals 18 tabs a day. Double check your answer by multiplying 18 times 25 which equals 450 mg., the total amount she is to take each day. But why would you select 25 mg. instead of 50? She could take half the amount of tabs each day. Answered by Malvina Salisbury 3 months ago.

If you have to give 150 mg & have only 25mg tabs, it's easy. You need 4 X 25 mg = 100 mg and 2 X 25 to = 50 ( 4 plus 2 = 6 tabs and 100 and 50 = 150mg ) Since the order says t.i.d., or 3 times a DAY, multiply times 3. Total is 6 pills 3 times a day or 18 pills a day (almost caught me with that tid, you little devil ). Answered by Selma Joeckel 3 months ago.


Which manufacturer discovered the first angiotensin-coverting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor?
E.R. squibb smithline Beecham , merck&company ,eli lilly Asked by Foster Stevener 3 months ago.

E.R. Squibb...Capoten. Answered by Hubert Lavigne 3 months ago.


Is tripple bypass can be cured by medicine without operations?
Medicines currently taking: Tenormin 100 mg Capoten 25 mg Tildiem 60 mg replacement for Isomack Retard 40 mg Asked by Sabra Schuner 3 months ago.

I do not understand what do you mean by triple bypass. I think it is triple vessel (Blocks in artery vessel) disease and required 3 Bypass grafting in one surgery. If your cardiologist had said you require bypass surgery it has to be done. As the other friend has said you you can have a second opinion by another cardiologist. What are the tests your doctor has said. He must have done a thread mill stress test only Next an angiogram has to be done. By this only the actual position will be known. If your cardiologist feels you should have CABG (Cardiac artery bypass grafting) you should have the surgery and it can not be cured by medicine. I had the similar problem and I was taking similar medicines but ultimately I had to undergo CABG surgery. CABG surgeries hav become very common and safe now and you need not worry at all. It is only an expensive affair. Wish you best of luck. Answered by Paz Ferber 3 months ago.

If your cardiologist is recommending a triple-bypass, he has done enough tests to determine that your problem can't be fixed any other way. Your arteries are too clogged with cholesterol/plaque, which medicine can't remove. If it will make you feel better, consult with another cardiologist. You will probably get the same answer. Answered by Tandy Hobbs 3 months ago.

It all depends upon what angiography tells. Are the blockages significant i.e. more than 50%? This all is to be decided by cardiologist. If he has nothing to do from his side i.e. medicines / angioplasty he should himself refer you to the cardiac surgeon. Taking opinion of another cardiologist is not a bad option if you doubt the diagnosis. Don't forget to take along the CD of your angio. Answered by Mack Kabanuck 3 months ago.


Which manufacturer discovered the first angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor?
Which manufacturer discovered the first angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor? A. E. R. Squibb D. Eli Lilly Asked by Patrick Blice 3 months ago.

I do think it was Squibb that developed Capoten (captopril). Answered by Paul Kinsolving 3 months ago.


Can you tell me about Lisinopril?
My brother got this prescribed by a Doctor for his blood pressure, but it's not working that good per my brother's words. Can you tell me about it? Asked by Myrl Gilley 3 months ago.

I'm not sure what it is you want to know about lisinopril. It's not capitalized, this is the generic name for Zestril and Prinivil. It's in the classification of antihypertensive meds known as ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) inhibitors. Although the action is unnkown, it's thought to result primarily from the suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The most common adverse reactions are dizziness, orhtostatic hypotension, nasal congestion and diarrhea. A few of the less common adverse effects are headache, fatigue, nausea, impotence, rash and a persistent dry nonproductive cough. The life-threatening adverse reactions are hyperkalemia and rarely, anaphalaxis with afcial, throat and laryngeal edema. It has a number of drug interactions. Interacts with Capsaicin to cause an ACE-inhibitor-induced cough. May cause hyperkalemia when used with potassium-containing salt substitutes. It can increase creatinine, BUN, potassium, bilirubin levels and liver function test values. The treatment of hypertension is typically a 3-step one. Step 1 is making changes in diet, weight loss and changes in lifestyle (no smoking, reduced or no drinking, exercise, stress management). If this doesn't work, Step 2 is introducing an antihypertensive while continuing Step 1. Dosage adjuments may be needed for maximum effectiveness. If both Steps 1 & 2 fail to produce the desired results, Step 3 is adding another antihypertensive. I have no idea what your brother's dosage is and for how long he's been using it or anything else he's done to lower his blood pressure but he may need a dosage adjustment. He should also be following Step 1. Suggest he speak to his doctor. Answered by Fermina Turkowski 3 months ago.

Yes it is for your blood pressure, and yes if you stop it for 2 weeks your blood pressure will go back up. Lisinopril is actually used to help kidneys, it acts in the kidneys to lower the filtration pressure (blood pressure in the kidney) this is beneficial for the kidneys long term, but in some patients it lowers the filtration pressure to much, to the point that the kidneys can't filter the blood properly. From what you are describing, I would bet this is what is going on. Just stop taking the lisinopril, they will check you again in a few weeks and may put you back on a lower dose of the lisinopril or try a different blood pressure medications. Answered by Leslee Stringfield 3 months ago.

Zestril Classification Answered by Henriette Echevaria 3 months ago.

Prinivil Classification Answered by Walter Mccuiston 3 months ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Carolann Sophy 3 months ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Jerald Dine 3 months ago.


Is Yasmin a safe Birth Control pill?
I would like to know any experiences that Yasmin users may have had...for example the side effects and pros and cons as I am concidering this pill. Thanks Asked by Matha Bail 3 months ago.

Yes, it is safe to take as a birth control if you are not also currently taking any of the following medications daily "NSAIDs like ibuprofen or naproxen, potassium supplements, potassium-sparing diuretics like spironolactone, ACE inhibitors like Capoten, Vasotec, Zestril, Heparin, or any angiotensin-II receptor antagonists like Cozaar, Diovan, or Avapro. Anyone that takes any of these medications daily and feels that Yasmin might work, should have their potassium levels tested in the first month of Yasmin use." The side effects of Yasmin are the same as any other birth control pill "irregular bleeding or spotting, breast tenderness, depression, decreased libido, headaches, nervousness, dizziness, a skin rash, or increased vaginal infections." But there are also "good" side effects including "women may not gain any weight or may loose weight while taking Yasmin. Yasmin is also good for women that have mild to moderate acne, and many see an improvement in their skin in just a few weeks." All of the above quotes were taken from my article "Yasmin, Is It Right For You?", which I have linked to below. As with all birth control pills, be sure to not only take it every day, but also take it at the same time every day for full effectiveness. Depending on your situation, Yasmin just might be the "perfect" pill for you. Be sure to discuss it with your doctor, and if you do try it, be sure to take it for at least three months to see if any side effects you experience are temporary or not (you may not experience any side effects). Good Luck!! Answered by Kurt Ollendick 3 months ago.

I've been taking yasmin about 8 months and haven't had problems....i haven't used anything else but most pills take 1 or 2 months for the body to get used to the hormone changes, there shouldnt be side effects after that, if u have any that lasts longer than normal talk to the doctor (u might need to change doses or type of pill)- some pills say helps cramps & it didn't really help but mine are always very bad, the good things are my period is always on schedule & sometimes lighter flow & less bloating- i haven't gained weight or had any other common side effects..... it's a combination hormone pill so it can have health benefits too, the yasmin website has that info & side effects listed Answered by Chris Homza 3 months ago.

It's a great medication. The only personal issue I had w/this medication is that it caused large dark spots on my face AKA melasma. This is rare. Other than that, it's great because you can take the active pills continuously for 3-4 months at a time without periods. It's a good idea to speak w/your doctor first before trying this. You'll need your prescription to be written for this type of use and it will need prior auth from your insurance. It's great to help w/acne, mood-swings, PMS water-weight, menstrual migraines, ovarian cysts, lessens cramps, and heaviness of cycle. Yasmin also has a lower dose counterpart called Yaz, which boasts the same benefits w/lower hormones, and three more days of active pills per pack for shorter periods. Good Luck Answered by Mei Chasteen 3 months ago.

i got lots of headaches withthis pill ,stong headaches Answered by Tyler Kolinsky 3 months ago.


Bipolar and meds combo?
What other meds combos are apart from old stand by lithium? Asked by Leonore Gradle 3 months ago.

you don't need combos for bipolar disorder because if you have one...it doesn't work, the dosage can be upped and it'll end up working. Lithium is pretty dangerous considering most medications can affect you and make the lithium not work... * acetazolamide (Diamox); * aminophylline (Truphylline) or theophylline (Elixophyllin, Respbid, Theo-Bid, Theo-Dur, Uniphyl); * sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer, Bicitra, Polycitra, or baking soda home remedy antacid); * carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol); * fluoxetine (Prozac); * metronidazole (Flagyl); * potassium iodide thyroid medication (Pima); * an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); * a calcium channel blocker such as diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem) or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan); * a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Vasoretic,Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; * medicines to treat psychiatric disorders, such as haloperidol (Haldol), aripiprazole (Abilify), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo), olanzapine (Zyprexa), quetiapine (Seroquel), pimozide (Orap), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon); or * celecoxib (Celebrex) or an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others. that's all that you couldn't take with Lithium. plus, it's recommended to have your blood drawn every so often while on it. and it causes weight gain....yeah, not good. BUT. Lamictal is probably the newest drug on the market for BP. i take it and have been for 2 years now since i was diagnosed with type II bipolar disorder....it's a 5 week process, but it's worth the wait. i think it's a miracle drug and doesn't cause all the side effects other drugs have. in rare cases a body rash can happen, to some people. but even with that, it's not even life threatening. i've only had to up my dosage from 100mg [stayed at that for a year and a half] to 150mg. and now...after my struggles with BP for all of high school...i'm a senior and happy 85% of the time. to the point where people wouldn't even figure somethings wrong with me. so my advice...talk to your doc about switching Lamictal. it doesn't cause weight gain. in my experience, along with my adderall i lost the 30 pounds i gained when i was depressed. back at 160 at 6'2'. research the drug...really it's probably the best. i asked my psych why he didn't put me on lithium, and told me that even though lithium is the most popular drug, he's found in that nearly 2/3 of his bipolar patients of his patients [who was put on that at first or other mood stabilizers didn't work] since the drug came out has worked very well for them. Answered by Lou Hun 3 months ago.

Lithium, is by far the best for True Bipolar. You must get your blood tests regular to check your lithium levels, but it is known to work the best. My son took this for many years and he did the best on it. He now refuses and his life is a mess because of it. Answered by Anastacia Helmle 3 months ago.

For mood stabilizers, there is Depakote, Topamax, Lamitcal, Abilify... There are more, can't think of them all. Anti-depressants, Prozac, Zoloft, Effexor, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Lexapro, etc etc. There are also mixes like Symbyax, which is Prozac with and antipsychotic. There are a whole bunch of things... Answered by Gaynelle Boersma 3 months ago.

There are more choice's in bi-polar meds now, like, depecote, seroquel, limictal, closeril and a host of others, only your health care provider can accurately know which combinations are safe and effective for you, the best to you, Mercee. Answered by Tom Linkhart 3 months ago.

Oh damn, please ask a doctor or pharmacist on this one. Do not trust Yahoo Answers, or anyone online for that matter, on this question. It's a really bad idea to mix similar medications, usually. Answered by Tesha Olivares 3 months ago.

i take a whole bevy of medication- lithium, lamictal, paxil and wellbutrin........some sleepers if needed.....usually trazadone....... Answered by Gaynell Cotnoir 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018343/001 CAPOTEN CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018343/002 CAPOTEN CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018343/003 CAPOTEN CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018343/004 CAPOTEN CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 150MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018343/005 CAPOTEN CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018343/006 CAPOTEN CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 37.5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018343/007 CAPOTEN CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 75MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018343/001 CAPOTEN CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018343/002 CAPOTEN CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018343/003 CAPOTEN CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018343/004 CAPOTEN CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 150MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018343/005 CAPOTEN CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018343/006 CAPOTEN CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 37.5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018343/007 CAPOTEN CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 75MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
074322/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074322/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074322/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074322/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074363/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074363/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074363/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074363/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074386/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074386/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074386/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074386/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074418/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074418/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074418/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074418/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074423/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074423/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074423/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074423/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074433/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074433/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074433/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074433/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074434/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074434/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074434/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074434/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074451/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074451/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074451/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074451/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074462/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074462/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074462/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074462/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074472/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074472/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074472/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074472/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074477/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074477/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074477/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074477/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074481/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074481/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074481/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074481/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074483/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074483/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074483/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074483/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074493/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074493/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074493/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074493/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074505/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074505/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074505/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074505/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074519/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074519/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074519/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074519/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074532/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074532/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074532/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074532/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074576/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074576/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074576/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074576/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074590/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074590/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074590/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074590/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074640/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074640/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074640/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074640/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074677/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074677/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074677/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074677/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074737/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG
074737/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074737/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074737/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074748/001 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 50MG
074748/002 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 25MG
074748/003 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074748/004 CAPTOPRIL CAPTOPRIL TABLET/ORAL 12.5MG

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceuticals Ltd

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